New! View global litigation for patent families

US20090138066A1 - Implant Deployment Apparatus - Google Patents

Implant Deployment Apparatus Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090138066A1
US20090138066A1 US12362755 US36275509A US20090138066A1 US 20090138066 A1 US20090138066 A1 US 20090138066A1 US 12362755 US12362755 US 12362755 US 36275509 A US36275509 A US 36275509A US 20090138066 A1 US20090138066 A1 US 20090138066A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
member
stent
graft
fig
restraining
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12362755
Inventor
Eric W. Leopold
Joseph Trautman
Troy Thomton
Randy S. Chan
Suresh S. Pai
Thomas G. Berton
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Gore W L and Associates Inc
Original Assignee
Leopold Eric W
Joseph Trautman
Troy Thomton
Chan Randy S
Pai Suresh S
Berton Thomas G
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • A61F2/07Stent-grafts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/88Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure the wire-like elements formed as helical or spiral coils
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/90Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2/954Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts for placing stents or stent-grafts in a bifurcation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2/962Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts having an outer sleeve
    • A61F2/97Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts having an outer sleeve the outer sleeve being splittable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/848Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents having means for fixation to the vessel wall, e.g. barbs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/86Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure
    • A61F2/89Stents in a form characterised by the wire-like elements; Stents in the form characterised by a net-like or mesh-like structure the wire-like elements comprising two or more adjacent rings flexibly connected by separate members
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • A61F2002/065Y-shaped blood vessels
    • A61F2002/067Y-shaped blood vessels modular
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • A61F2/07Stent-grafts
    • A61F2002/075Stent-grafts the stent being loosely attached to the graft material, e.g. by stitching
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/82Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/848Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents having means for fixation to the vessel wall, e.g. barbs
    • A61F2002/8486Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents having means for fixation to the vessel wall, e.g. barbs provided on at least one of the ends
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2002/9505Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts having retaining means other than an outer sleeve, e.g. male-female connector between stent and instrument
    • A61F2002/9511Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts having retaining means other than an outer sleeve, e.g. male-female connector between stent and instrument the retaining means being filaments or wires
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2002/9522Means for mounting a stent onto the placement instrument
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0008Fixation appliances for connecting prostheses to the body
    • A61F2220/0016Fixation appliances for connecting prostheses to the body with sharp anchoring protrusions, e.g. barbs, pins, spikes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/005Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements using adhesives
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2220/00Fixations or connections for prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2220/0025Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements
    • A61F2220/0075Connections or couplings between prosthetic parts, e.g. between modular parts; Connecting elements sutured, ligatured or stitched, retained or tied with a rope, string, thread, wire or cable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2230/00Geometry of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2230/0002Two-dimensional shapes, e.g. cross-sections
    • A61F2230/0004Rounded shapes, e.g. with rounded corners
    • A61F2230/001Figure-8-shaped, e.g. hourglass-shaped
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2250/00Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2250/0058Additional features; Implant or prostheses properties not otherwise provided for
    • A61F2250/0059Additional features; Implant or prostheses properties not otherwise provided for temporary

