US20090238685A1 - Disguised air displacement device - Google Patents

Disguised air displacement device Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090238685A1
US20090238685A1 US12/455,134 US45513409A US2009238685A1 US 20090238685 A1 US20090238685 A1 US 20090238685A1 US 45513409 A US45513409 A US 45513409A US 2009238685 A1 US2009238685 A1 US 2009238685A1
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Prior art keywords
air
body
front
air outlet
back
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Abandoned
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US12/455,134
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Roland Santa Ana
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Roland Santa Ana
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Priority to US79870306P priority Critical
Priority to US11/729,752 priority patent/US20070258833A1/en
Application filed by Roland Santa Ana filed Critical Roland Santa Ana
Priority to US12/455,134 priority patent/US20090238685A1/en
Publication of US20090238685A1 publication Critical patent/US20090238685A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D25/00Pumping installations or systems
    • F04D25/02Units comprising pumps and their driving means
    • F04D25/08Units comprising pumps and their driving means the working fluid being air, e.g. for ventilation
    • F04D25/12Units comprising pumps and their driving means the working fluid being air, e.g. for ventilation the unit being adapted for mounting in apertures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D19/00Axial-flow pumps
    • F04D19/002Axial flow fans
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D25/00Pumping installations or systems
    • F04D25/02Units comprising pumps and their driving means
    • F04D25/08Units comprising pumps and their driving means the working fluid being air, e.g. for ventilation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D29/00Details, component parts, or accessories
    • F04D29/005Decorative aspects, i.e. features which have no effect on the functioning of the pump
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F7/00Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures
    • F24F7/007Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures with forced flow
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/50Control or safety arrangements characterised by user interfaces or communication
    • F24F11/56Remote control

Abstract

A body has a back and parallel front. The back of the body defines an air inlet and a peripheral air outlet is associated with the front. A body chamber between the back and the front is in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet. A structurally prominent faceplate is on the body proximate to the peripheral air outlet and bears a transforming aesthetic overlay. An air displacement unit is formed of a plurality of blades rotatable in a plane parallel with the back and the front. The air displacement unit is substantially concealed within the body chamber and is configured to accept air from the air inlet and urge the air through the air outlet.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation in part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/729,752 filed Mar. 29, 2007, which, in turn, claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 60/798,703 titled ELECTRIC FAN WITH MULTIPLE FACIAL TREATMENTS, filed May 8, 2006, the subject matter of which applications is incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the field of air displacement devices and more specifically to the field of disguised air circulation devices.
  • BACKGROUND
  • A fan is common sight within homes and offices. However, simply because the sight of fan is common does not mean that it is a welcome sight. Fans are utilitarian objects that are infrequently structured to appeal to the personal tastes of spectators. Common fans generally include a bulky stand that supports a metal or plastic wire cage with fan blades disposed therein. Such objects rarely fit into the decor of a home or office building.
  • Fans that attract minimal attention are portable fans, as can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 2,341,220; 2,725,184; and 2,811,304. Portable fans commonly include a fan unit that is mounted onto a base that allows the fan to be tilted forward and backward, or sometimes allows on oscillating or rotational movement about a vertical axis. The fan usually includes a motor inside a motor housing for driving the fan blades and a motor actuating switch for actuating the motor.
  • Although portable fans are less likely to attract the attention of a spectator than their larger analogs, portable fans are still recognizable as fans—which is often unwanted in many decoration schemes. Therefore, there is a need for a portable fan unit that is unrecognizable as a fan.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a portable air displacement device having one or more aesthetic overlays that disguise its visible air circulation properties. By portable, it is meant that the present invention is capable of relatively simple relocation from one point to another. In a picture frame air displacement device embodiment of the present invention, the device includes a body, a stabilizer, a releasable faceplate, and an air displacement unit. The body includes a body cavity on its surface and a body chamber within. The body chamber is connected to an air outlet and an air inlet. The stabilizer of the picture frame embodiment includes mechanisms and articles commonly used in the frame art to brace a picture frame, such as a stand or a wall mount aperture. The releasable faceplate is a cover for the body cavity that serves to accept an aesthetic overlay disposed within the body cavity. Within the body chamber, the air displacement unit includes any air circulation devices common in the air circulation art, but is dimensioned to fit within the picture frame embodiment's body, which is comparable to a typical picture frame.
