US20090282698A1 - Slipper arrangements; and methods - Google Patents

Slipper arrangements; and methods Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090282698A1
US20090282698A1 US12/150,145 US15014508A US2009282698A1 US 20090282698 A1 US20090282698 A1 US 20090282698A1 US 15014508 A US15014508 A US 15014508A US 2009282698 A1 US2009282698 A1 US 2009282698A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
slipper
cover
pillow top
pillow
arrangement according
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US12/150,145
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Nina Sue Kovacs
Walter Thomas Bray, Jr.
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R G Barry Corp
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R G Barry Corp
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Priority to US122407P priority
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Priority to US12/150,145 priority patent/US20090282698A1/en
Assigned to R.G. BARRY CORPORATION reassignment R.G. BARRY CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BRAY, JR., WALTER THOMAS, KOVACS, NINA SUE
Publication of US20090282698A1 publication Critical patent/US20090282698A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/10Low shoes; Slippers
    • A43B3/108Low shoes; Slippers characterised by the sole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/10Low shoes; Slippers
    • A43B3/101Slippers
    • A43B3/102Slippers leaving the heel of the foot bare
    • A43B3/103Slippers leaving the heel of the foot bare characterised by the attachment of the toestrap

Abstract

A footwear slipper arrangement is described. The slipper arrangement comprises a pillow top secured to an outsole member. The pillow top is a cushion member. The pillow top billows or projects upwardly.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • The present provisional application includes the disclosure of, with additions thereto, U.S. Provisional Application 60/926,864 filed Apr. 30, 2007 and U.S. Provisional Application 61/001,224, filed Oct. 30, 2007. The complete disclosures of U.S. Application 60/926,864 and 61/001,224 are incorporated herein, by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention relates to slipper arrangements. In general, the arrangements provide for an attractive “pillow” arrangement, and a comfortable fit. Methods of assembly are also described.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The footwear industry is an old and crowded art. The industry is interested in the design of new products with aesthetic and comfort appeal while maintaining inexpensive construction.
  • In general, slippers are a type of footwear having a generally soft construction. They are often washable in a conventional clothes washing machine. Slippers are typically not manufactured using lasts, which are often necessary devices when manufacturing a shoe that includes a hard sole and often a leather upper. Slippers are intended, primarily, for indoor use.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Herein, slipper footwear arrangements are described. In general terms, the slipper footwear arrangements described include a cushioned pillow top secured to a cushioned slipper base. A typical pillow top comprises an upper pillow top cover and a lower pillow top cover, defining a cushion receiving space therebetween. A cushion is provided in the cushion receiving space. In the resulting pillow top of a typical example, the upper pillow top cover projects (visibly at least in the heel) above a seam (between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover), a distance of at least 2 mm, typically at least 4 mm, and often more. Further, at least in the heel portion, typically the pillow top itself is viewable projecting upwardly up at least 8 mm, typically at least 10 mm, and often 12 mm or more, above any surrounding portion of the slipper.
  • In a typical arrangement, a portion of the lower pillow top cover projects (visibly at least in the heel) downwardly from the peripheral seam. By “visibly” and variants thereof, in these, and related contexts, it is meant that the feature is viewable in the completed slipper, at least in the heel portion, when the slipper is not worn.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic side elevational view of an outside of a slipper arrangement in accord with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic side elevational view of an opposite side of the slipper arrangement of FIG. 1, the view of FIG. 2 being directed toward an inside or arch side of the slipper.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic top view of the slipper arrangement depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic bottom perspective view of the slipper arrangement depicted in FIGS. 1-3.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic top perspective view of the slipper arrangement depicted in FIGS. 1-4.
  • FIG. 6 is a schematic side elevational view of a first alternate slipper configuration to that depicted in FIGS. 1-5.
  • FIG. 7 is a schematic side elevational view of a second alternate configuration of a slipper arrangement according to the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 8 is a schematic top plan view of the slipper depicted in FIG. 7.
  • FIGS. 9-21 relate to steps in a method of assembling a slipper in accord with FIG. 1-5, as follows:
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic depiction relating to a step stitching a vamp cover and a vamp lining together.
  • FIG. 10 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of sewing of a mud guard or side guard loop.
  • FIG. 11 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of sewing portion of a lower cover of a pillow top and an upper cover of a bottom outsole cover together.
  • FIG. 12 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of sewing the result from FIG. 11, to an upper cover of a pillow top.
  • FIG. 13 is a schematic depiction of a result from FIG. 12, in a perspective view.
  • FIG. 14 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of sewing a pillow top peripheral binding on the result of FIG. 12.
  • FIG. 15 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of attaching a binding to the result of FIG. 9.
  • FIG. 16 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of attaching the result of FIG. 15 to the result of FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 17 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of securing the result of FIG. 10 to the result of FIG. 16.
  • FIG. 18 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of inserting a cushion pillow member into a pillow top cover from the result of FIG. 17.
  • FIG. 19 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of stitching closed the result of FIG. 18.
  • FIG. 20 is a schematic depiction relating to a step of securing the result of FIG. 19 to a lower cover in an outsole cover.
  • FIG. 21 is a schematic depiction of a result of inverting the result from FIG. 20.
  • FIGS. 22-28 schematically depict selected components usable in the steps of FIGS. 9-21 to form the slipper arrangement of FIGS. 1-5 as follows:
  • FIG. 22 schematically depicts a vamp cover or outer piece.
  • FIG. 23 schematically depicts a vamp lining.
  • FIG. 24 schematically depicts a lower portion of a pillow top cover.
  • FIG. 25 schematically depicts an upper portion of an outsole cover.
  • FIG. 26 schematically depicts an upper portion of a pillow top.
  • FIG. 27 schematically depicts a pillow top foam insert.
  • FIG. 28 schematically depicts an outsole bottom.