Abstract

A delivery system including a restraining member maintains a collapsed implant in its collapsed state for delivery through a small passageway to a desired site in a mammalian body. Once the implant is positioned at the desired site, the restraining member is released so that the stent may expand or be expanded to its expanded state. In a preferred embodiment, the restraining member comprises a sheet of material that surrounds at least a portion of the collapsed stent. Portions of the restraining member are releasably coupled to one another with a low profile thread-like member or suture.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 09/985,498, filed Nov. 5, 2001 which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/772,373, filed Dec. 23, 1996 and now issued as U.S. Pat. No. 6,352,561.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Technical Field
  • [0003]
    This invention relates generally to implants for repairing ducts and passageways in the body. More specifically, the invention relates to implant deployment apparatus.
  • [0004]
    2. Background Art
  • [0005]
    Treatment or isolation of vascular aneurysms or of vessel walls which have been thickened or thinned by disease has traditionally been performed via surgical bypassing with vascular grafts. Shortcomings of this procedure include the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery, long recovery times after surgery, and the high incidence of repeat intervention needed due to limitations of the graft or of the procedure.
  • [0006]
    Vessels thickened by disease may be treated less invasively with stents which mechanically hold vessels open. In some instances, stents may be used subsequent to or as an adjunct to a balloon angioplasty procedure. Stents also have been described in conjunction with grafts where the graft is intended to provide a generally smooth interface with blood flowing through the vessel.
  • [0007]
    Generally, it is important that the stent or stent-graft be accurately deployed so that it may be positioned at the desired location. Endovascular stent or stent-graft deployment can be summarized as a two-step process. The first step is moving the stent within the vasculature to a desired location. The stent or stent-graft may be self-expanding or balloon expandable. In both cases, the implant is typically delivered in a collapsed state to facilitate delivery through relatively small vessel lumens. The second step involves some method of “locking” the stent or stent-graft into its final geometry so that it will remain implanted in the desired location.
  • [0008]
    A number of techniques for delivering self-expanding or balloon expandable stents and stent-grafts are known. In the case of a self-expanding stent or stent-graft, a restraining mechanism typically is used to keep the stent or stent-graft in its collapsed state during delivery. The restraining mechanism is later removed to allow the stent or stent-graft to expand and engage the vessel wall at the desired implantation site. In the case of a balloon expandable stent or stent-graft, a restraining mechanism typically keeps the expandable device in a collapsed position during delivery with an inflatable balloon positioned within the collapsed device. The restraining mechanism is later removed to allow for inflation of the balloon which causes the stent or stent-graft to expand so that it engages the vessel wall. Generally, tubular sheaths or tying elements, which may be in the form of a filament or thread, have been described to restrain the collapsed devices.
  • [0009]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,878,906, to Lindemann et al., discloses balloon expandable stent-grafts which are deployed through a tubular sheath. The stent grafts are forwarded in a collapsed state along the vessel until they are in the correct location where the sheath is withdrawn, allowing expansion of the balloon within the stent-graft. After the balloon has expanded the stent-graft into final position, the balloon is deflated and drawn back into the tubular sheath. An alternative deployment method disclosed Lindemann et al. dispenses with the tubular sheath and uses a “thread” wrapped around the stent-graft and balloon which can be withdrawn when balloon inflation is desired.
  • [0010]
    Pinchuk, U.S. Pat. No. 5,019,090, shows a helically wrapped spring stent which is deployed with a balloon expansion catheter through a “sheath” which holds the stent and balloon catheter in a generally compressed state. Once the stent and balloon have been forwarded into the correct position along a lumen, the sheath is withdrawn. The balloon is then inflated, deflated, and withdrawn, leaving the stent in final implantation position.
  • [0011]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,246,452, to Sinnott, discloses a porous vascular graft which is implanted with a tear-away removable nonporous sheath. Once the graft has been forwarded into the desired position, circulation is restored to the area and blood is allowed to clot inside of the porous graft. After five minutes of clotting, the nonporous sheath can be removed by cutting or by pulling a string which tears the sheath and pulls it away.
  • [0012]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,344,426, to Lau et al., discloses an expandable stent which is preferably self locking when expanded. The stent is positioned over an expandable member such as a balloon catheter and covered by a one or two layer sheath which is connected to a guidewire. When the assembly of sheath, stent, and expandable member has been forwarded to the desired position, the sheath is removed by moving the guidewire distally. With the sheath pulled off of the stent, the expandable member can be activated to expand the stent into its final position.
  • [0013]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,366,473, to Winston et al., discloses an assembly in which a vascular graft is held in a compressed state over a pair of stents by a sheath. The stents take the form of flexible sheets wound around a spool. After the spool has been inserted to the correct endovascular site, the sheath is withdrawn allowing the stents to unwind and press the graft against the vessel walls.
  • [0014]
    Strecker, U.S. Pat. No. 5,405,378, discloses an expandable prosthesis which is held in radially compressed condition by a releasable sheath. The sheath can be a strippable meshwork which allows the compressed prosthesis to expand when the meshwork is controllably unraveled.
  • [0015]
    Generally, the mechanisms described above involve a number of components that may increase operational complexity. In addition, the size and mechanical properties of these mechanisms may limit deliverability of implants in small vessels. Delivery accuracy also may be a problem as discussed.
  • [0016]
    The diameter of conventional telescoping stent sheaths may contribute to undesirable friction with the delivery catheter as the sheath is pulled from the stent and over a push rod during deployment. This may make deployment accuracy difficult to control. Push rods, which are used to push the stent through the delivery catheter and which typically have a length of up to about 100 cm, also may contribute to undesirable friction with the catheter. This problem may be exacerbated where the catheter bends along its path in the vasculature. The sheath may also reposition the stent as it is retracted.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0017]
    The present invention generally involves a delivery system for an implant, such as a stent or stent-graft. The delivery system generally comprises a sheet of material adapted to extend around at least a portion of a collapsed implant, such as a collapsed stent or stent-graft. The sheet of material may form a tubular member when extending around at least a portion of a collapsed member. The system also may include a coupling member for coupling portions of the sheet together to maintain the implant in its collapsed state during delivery to a desired site in a mammalian body. With this construction a smooth interface between the collapsed stent and a vessel lumen, as compared to thread-like restraining members, may be achieved.
  • [0018]
    According to another aspect of the invention, the sheet may be constructed of a thin material which does not significantly contribute to the structural rigidity or cross-sectional profile to the delivery assembly. This construction may also eliminate the need for external sheathing or a guide catheter and is believed to advantageously increase the ability of the surgeon to deliver the device to relatively remote sites and through small tortuous vasculature. In addition, the sheet may comprise implantable material so that after release it may remain with the stent at the desired site.
  • [0019]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, an assembly comprising a stent and a restraining member coupled to the stent is provided. The stent has a collapsed and an expanded state and the restraining member comprises a sheet of material adapted to be wrapped around at least a portion of the stent when the stent is in the collapsed state. Portions of the sheet are adapted for coupling to one another to maintain the sheet wrapped around at least or portion of the stent in its collapsed state. Thus, in one configuration, portions of the sheet are releasably coupled to one another so that the sheet maintains the stent in its collapsed state.
  • [0020]
    According to another aspect of the invention, the portions of the sheet that may be coupled to one another may be coupled with a filament or thread-like member. The stent may be expanded (or allowed to expand when a self-expanding stent is used) after the thread-like coupling member is removed such as by being remotely pulled by a pull line, which may be an extension of the coupling member. Since the pull line may also have a thread-like low profile, friction between with the catheter, through which the pull line is pulled, and the pull line is minimized. It is believed that such construction may further facilitate deployment accuracy.
  • [0021]
    According to another aspect of the invention, multiple restraining members may be used. Alternatively, multiple coupling members may be used to couple multiple portions of one of more restraining members. These constructions can reduce deployment time and may reduce the time in which fluid flow may disturb the position of the implant as it is deployed.
  • [0022]
    According to another aspect of the invention an assembly comprises a stent and a restraining member coupled to the stent. The stent has a collapsed and an expanded state and first and second portions that move relative to one another when said stent moves between its collapsed and expanded states. The said restraining member comprises a sheet of material adapted to be wrapped around at least a portion of the stent when it is in its collapsed state, and portions of the sheet being adapted for coupling to one another to maintain said sheet wrapped around at least a portion of the stent in its collapsed state. The said assembly further includes a member having a first portion coupled to the restraining member and a second portion coupled to one of the stent first and second portions.
  • [0023]
    According to another aspect of the invention, an expandable stent, which is restrained in a collapsed state with a restraining member, is released and the restraining member urged against the wall of the lumen in which the stent is placed. Since the restraining member remains at the site, the number of deployment steps can be reduced as compared to other techniques (e.g. pushing a self-expanding implant out the end of a radially constraining sheath and retracting the sheath).
  • [0024]
    According to another aspect of the invention, a method of preparing a stent for delivery comprises restraining a collapsed stent in a sheet of material which may be in the form of a tube and coupling side margins of the tube.
  • [0025]
    According to another aspect of the invention, an expandable stent (or stent-graft) is collapsed into a generally cylindrical or tubular restraining by pulling the stent through a tapered member and into a tubular restraining member.
  • [0026]
    The above is a brief description of some deficiencies in the prior art and advantages of the present invention. Other features, advantages, and embodiments of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following description, accompanying drawings, and appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0027]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a mammalian implant that is restrained in a collapsed state in accordance with the principles of this invention.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 2 is an end view of the restrained implant of FIG. 1.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the assembly of FIG. 1 with the restraint released and the implant in an expanded state.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4A is an end view of the assembly of FIG. 3.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 4B is a bottom plan view of the restraining member of FIG. 4A.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 5A shows a restraining member retraction mechanism according to another embodiment of the invention where the mechanism is in an unactuated state.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 5B shows the mechanism of FIG. 5A in an actuated state.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 5C shows a restraining member retraction mechanism according to yet another embodiment of the invention where the mechanism is in an unactuated state.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 5D shows the mechanism of FIG. 5C in an actuated state.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 6A is a perspective view of another embodiment of the implant in conjunction with the restraining member of FIG. 1.
  • [0037]
    FIG. 6B is a perspective view of a further embodiment of the implant in conjunction with the restraining member of FIG. 1.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 7A illustrates the restraining and coupling member of FIG. 1 and the pull direction for removing the coupling member from the restraining member.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 7B shows the assembly of FIG. 7A with the coupling member loosened to illustrate the chain knots used according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 7C diagrammatically represents release of the assembly of FIG. 7A or 7B as the coupling member is pulled in the direction shown.
  • [0041]
    FIGS. 8A, 8B, 8C, 8D, 8E, and 8F diagrammatically show a procedure for loading an expandable stent-graft into a restraining member in accordance with the present invention prior to endolumenal delivery.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 9A diagrammatically shows delivering a restrained implant to a desired site in a mammalian body lumen in accordance with the present invention with the coupling member configured as shown in FIGS. 7A-7C.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 9B is a sectional view of FIG. 9A taken along line 9B-9B.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 9C shows an alternate multiple restraining member arrangement for that shown in FIG. 9A.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 10A diagrammatically shows partial deployment of the implant assembly illustrated in FIG. 9A showing progressive expansion in a direction away from the distal end of the illustrated guidewire (i.e., toward the illustrated hub).
  • [0046]
    FIG. 10B is a sectional view of FIG. 10A taken along line 10B-10B.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 11A diagrammatically shows full deployment of the implant assembly illustrated in FIG. 9A. FIG. 11B shows a cross sectional view.
  • [0048]
    FIGS. 12A, 12B, 12C, and 12D diagrammatically show deployment of a restrained implant according to another embodiment of the invention where the coupling member configuration provides release from the middle portion of the implant outward toward the implant ends.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 13 illustrates one coupling member configuration for deployment as shown in FIGS. 12A-12D.
  • [0050]
    FIG. 14A is a perspective view of a bifurcated stent-graft that can be used with the illustrated delivery systems.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 14B is a top plan view of the bifurcated stent-graft of FIG. 14A.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 14C is a cross-section view taken along section line 14C-14C depicted in FIG. 14A.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 14D is a cross-sectional view taken along section line 14D-14D depicted in FIG. 14A showing an alternate embodiment.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 15 is a front view of the assembled bifurcated stent-graft of FIG. 14A placed at a bifurcation site within the vasculature of a body.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 16 is a perspective break-away view showing a close-up of one construction of stent anchoring apexes.
  • [0056]
    FIG. 17 is a perspective break-away view showing a close-up of a preferred construction of the stent anchoring apexes.
  • [0057]
    FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of the stent-graft of FIG. 14B taken along section line 18-18.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 19 is a cross-sectional view of the stent-graft of FIG. 14A taken along section line 19-19.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 20 is an enlarged partial cross-sectional view of the contralateral leg connection depicted in FIG. 19.
  • [0060]
    FIG. 21 and FIG. 22 are enlarged partial cross-sectional views of alternative constructions of the receiving lumen.
  • [0061]
    FIG. 23 is a partial perspective view of an alternate scalloped construction of the proximal region of the contralateral leg component.
  • [0062]
    FIGS. 24A and 24B are cross-sectional views taken along section line 24A-24A as shown in FIG. 14A depicting a free state and a forced state respectively.
  • [0063]
    FIGS. 25A and 25B are cross-sectional views taken along section line 25A-25A as shown in FIG. 23 depicting a free state and a forced state respectively.
  • [0064]
    FIG. 26A is a front view of preassembled graft components.
  • [0065]
    FIGS. 26B and 26C are respectively the front view and top view of the assembled graft of FIG. 26A.
  • [0066]
    FIG. 27A is a front view of the unassembled components of an alternate construction of the graft element.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 27B is a front view of the assembled graft element according to the alternative construction of FIG. 27A.
  • [0068]
    FIGS. 28A through 28E diagrammatically show deployment of a bifurcated stent-graft.
  • [0069]
    FIGS. 29A, 29B, 29C, and 29D diagrammatically show deployment of a bifurcated stent-graft using an alternate delivery system.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0070]
    Referring to the drawings in detail wherein like numerals indicate like elements, delivery systems for delivering implants or devices, such as stents or stent-grafts, to a desired site in mammalian vasculature are shown in accordance with the principles of the present invention. The delivery systems of the present invention generally include a restraining member that is adapted and configured for surrounding at least a portion of a collapsed or compressed implant and a coupling member(s) for releasably coupling portions of the restraining member to one another to maintain the implant in its collapsed or compressed state.
  • [0071]
    Referring to FIGS. 1-4, an implant delivery system constructed in accordance with the present invention is shown. Delivery system (100), generally includes a restraining member (102), which as shown may be in the form of a sheet of material, and a coupling member (104) for releasably coupling portions of the restraining member to one another. The restraining member portions that are coupled may differ than those illustrated, but preferably are selected to maintain the implant, such as self-expanding stent-graft (106), in a collapsed or compressed state as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 where the restraining member (102) is shown in the form of a tube. In the illustrative embodiment, the coupling member (104) is shown as a filament or thread-like element which prevents the restraining member (102) from rearranging to a configuration where the stent-graft (106) could expand to its expanded state.
  • [0072]
    The implant may be collapsed in any suitable manner for placement within the restraining member (102). For example, the implant may be folded or radially crushed before placement within the restraining member (102) as will be described in more detail below. As shown in FIGS. 9-11, a delivery assembly (108), which includes the restraining member (102) and the stent-graft (106), has relatively small cross-sectional dimensions which facilitate endoluminal delivery of the assembly to a site where the natural lumen diameter may be smaller than the expanded diameter of the stent-graft (106).
  • [0073]
    Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4A, the assembly (108) is shown in a deployed state after removal of the coupling member (104). The restraining member (102) may be fixedly secured to the stent-graft (106) so that the two components remain attached after expansion at the desired deployment site. The attachment between the restraining member and the implant preferably is made to prevent significant movement between the restraining member and stent-graft after deployment which could disrupt endovascular fluid flow. Referring to FIGS. 4A and 4B multiple sutures (110) may be used to fixedly attach the restraining member (102) to the stent-graft (106). More specifically, the sutures can form loops that pass through the restraining member and around portions of the stent as shown in FIG. 4A. It is further noted that although one arrangement of the sutures (110) is shown in FIG. 4B other arrangements may be used.
  • [0074]
    Although other configurations of the restraining member (102) can be used, a preferred configuration is a generally rectangular one having constant width as shown in FIG. 4B. For example, in the case where the restraining member is used in conjunction with a modular bifurcated stent as will be described below, the restraining member may have a similar rectangular configuration as that shown in FIG. 4B. Alternatively, it may have two differently sized rectangular portions arranged to mate with the regions of different diameter (trunk and leg) or another configuration that would maintain the implant in a collapsed stent when secured. Returning to FIG. 4B, the restraining member may be described as having side margins (112) that extend between the ends (114) of the member. Eyelets (116) are disposed along the side margins so that the coupling member (104) may be laced or threaded therethrough. The eyelets may be in the form of through holes (118), which may be formed by a uniform-diameter puncturing device or by other means such as laser-drilling. Alternatively, the eyelets may be formed by loops (120) which may be attached to the side margins (112) or formed by other means as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art.
  • [0075]
    It is further desirable to have structural reinforcement at the side margins (112) to minimize or eliminate the possibility of the coupling member (104) from tearing the restraining member (102) when under load. Reinforced side margins may be formed by folding a portion of the restraining member (102) over a reinforcement member (122), such as a small diameter suture, which may be heat bonded between the two layers of sheet material. With this construction, a relatively low profile bead of material along the side margins (112) prevents or minimizes the possibility of tear propagation and, thus, accidental uncoupling of the restraining member (102). The small diameter suture (122) may comprise ePTFE, for example.
  • [0076]
    As the restraining member (102) constrains a collapsed self-expanding stent-graft, for example, forces resulting from stored spring energy in the collapsed stent-graft (106) will be acting on the restraining member (102) when it is configured for delivery. Thus, according to another aspect of the invention the restraining member (102) may comprise a material which is creep resistant and can withstand required loads without stretching over time. The restraining member (102) may comprise, for example, ePTFE, which is believed to provide suitable creep resistance, flexibility, and biocompatibility in a thin sheet form which can be heat bonded. Other materials also may be used including polyethers such as polyethylene terephthalate (DACRON® or MYLAR®) or polyaramids such as KEVLAR®.
  • [0077]
    The thread-like coupling member (104) may also comprise ePTFE. Sutures of polyethers such as polyethylene terephthalate (DACRON® or MYLAR®) or polyaramids such as KEVLAR® or metal wire comprising nitinol, stainless steel or gold may also be used for the coupling member (104). The coupling member (104) may simply extend to form a remote pull line as will be discussed below. Alternatively, a metallic pull line, such as one comprising stainless steel may be coupled to a nonmetallic coupling member (104) such as one comprising ePTFE. The coupling may be made by folding the end of the metallic pull line back upon itself to form an eyelet and threading the coupling member therethrough and securing it to the eyelet with a knot.
  • [0078]
    It is further noted that the width of the restraining member, when in a flat orientation as shown in FIG. 4A, preferably is less than the diameter of the implant. Typically the restraining member width will be less than about 40 mm (typically about 25-40 mm when the device is sized for thoracic aorta applications), and typically less than about 15 mm in other applications where the lumen is smaller. The sheet of material preferably has a thickness less than 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) and more preferably less than 0.005 inch (0.127 mm). In addition, the length of the restraining member preferably is less than or equal to that of the implant.
  • [0079]
    According to the present invention, a retraction assembly may be provided to retract the restraining member during expansion of the implant, so that the length of the restraining member is maintained to be about equal to or less than that of the implant. The expandable portion of the implant may undergo minor amounts of shortening along the axial direction due to the expansion thereof in the radial direction, which may lead to an overlap of the restraining member at the ends of the implant, but for the use of some type of retraction assembly in these situations. The retraction assembly minimizes or eliminates the risk of the restraining member extending beyond the implant and interfering with any channel formed by the implant, or any fluid flowing therethrough after expansion.
  • [0080]
    Referring to FIGS. 5A-5D, retraction assemblies or mechanisms constructed according to the principles of the invention are shown. In FIG. 5A, a retraction assembly (340) is shown including a biocompatible filament (342), which includes a portion that is stitched, tied or otherwise fixed to the restraining member (102), as shown at an attachment point (348), adjacent to one end of the restraining member. Filament (342) is passed underneath the members forming the first or end helical turn of the stent (126) and looped under or otherwise slidably secured to a portion of the second, third or another helical turn other than the first helical turn such a an apex or bend portion (344) in a second turn. The other end portion of filament (342) is further fixed, by tying or other means, to a portion of the stent that is circumferentially spaced from the attachment point (348) or the apex or bend portion (344), for example, such as an apex or bend portion (346) of the same helical turn. Preferably, the filament (342) is looped through an apex portion (344) of the second helical turn and tied to an apex portion (346) which is adjacent to the apex portion (344) as shown in FIG. 5A.
  • [0081]
    FIG. 5A shows the stent in the compressed state. Upon expansion of the stent, as mentioned above, the members of the stent expand to effect the radial expansion of the stent, as shown in FIG. 5B. Because the distance between apex portions (344) and (346) becomes greater upon expansion of the stent, and because the filament (342) is relatively unyieldable and inelastic, the distance between the attachment point (344) and the apex portion (348) necessarily decreases. The result is that the end of the restraining member (102) is retracted with respect to the stent (126), as shown in FIG. 5B. Thus, the retraction along the longitudinal axis of the restraining member is driven by the expanding distance between adjacent apexes in this embodiment. Although only one retraction mechanism is shown at one end of the restraining member, another similarly configured and arranged retraction mechanism may be used at the other end of the restraining member.
  • [0082]
    FIGS. 5C and 5D show another embodiment for a retraction assembly. The views of this assembly (as are those shown in FIGS. 5A and 5B) are taken from a location between the generally cylindrical graft and stent looking radially outward. In contrast to that shown above where one end portion of a filament is secured to the restraining member and another to a portion of the stent that circumferentially moves during stent expansion, the other end of the filament is secured to a portion of a stent that moves generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the stent (axially) as the stent expands. In this embodiment, at least one apex portion (364) of an end helix of the stent member (126′) (which differs from stent (126) in that it includes eyelets or loops which may be formed as shown in the drawings) is made shorter than the majority of apex portions (366). However, the apex portions may be otherwise configured such as those shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B. A filament (362) is tied or otherwise fixed at one end to apex portion (364), and at the other end, to one end portion of the restraining member (102). As shown in FIG. 5D, upon radial expansion of the stent, inwardly positioned apex portion (364) retracts to a greater extent in the longitudinal or axial direction than the full height apex portions (366) which are shown in the last or most outwardly positioned turn of the stent. This relative greater retraction directly translates through filament (362) such that the end of the restraining member (102) is retracted relative to apex portions (366). As described above, another similarly constructed retraction mechanism may be provided at the other end of the restraining member.