  • A motive air displacement device embodiment of the present invention includes a body, a stabilizer, a structurally prominent faceplate, and an air displacement unit. The body of the motive embodiment includes a substantially solid body surface that masks both a minimally-sized air inlet and peripheral air outlet. Within the body is a body chamber supporting an appropriately-sized air displacement unit connected to the air inlet and air 5 outlet. Upon the body, and near the air outlet, is located a structurally prominent faceplate that supports a transforming aesthetic overlay, i.e. an aesthetic overlay capable of altering its surface detail. Suitable stabilizers for the motive embodiment will vary with the transforming aesthetic overlay, but might include a base, wall mount, rotatable stand, and the like.
  • A buried air displacement device embodiment of the present invention includes a body, a retractable faceplate with an aesthetic overlay, and an air displacement unit. The body defines an interior body chamber connected to an air inlet and an air outlet, both of which are positioned on the surface of the body. Affixed to the body is a retractable faceplate configured to selectively obstruct the air outlet. Upon the retractable faceplate is an aesthetic overlay, whether a separate entity or integrated therein. The stabilizer includes any article capable of supporting the buried air displacement device on a surface. Within the body chamber is an air displacement unit configured to accept air from the air inlet to the air outlet.
  • A model air displacement device embodiment of the present invention includes a 20 body that is an aesthetic overlay. The aesthetic overlay is adapted to mimic a natural object that would naturally include apertures. Within the aesthetic overlay body is a body chamber that connects to the air inlet and the air outlet. The air outlet and air inlet are positioned to correspond to the natural aperture locations. It is preferred that the air inlets and air outlets are masked by either protrusions or recesses of material circumscribing the air inlets and air outlets. Within the body chamber is the air displacement device.
  • Therefore, it is an aspect of the present invention to present an air circulation device disguised by an object unrelated to air circulation. It is a further aspect of the present invention to provide a disguised and portable air circulation device.
  • It is a still further aspect of the present invention to provide an air circulation device having a function unrelated to air circulation.
  • It is a final aspect of the present invention to provide a disguised air displacement device that has a body with a back and parallel front with the back of the body defining an air inlet and a peripheral air outlet associated with the front. A body chamber between the back and the front is in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet. A structurally prominent faceplate is on the body proximate to the peripheral air outlet and bears a transforming aesthetic overlay. An air displacement unit is formed of a plurality of blades rotatable in a plane parallel with the back and the front. The air displacement unit is substantially concealed within the body chamber and is configured to accept air from the air inlet and urge the air through the air outlet.
  • These aspects of the invention are not meant to be exclusive. Furthermore, some features may apply to certain embodiments or versions of the invention, but not others. Other features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art when read in conjunction with the following description, and accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an exploded, isometric view of an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is an isometric view of an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is an exploded, isometric view of an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is an isometric view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the present invention detailing removable faceplates.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 8 is an exploded, isometric view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the present invention
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 12 a is a side, plan view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 12 b is a side, cutaway view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 13 is a top, plan view of the present invention.
  • FIG. 14 is a profile view of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF SELECT EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring first to FIG. 1, a picture frame fan 100 embodiment of the air displacement device is shown. The picture frame fan 100 includes a body 102, a stabilizer (not shown), a faceplate 106, and an air displacement unit 110. The body 102 includes a body cavity 108 within its surface and a body chamber 112 within. The body chamber 112 is an interior void within the body 102 of the device that includes passages that define an air outlet 116 and an air inlet 114.
  • The body 102 of the present invention acts as the protective housing for the internal components of the device, and also contributes to the disguised nature of the present invention. As can be seen in the picture frame fan 100, the body 102 is configured to include an internal body chamber 112, which is simply the space within the body 102. Upon the surface of the body are apertures allowing fluid connection with the body chamber 102, the air inlet 114 and the air outlet 116. The air inlet 114 allows air entrance into the body chamber 112, and the air outlet 116 allows air egress from the body chamber 112. The air displacement unit 110 is disposed within the body chamber 112.