  • FIG. 29 schematically depicts a bottom sole foam insert.
  • FIG. 30 is a schematic plan view of a vamp useable in forming the slipper arrangement of FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • FIG. 31 is a schematic side elevational view of a construction formed as an intermediate, in the process of forming the slipper arrangement of FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • FIG. 32 is a schematic, bottom plan view of a second intermediate formed during a process of constructing the slipper arrangement of FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • FIG. 33 is a schematic, heel end top perspective, view of a third alternate embodiment of the slipper arrangement in accord with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 34 is a schematic right side, outside, elevational view of the slipper of FIG. 33.
  • FIG. 35 is a schematic left side, inside, elevational view of the slipper of FIGS. 33 and 34.
  • FIG. 36 is a schematic top plan view of the slipper of FIGS. 33-35.
  • FIG. 37 is a schematic bottom plan view of the slipper of FIGS. 33-36.
  • FIG. 38 is a schematic toe end view of the slipper of FIGS. 33-37.
  • FIG. 39 is a schematic heel end elevational view of the slipper of FIGS. 33-38.
  • FIG. 40 is a schematic perspective view of an upper and heel band component useful to make a slipper in accord with FIGS. 33-39.
  • FIG. 41 is a schematic view of a step of forming a slipper component usable the slipper of FIGS. 33-39.
  • FIG. 42 is a schematic view of a pillow top component made during a step of forming slipper in accord with FIGS. 33-39.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION I. Example Slipper Arrangement, FIGS. 1-5
  • The reference numeral 1, FIG. 1, generally indicates slipper arrangement according to the present disclosure. The view of FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, generally directed toward an outside edge of the slipper; that is, a side of the slipper opposite a wearer's arch.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, slipper 1 generally comprises: a bottom or outsole portion 2, an upper pillow top cushion portion 3, and, a cover 4. The cover 4 extends over a portion of the wearer's foot, more specifically a front portion of the wearer's foot. For the particular example shown, the slipper 1 is an “open toed” slipper, and the cover 4 does not extend to the front or toe 7 of the slipper 1. Herein, cover 4 will sometimes be characterized as a “vamp.”
  • The slipper 1 is characterized herein as having an “open” heel portion 8, since no portion of the slipper heel 8 extends up over, or around, a wearer's heel.
  • The principles described herein can be applied in alternative arrangements, for example closed toe slippers and slippers with a thong-type cover, as discussed below in connection with FIGS. 6-8.
  • The example slipper 1 comprises two, isolated, cushioned members secured to one another. The two, isolated, cushioned members comprise the bottom outsole portion 2; and, the upper pillow top cushion portion 3. Details concerning this will be understood from further descriptions below. By the term “secured” in this context, it is meant that the pillow top portion 3 is not separable from the bottom outsole portion 2, during the useful life of the slipper arrangement 1. Typically, the outsole portion 2 and pillow top portion 3 comprise members stitched to one another.
  • By the term “isolated” when used in connection with the cushion arrangement of the bottom outsole portion 2 and the pillow top portion 3, it is meant that foam or other cushioned inserts within sections 2 and 3 are separated from one another, i.e., are in separate chambers.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, and in many slipper arrangements according to the present disclosure, a narrowed “waist” 5 is provided to the slipper, peripherally round in seam 6 with a pillow top 3 is secured to the outsole 2. This narrow waist 5 is characteristic of many slipper arrangements according to the present disclosure.
  • In many slipper arrangements according to the present disclosure, the narrowed “waist” 5 is viewable at least in a heel portion of the completed slipper, inside view, when not worn. That is, at least in some slipper arrangements according to the description, in the heel portion the waist 5 is not covered up. The waist 5 generally extends inwardly, adjacent most outer peripheral portion of the slipper 1, at least 4 mm, and typically at least 7 mm, for example 7-15 mm.
  • By “visible” and “viewable” and variants thereof, when used herein in connection with the feature of the slipper, it is meant that feature identified is viewable, when the slipper is viewed from the side. That is, in at least in a portion of the slipper 1, for example the heel portion as identified, the feature identified is not covered up. These terms are meant to reference a view of the slipper when it is not worn.
  • In the example shown, the pillow top or upper pillow cushion portion 3 comprises: an upper pillow top portion or cover 10; a lower pillow top bottom or cover portion 11 and a peripheral pillow top seam between cover 10 and cover 11; in the example depicted the seam being covered by pillow top peripheral binding 12. Together, the upper pillow top portion 10 and lower pillow top bottom portion 11 define a pillow top cover 3 x containing an internally positioned pillow top cushion member, discussed below.
  • A characteristic of many slipper arrangements according to the present disclosure, including, for example, slipper 1, is an upper cushioned pillow top 3 secured onto an outsole or slipper bottom 2. For the example slipper 1 depicted, the upper, cushioned pillow top 3, when not worn but when viewed from a side, generally provides, at least in a heel portion of the slipper, when not worn for: viewing of pillow top peripheral binder 12 (or seam if not covered by the binder 12) extending around visible portions of the cushioned pillow top 3; viewing of waist 5; and, viewing of pillow top cover 10 projecting above the binder 12 (or seam if not covered by the binder 12). This provides a view of pillow top 3 that is similar to that of a side view of a throw pillow or similar cushion.
  • For a typical example, in a slipper “rest” state, i.e., uncompressed by weight, and when viewed from the side, the pillow top portion 10 projects upwardly from the binding 12 (or seam if not covered by the binding 12), for example at least 2 mm, often 4 mm or more, usually at least 6 mm and typically within the range of 8 to 20 mm. By “uncompressed by weight” and similar terminology in this context, reference is meant to the slipper arrangement 1 when viewed standing alone, and not with the pillow top portion 3 compressed under a wearer's foot. In FIG. 1, this dimension of projection upwardly is indicated schematically at H. The amount of projection H, is quite often at least 10 mm.