  • [0083]
    Returning to FIG. 1, one stent-graft construction that may be used in conjunction with the delivery systems disclosed herein is shown. Stent-graft (106) generally includes a thin-walled tube or graft member (124), a stent member (126), which can be a self-expanding stent, and a ribbon or tape member (128) for coupling the stent (126) and graft (124) members together. The stent (126) and graft (124) members may be heat bonded together, thus sealing in portions of the stent member (126) that are between the tape member (128) and the graft member (124). The mechanical properties of the stent-graft (128) may be customized, for example, through materials selection, by varying the structural pattern of the stent member, varying the thickness of the tape (128) and graft (124) members, and varying the pattern with which the tape member contacts the stent and graft members.
  • [0084]
    As shown in FIG. 1A, the tape member (128) may cover only a portion of the stent member (126) as it follows the helical turns of the undulating stent member. With this construction, regions of the stent member do not interface with the tape member when the stent-graft is in an uncompressed state, for example. This is believed to advantageously reduce shear stresses between the stent member (126) and the tape member (128) when the stent-graft undergoes bending or compression, thereby reducing the risk of tearing the graft (124) or tape (128) members or causing delamination between the stent (126) and graft (124) members.
  • [0085]
    The tape member (128) also preferably has a generally broad or flat surface for interfacing with the stent (126) and graft (124) members as compared to filament or thread-like structures such as sutures. This increases potential bonding surface area between the tape member (128) and the graft member (124) to enhance the structural integrity of the stent-graft. The increased bonding surface area also facilitates minimizing the thickness of the tape member (128). It has been found that a tape member in the form of a generally flat ribbon as shown in the drawings provides desired results.
  • [0086]
    Tape members having widths of 0.025, 0.050 and 0.075 inches applied to a stent member having a peak-to-peak undulation amplitude of about 0.075 inch are believed to provide suitable results. However, it has been found that as the tape member band width increases, the stent-graft flexibility generally is diminished. It is believed that a tape member width of about one-fourth to three-fourths the amplitude of the stent member undulations, measured peak-to-peak, may be preferred (may be more preferably about one-third to two-thirds that amplitude) to optimize flexibility. It also has been found that by positioning one of the lateral margins of the tape member adjacent to the apexes, the tape member width may be reduced without significantly sacrificing apex securement. Varying the width of the tape member (e.g., varying width of the tape along the length of the stent graft) can also result in the adjustment of other structural properties. Increasing the width can also potentially increase the radial stiffness and the burst pressure and decrease the porosity of the device. Increasing band width can also diminish graft member wrinkling between coupling member turns.
  • [0087]
    The tape member (or separate pieces thereof) also may surround the terminal end portions of the stent-graft to secure the terminal portions of the graft member to the stent member.
  • [0088]
    FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate further stent-graft constructions that may be used with the delivery systems described herein. Referring to FIG. 6A, stent-graft (200) is the same as stent-graft (106) with the exception that stent-graft (200) includes a filament that couples stent undulations in adjacent turns. Filament (202) is laced or interwoven between undulations of the stent member and acquires a helical configuration (i.e., it forms a secondary helix) in being laced as such. Such a configuration is disclosed in PCT publication No. WO 95/26695 (International Application No. PCT/US95/04000) the entirety of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference. The stent-graft (300) shown in FIG. 6B is the same as that shown in FIG. 6A with the exception that the filament (302) is interwoven between undulations in the same helical turn of the stent member.
  • [0089]
    The filaments (202, 302) are of the same construction and may be of any appropriate filamentary material which is blood compatible or biocompatible and sufficiently flexible to allow the stent to flex and not deform the stent upon folding. Although the linkage may be a single or multiple strand wire (platinum, platinum/tungsten, gold, palladium, tantalum, stainless steel, etc.), much preferred is the use of polymeric biocompatible filaments. The flexible link may be tied-off at either end of the stent-graft (100), for example, by wrapping its end portion around the stent and tying it off at the point at the beginning of the last turn as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill.
  • [0090]
    A percutaneously delivered stent-graft must expand from a reduced diameter, necessary for delivery, to a larger deployed diameter. The diameters of these devices obviously vary with the size of the body lumen into which they are placed. For instance, the stents of this invention may range in size from 2.0 mm in diameter (for neurological applications) to 40 mm in diameter (for placement in the aorta). A range of about 2.0 mm to 6.5 mm (perhaps to 10.0 mm) is believed to be desirable. Typically, expansion ratios of 2:1 or more are required. These stents are capable of expansion ratios of up to 5:1 for larger diameter stents. Typical expansion ratios for use with the stents-grafts of the invention typically are in the range of about 2:1 to about 4:1 although the invention is not so limited. The thickness of the stent materials obviously varies with the size (or diameter) of the stent and the ultimate required yield strength of the folded stent. These values are further dependent upon the selected materials of construction. Wire used in these variations is typically of stronger alloys, e.g., nitinol and stronger spring stainless steels, and have diameters of about 0.002 inches to 0.005 inches. For the larger stents, the appropriate diameter for the stent wire may be somewhat larger, e.g., 0.005 to 0.020 inches. For flat stock metallic stents, thicknesses of about 0.002 inches to 0.005 inches is usually sufficient. For the larger stents, the appropriate thickness for the stent flat stock may be somewhat thicker, e.g., 0.005 to 0.020 inches.
  • [0091]
    The following example is provided for purposes of illustrating a preferred method of manufacturing a stent-graft as shown in FIG. 3. It should be noted, however, that this example is not intended to limit the invention. The stent member wire is helically wound around a mandrel having pins positioned thereon so that the helical structure and undulations can be formed simultaneously. While still on the mandrel, the stent member is heated to about 460° F. for about 20 minutes so that it retains its shape. Wire sizes and materials may vary widely depending on the application. The following is an example construction for a stent-graft designed to accommodate a 6 mm diameter vessel lumen. The stent member comprises a nitinol wire (50.8 atomic % Ni) having a diameter of about 0.007 inch. In this example case, the wire is formed to have sinusoidal undulations, each having an amplitude measured peak-to-peak of about 0.100 inch and the helix is formed with a pitch of about 10 windings per inch. The inner diameter of the helix (when unconstrained) is about 6.8 mm. (The filament when used as shown in FIGS. 6A and 6B may have a diameter of about 0.006 inch.)
  • [0092]
    In this example, the graft member is porous expanded polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), while the tape member is expanded PTFE coated with FEP. The tape member is in the form of a flat ribbon (as shown in the illustrative embodiments) that is positioned around the stent and graft member as shown in FIG. 3. The side of the tape member or ribbon that is FEP coated faces the graft member to secure it to the graft member. The intermediate stent-graft construction is heated to allow the materials of the tape and graft member to merge and self-bind as will be described in more detail below.
  • [0093]
    The FEP-coated porous expanded PTFE film used to form the tape member preferably is made by a process which comprises the steps of:
  • [0094]
    (a) contacting a porous PTFE film with another layer which is preferably a film of FEP or alternatively of another thermoplastic polymer;
  • [0095]
    (b) heating the composition obtained in step (a) to a temperature above the melting point of the thermoplastic polymer;
  • [0096]
    (c) stretching the heated composition of step (b) while maintaining the temperature above the melting point of the thermoplastic polymer; and
  • [0097]
    (d) cooling the product of step (c).
  • [0098]
    In addition to FEP, other thermoplastic polymers including thermoplastic fluoropolymers may also be used to make this coated film. The adhesive coating on the porous expanded PTFE film may be either continuous (non-porous) or discontinuous (porous) depending primarily on the amount and rate of stretching, the temperature during stretching, and the thickness of the adhesive prior to stretching.
  • [0099]
    In constructing this example, the thin wall expanded PTFE graft was of about 0.1 mm (0.004 in) thickness and had a density of about 0.5 g/cc. The microstructure of the porous expanded PTFE contained fibrils of about 25 micron length. A 3 cm length of this graft material was placed on a mandrel the same diameter as the inner diameter of the graft. The nitinol stent member having about a 3 cm length was then carefully fitted over the center of the thin wall graft.
  • [0100]
    The stent-member was then provided with a tape coupling member comprised of the FEP coated film as described above. The tape member was helically wrapped around the exterior surface of the stent-member as shown in FIG. 3. The tape member was oriented so that its FEP-coated side faced inward and contacted the exterior surface of the stent-member. This tape surface was exposed to the outward facing surface of the thin wall graft member exposed through the openings in the stent member. The uniaxially-oriented fibrils of the microstructure of the helically-wrapped ribbon were helically-oriented about the exterior stent surface.
  • [0101]
    The mandrel assembly was placed into an oven set at 315° C. for a period of 15 minutes after which the film-wrapped mandrel was removed from the oven and allowed to cool. Following cooling to approximately ambient temperature, the mandrel was removed from the resultant stent-graft. The amount of heat applied was adequate to melt the FEP-coating on the porous expanded PTFE film and thereby cause the graft and coupling members to adhere to each other. Thus, the graft member was adhesively bonded to the inner surface of the helically-wrapped tape member through the openings between the adjacent wires of the stent member. The combined thickness of the luminal and exterior coverings (graft and tape members) and the stent member was about 0.4 mm.
  • [0102]
    Although the invention has been described with reference to the stent-graft examples illustrated in the drawings, it should be understood that it can be used in conjunction with other devices, stents or stent-grafts having constructions different than those shown. For example, delivery systems described herein may be used in conjunction with bifurcated stents or stent-grafts as will be described in detail below. In addition, although a self-expanding stent-graft has been described, balloon expanding stent-grafts also may be used in conjunction with the delivery systems described herein. These stent-grafts require a balloon to expand them into their expanded state as opposed to the spring energy stored in a collapsed self-expanding stent.
  • [0103]
    Referring to FIGS. 7A-C, one slip knot configuration that may be used in conjunction with the thread-like coupling member (104) will be described. The restraining member (102) is shown without an implant positioned therein for purposes of simplification. FIG. 7A illustrates the slip knot in a prerelease or predeployment state. The series of knots are generally flush with the restraining member (102) surface and add very little profile to the construct which is preferred during implant delivery. FIG. 7B shows the assembly of FIG. 7A with the thread-like coupling member (104) loosened to illustrate how the chain knots (130) may be formed. FIG. 7C diagrammatically represents release of the assembly of FIG. 7A or 7B. The illustrated stitch is releasable by pulling one end of the line that results in releasing of the cylindrical or tubular restraining member and then deployment of the device. This particular stitch is called a chain stitch and may be created with a single needle and a single line. A chain stitch is a series of loops or slip knots that are looped through one another such that one slip knot prevents the next slip knot from releasing. When the line is pulled to release a slip knot, the following slip knot is then released and that releases the next slip knot. This process continues during pulling of the line until the entire line is pulled out of the restraining member.
  • [0104]
    Referring to FIGS. 7A-C, as the unknotted portion or the lead (132) of the thread-like coupling member (104) is pulled, such as in the direction shown by reference arrow (134), each consecutive chain knot (132) releases the next adjacent one. In the preferred embodiment, the chain knots (130) of the coupling member (104) are arranged to progressively release the collapsed implant in a direction away from the distal portion of the delivery catheter as shown in FIG. 10A and as will be discussed in detail below.
  • [0105]
    Referring to FIGS. 8A through 8F, a method for making an assembly comprising a restraining member with a collapsed or compressed implant therein is shown for purposes of example. FIG. 8A shows the restraining member (102) with its side margins releasably coupled to one another and its left end dilated by a tapered mechanical dilator (402). A small funnel (404) is then inserted into the restraining member (102) as shown in FIGS. 8B and 8C. The small funnel (404) and restraining member (102) are then mounted onto a pulling frame (410), and a large funnel (406) is fitted into the small funnel (404) as shown in FIG. 8D. Traction or pull lines (408), which have been sutured to one end of the stent-graft, (106) are pulled through the large funnel (406), small funnel (404), and restraining member (102) with a tapered mandrel (416). As shown in FIG. 8F, the pull lines (408) are fastened to a tie down post (412) located on a tension screw (414) and then are pulled by the tension screw (414). The stent-graft (106) is then pulled and collapsed sequentially through the large (406) and small (404) funnels, and then into the restraining member (102). Once the stent-graft (106) has been radially collapsed into the restraining member (102), which has its side margins coupled together, the pull lines (408) can be removed. The mandrel (416) may be inserted into the restrained implant to facilitate introduction of another component. In the preferred embodiment, a multilumen catheter (136) (FIGS. 9-11) is introduced through the center of the compressed stent-graft (106) and is used to deliver the radially restrained stent-graft to the desired endolumenal site.
  • [0106]
    It also is noted that the funnels may be chilled to facilitate compression of the stent when the stent is made of nitinol. That is, when the stent is made of nitinol, the funnels may be chilled below 0° C. or below the transition temperature (Mf) where nitinol is in its martensitic state. In addition, the stent-graft could be folded first and then reduced in profile by pulling through the funnel and into the restraining member. Cooling may be accomplished by spray soaking the stentgraft with chilled gas such as tetrafluroethane. Micro-Dust™ dry circuit duster manufactured by MicroCare Corporation (Conn) provides suitable results. The spray canister preferably is held upside down to discharge the fluid as a liquid onto the stent-graft.
  • [0107]
    A method of deploying an implant will be described with reference to FIGS. 9-11. In general, an implant may be delivered percutaneously with the delivery systems described herein, typically through the vasculature, after having been assembled in the reduced diameter form (see e.g. FIG. 1). At the desired delivery site, the implant may be released from the restraining member, thus allowing the implant to expand or be expanded against the lumen wall at the delivery site. Although other devices including stents or stent-grafts may be used, such as balloon expandable stents, the following example will be made with reference to a self-expanding stent-graft, which has the ability to fully expand itself into its final predetermined geometry when unconstrained. More particularly, the following example will be made using a delivery system as shown in FIGS. 1 and 7A-C and a stent-graft construction as shown in FIG. 3.
  • [0108]
    Referring to FIGS. 9A and 9B, an implant delivery assembly including a collapsed stent-graft (106) that is confined within a restraining member (102) and, which surrounds a distal portion of the delivery catheter (136), is shown. The attending physician will select a device having an appropriate size. Typically, the stent-graft will be selected to have an expanded diameter of up to about 20% greater than the diameter of the lumen at the desired deployment site.
  • [0109]
    The delivery catheter preferably is a multilumen catheter. The proximal portion of the catheter (136) is coupled to a hub (140), which includes a guidewire port (142) for a guidewire (142), and a deployment knob (144), which is coupled to the lead (132) of the thread-like coupling member (104). Accordingly, when the knob (144) is retracted, the restraining member (102) is released so that the stent-graft may expand. The hub (140) also may include a flushing port (146) as is conventional in the art. The stent-graft (106) is held axially in place prior to deployment by a proximal barrier (148) and distal barrier (150) which are positioned around delivery catheter (136) adjacent to the proximal and distal portions, respectively, of the restrained stent-graft. The proximal and distal barriers (148, 150) may be fixedly secured to the multilumen catheter (136) to restrict any axial movement of the restrained stent-graft. The barriers preferably are positioned to abut against the stent-graft or restraining member. The lead (132) of the coupling member (104) is passed through an aperture (152) in the proximal barrier (148) which is fluidly coupled to a lumen in the delivery catheter (136) so that the coupling member lead (132) can be coupled to the deployment knob (144). FIGS. 9A and 9B show advancement of the catheter (136) and the restrained implant through a vessel (154) toward a desired site. Referring to FIGS. 10A and 10B, once the restrained stent-graft reaches the desired site (156), the deployment knob (144) is retracted so that the stent-graft progressively expands as shown in the drawings as the coupling member (104) is removed from the restraining member. The coupling member preferably is arranged to facilitate stent-graft expansion in a direction from the distal to proximal ends of the stentgraft (i.e., in a direction from the catheter tip to the catheter hub). FIGS. 11A and 11B show the stent-graft (106) and restraining member (102) in their final implantation position after the coupling member and catheter have been removed therefrom. In another embodiment, multiple restraining members may be used as shown in FIG. 9C. When the multiple coupling members (104) are released simultaneously implant deployment time may be reduced.
  • [0110]
    A method for deploying a balloon expandable stent-graft may be the same as that described above, with the exception that after the coupling member (104) has been retracted from the eyelets (116), the balloon, which may be positioned inside the stent-graft prior to delivery, is inflated to expand the stent-graft (106) and then deflated for removal through the catheter (136).
  • [0111]
    According to further embodiments of the invention, multidirectional coupling member release or multiple coupling members may be used. These configurations may facilitate more rapid deployment of the implant than when a single unidirectional coupling member is used. FIGS. 12A-12D diagrammatically show multidirectional deployment of a restrained implant according to the principles of the invention where a coupling member arrangement is provided to release the implant from its middle portion, preferably its axial center, outward toward the implant ends. Although a particular coupling member configuration is not shown in these diagrammatic representations, one suitable coupling configuration is shown in FIG. 13 where the leads (132) may be passed through the aperture (152) and coupled to the deployment knob (144) as shown in FIG. 9A and described above.
  • [0112]
    Referring to FIG. 12A, the restrained stent-graft, which is positioned on the distal end portion of delivery catheter (136), is advanced through a vessel (154) for deployment in an aneurysm (158). The axial midpoint of the restraining member (102) preferably is positioned at the center of the aneurysmal sac. As the coupling member arrangement unlacing propagates from middle of the construct toward the proximal and distal ends of the restraining member (102) and the stent-graft (106), the stent-graft (106) progressively expands from its axial midportion toward its ends as shown in FIGS. 12B and 12C. This may be accomplished by pulling the leads (132) shown in FIG. 13 simultaneously when the arrangement in that figure is used. The stent-graft size is selected so that when the restraining member is fully released and the stent-graft fully deployed as shown in FIG. 12D, the proximal and distal portions of the stent-graft are positioned against the proximal and distal necks of the aneurysm. The delivery catheter may then be retracted.
  • [0113]
    As is apparent from the drawings, this embodiment advantageously allows fluid flow through the aneurysmal sac to remain substantially unobstructed during the release of the restraining member. For example, the stent-graft ends are still constrained at the deployment time shown in FIG. 12C where the aneurysm neck regions are shown minimally obstructed. In addition, this simultaneous, multidirectional release of the restraining member advantageously reduces the time in which fluid flow in the vessel may disturb the implant position as it is deployed as compared to a single directional release mechanism such as that shown in FIGS. 9-11.
  • [0114]
    Referring to FIG. 13, a multiple coupling member configuration is shown. The illustrated arrangement includes two lacing configurations (150) and (152). Except for the placement of the lead (132) of thread-like coupling member (104), configuration (152) is the mirror image of configuration (150). Accordingly, description of only one of the configurations will be made for purposes of simplification. Referring to the lacing configuration (152), configuration (152) is the same as that shown in FIGS. 7A-C with the exception that configuration (152) further includes two additional slip knots, generally designated with reference numeral (504), and tuck or loop arrangement (506). The additional slip knots are not interwoven in the restraining member and provide a delay mechanism for release of the coupling member, as is apparent from the drawings, when the lead (132) is pulled in the direction of the arrow (134). Thus, inadvertent pulling of the lead (132) will not immediately begin to release the coupling member from the restraining member. The tuck arrangement simply involves tucking the slack from lead (132) under stitches at various intervals as shown so that the additional slip knots (504) may be pulled out of the way for delivery. In addition, the tuck or loop arrangement (506) provides an additional delay mechanism for release of the slip knots.
  • [0115]
    As discussed, the delivery systems described above can be used with other implants or devices. These systems, for example, can be used in conjunction with the bifurcated devices described below.
  • [0116]
    The modular stent-graft of FIGS. 14A through 14D generally has two principal components; a main body (700) and a contralateral leg (730) each generally having a graft member attached to a stent member according to the description above. The main body (700) generally has a number of sections which have distinct overall constructions. A distal trunk section (708) has a single lumen structure beginning at a distal end (702) of the main body (700) and continuing until a bifurcation point (728). The bifurcation point (728) is the location within the prosthesis where the single lumen of the distal trunk section (708) bifurcates into internal two flow lumen.
  • [0117]
    An intermediate section (710) begins at the bifurcation point (728) and continues to the receiving hole (704). In the intermediate section (710), the stent-graft has an internal graft structure which is bifurcated into two lumen surrounded by a generally tubular, single-lumen stent structure. Finally, a proximal section (712) is a single lumen structure for both the stent member and the graft member and includes an ipsolateral leg (726) which terminates at an ipsolateral leg hole (706).
  • [0118]
    The graft member of the intermediate section (710) bifurcates the single lumen distal trunk section (708) into the ipsolateral leg (726) and am internal female receiving lumen (703). The receiving lumen (703) terminates at a receiving hole (704). The receiving hole (704) and receiving lumen (703) accommodate delivery and attachment of the contralateral leg component (730). Preferably, the graft material at the distal end (734) of the contralateral leg component (730) is scalloped as shown more clearly in FIG. 23 discussed below.
  • [0119]
    The receiving hole (704) is supported by a wire structure around a substantial portion of its periphery so that the receiving hole (704) is held open after deployment. In a preferred embodiment the wire structure that supports the receiving hole (704) is an independent wire ring (714).
  • [0120]
    The independent wire ring (714) is located in the general area of the receiving hole (704) in the intermediate section (710). The independent wire ring (714) ensures that the graft material at the receiving hole (704) is supported in an open position to receive the distal end (734) of the contralateral leg (730). In absence of such support, the receiving hole (704) may not reliably open after delivery of the main body component (700) because within the intermediate section (710) the bifurcated graft member in the area of the receiving lumen (703) does not have full stent support on its interior periphery. This may be better seen in FIG. 18 which shows the absence of any internal stent support of the interior graft periphery (785) in the area of the receiving lumen (703).
  • [0121]
    The independent wire ring (714) may be comprised of the same materials as the other stent-graft sections discussed above and is preferably self-expanding. In a preferred embodiment, the independent wire ring comprises a single turn of an undulating wire stent material surrounded by at least one layer of tape which is heat bonded to the receiving hole (704). Alternatively, the independent wire ring (714) could be formed as the last turn of the main body (700).
  • [0122]
    A radiopaque marker may be used to make the receiving hole (704) visible during implantation. Such a marker may include a radiopaque wire adjacent to the independent wire ring (714). Such markers make it easier to see the location of the receiving hole (704) after deployment of the main body (700) within the mammalian body.
  • [0123]
    This construction of the intermediate stent section (710) as seen in cross-section in FIG. 14C is characterized by a single-lumen stent member and bifurcated graft member and offers both a smaller compressed profile as well as simplified manufacturing over constructions which have discrete stented leg features. The compressed profile is determined largely by the physical amount of stent and graft material present in a given section. This construction eliminates the stent material that would normally support the inside periphery of the bifurcated graft section resulting in less stent material to compress in that region. As the main body component (700) is compressed for delivery as discussed above, the compressed profile is significantly smaller than would be a structure that had a section of bifurcated stent over the section of bifurcated graft.
  • [0124]
    Even though bifurcated flow is supported, manufacturing is simplified because there is no bifurcated stent section. Winding a bifurcated stent section in one piece, for example, is a more complex process. Likewise, winding separate cylindrical stent structures and connecting them to form a bifurcated stent structure is complicated and ultimately may be less reliable. The intermediate section (710) allows the entire stent member that covers the main body component (700) to be made from a single undulating wire arranged in multiple helical turns. The result is a bifurcated stent-graft device which is simple to manufacture, easily compressible and which expands reliably upon deployment.
  • [0125]
    An alternate construction of the intermediate stent section (710), is shown in FIG. 14D. The intermediate stent section (710′) has a shape characterized by the indented regions (727). The shape could generally be described as a ‘FIG. 8’, except that the area between the bifurcated graft member remains unsupported at its centermost region. This construction is still a single lumen stent construction and therefore maintains much of the benefits of reduced profile and simplified manufacturability while providing the bifurcated graft member with increased support around a greater portion of its perimeter. Further, indented portions (727) have less of a tendency to spring outward upon application of external forces.