  • The air displacement unit 110 is a mechanism adapted to accept air from a first point and transport it to a second point. The preferred air displacement unit 110 of the present invention is a fan; however, fan alternatives, e.g. pumps, are part of the present invention. In the present invention the air displacement unit 110 is always sized, such that in conjunction with the configuration of the body 102, the air displacement unit 110 is obscured, sometimes selectively, by the body 102 or some other component adjacent to the body. As FIG. 2 shows, in the picture frame fan 100 the body 102 includes a surface that obscures the presence of the air displacement unit 110 to the degree that it is generally invisible to a casual viewer.
  • Beyond merely obscuring the air displacement unit 110, a faceplate 106, as FIG. 1 illustrates, releasably attaches within a cavity 108 formed by the body 102 of the picture frame fan 100. The faceplate 106 braces an aesthetic overlay 118 that distracts attention from the air displacement aspects of the picture frame fan 100. The body 102 is configured to obscure the air displacement unit 110; and the aesthetic overlay 118 serves to distract a casual observer into believing that the present invention is something other than an air circulation machine.
  • The faceplate 106 of the present invention includes an assembly adapted to support and/or protect the aesthetic overlay 118 in its position on the body 102 of the present invention. The faceplate 106 of the present invention may be: completely removable from the body 102; removable only at selected points to allow a hinged attachment to the body 102; or permanently affixed to the body 102. At its simplest, the faceplate 106 can consist of a glass cover adapted to cover a single surface of the aesthetic overlay 118 as FIG. 2 shows; or as FIG. 3 shows can include a multiple layer configuration that completely encases the aesthetic overlay 118. The means for accepting the aesthetic overlay 118 will vary depending upon the particular type of aesthetic overlay 118 contemplated for use with the present invention. In the picture frame fan 100 embodiment of the present invention, it is preferred that the aesthetic overly 118 include a picture, and that the faceplate 106 comprise a removable assembly adapted to both completely encase the picture, and to form a size-generated interference fit with the body cavity (not shown) of the present invention. Other means for accepting the aesthetic overlay are compatible with the present invention, and may include, for example: a faceplate having surfaces that define a sleeve for the insertion of photographs, documents, and the like; a faceplate having magnetically attaching surfaces that using a magnetic field to secure an interior aesthetic overlay; a faceplate having a hinged attachment allows an aesthetic overlay to be placed therein. The body 102 can be adapted to accommodate these faceplates or any faceplate capable of fulfilling one of the aspects of the present invention.
  • As is further illustrated by FIG. 3, the preferred version of picture frame fan 100 includes one or more air outlets 116 about the periphery of the body 102. It is preferred that these air outlets 116 be discrete apertures, each selectively obstructed one or more louvers 122. The louvers 122 are adjustably affixed to the body 102 in a manner that a surface of the louver contacts the flow of air passing through the air outlet. The louvers 122 can be adjusted by hand, and their adjustment guides the air released through the air outlet 116 to a direction specified by a user in rotating the louvers. In versions of the picture frame fan 100 having louvers 122, it is further preferred that the periphery of the body surface, on the same face as the louvers, include a grooved design. This grooved design assists in disguising the presence of the louvers. The preferred picture frame fan 100 further includes a releasable frame 120 that snaps on to and circumscribes an outer portion of the body 102.
  • The air displacement unit 110 of the present invention will vary with the particular embodiment with which it is used. The air displacement unit 110 can include any mechanism capable of displacing and directing air in a given direction. In the preferred picture frame fan 100, the air displacement unit 110 is a twelve volt, 120 mm fan. Such a fan is preferred as it possesses substantial power and airflow generation with a minimum of sound generation.
  • The air inlet 114 of the present invention includes one or more apertures located on the body 102 in a position suitable to allow air entrance into the body chamber. The air inlets 114 comprise a minimum amount of space on the body 102 to minimize the recognition factor of the present invention's true nature. As is common in current fans, the amount of open space in the rear generally comprises the entire rear surface, limited merely by grating thereon. With the present invention, the air inlet—be it on the side, rear, or front—does not consume that entire surface; rather it is minimized for purposes of disguising the nature of the present invention. It is preferred that the air inlet 102 include only the space necessary to allow an amount of airflow suitable to allow the air displacement unit 110 to operate effectively. It is preferred that the air inlet 114 and air outlet 116 are offset or spaced to a degree that prevents a viewer from seeing through the body 102 of the present invention.