  • In general, when reference is herein to projection of the pillow top portion 10 above the binding 12, when made in reference to a “rest” or “uncompressed by weight” status, reference is meant, for example, to the slipper 1 before being worn; i.e., the slipper 1 as it would appear at the point of purchase or in a catalog, in appropriate view. The feature of the pillow top portion 10 projecting upwardly from the binding 12 or seam when not covered by the binding 12, provides for the attractive appearance of a soft, cushioned, slipper. When the slipper arrangement 1 is constructed from materials of the type characterized herein, the result is, in fact, a very soft, cushioned, upper member 3 in a slipper 1.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, it is noted that for the slipper arrangement 1 depicted, a portion of the lower pillow top or cover portion 10, is also viewable in the heel portion 8, when viewed from the side. This also adds to the appearance of the pillow top cushion 3 appearing as a decorative, soft, pillow in slipper arrangement 1.
  • In a typical slipper arrangement in accord with the present disclosure, for example, slipper 1, and from scale it can be seen that the pillow top 3, in the hell portion, is viewable projecting upwardly from adjacent portions of the slipper, and in total, at least 8 mm, at usually at 10 mm, often at least 12 mm and in many instances 15 mm or more. This dimension is indicated at H2 in FIG. 1.
  • For the example slipper arrangement 1 depicted in FIG. 1, both the pillow top 3 and the surface of the vamp or cover 4 can be provided with a quilted appearance, as a result of stitching 15 on the upper pillow top cover 10 and stitching 16 on the vamp or cover 4. Such stitching 15, 16 provides for an attractive, ornamental appearance; and, also, the comforting appearance of a cushioned construction such as a quilted pillow.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, materials for the upper pillow top cover 10, lower pillow top cover 11, and the outer portion of cover or vamp 4 are generally chosen, to provide a plush, soft fabric appearance. This is also referenced below, when materials for construction of the slipper 1 are described and exemplified. Also, for the particular slipper 1 depicted, bottom or outsole portion 2 is provided with a mud guard cover or wrap 20 therearound, which preferably also has a plush, soft fabric appearance.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, it is noted that front and rear edges 4 f, 4 r respectively of cover 4 are each provided with an edge binding 25, 26 respectively thereon. Material for the edge bindings 25, 26, for a typical example, can also be selected to provide a plush, soft fabric appearance; thus, a fabric material with a plush appearance can be used for the pillow binding 12.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, it is noted that the cover or vamp 4 is fastened in the slipper 1 such that the pillow top cushion 3 is free within an interior 4 i of the cover 4. This facilitates comfort, as well as the appearance of a plush, soft, cushioned or pillow top slipper arrangement. By “free” in this context, it is meant that the vamp or cover 4 extends over the top cushion member 3 and is secured to the bottom sole or outsole portion 2.
  • Attention is now directed to FIG. 2, an opposite side view to that of FIG. 1. In FIG. 2, seam 30 in mud guard or lower wrap 20 is viewable. The side viewable in FIG. 2 would typically be the inside or arch side of the slipper 1.
  • Attention is now directed to FIG. 3, the top view of slipper 1. In FIG. 3, arch or inside side 35 and opposite outside 36 are viewable, as well as toe 7 and heel 8.
  • From the view of FIG. 3, it can be seen that the example slipper 1 depicted is shown with an arch curvature typical of a right slipper. Of course a mate comprising a left slipper would typically be a mirror image. In some instances the principles described herein can be implemented in a slipper configuration which does not include the arcuate inside and outside edges 35, 36, but rather is straight (or relatively straight) in configuration, and thus is usable by either the left or the right foot of the wearer.
  • In FIG. 4 a bottom perspective view of slipper 1 is viewable directed generally toward underside 40 and inside 35. For the particular example slipper depicted, the bottom side or underside 40 includes a cover 41 thereon having a non-skid outer side 42.
  • In FIG. 5, a top perspective view of slipper 1 is depicted taken generally toward toe 7, outside 36 and cover or vamp 4.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, a side elevational view of the slipper arrangement 1, it is noted that in the heel portion there is no heel wrap or cover which extends around the heel of a wearer, and which would cover, from view, portions of the waist 5 and pillow top 3 (when the slipper is not worn).
  • There is no requirement that a slipper arrangement contain all of the features characterized herein, or not contain all features absent, to obtain some advantage according to the present disclosure.
  • II. Alternate Slipper Configurations of FIGS. 6-8 A. A Closed Toe Variation, FIG. 6.
  • Reference numeral 50, FIG. 6, designates an alternate slipper arrangement to arrangement 1. Slipper arrangement 50 comprises a closed toed variation, for the slipper 1. Referring to FIG. 6, slipper 50 can include, for example, the same outsole bottom 2, and the same pillow top 3, comprising upper pillow top cover 10, lower pillow top cover 11, and pillow top peripheral binding 12. Further, slipper 50 can include the same mud guard or bottom wrap 20, with seam 30.
  • In a closed toe version 50, depicted in FIG. 6, cover 4 is a cover 54, that causes a closing of the toe region or toe 57. The heel 8 on the other hand, can comprise the same heel as shown in FIG. 1. The cover 54 can be provided with a quilt stitching, similar to stitching 16, FIG. 1, if desired.
  • Slipper 50, then, has the same general characteristics of slipper 1, FIGS. 1-5, with respect to the definition of the pillow top 3 comprising a top cover 10, bottom cover 11 and peripheral seam, in this example covered by pillow top peripheral binding 12. It is noted that while a front portion of the pillow top 3 is not viewable in the view of FIG. 6, as it is under the cover of vamp 54. It would generally, in typical applications, be the same as pillow top 3, FIG. 1, in extension all the way to the toe region 57.