  • [0126]
    As mentioned above, the main body component (700) and the contralateral leg component (730) are adapted for delivery in a compressed state to a bifurcation site within a body. For this purpose the main body component (700) is preferably equipped with a restraining member (722) constructed as described above. Likewise, the contralateral leg component (730) has an attached restraining member (732). These restraining members are typically sutured to the graft material at intervals down their length.
  • [0127]
    FIG. 15 shows an assembled bifurcated stent-graft (740) after deployment at a bifurcation site within a bifurcated body vessel afflicted with an aneurysm (758). The prosthesis may be positioned at the location where the abdominal aortic artery (752) bifurcates into the left iliac artery (756) and the right iliac artery (754) as shown. So that the various features of the implant are more clearly shown, the restraining member is not shown in FIG. 15.
  • [0128]
    The assembled bifurcated stent-graft (740) is comprised of the main body component (700) and the contralateral leg component (730). The distal end (734) of the contralateral leg component (730) has been inserted into the receiving leg hole (704) and the female receiving lumen (703) of the main body component (700).
  • [0129]
    For best results in deploying any stent or stent-graft of these types it is essential that they have the appropriate structural properties such as axial stiffness, flexibility and kink-resistance. With complicated structures, such as those required for treating a bifurcated site, it is increasingly difficult to obtain the desired structural properties because optimizing one may negatively effect the other.
  • [0130]
    For instance, optimizing the global axial stiffness of a stent or stent-graft will necessarily make the device significantly less flexible and consequently impair its resistance to kinking and lessen its ability to conform to the natural bends of curves the body's vasculature. Conversely a device that has high flexibility with little axial stiffness is difficult to properly deploy and does not aid in anchoring the device in the desired location.
  • [0131]
    With these constraints in mind, it has been discovered that having a bifurcated stent-graft which has segments constructed with varying structural properties offers improved deployability, is less susceptible to kinking, and favorably tends to maintain its desired position after deployment while allowing sufficient flexibility to accommodate movement by the body. The exact structural properties desired may depend on the location where the prosthesis is to be deployed.
  • [0132]
    For these reasons, it is preferable that the bifurcated stent or stent-graft be constructed with at least two segments having structural properties different from one another. For example, in FIG. 14A, a length of the distal section (708) and the intermediate section (710) may be constructed with a higher axial stiffness for improved deployment and positional stability while the proximal section (712) may be constructed to have higher flexibility to accommodate the geometry of the iliac artery.
  • [0133]
    It may be further desirable to have a number of segments that have different structural properties. Accordingly, the main body component (700) and the contralateral leg component (730) of the assembled stent-graft (740) have segments constructed with structural properties different from adjacent segments. In one preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 15, the main body component (700) has four different segments constructed with different structural properties. The distal segment (742) is constructed to have higher axial stiffness than the more flexible proximally adjacent segment (744). The proximal section (748) is constructed to have a higher flexibility than that of its distally adjacent segment (746). Likewise the contralateral leg component (730) has an axially stiffer distal segment (750) and a more flexible proximal segment (749).
  • [0134]
    There are a number of ways to alter the structural properties of stent or stent-graft components. One way of selectively altering the structural properties of a stent-graft segment is to use a tape member for that segment that has different physical dimensions. Such a tape member is discussed above with reference to the tape member (128) of FIG. 1. For example the tape member width, thickness or spacing may be increased, from the preferred dimensions discussed above, in a segment where it is desirable to have increased or decreased stiffness. For example, the use of wider tape wound with closer spacing will increase the stiffness in that area.
  • [0135]
    Another way of selectively altering the structural properties of a stent or stent-graft segment is shown in FIGS. 14A and 15. Extended struts (718) and (719) may be used to increase the axial stiffness of a stent-graft segment. Extended struts are formed by extending an apex on one turn of the undulating wire until it contacts an apex on an adjacent turn. This contact between an extended strut and the apex of an adjacent stent turn provides an added amount of axial stiffness. In a preferred embodiment, a layer of tape (not shown) is applied around the device in a helical pattern that covers each of the apexes of the extended struts. This additional layer of taping keeps the strut pairs together.
  • [0136]
    Referring to FIG. 14A, a first helical stent turn (720) and a second helical stent turn (721) have a generally undulating shape having apexes. An extended strut (718) of the stent turn (720) is formed having its apex near or in contact with the apex of the stent turn (721) directly below. The extended strut (719) is similarly formed by extending an apex of the stent turn (721) directly down to contact the apex in the turn below. This pattern in continued, each time spacing the extended strut over one undulation. This results in a helical pattern of extended struts down the length of the device. Of course, the extended struts may be arranged in patterns other than the helical configuration described.
  • [0137]
    A number of these patterns may be employed in any one segment or the extended strut pattern may be used in other segments to increase axial stiffness. Preferably the distally adjacent segment (746) on the main body component (700) and the axially stiff distal segment (750) on the contralateral leg component are constructed with extended struts as shown.
  • [0138]
    Referring to FIG. 15, the distal end (702) may be sized to properly fit the inside diameter of the target artery, in this case the abdominal aortic artery. Typically the prosthesis is designed to have an unconstrained diameter slightly larger than the inside of the target vessel.
  • [0139]
    The ipsalateral and contralateral legs of the assembled bifurcated stent-graft (740) are typically the same size at their distal ends regardless of the size of the distal end (702) and undergo tapered sections (724) and (738) that taper to a diameter which corresponds approximately to the internal diameter of the iliac arteries. These tapered sections (724) and (738) are preferable to abrupt changes in diameter as they tend to produce superior flow dynamics.
  • [0140]
    After deployment, the assembled bifurcated stent-graft (740) must establish sufficient contact with the healthy vessel lumen an each side of the aneurysm (758) so that the device does not migrate or dislodge when subjected to the relatively high fluid pressures and flow rates encountered in such a major artery, especially when the body again becomes mobile after recovery. Further, sufficient contact must be made so that there is no leakage at the distal end (702), the ipsolateral leg hole (706) or the proximal end (736) of the contralateral leg.
  • [0141]
    Anchoring or staying features that allow the stent or stent-graft exterior to anchor itself to the vessel lumen wall may be provided to help the device seal to the vessel wall and maintain its deployed position. For example, anchors (716) as seen in FIGS. 14A and 15 are provided on the main body component (700) and could also be provided on the contralateral leg component (730). Preferably the top stent portion (717) is directed angularly outward. This flared stent portion works to force the anchors (716) into the vessel wall as the top stent portion (717) expands under force into radial interference with the vessel wall upon deployment.
  • [0142]
    A preferred construction for an anchor (716) is shown in FIG. 17. This construction involves extending two wires from the upper stent turn (762) under an apex of an adjacent lower stent turn (764). The two ends of stent wires (760 and 761) are then bent out and away from the graft material (768). Extended struts (771) are formed adjacent to each anchor in the manner described above except the extended struts extend under the adjacent lower stent turn (764) down to a third stent turn (765). This extended strut arrangement provides support for the anchors (716) and provides for low stresses in the wires (760 and 761) under the application of bending forces encountered as the prosthesis expands into the vessel wall. The extended struts (771) minimize the localized deformation of the stent-graft structure in the area of the anchors by providing broader support.
  • [0143]
    Another construction of the anchors (716′) are shown in FIG. 16. An anchor (716′) is formed in the same manner except the ends of the anchor remain connected in a ‘U-shape’ configuration as shown. An anchor (716′) may be formed at any location on the stent-graft. Most preferably, the anchors are formed in an evenly spaced pattern around the top stent portion (717) (FIG. 14A).
  • [0144]
    It should be apparent that the anchors as described above are not limited in use to the stent-graft combination shown in the figures but indeed could be used in any non-bifurcated or stent only construction that require similar functionality.
  • [0145]
    Sealing at the vessel wall may also be enhanced by the alternate construction shown in FIG. 17 by way of a sealing mechanism. A sealing mechanism can be used with any type of implant, including any of the implants discussed above. For purposes of illustration, the sealing mechanism is shown with reference to the bifurcated implant of FIG. 14 and comprises seal member (772) as seen in detail in FIGS. 16 and 17. The sealing mechanism described below can be used with any of the implants discussed above.
  • [0146]
    One preferred construction for seal member (772) in the variations shown in FIGS. 16 and 17 may be similar to the preferred construction for the tape member used in constructing the stent-graft tubular member, as is provided in reference to FIG. 1A and FIG. 3 above.
  • [0147]
    In general, a thin walled ePTFE tape is used for seal member (722) similarly as that for tape member (128), shown variously in the previous figures. The tape used for seal member (722) is adhered to the outer surface of the stent-graft, including over tape member (128), described previously for bonding the stent and graft members. Seal member (722) has an inner surface constructed of a similar material for either the outer surface of the tape member (128) or the outer surface of the graft-member (124), depending upon which surface the seal member is desirably adhered.
  • [0148]
    First cuff end (767) is bonded to the stent-graft outer surface and second cuff end (769) is not, in order to form the unadhered flange to function as a one-way valve against peri-stent-graft flow. Seal member (722) may be selectively adhered along its length in this manner by providing a variable inner surface to the seal member such that, upon heating, only the surface in the region of first cuff end (767) bonds to the outer surface of the stent-graft. For example, the inner surface of seal member (722) may have an FEP liner in the region of first cuff end (767) but not in the region of second cuff end (769). In this case, upon contacting an outer surface of the stent-graft that has a uniform FEP outer surface, only first cuff end (767) may be heat secured thereon.
  • [0149]
    Alternatively, seal member (722) may have a uniform inner surface, such as constructed of FEP, and a variable outer surface, such as with a selective portion of FEP, may be provided either on the tape member (128) or on the graft member (124) in the region where the heat bonding of seal member (722) is desired. Still further, seal member (722) may have a uniform surface and may be positioned over tape member (128) and graft member (124) so that variability between the outer surfaces of tape member (128) and graft member (124) causes a selective bonding with the first cuff end (767) over one of those surfaces.
  • [0150]
    Further to the construction of seal member (722), the particular wall of thickness of the tape which may be used for this component should desirably be as thin as possible to functionally provide the flange-one-way-valve function for that member. This is because, since seal member (722) is over the outer surface of the other stent and graft components of the stent-graft, seal member (722) is believed to be the profile-limiting feature of the overall assembly. Therefore, in a particular design, seal member (722) may desirably be a thinner wall than for the tape member used to construct the stent-graft described in reference to FIGS. 1 and 3.
  • [0151]
    Further referring to the particular constructions and related methods just described for adhering seal member (722) to the outer surface of the underlying stent-graft, it should be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that the desired construction and heat securing technique for seal member (722) is premised upon the theory that, where one polymer meets a like polymer (such as FEP meeting FEP), heating under proper conditions will allow for a selected heat bond. Any suitable means may be used for securing a seal member to the outer surface of a given tubular member, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill.
  • [0152]
    Further there is a plurality of circumferential strut spaces between the struts of the stent member. It is believed that these spaces may provide a path for leakage flow around the outer surface of the graft member and along the outside of the stent-graft. Second cuff end (769), however, captures such leakage flow beneath its flange, which can not propagate along the outer surface of the stent-graft because first cuff end (767) is secured to the outer surface of that stent-graft. In other words, flow over the stent-graft and into an aneurysm is occluded.
  • [0153]
    Furthermore, when apex strut (716) is anchored into the wall of abdominal aortic artery as shown in FIG. 15, it has been observed that the portion of main body component (700) at and adjacent to the apex strut (716) may be forced away from the artery wall. This action causes a separation between the outer surface of main body (700) and the artery wall, which separation is believed to create a leakage flow path. The flange of seal member (772) captures that flow and occludes it from propagating into the aneurysm (758).
  • [0154]
    In addition to maintaining a good contact with the vessel lumen walls, the components of the stent-graft must make sufficient contact with each other such that the separate modules stay attached and do not leak at their engagement interface. The stent-graft shown in FIG. 18 illustrates several important features designed to effectuate a leak-free and positionally stable seal at the interface between the receiving lumen (703) of the main body component (700) and contralateral leg component (730).
  • [0155]
    FIG. 18 shows a partial cross-section of the assembled stent-graft. The contralateral leg component (730) has been inserted into the receiving lumen (703) of the main body component (700). This cross-sectional view shows clearly that the main body component (700) includes a main body graft member (780) and a main body stent member (782). The contralateral leg component (730) includes a contralateral graft member (784) and a contralateral stent member (786).
  • [0156]
    At the interface between the contralateral leg component (730) and the receiving lumen (703), the assembly provides for an extending sealing region (790). Preferably the extended sealing region (790) consists of a generally cylindrical interfering friction fit between the outside diameter of the contralateral leg component (730) and the inside diameter of the receiving lumen (703). That is, the natural or resting outside diameter of the self expanding contralateral leg component (730) would be larger than the natural inside diameter of the receiving lumen (703). Thus the forces created by the interference act to seal the two components and also serve to resist movement of the two components.
  • [0157]
    The type of generally cylindrical extended sealing region just described has many advantages. First, it allows for the stent and graft structures in the extended sealing region (790) to be constructed of relatively simple generally cylindrical elements that are easily manufactured. Because the extended scaling region (790) extends over a large length it necessarily has a large surface area to effectuate sealing between the components. This larger sealing area typically provides that multiple turns of the stent structures will be engaged in an interfering and thus sealing relationship.
  • [0158]
    In one preferred embodiment, the extended sealing region has a length in excess of one-half of the diameter of the receiving lumen (703), more preferably the length is greater that the diameter of the receiving lumen (703), and most preferably the length is more than 2 times the diameter of the receiving lumen (703).
  • [0159]
    Because the manufacturing tolerances of the simplified shapes are easily controlled and because the engagement of the extended sealing region (790) is quite large, a highly reliable joint is formed between the modular components. Even so it may be desirable to create one or more localized zones of increased interference to increase the sealing capability and positional stability.
  • [0160]
    Localized zones of interference may be created in a number of ways. In a preferred embodiment, an annular ring of decreased diameter is formed within the receiving lumen. Such a localized decreased diameter causes a greater interference with the outside diameter of the contralateral leg component in a localized area while the remainder of the engagement with the receiving lumen is subject to the general interference friction fit described above.
  • [0161]
    One way of creating a localized decreased diameter is illustrated in FIG. 20 which shows a partial cross-section of the extended scaling region (790). A zone of reduced diameter (799) is created by placing an anchoring ring (798) between the graft member (780) and the stent member (782) of the receiving lumen (703). The anchoring ring may be made from any polymeric or wire material, preferably a material that will not inhibit the receiving lumen from self-expanding to an open position. Most preferably the material is a suture material, typically ePTFE.
  • [0162]
    Alternately, localized zones of decreased diameter may be created as shown in FIGS. 21 and 22 by folding a portion of the graft member (780) back up into the receiving lumen (703). In FIG. 21, the zone of reduced diameter (806) is formed by creating a folded flap (808) of the graft material (780) around an anchoring ring (802). The flap is heat bonded in place roughly at a location (804) as shown. In FIG. 22, the zone of reduced diameter (809) is formed of flap (808) and heat bonded roughly at a location (807) in a similar manner but without any anchoring ring. The localized interference using these methods tends to cover a larger area and the flap (808) provides a more flexible member to seal against the outside diameter of the contralateral leg component (730).
  • [0163]
    One further aspect of ensuring a good seal between the stent-graft components involves the use of a scalloped stent-graft construction at the distal end of the contralateral leg component (810). To create this scalloped construction, the graft material between the apexes of the stent member is removed on the last turn of the stent. For example scallop (812) may be formed by removing (or cutting and folding under) the graft material from between a first apex (814) and an adjacent apex (816).
  • [0164]
    The advantages of using a scalloped arrangement are illustrated in FIGS. 24A through 25B. FIG. 24A shows a cross-section of the fully expanded contralateral leg component (730) having an unscalloped construction. A first apex (822) and an adjacent apex (824) have continuous graft material (784) in the area between them. When the apex (822) and the adjacent apex (824) are forced together in the directions of the arrows (820), the graft material (784) forms a buckle or wrinkle (818) which is a potential leak path or is a potential site for thrombogenic material to build up as seen in FIG. 24B. The scalloped construction shown in FIGS. 25A and 25B, on the other hand, have no graft material between the first apex (814) and the adjacent apex (816) and therefore when forced together do not form a graft material wrinkle.
  • [0165]
    The wrinkle (818), mentioned above may also be formed when the stent-graft is not allowed to expand to its complete diameter. For instance it is quite common that the receiving lumen or vessel wall internal diameter is smaller than the fully expanded stent-graft outer diameter. This being the case, it should be clear that the scalloped construction may alternately be used at any of the terminal openings of the main body component or the contralateral leg component. Preferably, the distal end (702) of the main body component (700) also has this scalloped construction as shown in FIGS. 14A and 14B.
  • [0166]
    In the previous discussion we have referred generally to a stent-graft that includes a graft member. While the construction of such straight stent grafts are discussed at length above, the construction of a bifurcated graft member is illustrated in FIGS. 26, 27A and 27B. A bifurcated graft member suitable for construction of the main body component (700) discussed above is generally formed of two graft members: the ipsolateral tapered graft (840) and the contralateral tapered graft (842). The separate contralateral leg graft component (844) is a straight or tapered section and may be formed according to the principles discussed in the first section above.
  • [0167]
    The ipsilateral tapered graft (840) has three sections which are separated by tapers. A top section (846), a middle section (848), and a bottom section (850). The body component graft (854) is formed by heat bonding the top section (846) of ipsolateral tapered graft (840) to the top section (847) of contralateral tapered graft (842). This heat bonding forms a common septum (856) which in a preferred embodiment is subsequently cut away to produce a smooth bifurcation (858). Cutting away the septum material prevents fluid flow disturbance or blockage that could result from deviation of the septum. Such deviation is caused by the fluid pressure and is aggravated if the stent-graft is radially compressed in a manner which causes the septum to become loose or no longer taut.
  • [0168]
    In another embodiment, a graft section may be constructed in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 27A and 27B. According to this embodiment, the body component graft (867) is constructed from two pieces. A tubular graft section (860) is bent into a ‘U-shape’. A top hole (864) is formed by notching the top of the ‘U-shape’. Upper graft section (862) is placed over the top hole (864) of tubular graft section (860). The two pieces are bonded together at the bonding interface (866). Preferably, the two graft pieces are heat bonded while supported by interior mandrels (not shown) to obtain the desired shape and smooth interior. However, upper graft section (862) may be attached to the tubular graft section (860) at the bond interface (866) in any manner that provides a sufficiently leak free seal. For example the components may be sutured together or adhesive bonded.
  • [0169]
    In use, the modular bifurcated stent-graft is typically delivered percutaneously through the vasculature of the body. Preferably the prosthesis is delivered by way of a restraining member as described in detail above. FIGS. 28A through 28E diagrammatically illustrate deployment of a bifurcated stent-graft with a restraining member (902) using a percutaneous catheter assembly. Referring to FIG. 28A, a multilumen catheter assembly (928) has been inserted to a selected site within a body lumen. The main body component (700) of a bifurcated stent-graft is held in a compressed state about a guidewire (926) and a guidewire lumen (929) by a restraining member (902) and a coupling member (906). The collapsed main body component (700) is held axially in place prior to deployment by a distal barrier (930) and a proximal barrier (932). The distal (930) and proximal (932) barriers are typically affixed to the guidewire lumen (929). The coupling member (906) extends through the eyelets (920) of the restraining member (902) forming chain knots and into the multilumen catheter (928).
  • [0170]
    FIG. 28A shows advancement of the multilumen catheter (928) with the distally located main body component (700) and the restraining member (902) into implantation position, typically at the bifurcation of a major vessel. During deployment it is critical that the surgeon align the main body component (700) so that the ipsolateral leg (726) will extend down one branch of the bifurcated vessel, and so the receiving hole (704) and the receiving lumen (703) will be lined up with the other branch of the bifurcated vessel so as to receive the contralateral leg component (730).
  • [0171]
    One way of facilitating this alignment is to provide radiopaque markers so that the surgeon may readily determine the rotational position of the main body component (700) prior to deployment or release from the restraining member (902). In a preferred embodiment, a long marker (934) is located on the contralateral side of the compressed assembly and a shorter marker (936) is placed on the ipsolateral side. Preferably these markers are placed on the stent prior to compression but may alternatively be part of the restraining member. Having one marker of a different length allows the surgeon to identify the orientation of both the ipsolateral leg and the receiving lumen relative to the bifurcated vessel.
  • [0172]
    Once the assembly is properly aligned and positioned for implantation, the coupling member (906) is pulled and the restraining member (902) begins to release the implant, typically at the distal end first. In the preferred embodiment, the restraining member (902) is located down the side as shown because it is less likely to interfere with deployment of the receiving lumen (703).
  • [0173]
    FIG. 28B shows the main body component (700) radially expanding as the coupling member (906) is retracted through the eyelets (920) of the restraining member (902) and into the catheter assembly (928). In the preferred embodiment, the restraining member (902) has been fixedly attached to the main body component (700) with a number of sutures along the length of the main body component to prevent any relative longitudinal movement between the implanted prosthesis and the restraining member (902). The restraining member may optionally employ a retracting or pull-down mechanism as described at length above.
  • [0174]
    FIG. 28C shows the main body component (700) and the restraining member (902) in final implantation position at the vessel bifurcation after the guidewire (926) and the catheter assembly (928) have been retracted.
  • [0175]
    FIG. 28D shows the contralateral leg component (730) being delivered to the contralateral receiving hole using a restraining member (942). The procedure for positioning and releasing the contralateral leg component (730) is the same as that described above for implantation of a generally cylindrical stent-graft except that certain radiopaque markers may be employed to ensure its proper position relative to the bifurcation point (728) of main body component (700).
  • [0176]
    Radiopaque markers may be located, for example, to indicate the position of the receiving hole (704), the distal end (734) of the contralateral leg component (730), and the bifurcation point (728) of the main body component (700). These markers serve to indicate the position of the contralateral leg component as it enters the receiving hole (704) and its ultimate position relative to the receiving lumen (703) which begins at bifurcation point (728). In a preferred embodiment illustrated in FIG. 19, the radiopaque wires (794) may be heat bonded or imbedded into the graft material (780) around the periphery of the receiving lumen. Such radiopaque wires could be used in other places such as the contralateral leg component lumen, the ipsolateral leg lumen or the lumen at the distal end of the main body component (700).
  • [0177]
    FIG. 28E shows the assembled bifurcated stent-graft in its final implantation state with the contralateral leg component expanded into and engaged with the receiving lumen of the main body component (700).
  • [0178]
    FIGS. 29A through 29D diagrammatically show the same stent or stent-graft components being deployed except that the restraining member (902) is released from the center out towards as the coupling member (906) is retracted. This may provide more accurate placement relative to the bifurcation point of the vessel instead of relative to the distal end as with end release.
  • [0179]
    While this invention has been described with reference to illustrative embodiments, this description is not intended to be construed in a limiting sense. Various modifications and combinations of the illustrative embodiments, as well as other embodiments of the invention will be apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reference to the description. It is therefore intended that the appended claims encompass any such modifications or embodiments.
  • [0180]
    The disclosures of the publications and patents that are cited in this application are hereby incorporated by reference.