  • The stabilizer 104 of the present invention is a device or structure adapted to steady the body 102 on a surface. In instances where the surface that will most likely support the present invention is a horizontal surface, the stabilizer preferably includes one of the following: a base, which is material integrated within the body and is dimensioned to support the present invention; or a stand, which includes material shaped to confer a high degree of stabilization with a minimum of material. In instances where the surface that will most likely support the present invention is a vertical surface, the stabilizer preferably includes an aperture dimensioned to accept a nail, screw or other hanging article; or the body includes an integrally formed hanging articles, such as a hook. The stabilizer 104 may include features allowing the present invention to be easily moved or adjusted, such as a rotatable connection controlling pitch, yaw, or a combination of the two. Other stabilizers may be capable of actuating the present invention in a tiltable, rotatable, slidable, or reversible fashion. In the preferred picture frame fan 100 embodiment, the stabilizer 104 includes a wire fashioned to support the picture frame fan 100 on a horizontal surface. Commercial embodiments may include two such wires: one to allow the body a lengthened vertical appearance; the other to allow the body a shortened vertical appearance.
  • As the present invention includes an air displacement unit 110, the present invention includes a power source 124. As shown in FIG. 3, the power source 124 can include an AC adapter, but a DC power source is additionally within the bounds of the present invention as are many other components used in conjunction with air displacement devices, e.g. sensors that adjust fan speed based on temperature.
  • The aesthetic overlay 118 of the present invention includes any aesthetic design of adapted to disguise the present invention as a device other than a fan. The present invention includes at least one aesthetic overlay 118, and may include multiple aesthetic overlays 118 as FIG. 4 shows. In the picture fan frame 100 embodiment of FIG. 4, the body 102 of the fan 100 includes multiple facets, each capable of supporting an aesthetic overlay 118. As FIG. 5 shows, each aesthetic overlay 118 is supported by a faceplate 106 releasable from the body 102; wherein each faceplate 106 is dimensioned to fit within a body cavity 108. In the cube version of the picture fan frame 100 embodiment of FIGS. 4 and 5, the faceplate 106 is preferably made of a single pane of glass and can either be integrated onto the body 102 to allow the aesthetic overlay 118 to slide therein, or releasable from the body 102.
  • The primary aesthetic overlay includes generally two-dimensional articles such as photographs, visual works of art, postcards, stickers, characters, symbols, images, mirrors, and the like. Articles not capable of serving as aesthetic overlays include visual cues that indicate that the device is a fan, e.g. a trademark of a brand of fan. FIG. 6 illustrates a transforming aesthetic overlay 218 of the present invention. The transforming aesthetic overlay 218 includes the attributes of the aesthetic overlay, but rather than rely purely on design to distract attention from the true nature of the present invention; the transforming aesthetic overlay relies on functional distractions such as the clock faces of FIGS. 6 and 7.
  • In the embodiment of the present invention illustrated in FIG. 6, the clock fan 200 embodiment, the transforming aesthetic overlay 218 includes that of an analog clock face. The transforming nature, i.e. the motion of the aesthetic overlay in changing from one aspect to another, of the aesthetic overlay 218 is that of keeping time. As the transforming aesthetic overlay 218 is that of real clock, a viewer will more likely recognize the present invention as a clock rather than a fan.
  • In the clock fan 200 embodiment, it is preferred that the air outlet 116 spans the periphery of the clock fan 200, and the stabilizer (not shown) include either an aperture adapted to accept an article adapted to hang the clock fan 200 on a wall or include a hanging aperture upon the rear of the body 102 of the clock fan 200. As FIG. 7 illustrates, the present invention could further support a transforming aesthetic overlay 218 of a more complex nature. The transforming aesthetic overlay 218 can include multiple functional devices, such as a digital clock face, a television screen, a light, and other devices unrelated to fans.
  • As embodiments of the present invention utilizing transforming aesthetic overlays include functional aesthetics, the ability to alter the functional aesthetics will not be necessary. Unlike the picture frame fan embodiments of the present invention, the embodiments of the present invention utilizing a transforming aesthetic overlay need not be amenable to aesthetic overlay substitution. Thus, removable faceplates or faceplates adapted to accept multiple aesthetic overlays may be used with transforming aesthetic overlay embodiments, but are not necessary.