  • B. A Thong Version, FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • At reference 60, FIG. 7, a “thong” or “flip-flop” version of the slipper 1 is depicted. Referring to FIG. 7, slipper 60 comprises the same outsole bottom 2 with a mud guard or wrap 20 therearound, with seam 30. It also includes a similar cushioned pillow top 3 secured to the bottom 2; the cushioned pillow top 3 comprising upper pillow top cover 10, lower pillow top bottom cover 11 and a peripheral seam covered by pillow top peripheral binding 12. Indeed, the slipper 60 has the same basic heel construction 8 as slipper 1.
  • In the toe region 67, slipper 60 is completely open. The vamp 4, comprising cover 64 in this instance, is a thong-type cover 64, with a central forward attachment end 65 and vamp sides 66, 67, only side 66 being fully viewable in FIG. 7.
  • In a top plan view of FIG. 8, slipper 60 is viewable, and center attachment 65 and vamp sides 66, 67 are viewable.
  • It is noted that the thong version 60 of the slipper arrangement, is modified with respect to the top portion 3, from those (1, 50) previously discussed, in that front attachment 65 projects through top portion 3. However, the cushioned appearance of top portion 3 is generally as previously discussed and described.
  • In FIG. 7, slipper 60 is depicted with cover 64 having quilt stitching 16 thereon, for an attractive appearance.
  • III. Assembly of Slipper 1
  • In FIGS. 9-21, schematic depictions of selected steps during the construction of a slipper generally in accord with FIG. 1 are provided. Material pieces to be used in the assembly depicted schematically of FIGS. 9-21 are depicted in FIGS. 22-29.
  • Variations from the assembly steps described for the construction of slipper, FIGS. 1-5, are discussed below, for the construction of slipper 50 (FIG. 6) and slipper 60 (FIGS. 7 and 8).
  • There is no requirement that a slipper be made in accord with the specific techniques described herein, to obtain some benefit according to the present disclosure.
  • In FIG. 9, a step of pre-forming vamp cover 4, to later be attached into the slipper 1, is schematically depicted. Cover 4 comprises two components secured to one another along an outer seam. These two components are depicted in FIGS. 22 and 23. In FIG. 22, vamp cover 70 is depicted and in FIG. 23 the vamp lining 71 is depicted. The vamp cover 70 will form an outside of cover 4; and the vamp lining 71, an inside surface of the cover 4. In FIG. 9, the vamp 70 and vamp lining 71 are depicted being sewn to one another along a periphery thereof, as indicated at stitching 73. It is noted that in FIG. 9, the bindings 25, 26, of FIG. 1, are not yet added. The bindings 25, 26, are added in a later step discussed below.
  • In FIG. 10 a step of pre-forming the mud guard or lower wrap 2 is depicted. Mud guard or lower wrap 2 comprises a loop 77 of material 77 a. In FIG. 10, seam 30 is shown being formed in the loop 77. In FIG. 10, side 78 will form an inside of the loop 77, when positioned on the finished slipper 1, and side 79 will form an outside viewable to the observer of the slipper 1, FIG. 1. Thus, side 79 is generally a plush, attractive side, whereas side 78 may include a lining or other structural material.
  • In FIG. 11, a subcomponent 84 sometimes referred to herein as a “pillow base” is shown being formed. The “pillow base” of FIG. 1, comprises two components secured to one another by stitching 85. The stitching 85 is generally positioned inwardly from the edge of the two components, to form a five-eighth's inch (⅝″ or 15.9 mm) wide seam 86. The two components depicted in FIG. 11 being stitched together, comprise a lower pillow top (bottom) cover 88, FIG. 24 and an upper outsole cover 89 of FIG. 25.
  • Referring to FIG. 24, the lower pillow top cover 88 has an outer periphery 91 and a central slit 92. The central slit 92 extends completely through the lower pillow top cover 88 and is aligned, for the example shown, with a direction between toe portion 93 and heel portion 94. The slit 92 is typically at least 80 mm long, usually 90 to 150 mm long. Typically the slit 92 extends, centrally, along 40-60% of a length of the piece 88.
  • It is noted that the outer periphery 91 includes a plurality of spaced indexing notches 96 therein, to facilitate assembly.
  • Pattern piece 88 will, in the finished slipper 1, form lower (bottom) pillow top cover 11 of the pillow top cushion member 3.
  • Referring to FIG. 25, the upper outsole cover 89 also includes an outer periphery 99, a central slit 100, and spaced indexing notches 99 a. The central slit 100, in the example shown, is aligned in a direction between toe portion 101, and heel portion 102. The slit 100 is typically at least 80 mm long and usually within the range of 90 to 150 mm long. It is preferably the same length as slit 92. Thus, it is usually 40-60% of a length of the piece 89. Piece 88 is generally the same size and shape as piece 89.
  • Pattern piece 89 will generally form upper cover 21, FIG. 1, of the cushioned outsole bottom 2, FIG. 1. Pattern pieces 88, 89 are generally selected to be of the same size and shape, and be such that when pieces 88 and 89 are positioned overlapping one another, slit 92 overlaps slit 100.
  • In FIG. 11, one can see pillow base 84 being formed from lower pillow top cover 88 and outsole top 89; the two being secured together by stitching 85. The stitching depicted in FIG. 11 is such as to align slits 92 and 100 with one another, to form a single slit 109 through the pillow base 84, of FIG. 11.
  • In FIG. 12, a further step of assembly is depicted, in which pillow base 84 formed in FIG. 11, is shown being secured to upper pillow top cover 110, by stitching. The upper pillow top cover 110 used is depicted in FIG. 26. Referring to FIG. 26, upper pillow top cover 110 includes an outer periphery 111 with indexing notches 112 herein. Upper pillow top cover 110 includes toe portion 113, and opposite heel portion 114. The upper pillow top cover 110 is shown being secured to the pillow base 84 of FIG. 12, by appropriate stitching 116. It is noted that pillow top cover piece 110 will form upper cover 10, FIG. 1, and includes quilt pattern stitching 15, for an attractive appearance.