Claims (27)

  1. 1. An endoluminal implant device for implanting within a body lumen having a natural lumen diameter, the device comprising:
    a tubular graft member made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the graft member has a proximal end for positioning in an upstream location of the body lumen and a distal end for positioning in a downstream location of the body lumen;
    a stent member attached to the proximal end of the graft member, wherein the stent member is self-expanding from a collapsed configuration to an expanded configuration, wherein a diameter of the stent member in the expanded configuration is larger than the natural lumen diameter of the body lumen, and wherein the stent member comprises:
    a wire undulating around the graft member, the undulating wire defining proximal apexes and distal apexes, and
    a plurality of anchors disposed around the undulating wire, wherein each anchor protrudes from the wire away from the graft member and in a direction toward the distal apexes, and is disposed between the proximal apexes and the distal apexes along the longitudinal axis of the graft member.
  2. 2. The device of claim 1, wherein the each anchor comprises a wire having an open end bent out and away from the graft member.
  3. 3. The device of claim 1, wherein the each anchor comprises two wires having open ends bent out and away from the graft member.
  4. 4. The device of claim 1, wherein the each anchor comprises a U-shaped wire.
  5. 5. The device of claim 1, wherein the anchors of the plurality of anchors are disposed in an evenly spaced pattern around the circumference of the graft member.
  6. 6. The device of claim 1, wherein the proximal apexes of the undulating wire project angularly outward from the remaining portions of the undulating wire and from the longitudinal axis of the graft member.
  7. 7. The device of claim 1, wherein the graft member comprises an inside face and an outside face, wherein the stent member is disposed over the outside face of the graft member, and wherein the device further comprises a tape member disposed over the stent member, the tape member bonded to the graft member through openings in the undulating wire of the stent member.
  8. 8. The device of claim 7, wherein the tape member comprises fluorinated ethylene-propylene coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene.
  9. 9. The device of claim 1, wherein the wire undulates around the graft member in a helical pattern.
  10. 10. The device of claim 1, wherein the wire undulates around the graft member in a single turn to form a ring.
  11. 11. The device of claim 1, wherein the undulating wire comprises an upstream turn and a downstream turn around the graft member, and wherein the each anchor extends from the upstream turn and under a proximal apex of the downstream turn, and protrudes away from the graft member downstream of the proximal apex.
  12. 12. The device of claim 11, wherein the upstream turn comprises extended struts formed adjacent to each anchor and extending under the downstream turn.
  13. 13. The device of claim 1, further comprising a restraining member in which the device is constrained in a collapsed state for deployment within the body lumen.
  14. 14. The device of claim 13, wherein the restraining member comprises a pull line that releases the restraining member to allow the device to expand.
  15. 15. The device of claim 1, wherein the stent member has an expansion ratio of approximately 5:1.
  16. 16. The device of claim 1, wherein the each anchor extends from a proximal apex of the undulating wire.
  17. 17. The device of claim 1, further comprising an outer graft member made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the stent member is sandwiched between the tubular graft member and the outer graft member to attach the stent member to the proximal end of the tubular graft member.
  18. 18. An endoluminal implant device for implanting within a body lumen having a natural lumen diameter, the device comprising:
    a tubular graft member made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the graft member has a proximal end for positioning in an upstream location of the body lumen and a distal end for positioning in a downstream location of the body lumen;
    a stent wire attached to the proximal end of the graft member,
    wherein the stent wire undulates around the graft member and defines proximal apexes and distal apexes,
    wherein the stent wire is self-expanding from a collapsed configuration to an expanded configuration, and
    wherein a diameter of the stent wire in the expanded configuration is larger than the natural lumen diameter of the body lumen; and
    a plurality of anchor wires disposed around the undulating stent wire, wherein each anchor wire protrudes away from the graft member at a location between the proximal apexes and the distal apexes along the longitudinal axis of the graft member, and in a direction toward the distal apexes.
  19. 19. The device of claim 18, wherein the each anchor wire is attached to a proximal apex of the undulating stent wire.
  20. 20. The device of claim 18, wherein the each anchor wire extends from a proximal apex of the undulating stent wire.
  21. 21. The device of claim 18, wherein the each anchor wire is an integral portion of the undulating stent wire.
  22. 22. The device of claim 18, wherein the each anchor wire comprises two open ends bent out and away from the graft member.
  23. 23. The device of claim 18, wherein in an expanded configuration, a diameter of the undulating wire at the proximal ends is larger than a diameter of the undulating wire at the distal ends.
  24. 24. A method for manufacturing an endoluminal implant device for implanting within a body lumen having a natural lumen diameter, the method comprising:
    forming a tubular graft member from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the graft member has a proximal end for positioning in an upstream location of the body lumen and a distal end for positioning in a downstream location of the body lumen;
    forming a stent wire that wraps in a generally cylindrical configuration to define an interior area and an exterior area, and undulates to define proximal apexes, distal apexes, and openings between the distal and proximal apexes,
    wherein the stent wire is self-expanding from a collapsed configuration to an expanded configuration, and
    wherein a diameter of the stent wire in the expanded configuration is larger than the natural lumen diameter of the body lumen;
    forming a plurality of anchor wires disposed around the undulating stent wire, wherein each anchor wire protrudes away from the interior area at a location between the proximal apexes and the distal apexes along the longitudinal axis defined by the cylindrical configuration, and in a direction toward the distal apexes;
    placing the tubular graft member on a mandrel;
    placing the stent wire over the tubular graft member;
    placing an outer graft member, made from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, around the stent wire such that the outer graft member is exposed to the tubular graft member through the openings in the stent wire;
    heating the outer graft member and the tubular graft member to adhere the outer graft member to the tubular graft member through the openings in the stent wire, thereby forming the implant device; and
    removing the mandrel from inside the tubular graft member.
  25. 25. The method of claim 24, further comprising
    collapsing the implant device;
    placing the collapsed implant device inside a restraining member that constrains the implant device in a collapsed state; and
    attaching a coupling member to the restraining member, wherein the coupling member is configured to release the collapsed implant device from the restraining member to allow the implant device to expand to an expanded state.
  26. 26. An endoluminal implant device for implanting within a body lumen having a natural lumen diameter, the device comprising:
    a tubular graft member made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the tubular graft member has a proximal end for positioning in an upstream location of the body lumen and a distal end for positioning in a downstream location of the body lumen;
    a stent member attached to the proximal end of the tubular graft member,
    wherein the stent member wraps in a generally cylindrical configuration around the tubular graft member,
    wherein the stent member is self-expanding from a collapsed configuration to an expanded configuration, and
    wherein a diameter of the stent member in the expanded configuration is larger than the natural lumen diameter of the body lumen; and
    a plurality of anchors attached to the stent member, wherein each anchor protrudes away from the tubular graft member and in a direction toward the distal end of the tubular graft member.
  27. 27. The device of claim 26, further comprising an outer graft member made of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, wherein the stent member is sandwiched between the tubular graft member and the outer graft member, and wherein the outer graft member and the tubular graft member are attached to each other through openings in the stent member, to attach the stent member to the proximal end of the tubular graft member.
US12362755 1996-12-23 2009-01-30 Implant Deployment Apparatus Abandoned US20090138066A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08772373 US6352561B1 (en) 1996-12-23 1996-12-23 Implant deployment apparatus
US09985498 US20020029077A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2001-11-05 Implant deployment apparatus
US12362755 US20090138066A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2009-01-30 Implant Deployment Apparatus

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12362755 US20090138066A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2009-01-30 Implant Deployment Apparatus
US14082908 US20140074218A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2013-11-18 Implant deployment apparatus

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09985498 Continuation US20020029077A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2001-11-05 Implant deployment apparatus

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14082908 Division US20140074218A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2013-11-18 Implant deployment apparatus

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090138066A1 true true US20090138066A1 (en) 2009-05-28

Family

ID=25094855

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08772373 Expired - Lifetime US6352561B1 (en) 1996-12-23 1996-12-23 Implant deployment apparatus
US09985498 Abandoned US20020029077A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2001-11-05 Implant deployment apparatus
US12362755 Abandoned US20090138066A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2009-01-30 Implant Deployment Apparatus
US14082908 Abandoned US20140074218A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2013-11-18 Implant deployment apparatus

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08772373 Expired - Lifetime US6352561B1 (en) 1996-12-23 1996-12-23 Implant deployment apparatus
US09985498 Abandoned US20020029077A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2001-11-05 Implant deployment apparatus

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14082908 Abandoned US20140074218A1 (en) 1996-12-23 2013-11-18 Implant deployment apparatus

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (4) US6352561B1 (en)
EP (2) EP0971642B1 (en)
JP (4) JP4327256B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2275921C (en)
DE (1) DE69739148D1 (en)
WO (1) WO1998027894A8 (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090125092A1 (en) * 1995-03-10 2009-05-14 C.R. Bard, Inc. Methods for making an encapsulated stent and intraluminal delivery thereof
US20100305590A1 (en) * 2009-05-29 2010-12-02 Gi Dynamics, Inc. Transpyloric Anchoring
US20120165915A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Cook Incorporated (d/b/a Cook Critical Care Incorporated) Emergency vascular repair prosthesis deployment system
WO2012150941A1 (en) * 2011-05-05 2012-11-08 Eva Corporation Apparatus and method for delivering a surgical fastener
US20140172067A1 (en) * 2012-02-23 2014-06-19 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
WO2014111911A1 (en) * 2013-01-18 2014-07-24 Javelin Medical Ltd. Monofilament implants and systems for delivery thereof
US9192498B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2015-11-24 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9220588B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2015-12-29 Javelin Medical Ltd. Systems, methods and devices for embolic protection
US9474639B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2016-10-25 Covidien Lp Delivery of medical devices
CN106132357A (en) * 2014-04-04 2016-11-16 W.L.戈尔及同仁股份有限公司 Method of manufacturing a deployment handle of a medical device deployment system
US9592110B1 (en) 2013-12-06 2017-03-14 Javelin Medical, Ltd. Systems and methods for implant delivery
US9724222B2 (en) 2012-07-20 2017-08-08 Covidien Lp Resheathable stent delivery system
US9782186B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2017-10-10 Covidien Lp Vascular intervention system
US9849014B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2017-12-26 Covidien Lp Medical device delivery