  • As FIG. 8 shows, the clock fan 200 embodiment, like other transforming aesthetic overlay embodiments, includes the body 102, air displacement unit 110, air inlet 114, and air outlet 116 of the present invention. The body 102 of the clock fan 200 is dimensioned to appear as a clock, rather than a fan. The body 102 is substantially closed for that purpose, as is preferred for all body types of the present invention. By a closed body, it is meant that the body 102 includes more closed surface related to the object for which the present invention is disguised to resemble than open surface like that of a fan. For analog clock fan embodiments, it is preferred that the body 102 include a flattened cylindrical appearance typical of wall clocks. The air outlet 116 comprises multiple apertures about the periphery of the transforming aesthetic overlay 218 and point in the same direction as the face of the transforming aesthetic overlay 218. The air inlet 114 of the clock fan 200 embodiment includes one or more apertures leading air to the body chamber disposed within the body 102 of the clock fan 200.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a buried fan 300 embodiment of the present invention. The buried fan 300 embodiment includes the body 102, stabilizer 104, the faceplate 106 retractably affixed to the body, and the air displacement unit 110. As FIG. 9 shows, the faceplate 106 of the buried fan embodiment is positioned onto the body 102 of the buried fan in a manner that selectively blocks the air outlet 118. By selectively blocking, it is meant that the faceplate 106 can accept multiple positions upon the body 102 where one of the positions substantially blocks the air outlet 118, and at least one more position where the faceplate 106 exposes the air displacement unit 110 therein to the environment. In the hinged embodiment shown in FIG. 9, the faceplate 106 can occupy a first position where the door swings into a position that completely obscures the air displacement unit 110 from sight. In a second position the faceplate 106 opens to allow the air displacement unit 110 the ability to maximize its air circulation ability. In the buried fan 300 embodiments, it is not required that the faceplate 106 completely block the air outlet 118 in all positions; the faceplate 106 should occupy at least one position that allows very limited access to the body chamber 108 of the buried fan 300. The aesthetic overlay 118 of the pictured embodiment includes wood paneling, which disguises the fan as an article of furniture. The stabilizer 104 is simply a base portion of the fan 300 adapted to position the fan 300 upright.
  • Embodiments of the present invention may further include ornamental fan blades. As shown in FIG. 9, portions of the air displacement unit 110 may include, for example, one or more lights located thereon. When the air displacement unit 110 is a fan, the fan blades could include a transparent body.
  • The embodiment of the buried fan 300 shown in FIG. 10 includes an aesthetic overlay 118 having a mirror on the body 102 supported by a rotatable version of the stabilizer 104. The body 102 includes a shape that simulates that of a woman's vanity mirror. The aesthetic overlay 118, i.e. the mirror, is integrated within the faceplate 106, which is hingedly attached to the body 102. FIG. 11 shows a model embodiment 400 of the present invention. The model embodiments utilize the aesthetic overlay 118 that mimics a decorative object with an air displacement unit (not shown) disposed within. In the model embodiments, the aesthetic overlay 118 covers substantially the entire present invention and acts as a housing. The aesthetic overlay 119 of the model embodiments includes any non-fan shape that would naturally include multiple apertures. Multiple apertures must exist in the article that the aesthetic overlay mimics because these apertures form the air inlet(s) 114 and air outlet(s) 116 of the model embodiment 400. The embodiment of FIG. 11 is that of a doll house using the chimneys and windows of the dollhouse as an air inlet 114 and air outlet 116, respectively.
  • Both the air inlets 114 and air outlets 116 of the model embodiments are preferably situated proximate to structural recesses and protrusions to further hide the air circulation aspects of the present invention. As the air inlet or air outlet is masked by a protruding or recessed aperture, the line of sight of an observer in peering into the innards of the present invention would be more greatly obstructed. Such masked apertures are preferred, and are present in the device of FIG. 11: the air inlet is masked within a protruding chimney; and the air outlet is masked within the recess of a window. The apertures of the model embodiment exist in places where the apertures would exist in an article which the aesthetic overlay mimics 118. The incoming airflow thus, enters the present invention via seemingly natural apertures; and the outgoing airflow exits the present invention through seemingly natural apertures.