  • The net result of FIG. 12, is the formation of a pillow member 120, FIGS. 12 and 13. An open central volume 121, FIG. 13, is accessible from an exterior, through slit 109; slit 109 comprising slits 92 and 100 together.
  • In FIG. 13, pillow member 120 is viewable in a perspective view. Internal volume 121 is viewable through slit 109. In FIG. 13, the layers that will form upper pillow top cover 10 and lower pillow top cover 11 are viewable.
  • In FIG. 14, the step of providing a peripheral, pillow, binding 12 on pillow member 120 (to form pillow top cushion 3) is depicted. Binding 12, formed from a strip 124 sewn around a periphery of pillow member 120, is depicted along and covering (closing) a seam 124 x, FIG. 12, between upper pillow top cover 110 (10, FIG. 1) and lower pillow top cover 88 (11, FIG. 1).
  • In FIG. 15, vamp 4 is depicted being completed by applying bindings 25, 26 thereto, from a strip 126 of binding material. Bindings 25, 26 are formed by securing strip 126 over a seam along opposite edges, between vamp cover 70 and vamp lining 71.
  • In FIG. 16, slipper upper section 130 is depicted, comprising vamp 4 secured to upper outsole cover 89. Referring to FIG. 16, a completed vamp for cover 4 is sewn directly to the upper outsole cover 89. In one region, indicated at 89 x, along one of the sides of the vamp 4, a gap is left in the stitching between the vamp 4 and outsole cover 89. A function of gap 89 x is to allow for an inversion of a portion of a partial slipper assembly discussed below, through the opening of gap 89 x.
  • Again, the mid-assembly (intermediate) structure 130 indicated in FIG. 16 will generally be referred to herein as the slipper upper section 130, comprising top cushion member 3 (minus an internal cushion), outsole cover 89 and vamp 4.
  • In FIG. 17, mud guard wrap 20 is shown being stitched to slipper upper section 130 around a periphery thereof. Stitching is directly between the wrap 20 and the upper outsole cover piece 89. It can be seen that the stitching is along a portion of the wrap 20 which will form an inside, in the completed slipper 1.
  • The construction 135 resulting from FIG. 17 will sometimes be referred to herein as the slipper upper section 130/wrap 20 combination 135 or by similar terms.
  • In FIG. 18, the pillow top cushion 140 is shown being inserted into interior volume 121 of pillow member 120, in combination 135. Pillow top cushion 140 is depicted in FIG. 27, and has an outer periphery 141 with a toe portion 142 and a heel portion 143.
  • In FIG. 19, an assembly 146 comprising slipper upper section/wrap combination 135 with pillow top cushion 140 inserted therein, is depicted, stitched close at stitching 147 along slit 109.
  • In FIG. 20, a lower outsole cover 150 is shown being stitched to the mud guard or side wrap 20. This creates a closed outsole bottom cover. The outsole bottom 150 is depicted in FIG. 28 having an outer periphery 151 with indexing notches 152 therein. It includes toe portion 153 and heel portion 154. As discussed below, for the example shown, a side of the outsole or slipper bottom 150, which will form a slipper bottom 40, FIG. 4 typically includes non-stick material thereon.
  • Referring to FIG. 20, the resulting component 160 from the stitching of the outsole 150 to assembly 146 may be referred to herein as the “inverted slipper minus sole filler” 160.
  • In final steps of manufacture, the following occur. First, assembly 160 of FIG. 20 is inverted through aperture 89 x, FIG. 10. This will generate the appearance of FIG. 21. Next, the outsole cushion 170, FIG. 29, is inserted through the aperture 89 x, FIG. 21. Referring to FIG. 29, outsole cushion 170 has an outer perimeter 171 defining toe portion 172 and a heel portion 173. After cushion 170 is inserted through aperture 89 x, aperture 89 x is sewn closed, and the slipper is turned inside out with respect to passage of the vamp 4 over toe 7, FIG. 21. This will result in slipper assembly 1, FIG. 1.
  • IV. Processing Variations to Form Slippers 50, 60
  • Closed toe variation 50, FIG. 6, can be made in the same manner as slipper 1. Whether open or closed toe, the vamp 4, 54 will invert over the toe 7, as discussed in the final steps in preparation of slipper 1.
  • Slipper 60 of FIGS. 7 and 8, thong version, is constructed analogously. However, there are some modifications in assembly steps, which can be understood by reference to FIGS. 30-32, as follows.
  • In FIG. 30, a modified vamp piece 180 usable to form cover 64, FIG. 7, is depicted. The vamp piece 180 includes sides 181, 182, toe section 183 and extensions 184, 185 forwardly from toes section 183.
  • Referring to FIG. 31, during a step of assembly with vamp piece 180 secured in place by the sides 181, 182, with extensions 184, 185 extend forwardly. Referring to FIG. 32, an aperture 190 is provided through cover 10, cover 11, cover 21 and foam insert 140. In FIG. 32, mud guard 20 is viewable. It is noted that aperture 89 x, for the thong version, is left out of the side, but rather an analogous aperture is in the heel region at 290 x. This aperture 290 x is used for the inversion and the outsole cushion insertion steps of in forming slipper 60.
  • V. Example Materials
  • A variety of materials can be utilized for slippers in accord with the descriptions herein. Example materials useable to form an attractive plush appearance slipper depicted for slipper 1 are described in this section.
  • For the vamp cover 70, a fabric construction comprising a three-layer laminate is usable. An example comprises a 2 mm quilted microfiber terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot/and Pellon laminate. The Pellon will form the inside of the vamp, against the vamp lining.
  • The vamp lining 71, which is not quilted, can also comprise a fabric laminate. An example comprises a 2 mm microfiber terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot/Pellon combination.