Families Citing this family (258)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6331188B1 (en) * 1994-08-31 2001-12-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US20020156523A1 (en) * 1994-08-31 2002-10-24 Lilip Lau Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
JP3409100B2 (en) * 1995-07-14 2003-05-19 株式会社リコー Method for producing a toner
US6814747B2 (en) * 1995-09-08 2004-11-09 Anthony Walter Anson Surgical graft/stent system
US6042605A (en) 1995-12-14 2000-03-28 Gore Enterprose Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant stent-graft
US6352561B1 (en) * 1996-12-23 2002-03-05 W. L. Gore & Associates Implant deployment apparatus
US6551350B1 (en) 1996-12-23 2003-04-22 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant bifurcated prosthesis
US5906759A (en) 1996-12-26 1999-05-25 Medinol Ltd. Stent forming apparatus with stent deforming blades
US6951572B1 (en) * 1997-02-20 2005-10-04 Endologix, Inc. Bifurcated vascular graft and method and apparatus for deploying same
US6395019B2 (en) 1998-02-09 2002-05-28 Trivascular, Inc. Endovascular graft
US6224627B1 (en) * 1998-06-15 2001-05-01 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Remotely removable covering and support
US6514281B1 (en) 1998-09-04 2003-02-04 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. System for delivering bifurcation stents
WO2000015151A1 (en) * 1998-09-16 2000-03-23 Isostent, Inc. Linkage stent
US20110087320A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2011-04-14 Aptus Endosystems, Inc. Devices, Systems, and Methods for Prosthesis Delivery and Implantation, Including a Prosthesis Assembly
US20090112302A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2009-04-30 Josh Stafford Devices, systems, and methods for endovascular staple and/or prosthesis delivery and implantation
US9320503B2 (en) * 2001-11-28 2016-04-26 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Devices, system, and methods for guiding an operative tool into an interior body region
US7491232B2 (en) * 1998-09-18 2009-02-17 Aptus Endosystems, Inc. Catheter-based fastener implantation apparatus and methods with implantation force resolution
EP1117341B1 (en) * 1998-09-30 2004-12-29 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Delivery mechanism for implantable stent
US6475234B1 (en) * 1998-10-26 2002-11-05 Medinol, Ltd. Balloon expandable covered stents
US6660030B2 (en) * 1998-12-11 2003-12-09 Endologix, Inc. Bifurcation graft deployment catheter
US6254609B1 (en) * 1999-01-11 2001-07-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Self-expanding stent delivery system with two sheaths
DE60027999T2 (en) 1999-01-22 2007-04-26 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc., Newark coated endoprosthesis
US6673102B1 (en) 1999-01-22 2004-01-06 Gore Enterprises Holdings, Inc. Covered endoprosthesis and delivery system
EP1073385A2 (en) * 1999-01-22 2001-02-07 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. A biliary stent-graft
DE60037691T2 (en) * 1999-01-22 2009-01-02 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc., Newark A method for compressing an endoprosthesis
US6187054B1 (en) 1999-02-04 2001-02-13 Endomed Inc. Method of making large diameter vascular prosteheses and a vascular prosthesis made by said method
US6261316B1 (en) 1999-03-11 2001-07-17 Endologix, Inc. Single puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
US8034100B2 (en) 1999-03-11 2011-10-11 Endologix, Inc. Graft deployment system
EP1095635A4 (en) * 1999-05-06 2007-06-20 Kanji Inoue Apparatus for folding instrument and use of the same apparatus
US6364904B1 (en) 1999-07-02 2002-04-02 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Helically formed stent/graft assembly
US6652570B2 (en) 1999-07-02 2003-11-25 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Composite vascular graft
US6402779B1 (en) 1999-07-26 2002-06-11 Endomed, Inc. Balloon-assisted intraluminal stent graft
US6183481B1 (en) * 1999-09-22 2001-02-06 Endomed Inc. Delivery system for self-expanding stents and grafts
GB9925447D0 (en) * 1999-10-27 1999-12-29 Anson Medical Ltd Tubular medical implants and methods for manufacture
GB9925636D0 (en) * 1999-10-29 1999-12-29 Angiomed Ag Method of, and device for, installing a stent in a sleeve
US6428569B1 (en) * 1999-11-09 2002-08-06 Scimed Life Systems Inc. Micro structure stent configurations
US6312458B1 (en) * 2000-01-19 2001-11-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Tubular structure/stent/stent securement member
US6602280B2 (en) * 2000-02-02 2003-08-05 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for expandable intracorporeal device
US6746426B1 (en) * 2000-07-11 2004-06-08 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Transluminally deliverable vascular blockers and methods for facilitating retrograde flow of arterial blood through veins
US6899727B2 (en) 2001-01-22 2005-05-31 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Deployment system for intraluminal devices
US20040138734A1 (en) * 2001-04-11 2004-07-15 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for bifurcated graft
US6761733B2 (en) * 2001-04-11 2004-07-13 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for bifurcated endovascular graft
US6733521B2 (en) 2001-04-11 2004-05-11 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for endovascular graft
US6800090B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2004-10-05 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve therapy device, system and method
US6676702B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2004-01-13 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve therapy assembly and method
US7338514B2 (en) 2001-06-01 2008-03-04 St. Jude Medical, Cardiology Division, Inc. Closure devices, related delivery methods and tools, and related methods of use
US6878153B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2005-04-12 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Methods, systems, and devices for providing embolic protection and removing embolic material
US6951570B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2005-10-04 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Methods, systems, and devices for deploying a filter from a filter device
US6962598B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2005-11-08 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Methods, systems, and devices for providing embolic protection
US6997939B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2006-02-14 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Methods, systems, and devices for deploying an embolic protection filter
JP4512362B2 (en) 2001-07-06 2010-07-28 アンギオメット ゲゼルシャフト ミット ベシュレンクテル ハフツング ウント コムパニー メディツィンテヒニク コマンデイトゲゼルシャフト Delivery system with a rapid pusher assembly and stent exchanged forms of self-expanding stents
CA2457860C (en) 2001-08-23 2010-03-16 Darrel C. Gumm Rotating stent delivery system for side branch access and protection and method of using same
WO2003022344A3 (en) * 2001-09-06 2003-07-31 Nmt Medical Inc Flexible delivery system
US20030050684A1 (en) * 2001-09-10 2003-03-13 Abrams Robert M. Internal restraint for delivery of self-expanding stents
GB0123633D0 (en) 2001-10-02 2001-11-21 Angiomed Ag Stent delivery system
US7635387B2 (en) * 2001-11-01 2009-12-22 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Adjustable height focal tissue deflector
US6949122B2 (en) * 2001-11-01 2005-09-27 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Focused compression mitral valve device and method
US20050177180A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2005-08-11 Aptus Endosystems, Inc. Devices, systems, and methods for supporting tissue and/or structures within a hollow body organ
CA2464048C (en) 2001-11-28 2010-06-15 Lee Bolduc Endovascular aneurysm repair system
US8231639B2 (en) 2001-11-28 2012-07-31 Aptus Endosystems, Inc. Systems and methods for attaching a prosthesis within a body lumen or hollow organ
CN101466316B (en) 2005-10-20 2012-06-27 阿普特斯内系统公司 Devices systems and methods for prosthesis delivery and implantation including the use of a fastener tool
US6908478B2 (en) * 2001-12-05 2005-06-21 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Anchor and pull mitral valve device and method
US7179282B2 (en) * 2001-12-05 2007-02-20 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US20100016943A1 (en) 2001-12-20 2010-01-21 Trivascular2, Inc. Method of delivering advanced endovascular graft
US6723116B2 (en) * 2002-01-14 2004-04-20 Syde A. Taheri Exclusion of ascending/descending aorta and/or aortic arch aneurysm
US6939368B2 (en) 2002-01-17 2005-09-06 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Delivery system for self expanding stents for use in bifurcated vessels
US6976995B2 (en) * 2002-01-30 2005-12-20 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Fixed length anchor and pull mitral valve device and method
US6960229B2 (en) * 2002-01-30 2005-11-01 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US7311729B2 (en) 2002-01-30 2007-12-25 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US20050209690A1 (en) * 2002-01-30 2005-09-22 Mathis Mark L Body lumen shaping device with cardiac leads
JP4926980B2 (en) * 2005-01-20 2012-05-09 カーディアック ディメンションズ インコーポレイテッド Organization shaping device
US7004958B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2006-02-28 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Transvenous staples, assembly and method for mitral valve repair
US6797001B2 (en) 2002-03-11 2004-09-28 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device, assembly and method for mitral valve repair
US20030204248A1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2003-10-30 Murphy Kieran P. Device viewable under an imaging beam
US20030181810A1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2003-09-25 Murphy Kieran P. Kit for image guided surgical procedures
US7927368B2 (en) * 2002-03-25 2011-04-19 Kieran Murphy Llc Device viewable under an imaging beam
US20050049672A1 (en) * 2003-03-24 2005-03-03 Murphy Kieran P. Stent delivery system and method using a balloon for a self-expandable stent
US9375203B2 (en) 2002-03-25 2016-06-28 Kieran Murphy Llc Biopsy needle
US6824562B2 (en) * 2002-05-08 2004-11-30 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Body lumen device anchor, device and assembly
DE60325356D1 (en) * 2002-05-08 2009-01-29 Cardiac Dimensions Inc Means for changing the shape of a mitral valve
US20030236565A1 (en) * 2002-06-21 2003-12-25 Dimatteo Kristian Implantable prosthesis
US20040015224A1 (en) 2002-07-22 2004-01-22 Armstrong Joseph R. Endoluminal expansion system
US20040044351A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-03-04 Gary Searle Mechanical occluding device
US20040143288A1 (en) * 2002-08-27 2004-07-22 Gary Searle Mechanical occluding and dilation device for a vessel
US7837729B2 (en) * 2002-12-05 2010-11-23 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Percutaneous mitral valve annuloplasty delivery system
US7316708B2 (en) * 2002-12-05 2008-01-08 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Medical device delivery system
US6984242B2 (en) * 2002-12-20 2006-01-10 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Implantable medical device assembly
US7901448B2 (en) * 2002-12-24 2011-03-08 Novostent Corporation Vascular prothesis having interdigitating edges and methods of use
US6793673B2 (en) 2002-12-26 2004-09-21 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. System and method to effect mitral valve annulus of a heart
US8568467B2 (en) 2003-01-15 2013-10-29 Angiomed Gmbh & Co. Medizintechnik Kg Trans-luminal surgical device
US20060058866A1 (en) 2003-01-17 2006-03-16 Cully Edward H Deployment system for an expandable device
US6702845B1 (en) 2003-01-17 2004-03-09 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Compacted implantable medical devices and method of compacting such devices
US7198636B2 (en) 2003-01-17 2007-04-03 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Deployment system for an endoluminal device
US7753945B2 (en) * 2003-01-17 2010-07-13 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Deployment system for an endoluminal device
US7314485B2 (en) * 2003-02-03 2008-01-01 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve device using conditioned shape memory alloy
US20040158321A1 (en) * 2003-02-12 2004-08-12 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Method of implanting a mitral valve therapy device
FR2853829B1 (en) * 2003-04-16 2005-07-08 Cie Euro Etude Rech Paroscopie Kit for introducing an intragastric implant, etui insertion of such an implant and method of manufacture corresponding
US20040220612A1 (en) * 2003-04-30 2004-11-04 Swainston Kyle W Slidable capture catheter
US20060161169A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2006-07-20 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc., A Delaware Corporation Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US20040220654A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2004-11-04 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US20040225349A1 (en) * 2003-05-09 2004-11-11 Thistle Robert C. Eversible locking mechanism for modular stents
US7101390B2 (en) * 2003-05-27 2006-09-05 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Staged deployment endograft
US7887582B2 (en) * 2003-06-05 2011-02-15 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US7351259B2 (en) * 2003-06-05 2008-04-01 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Device, system and method to affect the mitral valve annulus of a heart
ES2350912T3 (en) * 2003-07-17 2011-01-28 Gunze Limited Suture reinforcement material for an automatic suturing.
FR2857578B1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2007-02-09 Cie Eu Etude Rech Dispositifs Kit for introducing a plastic surgery implant, etui insertion of such an implant and method of manufacture corresponding
US7699865B2 (en) * 2003-09-12 2010-04-20 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Actuating constraining mechanism
US8535344B2 (en) * 2003-09-12 2013-09-17 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Methods, systems, and devices for providing embolic protection and removing embolic material
WO2005032340A3 (en) 2003-09-29 2006-08-03 Secant Medical Llc Integral support stent graft assembly
US20050149093A1 (en) * 2003-10-30 2005-07-07 Pokorney James L. Valve bypass graft device, tools, and method
US20050131515A1 (en) * 2003-12-16 2005-06-16 Cully Edward H. Removable stent-graft
US7837728B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2010-11-23 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Reduced length tissue shaping device
US20050137450A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-23 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc., A Washington Corporation Tapered connector for tissue shaping device
US20050137449A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-06-23 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Tissue shaping device with self-expanding anchors
US7794496B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2010-09-14 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Tissue shaping device with integral connector and crimp
US9526616B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2016-12-27 Cardiac Dimensions Pty. Ltd. Mitral valve annuloplasty device with twisted anchor
US9254213B2 (en) * 2004-01-09 2016-02-09 Rubicon Medical, Inc. Stent delivery device
US20060106447A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2006-05-18 Nmt Medical, Inc. Adjustable stiffness medical system
US7744619B2 (en) * 2004-02-24 2010-06-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Rotatable catheter assembly
US7922740B2 (en) 2004-02-24 2011-04-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Rotatable catheter assembly
US7846171B2 (en) 2004-05-27 2010-12-07 C.R. Bard, Inc. Method and apparatus for delivering a prosthetic fabric into a patient
US7727271B2 (en) * 2004-06-24 2010-06-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Implantable prosthesis having reinforced attachment sites
US8308789B2 (en) 2004-07-16 2012-11-13 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Deployment system for intraluminal devices
CN100352406C (en) * 2004-08-17 2007-12-05 微创医疗器械(上海)有限公司 Combined membrane-covered stent capable of being bent in any direction
JP4565956B2 (en) * 2004-10-06 2010-10-20 泉工医科工業株式会社 Stent graft delivery device
US7699883B2 (en) * 2004-10-25 2010-04-20 Myles Douglas Vascular graft and deployment system
US7381048B2 (en) * 2005-04-12 2008-06-03 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stents with profiles for gripping a balloon catheter and molds for fabricating stents
JP4917089B2 (en) 2005-05-09 2012-04-18 アンギオメット ゲゼルシャフト ミット ベシュレンクテル ハフツング ウント コムパニー メディツィンテヒニク コマンデイトゲゼルシャフト Implant delivery device
US7963988B2 (en) * 2005-06-23 2011-06-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. ePTFE lamination—resizing ePTFE tubing
JP5203192B2 (en) * 2005-07-27 2013-06-05 クック メディカル テクノロジーズ エルエルシーCook Medical Technologies Llc The stent-graft device and method for placement in open surgery
US8172895B2 (en) * 2005-08-18 2012-05-08 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Design and assembly of fenestrated stent grafts
US8968379B2 (en) * 2005-09-02 2015-03-03 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Stent delivery system with multiple evenly spaced pullwires
WO2007030433B1 (en) * 2005-09-06 2007-08-23 David J Callaghan Jr Removable intracardiac rf device
US9259267B2 (en) 2005-09-06 2016-02-16 W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Devices and methods for treating cardiac tissue
WO2007035895A3 (en) * 2005-09-21 2007-05-10 Cook Inc Endoluminal stent graft delivery assembly
WO2007054015A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-18 Ning Wen An artificial heart valve stent and weaving method thereof
WO2007054014A1 (en) * 2005-11-09 2007-05-18 Ning Wen Delivery device for delivering a self-expanding stent
EP1973501B1 (en) 2006-01-18 2013-10-16 William A. Cook Australia Pty. Ltd. Self expanding stent
US9375215B2 (en) * 2006-01-20 2016-06-28 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Device for rapid repair of body conduits
US20070179586A1 (en) * 2006-01-31 2007-08-02 Gus Aguirre Deployment catheter for medical implant devices
CN101045022B (en) * 2006-03-30 2010-08-25 温宁;金磊 Self-expanding stent axial wire-drawing tensioning mechanism
US20070239255A1 (en) * 2006-04-07 2007-10-11 Richard Allen Hines System and device for helical stent delivery
US7503932B2 (en) * 2006-04-11 2009-03-17 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve annuloplasty device with vena cava anchor
US20070244494A1 (en) * 2006-04-18 2007-10-18 Downing Stephen W Methods and devices for treating atrial septal defects
US8406901B2 (en) * 2006-04-27 2013-03-26 Medtronic, Inc. Sutureless implantable medical device fixation
US8021408B2 (en) * 2006-05-15 2011-09-20 S&G Biotech, Inc. Inserting device of artificial blood stent
US8753384B2 (en) * 2006-05-19 2014-06-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for loading and delivering a stent
US8834550B2 (en) 2006-05-19 2014-09-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for loading and delivering a stent using a suture retaining mechanism
US20080071343A1 (en) * 2006-09-15 2008-03-20 Kevin John Mayberry Multi-segmented graft deployment system
US7854849B2 (en) * 2006-10-10 2010-12-21 Multiphase Systems Integration Compact multiphase inline bulk water separation method and system for hydrocarbon production
US9492657B2 (en) * 2006-11-30 2016-11-15 Medtronic, Inc. Method of implanting a medical device including a fixation element
US7765012B2 (en) * 2006-11-30 2010-07-27 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device including a conductive fixation element
US8523931B2 (en) * 2007-01-12 2013-09-03 Endologix, Inc. Dual concentric guidewire and methods of bifurcated graft deployment
US9717584B2 (en) * 2007-04-13 2017-08-01 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Medical apparatus and method of making the same
US9642693B2 (en) * 2007-04-13 2017-05-09 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Medical apparatus and method of making the same
US20080255678A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-16 Cully Edward H Medical apparatus and method of making the same
US8273115B2 (en) * 2007-04-24 2012-09-25 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Side branched endoluminal prostheses and methods of delivery thereof
US9358142B2 (en) 2007-04-24 2016-06-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Catheter having guidewire channel
US7967788B2 (en) 2007-05-25 2011-06-28 Iq Medical Devices, Llc Catheter with variable attachment means
US9656009B2 (en) * 2007-07-11 2017-05-23 California Institute Of Technology Cardiac assist system using helical arrangement of contractile bands and helically-twisting cardiac assist device
US20090043376A1 (en) * 2007-08-08 2009-02-12 Hamer Rochelle M Endoluminal Prosthetic Conduit Systems and Method of Coupling
US8906081B2 (en) 2007-09-13 2014-12-09 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Stented vascular graft
US8226701B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2012-07-24 Trivascular, Inc. Stent and delivery system for deployment thereof
US8066755B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2011-11-29 Trivascular, Inc. System and method of pivoted stent deployment
US8663309B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2014-03-04 Trivascular, Inc. Asymmetric stent apparatus and method
JP2011500283A (en) * 2007-10-26 2011-01-06 クック クリティカル ケア インコーポレーテッドCook Critical Care Incorporated Vascular conduit and delivery system installed in an open surgery
US8328861B2 (en) 2007-11-16 2012-12-11 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery system and method for bifurcated graft
US8083789B2 (en) 2007-11-16 2011-12-27 Trivascular, Inc. Securement assembly and method for expandable endovascular device
US8845712B2 (en) * 2008-01-15 2014-09-30 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Pleated deployment sheath
US20090209944A1 (en) * 2008-02-14 2009-08-20 Cook Incorporated Component of an implantable medical device comprising an oxide dispersion strengthened (ods) metal alloy
WO2009105699A1 (en) 2008-02-22 2009-08-27 Endologix, Inc. Design and method of placement of a graft or graft system
WO2009122299A3 (en) * 2008-04-03 2009-12-23 Gardia Medical Ltd. Delivery catheter with constraining sheath and methods of deploying medical devices into a body lumen
US8236040B2 (en) 2008-04-11 2012-08-07 Endologix, Inc. Bifurcated graft deployment systems and methods
WO2009148594A1 (en) * 2008-06-04 2009-12-10 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Controlled deployable medical device and method of making the same
JP5536764B2 (en) 2008-06-04 2014-07-02 ゴア エンタープライズ ホールディングス,インコーポレイティド Control deployable medical device and a manufacturing method thereof
US9750625B2 (en) * 2008-06-11 2017-09-05 C.R. Bard, Inc. Catheter delivery device
EP2520320B1 (en) 2008-07-01 2016-11-02 Endologix, Inc. Catheter system
US8006594B2 (en) * 2008-08-11 2011-08-30 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Catheter cutting tool
US8133199B2 (en) 2008-08-27 2012-03-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Electroactive polymer activation system for a medical device
JP5733759B2 (en) * 2008-08-28 2015-06-10 カルロス ヴォンダーウォールデ Intravascular instrument for the expansion with directionality
GB0822110D0 (en) 2008-12-03 2009-01-07 Angiomed Ag Catheter sheath for implant delivery
US8444669B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2013-05-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Embolic filter delivery system and method
US20100152711A1 (en) * 2008-12-15 2010-06-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Offset coupling region
US8858610B2 (en) * 2009-01-19 2014-10-14 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Forced deployment sequence
US8292941B2 (en) * 2009-04-23 2012-10-23 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Delivery system for deployment of a one-piece iliac-branch device
US8945202B2 (en) 2009-04-28 2015-02-03 Endologix, Inc. Fenestrated prosthesis
US9579103B2 (en) 2009-05-01 2017-02-28 Endologix, Inc. Percutaneous method and device to treat dissections
US8435282B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2013-05-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Tube with reverse necking properties
US8491646B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2013-07-23 Endologix, Inc. Stent graft
US8936634B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2015-01-20 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Self constraining radially expandable medical devices
ES2549000T3 (en) 2009-07-27 2015-10-22 Endologix, Inc. endoprosthesis
US20110218613A1 (en) * 2009-09-10 2011-09-08 Novostent Corporation Vascular Prosthesis Assembly with Retention Mechanism and Method
US8474120B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2013-07-02 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Bifurcated highly conformable medical device branch access
US20110190870A1 (en) * 2009-12-30 2011-08-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Covered Stent for Vascular Closure
US20110218617A1 (en) * 2010-03-02 2011-09-08 Endologix, Inc. Endoluminal vascular prosthesis
US20110224785A1 (en) 2010-03-10 2011-09-15 Hacohen Gil Prosthetic mitral valve with tissue anchors
EP2470114B8 (en) * 2010-04-23 2016-03-30 Cook Medical Technologies LLC Curve forming stent graft
US8333800B2 (en) * 2010-04-29 2012-12-18 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Mobile external coupling with internal sealing cuff for branch vessel connection
US9125655B2 (en) 2010-07-16 2015-09-08 California Institute Of Technology Correction and optimization of wave reflection in blood vessels
US9763657B2 (en) 2010-07-21 2017-09-19 Mitraltech Ltd. Techniques for percutaneous mitral valve replacement and sealing
CN102370532B (en) * 2010-08-13 2015-06-17 黄连军 Collateral type tectorial membrane support frame conveyor as well as installing method
GB201017834D0 (en) * 2010-10-21 2010-12-01 Angiomed Ag System to deliver a bodily implant
US9468547B2 (en) * 2010-11-11 2016-10-18 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Deployment of endoluminal devices
US9414944B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2016-08-16 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Deployment sleeve shortening mechanism
US20120130475A1 (en) * 2010-11-16 2012-05-24 Shaw Edward E Sleeves for expandable medical devices
US9095466B2 (en) 2010-11-16 2015-08-04 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Apposition fiber for use in endoluminal deployment of expandable devices in tortuous anatomies
WO2012068298A1 (en) 2010-11-17 2012-05-24 Endologix, Inc. Devices and methods to treat vascular dissections
US9775982B2 (en) 2010-12-29 2017-10-03 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device fixation
US9839540B2 (en) 2011-01-14 2017-12-12 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Stent
US20130131780A1 (en) 2011-11-16 2013-05-23 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Lattice
US8641752B1 (en) 2011-01-20 2014-02-04 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Integrated sheath and deployment
US9243353B2 (en) 2011-01-26 2016-01-26 Asahi Kasei Fibers Corp. Stent grafts
WO2012118901A1 (en) 2011-03-01 2012-09-07 Endologix, Inc. Catheter system and methods of using same
CN102166143B (en) * 2011-05-23 2014-04-09 先健科技(深圳)有限公司 Device for conveying bracket in operation
GB201109315D0 (en) * 2011-06-03 2011-07-20 Vascutek Ltd Prosthesis
JP5719327B2 (en) * 2011-06-24 2015-05-13 クック・メディカル・テクノロジーズ・リミテッド・ライアビリティ・カンパニーCook Medical Technologies Llc Helical stent
US20130018450A1 (en) * 2011-07-13 2013-01-17 Hunt James B Prosthesis delivery system with retention sleeve
US20140324164A1 (en) * 2011-08-05 2014-10-30 Mitraltech Ltd. Techniques for percutaneous mitral valve replacement and sealing
US8852272B2 (en) 2011-08-05 2014-10-07 Mitraltech Ltd. Techniques for percutaneous mitral valve replacement and sealing
US9227388B2 (en) 2011-10-10 2016-01-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Devices and methods for attaching support frames to substrates
US9877858B2 (en) 2011-11-14 2018-01-30 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. External steerable fiber for use in endoluminal deployment of expandable devices
US9782282B2 (en) * 2011-11-14 2017-10-10 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. External steerable fiber for use in endoluminal deployment of expandable devices
US9387097B2 (en) * 2011-11-16 2016-07-12 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Implant assembly with tactile indicator
US8945200B1 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-02-03 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Iliac bifurcated endoprosthesis medical apparatus and method of deploying same
US9364359B2 (en) 2011-12-08 2016-06-14 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Systems and methods for delivery of a medical device
US9629737B2 (en) 2011-12-23 2017-04-25 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Delivery system for staged stent release
US9687371B2 (en) * 2012-02-14 2017-06-27 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Endoprosthesis having aligned legs for ease of cannulation
US9375308B2 (en) * 2012-03-13 2016-06-28 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. External steerable fiber for use in endoluminal deployment of expandable devices
US9833625B2 (en) 2012-03-26 2017-12-05 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device delivery with inner and outer sheaths
US9220906B2 (en) 2012-03-26 2015-12-29 Medtronic, Inc. Tethered implantable medical device deployment
US9339197B2 (en) 2012-03-26 2016-05-17 Medtronic, Inc. Intravascular implantable medical device introduction
US9854982B2 (en) 2012-03-26 2018-01-02 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device deployment within a vessel
US9717421B2 (en) 2012-03-26 2017-08-01 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device delivery catheter with tether
US9636241B2 (en) * 2012-03-30 2017-05-02 Manli International Ltd Coil bioabsorbable stents
US8992595B2 (en) 2012-04-04 2015-03-31 Trivascular, Inc. Durable stent graft with tapered struts and stable delivery methods and devices
EP2833829A1 (en) * 2012-04-06 2015-02-11 TriVascular, Inc. Low profile stent graft and delivery system
US9192462B2 (en) 2012-04-06 2015-11-24 Trivascular, Inc. Low profile stent graft and delivery system
US9498363B2 (en) 2012-04-06 2016-11-22 Trivascular, Inc. Delivery catheter for endovascular device
US9393140B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2016-07-19 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Reconfigurable stent-graft delivery system and method of use
US9737394B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2017-08-22 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Stent-graft prosthesis for placement in the abdominal aorta
US9452069B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2016-09-27 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Reconfigurable stent-graft delivery system and method of use
US8968384B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2015-03-03 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Circumferentially constraining sutures for a stent-graft
US9486349B2 (en) * 2012-08-10 2016-11-08 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Systems and methods of deployment of endoluminal devices
US9351648B2 (en) 2012-08-24 2016-05-31 Medtronic, Inc. Implantable medical device electrode assembly
US20140120287A1 (en) 2012-10-30 2014-05-01 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Sleeve for medical device assembly
US8628571B1 (en) 2012-11-13 2014-01-14 Mitraltech Ltd. Percutaneously-deliverable mechanical valve
US9622893B2 (en) 2012-12-20 2017-04-18 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Apparatus and method for improved deployment of endovascular grafts
EP2948103A2 (en) 2013-01-24 2015-12-02 Mitraltech Ltd. Ventricularly-anchored prosthetic valves
US9763819B1 (en) 2013-03-05 2017-09-19 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Tapered sleeve
DE102013106463A1 (en) * 2013-06-20 2014-12-24 Jotec Gmbh stent graft
JP5747098B2 (en) * 2014-03-27 2015-07-08 京セラメディカル株式会社 Artificial joint replacement surgical equipment
US9849012B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2017-12-26 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Port retention mechanism for deployment handle of a medical device deployment system
US9833346B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2017-12-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Deployment handle for a medical device deployment system
US20150282967A1 (en) 2014-04-04 2015-10-08 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Delivery and deployment systems for bifurcated stent grafts
US20150313738A1 (en) 2014-05-02 2015-11-05 W. L. Gore & Associates. Inc. Push and pull medical device delivery system
US20160045348A1 (en) 2014-08-12 2016-02-18 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Handle for medical device deployment
CN205612594U (en) * 2016-03-15 2016-10-05 北京奇伦天佑创业投资有限公司 Take ramose tectorial membrane support and implantation system thereof
USD800908S1 (en) 2016-08-10 2017-10-24 Mitraltech Ltd. Prosthetic valve element

Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2638093A (en) * 1949-12-20 1953-05-12 Kulick George Vaginal insert
US3029819A (en) * 1959-07-30 1962-04-17 J L Mcatee Artery graft and method of producing artery grafts
US3096560A (en) * 1958-11-21 1963-07-09 William J Liebig Process for synthetic vascular implants
US3142067A (en) * 1958-11-21 1964-07-28 William J Liebig Synthetic vascular implants
US3152618A (en) * 1959-03-30 1964-10-13 Dayco Corp Flexible conduit
US3174851A (en) * 1961-12-01 1965-03-23 William J Buehler Nickel-base alloys
US3351463A (en) * 1965-08-20 1967-11-07 Alexander G Rozner High strength nickel-base alloys
US3479670A (en) * 1966-10-19 1969-11-25 Ethicon Inc Tubular prosthetic implant having helical thermoplastic wrapping therearound
US3514791A (en) * 1967-07-25 1970-06-02 Charles H Sparks Tissue grafts
US3562820A (en) * 1966-08-22 1971-02-16 Bernhard Braun Tubular sheet and strip form prostheses on a basis of biological tissue
US3657744A (en) * 1970-05-08 1972-04-25 Univ Minnesota Method for fixing prosthetic implants in a living body
US3710777A (en) * 1970-12-23 1973-01-16 C Sparks Method and apparatus for growing graft tubes in place
US4118806A (en) * 1976-02-04 1978-10-10 Thermo Electron Corporation Prosthetic blood vessel
US4140126A (en) * 1977-02-18 1979-02-20 Choudhury M Hasan Method for performing aneurysm repair
US4164045A (en) * 1977-08-03 1979-08-14 Carbomedics, Inc. Artificial vascular and patch grafts
US4187390A (en) * 1970-05-21 1980-02-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Porous products and process therefor
US4300244A (en) * 1979-09-19 1981-11-17 Carbomedics, Inc. Cardiovascular grafts
US4319363A (en) * 1978-05-23 1982-03-16 Vettivetpillai Ketharanathan Vascular prostheses
US4355426A (en) * 1975-05-09 1982-10-26 Macgregor David C Porous flexible vascular graft
US4411655A (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-10-25 Schreck David M Apparatus and method for percutaneous catheterization
US4424208A (en) * 1982-01-11 1984-01-03 Collagen Corporation Collagen implant material and method for augmenting soft tissue
US4425908A (en) * 1981-10-22 1984-01-17 Beth Israel Hospital Blood clot filter
US4494531A (en) * 1982-12-06 1985-01-22 Cook, Incorporated Expandable blood clot filter
US4502159A (en) * 1982-08-12 1985-03-05 Shiley Incorporated Tubular prostheses prepared from pericardial tissue
US4503569A (en) * 1983-03-03 1985-03-12 Dotter Charles T Transluminally placed expandable graft prosthesis
US4512338A (en) * 1983-01-25 1985-04-23 Balko Alexander B Process for restoring patency to body vessels
US4530113A (en) * 1983-05-20 1985-07-23 Intervascular, Inc. Vascular grafts with cross-weave patterns
US4546500A (en) * 1981-05-08 1985-10-15 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Fabrication of living blood vessels and glandular tissues
US4562596A (en) * 1984-04-25 1986-01-07 Elliot Kornberg Aortic graft, device and method for performing an intraluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair
US4580568A (en) * 1984-10-01 1986-04-08 Cook, Incorporated Percutaneous endovascular stent and method for insertion thereof
US4582640A (en) * 1982-03-08 1986-04-15 Collagen Corporation Injectable cross-linked collagen implant material
US4592754A (en) * 1983-09-09 1986-06-03 Gupte Pradeep M Surgical prosthetic vessel graft and catheter combination and method
US4604762A (en) * 1981-02-13 1986-08-12 Thoratec Laboratories Corporation Arterial graft prosthesis
US4617932A (en) * 1984-04-25 1986-10-21 Elliot Kornberg Device and method for performing an intraluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair
US4795458A (en) * 1987-07-02 1989-01-03 Regan Barrie F Stent for use following balloon angioplasty
US4798606A (en) * 1985-02-26 1989-01-17 Corvita Corporation Reinforcing structure for cardiovascular graft
US4800882A (en) * 1987-03-13 1989-01-31 Cook Incorporated Endovascular stent and delivery system
US4816339A (en) * 1987-04-28 1989-03-28 Baxter International Inc. Multi-layered poly(tetrafluoroethylene)/elastomer materials useful for in vivo implantation
US4816028A (en) * 1987-07-01 1989-03-28 Indu Kapadia Woven vascular graft
US4820298A (en) * 1987-11-20 1989-04-11 Leveen Eric G Internal vascular prosthesis
US4830003A (en) * 1988-06-17 1989-05-16 Wolff Rodney G Compressive stent and delivery system
US4842575A (en) * 1984-01-30 1989-06-27 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Method for forming impregnated synthetic vascular grafts
US4856516A (en) * 1989-01-09 1989-08-15 Cordis Corporation Endovascular stent apparatus and method
US4877025A (en) * 1988-10-06 1989-10-31 Hanson Donald W Tracheostomy tube valve apparatus
US4892539A (en) * 1988-02-08 1990-01-09 D-R Medical Systems, Inc. Vascular graft
US4913141A (en) * 1988-10-25 1990-04-03 Cordis Corporation Apparatus and method for placement of a stent within a subject vessel
US4921479A (en) * 1987-10-02 1990-05-01 Joseph Grayzel Catheter sheath with longitudinal seam
US4941870A (en) * 1986-11-10 1990-07-17 Ube-Nitto Kasei Co., Ltd. Method for manufacturing a synthetic vascular prosthesis
US4950227A (en) * 1988-11-07 1990-08-21 Boston Scientific Corporation Stent delivery system
US4955899A (en) * 1989-05-26 1990-09-11 Impra, Inc. Longitudinally compliant vascular graft
US4957508A (en) * 1986-10-31 1990-09-18 Ube Industries, Ltd. Medical tubes
US4957504A (en) * 1988-12-02 1990-09-18 Chardack William M Implantable blood pump
US4990151A (en) * 1988-09-28 1991-02-05 Medinvent S.A. Device for transluminal implantation or extraction
US4990155A (en) * 1989-05-19 1991-02-05 Wilkoff Howard M Surgical stent method and apparatus
US4994071A (en) * 1989-05-22 1991-02-19 Cordis Corporation Bifurcating stent apparatus and method
US5007926A (en) * 1989-02-24 1991-04-16 The Trustees Of The University Of Pennsylvania Expandable transluminally implantable tubular prosthesis
US5015253A (en) * 1989-06-15 1991-05-14 Cordis Corporation Non-woven endoprosthesis
US5019090A (en) * 1988-09-01 1991-05-28 Corvita Corporation Radially expandable endoprosthesis and the like
US5019085A (en) * 1988-10-25 1991-05-28 Cordis Corporation Apparatus and method for placement of a stent within a subject vessel
US5035706A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-07-30 Cook Incorporated Percutaneous stent and method for retrieval thereof
US5037377A (en) * 1984-11-28 1991-08-06 Medtronic, Inc. Means for improving biocompatibility of implants, particularly of vascular grafts
US5037392A (en) * 1989-06-06 1991-08-06 Cordis Corporation Stent-implanting balloon assembly
US5078726A (en) * 1989-02-01 1992-01-07 Kreamer Jeffry W Graft stent and method of repairing blood vessels
US5092877A (en) * 1988-09-01 1992-03-03 Corvita Corporation Radially expandable endoprosthesis
US5100429A (en) * 1989-04-28 1992-03-31 C. R. Bard, Inc. Endovascular stent and delivery system
US5102417A (en) * 1985-11-07 1992-04-07 Expandable Grafts Partnership Expandable intraluminal graft, and method and apparatus for implanting an expandable intraluminal graft
US5104404A (en) * 1989-10-02 1992-04-14 Medtronic, Inc. Articulated stent
US5108424A (en) * 1984-01-30 1992-04-28 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Collagen-impregnated dacron graft
US5122154A (en) * 1990-08-15 1992-06-16 Rhodes Valentine J Endovascular bypass graft
US5123917A (en) * 1990-04-27 1992-06-23 Lee Peter Y Expandable intraluminal vascular graft
US5127919A (en) * 1988-12-14 1992-07-07 Vascutec Corporation Woven vascular graft
US5133732A (en) * 1987-10-19 1992-07-28 Medtronic, Inc. Intravascular stent
US5139480A (en) * 1990-08-22 1992-08-18 Biotech Laboratories, Inc. Necking stents
US5147370A (en) * 1991-06-12 1992-09-15 Mcnamara Thomas O Nitinol stent for hollow body conduits
US5151105A (en) * 1991-10-07 1992-09-29 Kwan Gett Clifford Collapsible vessel sleeve implant
US5156619A (en) * 1990-06-15 1992-10-20 Ehrenfeld William K Flanged end-to-side vascular graft
US5178630A (en) * 1990-08-28 1993-01-12 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Ravel-resistant, self-supporting woven graft
US5192289A (en) * 1989-03-09 1993-03-09 Avatar Design And Development, Inc. Anastomosis stent and stent selection system
US5192984A (en) * 1990-12-19 1993-03-09 Environmental Analytical Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for determination of concentrations
US5197977A (en) * 1984-01-30 1993-03-30 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Drug delivery collagen-impregnated synthetic vascular graft
US5197978A (en) * 1991-04-26 1993-03-30 Advanced Coronary Technology, Inc. Removable heat-recoverable tissue supporting device
US5201757A (en) * 1992-04-03 1993-04-13 Schneider (Usa) Inc. Medial region deployment of radially self-expanding stents
US5209735A (en) * 1988-11-07 1993-05-11 Lazarus Harrison M External guide wire and enlargement means
US5211658A (en) * 1991-11-05 1993-05-18 New England Deaconess Hospital Corporation Method and device for performing endovascular repair of aneurysms
US5213580A (en) * 1988-08-24 1993-05-25 Endoluminal Therapeutics, Inc. Biodegradable polymeric endoluminal sealing process
US5217483A (en) * 1990-11-28 1993-06-08 Numed, Inc. Intravascular radially expandable stent
US5221261A (en) * 1990-04-12 1993-06-22 Schneider (Usa) Inc. Radially expandable fixation member
US5226913A (en) * 1988-09-01 1993-07-13 Corvita Corporation Method of making a radially expandable prosthesis
US5246452A (en) * 1992-04-13 1993-09-21 Impra, Inc. Vascular graft with removable sheath
US5275622A (en) * 1983-12-09 1994-01-04 Harrison Medical Technologies, Inc. Endovascular grafting apparatus, system and method and devices for use therewith
US5276276A (en) * 1988-07-18 1994-01-04 Gunn Dennis R Coil transducer
US5282847A (en) * 1991-02-28 1994-02-01 Medtronic, Inc. Prosthetic vascular grafts with a pleated structure
US5282824A (en) * 1990-10-09 1994-02-01 Cook, Incorporated Percutaneous stent assembly
US5282860A (en) * 1991-10-16 1994-02-01 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Stent tube for medical use
US5397345A (en) * 1983-12-09 1995-03-14 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Artificial graft and implantation method
US5749880A (en) * 1995-03-10 1998-05-12 Impra, Inc. Endoluminal encapsulated stent and methods of manufacture and endoluminal delivery
US5755778A (en) * 1996-10-16 1998-05-26 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Anastomosis device
US20020107561A1 (en) * 1995-06-01 2002-08-08 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Implantable intraluminal prosthesis
US20070067024A1 (en) * 1993-09-30 2007-03-22 White Geoffrey H Intraluminal Graft