  • As FIGS. 12 a and 12 b show, the air inlets lead directly to the air displacement unit 110. The air displacement unit 110 then urges the air through the air outlet 116. As FIG. 12 b shows, the present invention can further be adapted to include an air filter 198 obstructing an air flow path to the clean the air from unwanted contaminants. Preferred filter materials may include dense fiberglass or polyester media, pleated media, HEPA, activated carbon, cotton gauze, vegetable fibers, synthetic fibers, charged plastic film or fiber, or any other air cleaners used in the art of air purifying. In place of, or in conjunction with an air filter 198, a fragrance injection device may be included in the air flow path. As FIG. 13 shows, the air inlet 114—or the air outlet (not shown) for that matter—may include safety features relevant to the present inventions operation such as screens. The aesthetic overlay 118 of the model embodiment 400 can include any overlay that mimics a non-fan shape that could potentially include natural apertures. In the doll model embodiment 400 of FIG. 14, an aesthetic overlay 118 adapted to mimic a human head includes the air inlet 114 and air outlet 116 of the present invention 400. The apertures of the doll are masked within protruding facial features that assist in obscuring the presence of the apertures: the air inlet in the ears; and the air outlet in the mouth. Further preferred aesthetic overlays may include replications of animals.
  • FIG. 14 further illustrates a doll model embodiment equipped with a sensor 196. The sensors of the present invention can include a motion sensor, body heat sensor, or an ambient temperature sensor. When used with a device of the present invention, the sensor would allow automatic fan actuation.
  • The present invention, from a generic view point, broadly includes a body, a body chamber, a structurally prominent faceplate, and an air displacement unit. First provided in the broadest embodiment is a body having a back and an associated front parallel with the back. The body defines an air inlet associated with the back. The body has a peripheral air outlet associated with the front.
  • Next in this broadest embodiment, a body chamber is provided between the back and the front. The body chamber is in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet.
  • A structurally prominent faceplate is provided in this broadest embodiment. The faceplate is on the body proximate to the peripheral air outlet and bears a transforming aesthetic overlay.
  • Finally, in this broadest embodiment, an air displacement unit is provided. The air displacement unit is formed of a plurality of blades rotatable in a plane parallel with the back and the front. The air displacement unit is substantially concealed within the body chamber. The air displacement unit is configured to accept air from the air inlet and urge the air through the air outlet.
  • Note now the embodiment of FIG. 6. In this embodiment, the front is circular. The back is circular and is parallel with the front. In this embodiment, the transforming aesthetic overlay comprises a circular clock having an area of 74 percent of the area of the front, plus or minus 10 percent.
  • Note now the embodiment of FIG. 1. In this embodiment, the front is rectangular. The back is rectangular and parallel with the front. In this embodiment, the transforming aesthetic overlay comprises a rectangular picture having an area of 44 percent of the area of the front, plus or minus 10 percent.
  • Reference is again made to the embodiment of FIG. 1. In this final embodiment, first provided is a body having a rectangular back with an associated air inlet. The body has a rectangular front with an associated air outlet. The body defines a body chamber. The body chamber is in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet. A rectangular faceplate has a rectangular central section in the form of a picture. The central section is imperforate and obstructs the air outlet. The central section bears an aesthetic overlay. The rectangular faceplate has a peripheral section which surrounds the central section and constitutes the air outlet. The central section has an area of between 44 and 77 percent of the area of the peripheral section.
  • Lastly, in this final embodiment of the invention, an air displacement unit is provided. The air displacement unit is within the body chamber. The air displacement unit is located between the air inlet and the air outlet. The air displacement unit is formed of a plurality of rotatable blades configured to accept air from the air inlet and to urge the air through the air outlet.
  • Although the present invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain preferred versions thereof, other versions would be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. Therefore, the spirit and scope of the appended claims should not be limited to the description of the preferred versions contained herein.

Claims (4)

1. A portable, disguised air displacement device comprising:
a body having a back and an associated front parallel with the back, the body defining an air inlet associated with the back, the body having a peripheral air outlet associated with the front;
a body chamber between the back and the front, the body chamber being in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet;
a structurally prominent faceplate on the body proximate to the peripheral air outlet and bearing a transforming aesthetic overlay; and
an air displacement unit formed of a plurality of blades rotatable in a plane parallel with the back and the front, the air displacement unit being substantially concealed within the body chamber, the air displacement unit being configured to accept air from the air inlet and urge the air through the air outlet.