  • For the mud guard or bottom wrap 20, the loop 77 is typically formed of a fabric laminate strip. A usable example comprises 2 mm microfiber terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot.
  • The lower pillow top cover 88 (11) comprises a fabric laminate. An example is 2 mm microfiber terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot. The upper outsole cover 89 (21) typically comprises a fabric laminate. A 2 mm microfiber terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot laminate is usable combination.
  • For the upper pillow top cover 110, which will form the attractive upper surface 10 of the resulting pillow top 3, FIG. 1, a fabric laminate is also usable. A usable material, for an example, is a quilted 2 mm micro terry/⅛ inch (or 3.2 mm) polytricot laminate.
  • A lower outsole cover 115 can comprise a variety of materials selected for the bottom surface 40 of slipper 1. An example variation comprises fabrics such as a cotton or polyester cloth, provided with a non-skid dot print pattern (tpr or tpu) or other pattern, on a surface thereof, which will provide the bottom most surface or under surface 40 of the slipper 1. Alternatively, a leather or suede material can be used for the cover 115. Typically, a flexible material will be chosen. If a flexible, but relatively robust, outsole is desired, a TPR (thermoplastic rubber) can be used.
  • The foam inserts will be selected for desirable cushion and memory characteristics. For the pillow top 3, an example of usable foam would comprise a laminate, for example, a Pellon/⅜ inch (or 9.5 mm) visco elastic foam/Pellon laminate.
  • A filler for the outsole will typically be more rigorous material, for example ⅜ inch (or 9.5 mm) high-density polyester foam.
  • Fabric materials can typically be chosen for the bindings. A useable material is a 2 mm microfiber terry.
  • The various fabric and foam material used are generally selected as a matter of choice, for the desired appearance and feel of the slipper. Materials of the type characterized herein, and minor variations from them, can be obtained from commercial suppliers.
  • It is noted that as characterized, the slipper 1 comprises flexible fabric components, configured to form two internal sub-chambers, each of which is filled with a foam cushion material. It is noted that in some instances, the outsole bottom can be a more rigorous component, for example a molded polymeric component.
  • VI. An Additional Example Embodiment, FIG. 33-42
  • The reference numeral 401, FIG. 33, generally indicates an alternate slipper arrangement according to the present disclosure. The view of FIG. 33 is a schematic heel end, top perspective, view.
  • Referring to FIG. 33, slipper 401 generally comprises: a slipper base 402 comprising bottom lower cover or outsole portion 402 x; an upper pillow top cushion portion 403; and, a cover 404. (The base 402 also includes an upper cover, not viewable in FIG. 33). The cover 404 extends over a portion of a wearer's foot, more specifically a front portion of the wearer's foot. The particular example depicted, is of a “closed toe” slipper, 401. However, the principles of FIG. 33 could be utilized in a thong style slipper or a open-toe slipper.
  • Herein, the cover 404 will sometimes be characterized as a “vamp”, comprising an outer cover 404 x and lining 404 y.
  • The toe of the slipper 401 is indicated generally at 407. The slipper 401 is of a type characterized herein as having a “open” heel portion 408.
  • As with the previous embodiments, the example slipper 401 comprises two, isolated, cushion members secured to one another. The two, isolated, cushion members comprise base portion 402; and, the upper pillow top (cushion portion) 403. In the particular example shown, the base 402 and pillow top portion 403 comprise members stitched to one another.
  • In the particular slipper 401, FIG. 33, the cover portion or vamp 404 includes, secured thereto, a heel band 413. While in the example shown, the heel band 413 is not secured directly to the pillow top 403, it can partially or completely obscure a viewing of a narrow waist underneath the pillow top 403; i.e. a waist between the pillow top 403 and the slipper base 402. (The example heel band 413 is sufficiently small to not extend upwardly along a significant portion of a wearer's heel).
  • As will be understood from further descriptions, except for: (a) the presence of heel band 413; (b) utilization of optional button tacking in the pillow top of upper portion 403; (c) the absence of a binding over a peripheral seam in the pillow top 403; and, (d) the specific use of a TPR rubber for the outsole 402, slipper 401 generally includes features analogous to those previously depicted.
  • In the example slipper 401 shown, the upper pillow top cushion portion 403 comprises: an upper pillow top cover 410, a lower pillow top bottom or lower cover portion 411, and a peripheral pillow top seam 412 between cover 410 and cover 411 securing the two together. It is noted that for the example slipper 401 depicted, seam 412 is not covered by a binding. Together, the upper pillow top portion 410 and lower pillow bottom portion 411 define a pillow top cover 403 x containing an internally positioned pillow top cushion member, such as a foam cushion.
  • As with previously described embodiments, a characteristic of slipper 401 is an upper cushion pillow top 403 secured to a cushion-containing slipper base 402. The upper, cushioned, pillow top 403, when the slipper 401 is not worn (and when viewed from the side), generally provides (at least in a heel portion 408 of the slipper 401), for viewing of the pillow top cover 410 projecting above the seam 412 (although the seam 412 may be configured to be nearly invisible in the final slipper unless closely examined). This provides for view of pillow top 403 that is similar to a side view of a throw pillow or a similar cushion.
  • As with the previous embodiments, in a slipper “rest” state, the pillow top portion 410 typically projects upwardly from the seam 412 at least 2 millimeters, often 4 millimeters or more, typically, at its highest, at least 6 millimeters; and, in some applications of techniques described herein, 10 mm or more.
  • As with previous embodiment, in a slipper “rest” state, the pillow top cushion 403 is generally viewable projecting upwardly from adjacent portions of the slipper, at least 8 mm, and typically at least 10 mm, often at least 12 mm; and, in some instances, 15 mm or more. In this instance (FIG. 33, slipper 401) the projection would be the portion viewable above heel band 413.