2. The device of claim 1 wherein the front is circular with an area and the back is circular and parallel with the front and wherein the transforming aesthetic overlay comprises a circular clock having an area of 74 percent of the area of the front, plus or minus 10 percent.
3. The device of claim 1 wherein the front is rectangular with an area and the back is rectangular and parallel with the front and wherein the transforming aesthetic overlay comprises a rectangular picture having an area of 44 percent of the area of the front, plus or minus 10 percent.
4. A disguised air displacement device comprising, in combination:
a body having a rectangular back with an associated air inlet, the body having a rectangular front with an associated air outlet, the body defining a body chamber, the body chamber being in fluid communication with the air inlet and the air outlet;
a rectangular faceplate with a rectangular central section in the form of a picture, the central section being imperforate and obstructing the air outlet, the central section bearing an aesthetic overlay, the rectangular faceplate having a peripheral section surrounding the central section and constituting the air outlet, the central section having an area of between 44 and 77 percent of the area of the peripheral section; and
an air displacement unit, within the body chamber, the air displacement unit being located between the air inlet and the air outlet, the air displacement unit being formed of a plurality of rotatable blades configured to accept air from the air inlet and urge the air through the air outlet.
US12/455,134 2006-05-08 2009-05-28 Disguised air displacement device Abandoned US20090238685A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US79870306P true 2006-05-08 2006-05-08
US11/729,752 US20070258833A1 (en) 2006-05-08 2007-03-29 Disguised air displacement device
US12/455,134 US20090238685A1 (en) 2006-05-08 2009-05-28 Disguised air displacement device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/455,134 US20090238685A1 (en) 2006-05-08 2009-05-28 Disguised air displacement device

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/729,752 Continuation-In-Part US20070258833A1 (en) 2006-05-08 2007-03-29 Disguised air displacement device

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Cited By (10)

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US20100227545A1 (en) * 2009-03-08 2010-09-09 Nicholas John Frois Air vent outlet cover and filter
US20110146125A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Orme-Johnson Nathan P Picture frame assembly
US20140260399A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for mini-split liquid desiccant air conditioning
US9506697B2 (en) 2012-12-04 2016-11-29 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for cooling buildings with large heat loads using desiccant chillers
US9631823B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2017-04-25 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for desiccant air conditioning
US9631848B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2017-04-25 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Desiccant air conditioning systems with conditioner and regenerator heat transfer fluid loops
US9709285B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-07-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for liquid desiccant air conditioning system retrofit
US9835340B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2017-12-05 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for turbulent, corrosion resistant heat exchangers
US10024558B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2018-07-17 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for mini-split liquid desiccant air conditioning
US10323867B2 (en) 2014-03-20 2019-06-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Rooftop liquid desiccant systems and methods

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100227545A1 (en) * 2009-03-08 2010-09-09 Nicholas John Frois Air vent outlet cover and filter
US20110146125A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Orme-Johnson Nathan P Picture frame assembly
US10168056B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2019-01-01 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Desiccant air conditioning methods and systems using evaporative chiller
US10006648B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2018-06-26 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for desiccant air conditioning
US9631823B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2017-04-25 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for desiccant air conditioning
US9709286B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2017-07-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for desiccant air conditioning
US9835340B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2017-12-05 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for turbulent, corrosion resistant heat exchangers
US10443868B2 (en) 2012-06-11 2019-10-15 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for turbulent, corrosion resistant heat exchangers
US9506697B2 (en) 2012-12-04 2016-11-29 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for cooling buildings with large heat loads using desiccant chillers
US10024601B2 (en) 2012-12-04 2018-07-17 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for cooling buildings with large heat loads using desiccant chillers
US9631848B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2017-04-25 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Desiccant air conditioning systems with conditioner and regenerator heat transfer fluid loops
US20140260399A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for mini-split liquid desiccant air conditioning
US9709285B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-07-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for liquid desiccant air conditioning system retrofit
US10323867B2 (en) 2014-03-20 2019-06-18 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Rooftop liquid desiccant systems and methods
US10024558B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2018-07-17 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for mini-split liquid desiccant air conditioning

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