  • As with previous embodiments, for the embodiment of FIG. 33, portions of the vamp or cover 404, and portions of the upper pillow top 403, can be provided with a quilted stitching. However, the particular example embodiment of slipper 401, FIG. 33, is depicted with no quilt pattern depicted on the cover 404 or on the upper pillow top or cover portion 410. Slipper 401 does have an optional button tacking pattern in a portion of the pillow top 403 not covered by cover 404, as indicated at 450.
  • It is noted that when an optional button tacking pattern 450 is used, the rise of the pillow top cover 410 above seam 412 will be truncated somewhat. However, a rise of at least 2 mm, usually at least 4 mm or more; and, in some instances at least 6 mm, will still, typically, be present. Further, even with a button tacking 450, typically the pillow top 403 will be viewable projecting upwardly from adjacent portions of the slipper 401, at least 8 mm, typically at least 10 mm, usually at least 12 mm, often at least 15 mm or more. (Of course, if the optional button tacking pattern, 450 is not used, in some instances pillow top cover 410 will project above seam 412 at least 10 mm or more).
  • It is noted that the materials for the upper pillow top cover 410, lower pillow top cover 411, and the outer portion 404 x of the cover or vamp 404 can be chosen to provide a plush, soft, fabric appearance.
  • For the particular example arrangement depicted, the outsole portion 402 x of slipper base 402 comprises a TPR (thermoplastic rubber) molded to form (together) the bottom or sole 402 b, and outer rim 402 r. Within an interior volume defined by bottom 402 b and rim 402 r, is typically provided a second foam cushion member, for providing cushion to the pillow bottom 402. The foam insert, and thus the interior volume identified, will typically be covered by a base upper cover, such as a fabric member, not viewable in FIG. 33; but secured at stitching 409. Typically, the base upper cover is fabric.
  • The heel wrap 413, and cover 404, will typically be secured to the base upper cover.
  • In FIGS. 33-39, a right foot slipper is depicted. Of course the left foot mating member to slipper 401, could be formed, in general as a mirror image.
  • In FIG. 34, a side elevational view of slipper 401 is depicted. In FIG. 34, the view is directed toward the right, or outside 460. In FIG. 34, seam 412, is viewable, with pillow top portion 410 billowing upwardly, and with a portion of pillow top bottom portion 411 viewable directed downwardly. Again, a waist between pillow top 403 and pillow bottom 402, analogous to waist 5 FIG. 1, is present, but is not viewable due to the heel wrap 413. (The waist will typically be viewable, without damage to the slipper 401, by manipulating the slipper 401 to separate, slightly, pillow top 403 and heel band 413).
  • In FIG. 35, a side elevational view of slipper 401 is provided, directed toward the inside or arch side 461.
  • In FIG. 36 a top plan view of slipper 401 is provided.
  • In FIG. 37 a bottom plan view of slipper 401 is provided. It is noted that the bottom surface 402 b can be provided with a variety of tread patterns. In addition, alternate materials from TPR can be used for the outsole bottom 402.
  • In FIG. 38, a toe end elevational view of slipper 401 is provided.
  • In FIG. 39 a heel end elevational view of the slipper 401 is provided.
  • FIGS. 40-42, provide for a general understanding of an approach to manufacture of slipper 401. In FIG. 40, a component 470 is depicted, comprising vamp 404 with heel band 413 secured thereto. The vamp 404 generally comprises an outer cover 404 x and lining 404 y. The component 470 would generally be formed as part of the operation of making slipper 401.
  • In FIG. 41 the pillow top upper cover portion 410 and pillow top lower cover portion 411 are shown secured to one another around seam 412, and the pillow base upper cover 465 is viewable secured thereto at waist 466. A pillow top cushion member 481 is shown being inserted into the pillow top 403.
  • In FIG. 42, a slipper component 468 is shown resulting from the structure of FIG. 41, after complete cushion insertion; note the optional button tacking 450.
  • In the next step of manufacture, the pillow top cover/heel wrap combination, 470, FIG. 40, can be secured to component 468, FIG. 42, by stitching to the bottom cover 465, leaving the pillow top cushion 403 positioned freely therein. The resulting combination can then be stitched to a outsole bottom 402 x, with stitching between the pillow base upper cover 465 and the outsole 402 x, as shown at 409, FIG. 33. Typically, a pillow bottom cushion will be positioned within the outsole 402 before stitching. This will provide for two spaced (isolate) cushion members. In some instances, stitching 409 will be through: the outside button 402 x, member 470 and upper cover 405.
  • It is noted that in the slipper 401, the rise of the pillow top 403 is free, i.e. the vamp 404 is shown extending over the pillow top 403, allowing the pillow top 403 to rise therein, and be separate therefrom.
  • It is also noted that, (although normally the waist 466, FIG. 41, between the pillow top 403 and the pillow bottom 402 is not viewable in the slipper rest state, due to the heel band 413, in the final slipper 401, FIG. 33), because in the example, the heel band 413 is secured to the slipper base upper cover 465, and not the pillow top 403, in examining the slipper 401, after completion, a person can spread apart pillow top 403 and heel wrap 413, sufficiently to view the waist without damage to slipper 401.
  • VII. Conclusions
  • According to the present disclosure, a slipper footwear arrangement is provided. The arrangement can comprise a slipper base, typically including: a lower outsole cover; an upper outsole cover; and a cushion insert between the lower outsole cover and the upper outsole cover. The example slipper footwear arrangement typically comprises a slipper base or bottom which defines an internal pocket, that receives a cushion insert during assembly.
  • The slipper footwear arrangement includes a pillow top positioned on, and secured to, a slipper base or bottom. The pillow top is typically non-removably secured to the slipper base, for example, with stitching. The pillow top comprises a pillow cover, for example comprising an upper pillow top cover; a lower pillow top cover; and, a cushion insert between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover. Alternately phrased, an upper pillow top cover and a lower pillow top cover define an interior region of a cover, into which a pillow top cushion can be received. Such a pillow top is secured, typically with stitching, to a slipper base.
  • Typically, the pillow top includes a peripheral side seam between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover. The side seam can be covered, with a peripheral binding.
  • The typical slipper arrangement includes a narrowed “waist” section, defined where a pillow top is secured to the slipper outsole. In some instances, the narrow waist section is viewable, at least in the heel section, when slipper is not worn. In one example, the narrowed waist is not viewable in the slipper rest state, as it is behind a heel band, unless the heel wrap and pillow top are spread apart slightly.
  • In typical arrangements according to the present disclosure, the pillow top projects above the peripheral pillow side seam, (and binding when present), a distance of at least 2 mm, typically at least 4 mm, often at least 6 mm. In an example, this distance is within the range of 8-20 mm and is usually more than 10 mm. The projection characterized, is meant to be in reference to the slipper before weight is applied to the pillow top. The projection characterized is viewable at least in the heel section, when the slipper is not worn.
  • Typical slipper arrangements according to the present disclosure have an “open heel” assembly. That is, there is no side projection which extends above, and around, a portion of a wearer's heel. Even in the embodiment of FIG. 33, the heel band 413 typically does not extend up enough to substantially cover any portion of a wearer's heel. Thus, the wrap 413, for example, does not extend above seam 412, in the typical, completed, rest state, slipper.
  • In a typical slipper arrangement, the pillow top is viewable, in the heel portion, when the slipper is in a rest state, projecting upwardly up at least 8 mm, typically at least 10 mm often at least 12 mm and in many instances 15 mm or more, from adjacent portions of the slipper.
  • Certain slipper arrangements according to the present invention generally have a heel section in which the pillow top and a narrowed waist section are viewable (i.e., there is no projection which extends over the portions of the slipper arrangement), when the slipper is not worn. When a heel band is present, as in slipper 401, the waist may not be viewable without manipulation to separate heel wrap 413 and pillow top 403.
  • Variations of slipper footwear arrangements are described, in which an open toe, closed toe, and thong arrangement result.
  • An example of slipper footwear arrangement is described herein, in which the slipper base includes a plush fabric mud guard therearound.
  • In an example arrangement depicted, the upper pillow top cover is provided with a quilt stitching pattern thereon, for an attractive appearance. Further foot covers (i.e., vamps) can be provided with a quilt stitching pattern thereon as well, for attractive appearance.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, in a typical slipper arrangement 1, a portion of the lower pillow top cover is exposed below the seam between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover; i.e., below the binding 12. The amount of exposure is typically a distance of at least 1 mm, and in some instances more.
  • As described herein, a lower outsole cover, which forms the bottom of the slipper arrangement in use, can be fabric, for example, a fabric having a non-skid print on a bottom surface thereof. However, alternates are possible, and a TRP example is described.
  • Techniques usable to form slipper footwear arrangements as described herein, are provided.
  • There is no requirement that a slipper arrangement include all of the detail features described herein, or be made with all of the assembly steps described, to obtain some benefit of the present disclosure.

Claims (22)

1. A slipper footwear arrangement comprising:
(a) a slipper base;
(b) a pillow top positioned on, and secured to, the slipper base; the pillow top comprising: an upper pillow top cover; a lower pillow top cover; and, a cushion insert between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover;
(i) the pillow top including a peripheral side seam between the upper pillow top cover and the lower pillow top cover; and,
(ii) the pillow top being viewable projecting above the peripheral pillow side seam a distance of at least 4 mm; and,
(c) a foot cover extending over a portion of the pillow top.
2. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the slipper base includes a lower outsole cover; an upper outsole cover; and, a cushion insert between the lower outsole cover and the upper outsole cover.
3. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the foot cover is an open-toed vamp.
4. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the foot cover is a closed-toed vamp.
5. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the foot cover is a thong vamp.
6. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the pillow top projects above the peripheral pillow side seam a distance of at least 6 mm.
7. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the lower pillow top cover has an exposed periphery that extends downwardly from the peripheral pillow side seam a distance of at least 1 mm.
8. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) in a heel portion of the slipper, the pillow top is viewable, in a rest state, projecting upwardly a distance of at least 8 mm.
9. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 including:
(a) a viewable narrowed peripheral waist between portions of the pillow top and the slipper base.
10. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the pillow top projects above the peripheral pillow side seam a distance of at least 10 mm.
11. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the peripheral pillow side seam is covered by a binding.
12. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the upper pillow top cover has a quilted stitching pattern thereon.
13. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the foot cover includes a quilted stitching pattern thereon.
14. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the slipper base includes a plush fabric mud guard therearound.
15. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the lower outsole cover is fabric.
16. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 15 wherein:
(a) the bottom outside cover has a non-skid print on a bottom surface thereof.
17. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 including:
(a) a heel band secured to the slipper base.
18. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 1 wherein:
(a) the lower outsole cover: is a molded outsole with a base and a side; and, includes a cushion positioned therein,
19. A slipper footwear arrangement comprising:
(a) a slipper base having a cushion therein;
(b) a pillow top positioned on, and secured to, the slipper base; the pillow top comprising a cover and a cushion member;
(i) the slipper footwear arrangement having a viewable narrowed peripheral waist between portions of the pillow top and the slipper base; and,
(c) a foot cover extending over a portion of the pillow top.
20. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 19 wherein:
(a) the pillow top comprises: an upper pillow top cover; and, a lower pillow top cover;
(i) the upper pillow top cover being secured to the lower pillow top cover along a peripheral seam.
21. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 20 wherein:
(a) the slipper base includes a lower outsole cover and an upper outsole cover with an outsole cushion therebetween.
22. A slipper footwear arrangement according to claim 21 wherein:
(a) the slipper base includes a peripheral mud guard secured between the upper and lower outsole covers.
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