Family Cites Families (236)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3625198A (en) 1969-05-09 1971-12-07 Charles H Sparks Die and holder for implanting in a living body to grow tissue grafts
US3753700A (en) 1970-07-02 1973-08-21 Raychem Corp Heat recoverable alloy
US3774596A (en) 1971-06-29 1973-11-27 G Cook Compliable cavity speculum
US3866609A (en) 1972-04-05 1975-02-18 Charles Howard Sparks Apparatus for growing graft tubes in place
US3938524A (en) 1973-06-11 1976-02-17 Sparks Charles Howard Compliant mandrel and mandrel assembly for growing graft tubes
US3866247A (en) 1972-04-05 1975-02-18 Charles Howard Sparks Graft tubes
US3868956A (en) 1972-06-05 1975-03-04 Ralph J Alfidi Vessel implantable appliance and method of implanting it
US3805301A (en) 1972-07-28 1974-04-23 Meadox Medicals Inc Tubular grafts having indicia thereon
US3974526A (en) 1973-07-06 1976-08-17 Dardik Irving I Vascular prostheses and process for producing the same
US3927422A (en) 1973-12-12 1975-12-23 Philip Nicholas Sawyer Prosthesis and method for making same
DE2508570C2 (en) 1974-04-02 1985-01-24 W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark, Del., Us
US4011861A (en) 1974-04-03 1977-03-15 Case Western Reserve University Implantable electric terminal for organic tissue
US3949073A (en) 1974-11-18 1976-04-06 The Board Of Trustees Of Leland Stanford Junior University Process for augmenting connective mammalian tissue with in situ polymerizable native collagen solution
US4488911A (en) 1975-10-22 1984-12-18 Luck Edward E Non-antigenic collagen and articles of manufacture
US3993045A (en) 1975-11-10 1976-11-23 Elizabeth Edwinia Ion Tubular measuring medical instruments
US4047252A (en) 1976-01-29 1977-09-13 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Double-velour synthetic vascular graft
GB1567122A (en) 1977-03-31 1980-05-08 Gore & Ass Tubular flixible instruments
US4130904A (en) 1977-06-06 1978-12-26 Thermo Electron Corporation Prosthetic blood conduit
WO1980000007A1 (en) 1978-06-02 1980-01-10 A Rockey Medical sleeve
JPS6037734B2 (en) 1978-10-12 1985-08-28 Sumitomo Electric Industries
NL8220336A (en) 1981-09-16 1984-01-02 Wallsten Hans Ivar Device for use in blood vessels or other difficult to reach places, and its use.
DE3342798T (en) 1982-04-30 1985-01-10
US4517687A (en) 1982-09-15 1985-05-21 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Synthetic woven double-velour graft
US4647416A (en) 1983-08-03 1987-03-03 Shiley Incorporated Method of preparing a vascular graft prosthesis
US4665906A (en) 1983-10-14 1987-05-19 Raychem Corporation Medical devices incorporating sim alloy elements
US5067957A (en) 1983-10-14 1991-11-26 Raychem Corporation Method of inserting medical devices incorporating SIM alloy elements
US4557764A (en) 1984-09-05 1985-12-10 Collagen Corporation Process for preparing malleable collagen and the product thereof
US4728328A (en) 1984-10-19 1988-03-01 Research Corporation Cuffed tubular organic prostheses
US4600533A (en) 1984-12-24 1986-07-15 Collagen Corporation Collagen membranes for medical use
US4629458A (en) 1985-02-26 1986-12-16 Cordis Corporation Reinforcing structure for cardiovascular graft
US4642117A (en) 1985-03-22 1987-02-10 Collagen Corporation Mechanically sheared collagen implant material and method
EP0201466A3 (en) 1985-04-10 1987-10-14 Medinvent S.A. Coil spring for transluminal implantation and planar blank for the manufacture thereof
US4738666A (en) 1985-06-11 1988-04-19 Genus Catheter Technologies, Inc. Variable diameter catheter
US5042161A (en) 1985-10-07 1991-08-27 Joseph Hodge Intravascular sizing method and apparatus
US4733665C2 (en) 1985-11-07 2002-01-29 Expandable Grafts Partnership Expandable intraluminal graft and method and apparatus for implanting an expandable intraluminal graft
US4649922A (en) 1986-01-23 1987-03-17 Wiktor Donimik M Catheter arrangement having a variable diameter tip and spring prosthesis
US4878906A (en) * 1986-03-25 1989-11-07 Servetus Partnership Endoprosthesis for repairing a damaged vessel
US4740207A (en) 1986-09-10 1988-04-26 Kreamer Jeffry W Intralumenal graft
DE3724514A1 (en) 1987-07-24 1989-02-02 Kabelmetal Electro Gmbh Process for the continuous production of branch caps or dividing caps from plastic which recovers its shape on heating
US5242451A (en) 1987-09-24 1993-09-07 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Instrument for retaining inner diameter of tubular organ lumen
US5192307A (en) 1987-12-08 1993-03-09 Wall W Henry Angioplasty stent
US6015430A (en) * 1987-12-08 2000-01-18 Wall; William H. Expandable stent having a fabric liner
US4865903A (en) * 1987-12-09 1989-09-12 Pall Corporation Chemically resistant composite structures and garments produced therefrom
US5575815A (en) 1988-08-24 1996-11-19 Endoluminal Therapeutics, Inc. Local polymeric gel therapy
CA1322628C (en) 1988-10-04 1993-10-05 Richard A. Schatz Expandable intraluminal graft
US5162430A (en) 1988-11-21 1992-11-10 Collagen Corporation Collagen-polymer conjugates
ES2067700T3 (en) 1989-12-29 1995-04-01 Med Inst Inc Resistant flexible catheter kinking.
CA2008312C (en) 1989-01-26 2000-05-30 Ulrich Sigwart Intravascular endoprothesis
US5163958A (en) 1989-02-02 1992-11-17 Cordis Corporation Carbon coated tubular endoprosthesis
US5425739A (en) 1989-03-09 1995-06-20 Avatar Design And Development, Inc. Anastomosis stent and stent selection system
US5116318A (en) 1989-06-06 1992-05-26 Cordis Corporation Dilatation balloon within an elastic sleeve
DE3918736C2 (en) 1989-06-08 1998-05-14 Christian Dr Vallbracht Plastic coated metal mesh stents
US5171262A (en) 1989-06-15 1992-12-15 Cordis Corporation Non-woven endoprosthesis
ES2081372T3 (en) 1989-06-28 1996-03-01 David S Zimmon Balloon tamponade devices.
EP0408245B1 (en) 1989-07-13 1994-03-02 American Medical Systems, Inc. Stent placement instrument
US5662701A (en) 1989-08-18 1997-09-02 Endovascular Instruments, Inc. Anti-stenotic method and product for occluded and partially occluded arteries
US5002560A (en) 1989-09-08 1991-03-26 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable cage catheter with a rotatable guide
US5066298A (en) 1989-11-30 1991-11-19 Progressive Angioplasty Systems, Inc. Article and method of sheathing angioplasty balloons
GB8927282D0 (en) 1989-12-01 1990-01-31 Univ Strathclyde Vascular surgical devices
JPH067843B2 (en) 1990-02-15 1994-02-02 寛治 井上 Frame with artificial blood vessels
US5344426A (en) 1990-04-25 1994-09-06 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method and system for stent delivery
US5360443A (en) 1990-06-11 1994-11-01 Barone Hector D Aortic graft for repairing an abdominal aortic aneurysm
US5578071A (en) 1990-06-11 1996-11-26 Parodi; Juan C. Aortic graft
US5064435A (en) 1990-06-28 1991-11-12 Schneider (Usa) Inc. Self-expanding prosthesis having stable axial length
US5236447A (en) 1990-06-29 1993-08-17 Nissho Corporation Artificial tubular organ
LU87995A1 (en) 1990-08-28 1992-03-11 Meadox Medicals Inc vascular grafts and their method of preparing
DE69114505T2 (en) 1990-08-28 1996-04-18 Meadox Medicals Inc Self-supporting woven vascular graft.
US5507771A (en) 1992-06-15 1996-04-16 Cook Incorporated Stent assembly
US5354309A (en) 1991-10-11 1994-10-11 Angiomed Ag Apparatus for widening a stenosis in a body cavity
DE4137857A1 (en) 1990-11-26 1992-05-27 Ernst Peter Prof Dr M Strecker Device having a in a patient's body implantable prosthesis
US5161547A (en) 1990-11-28 1992-11-10 Numed, Inc. Method of forming an intravascular radially expandable stent
US5356423A (en) 1991-01-04 1994-10-18 American Medical Systems, Inc. Resectable self-expanding stent
US5458615A (en) 1993-07-06 1995-10-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent delivery system
US5271410A (en) 1991-04-01 1993-12-21 Baxter International Inc. Catheter with rapid response thermistor and method
CA2065634C (en) 1991-04-11 1997-06-03 Alec A. Piplani Endovascular graft having bifurcation and apparatus and method for deploying the same
US5628783A (en) 1991-04-11 1997-05-13 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Bifurcated multicapsule intraluminal grafting system and method
FR2678508B1 (en) 1991-07-04 1998-01-30 Celsa Lg Device for reinforcing the body vessels.
FR2678823B1 (en) 1991-07-11 1995-07-07 Legrand Jean Jacques A device for reinforcing a ligament in a ligamentoplasty.
US5314472A (en) 1991-10-01 1994-05-24 Cook Incorporated Vascular stent
US5662713A (en) 1991-10-09 1997-09-02 Boston Scientific Corporation Medical stents for body lumens exhibiting peristaltic motion
US5290305A (en) 1991-10-11 1994-03-01 Kanji Inoue Appliance collapsible for insertion into human organs and capable of resilient restoration
EP0539237A1 (en) 1991-10-25 1993-04-28 Cook Incorporated Expandable transluminal graft prosthesis for repair of aneurysm and method for implanting
US5693084A (en) 1991-10-25 1997-12-02 Cook Incorporated Expandable transluminal graft prosthesis for repair of aneurysm
US5387235A (en) 1991-10-25 1995-02-07 Cook Incorporated Expandable transluminal graft prosthesis for repair of aneurysm
US5456713A (en) 1991-10-25 1995-10-10 Cook Incorporated Expandable transluminal graft prosthesis for repairs of aneurysm and method for implanting
US5720776A (en) 1991-10-25 1998-02-24 Cook Incorporated Barb and expandable transluminal graft prosthesis for repair of aneurysm
CA2079417C (en) 1991-10-28 2003-01-07 Lilip Lau Expandable stents and method of making same
US5232446A (en) 1991-10-30 1993-08-03 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Multi-sinus perfusion balloon dilatation catheter
US5372600A (en) 1991-10-31 1994-12-13 Instent Inc. Stent delivery systems
US5258042A (en) 1991-12-16 1993-11-02 Henry Ford Health System Intravascular hydrogel implant
US5316023A (en) 1992-01-08 1994-05-31 Expandable Grafts Partnership Method for bilateral intra-aortic bypass
US5507767A (en) 1992-01-15 1996-04-16 Cook Incorporated Spiral stent
US5405377A (en) 1992-02-21 1995-04-11 Endotech Ltd. Intraluminal stent
FR2688401B1 (en) 1992-03-12 1998-02-27 Thierry Richard Expandable endoprosthesis for human or animal tubular member, and setting tool.
US5571166A (en) 1992-03-19 1996-11-05 Medtronic, Inc. Method of making an intraluminal stent
DE69318614T2 (en) 1992-03-25 1998-11-05 Cook Inc Means for widening of blood vessels
US5264276A (en) 1992-04-06 1993-11-23 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Chemically protective laminate
US5540712A (en) 1992-05-01 1996-07-30 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Stent and method and apparatus for forming and delivering the same
US5354308A (en) 1992-05-01 1994-10-11 Beth Israel Hospital Association Metal wire stent
US5366504A (en) 1992-05-20 1994-11-22 Boston Scientific Corporation Tubular medical prosthesis
US5405378A (en) * 1992-05-20 1995-04-11 Strecker; Ernst P. Device with a prosthesis implantable in the body of a patient
US5383928A (en) 1992-06-10 1995-01-24 Emory University Stent sheath for local drug delivery
US5324304A (en) 1992-06-18 1994-06-28 William Cook Europe A/S Introduction catheter set for a collapsible self-expandable implant
US5342387A (en) 1992-06-18 1994-08-30 American Biomed, Inc. Artificial support for a blood vessel
US5496365A (en) 1992-07-02 1996-03-05 Sgro; Jean-Claude Autoexpandable vascular endoprosthesis
US5348537A (en) 1992-07-15 1994-09-20 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Catheter with intraluminal sealing element
US5306294A (en) 1992-08-05 1994-04-26 Ultrasonic Sensing And Monitoring Systems, Inc. Stent construction of rolled configuration
WO1994003129A1 (en) 1992-08-07 1994-02-17 Keravision Inc. Hybrid intrastromal corneal ring
US5366473A (en) 1992-08-18 1994-11-22 Ultrasonic Sensing And Monitoring Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for applying vascular grafts
US5382261A (en) 1992-09-01 1995-01-17 Expandable Grafts Partnership Method and apparatus for occluding vessels
US5324323A (en) 1992-09-09 1994-06-28 Telectronics Pacing Systems, Inc. Multiple channel cardiosynchronous myoplasty apparatus
US5336254A (en) 1992-09-23 1994-08-09 Medtronic, Inc. Defibrillation lead employing electrodes fabricated from woven carbon fibers
US5382259A (en) 1992-10-26 1995-01-17 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Vasoocclusion coil with attached tubular woven or braided fibrous covering
EP0596145B1 (en) 1992-10-31 1996-05-08 Schneider (Europe) Ag Disposition for implanting a self-expanding endoprothesis
US5370618A (en) 1992-11-20 1994-12-06 World Medical Manufacturing Corporation Pulmonary artery polyurethane balloon catheter
US5342348A (en) 1992-12-04 1994-08-30 Kaplan Aaron V Method and device for treating and enlarging body lumens
US5423849A (en) 1993-01-15 1995-06-13 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Vasoocclusion device containing radiopaque fibers
US5306261A (en) 1993-01-22 1994-04-26 Misonix, Inc. Catheter with collapsible wire guide
US5370691A (en) 1993-01-26 1994-12-06 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Intravascular inflatable stent
WO1994021197A1 (en) 1993-03-25 1994-09-29 C.R. Bard, Inc. Vascular graft
GB9306812D0 (en) 1993-04-01 1993-05-26 Vascutek Ltd Textile prostheses
US5571176A (en) 1993-04-02 1996-11-05 Taheri; Syde A. Partially autogenous four chambered heart
US5843167A (en) 1993-04-22 1998-12-01 C. R. Bard, Inc. Method and apparatus for recapture of hooked endoprosthesis
WO1994026206A1 (en) * 1993-05-11 1994-11-24 Target Therapeutics, Inc. Temporary inflatable intravascular prosthesis
US5453084A (en) 1993-05-19 1995-09-26 Moses; John A. Vascular graft with internal shunt
US5480423A (en) 1993-05-20 1996-01-02 Boston Scientific Corporation Prosthesis delivery
US5571169A (en) 1993-06-07 1996-11-05 Endovascular Instruments, Inc. Anti-stenotic method and product for occluded and partially occluded arteries
US5464449A (en) 1993-07-08 1995-11-07 Thomas J. Fogarty Internal graft prosthesis and delivery system
US5499994A (en) 1993-07-30 1996-03-19 American Medical Systems, Inc. Dilation device for the urethra
US6027779A (en) 1993-08-18 2000-02-22 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Thin-wall polytetrafluoroethylene tube
DE69428282D1 (en) 1993-08-18 2001-10-18 Gore & Ass Thin-walled, seamless, porous polytetrafluoroäthylenrohr
US6159565A (en) 1993-08-18 2000-12-12 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Thin-wall intraluminal graft
DE69431302T2 (en) 1993-08-18 2003-05-15 Gore & Ass Rohrfoermiges intraluminal usable tissue
US5735892A (en) 1993-08-18 1998-04-07 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Intraluminal stent graft
US6025044A (en) 1993-08-18 2000-02-15 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Thin-wall polytetrafluoroethylene tube
KR970004845Y1 (en) 1993-09-27 1997-05-21 이재용 Stent for expanding a lumen
DE69433617D1 (en) 1993-09-30 2004-04-22 Endogad Res Pty Ltd An intraluminal graft
WO1995009586A1 (en) 1993-10-01 1995-04-13 Emory University Self-expanding intraluminal composite prosthesis
US5632772A (en) 1993-10-21 1997-05-27 Corvita Corporation Expandable supportive branched endoluminal grafts
US5639278A (en) 1993-10-21 1997-06-17 Corvita Corporation Expandable supportive bifurcated endoluminal grafts
US5723004A (en) 1993-10-21 1998-03-03 Corvita Corporation Expandable supportive endoluminal grafts
US5425710A (en) 1993-10-26 1995-06-20 Medtronic, Inc. Coated sleeve for wrapping dilatation catheter balloons
US5389106A (en) * 1993-10-29 1995-02-14 Numed, Inc. Impermeable expandable intravascular stent
DE69419877T2 (en) * 1993-11-04 1999-12-16 Bard Inc C R Fixed vascular prosthesis
WO1995013033A1 (en) 1993-11-08 1995-05-18 Lazarus Harrison M Intraluminal vascular graft and method
US5607444A (en) 1993-12-02 1997-03-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ostial stent for bifurcations
DE9319267U1 (en) 1993-12-15 1994-02-24 Vorwerk Dierk Dr Aortenendoprothese
DE4401227C2 (en) 1994-01-18 1999-03-18 Ernst Peter Prof Dr M Strecker In the body of a patient percutaneously implantable endoprosthesis
US5549635A (en) 1994-01-24 1996-08-27 Solar, Rita & Gaterud, Ltd. Non-deformable self-expanding parallel flow endovascular stent and deployment apparatus therefore
US5476506A (en) 1994-02-08 1995-12-19 Ethicon, Inc. Bi-directional crimped graft
US5609627A (en) 1994-02-09 1997-03-11 Boston Scientific Technology, Inc. Method for delivering a bifurcated endoluminal prosthesis
ES2141576T5 (en) 1994-02-25 2006-08-01 David R. Fischell stent.
US5549663A (en) 1994-03-09 1996-08-27 Cordis Corporation Endoprosthesis having graft member and exposed welded end junctions, method and procedure
US5556413A (en) 1994-03-11 1996-09-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coiled stent with locking ends
US5449373A (en) 1994-03-17 1995-09-12 Medinol Ltd. Articulated stent
US6001123A (en) 1994-04-01 1999-12-14 Gore Enterprise Holdings Inc. Folding self-expandable intravascular stent-graft
US6165210A (en) 1994-04-01 2000-12-26 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expandable helical intravascular stent and stent-graft
DE69531239T2 (en) 1994-04-01 2004-04-22 Prograft Medical, Inc., Palo Alto Selbstausdehnbarer stent and stent-graft transplant
US5458605A (en) 1994-04-04 1995-10-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coiled reinforced retractable sleeve for stent delivery catheter
DE69527141T2 (en) * 1994-04-29 2002-11-07 Scimed Life Systems Inc Stent with collagen
US5554181A (en) 1994-05-04 1996-09-10 Regents Of The University Of Minnesota Stent
US5540701A (en) 1994-05-20 1996-07-30 Hugh Sharkey Passive fixation anastomosis method and device
EP0792627B2 (en) 1994-06-08 2003-10-29 Cardiovascular Concepts, Inc. System for forming a bifurcated graft
US5683451A (en) * 1994-06-08 1997-11-04 Cardiovascular Concepts, Inc. Apparatus and methods for deployment release of intraluminal prostheses
US5824041A (en) 1994-06-08 1998-10-20 Medtronic, Inc. Apparatus and methods for placement and repositioning of intraluminal prostheses
US5522881A (en) 1994-06-28 1996-06-04 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Implantable tubular prosthesis having integral cuffs
US5509902A (en) 1994-07-25 1996-04-23 Raulerson; J. Daniel Subcutaneous catheter stabilizing devices and methods for securing a catheter using the same
CA2147547C (en) 1994-08-02 2006-12-19 Peter J. Schmitt Thinly woven flexible graft
US5575816A (en) 1994-08-12 1996-11-19 Meadox Medicals, Inc. High strength and high density intraluminal wire stent
US5571172A (en) 1994-08-15 1996-11-05 Origin Medsystems, Inc. Method and apparatus for endoscopic grafting
US5575817A (en) 1994-08-19 1996-11-19 Martin; Eric C. Aorto femoral bifurcation graft and method of implantation
US6331188B1 (en) * 1994-08-31 2001-12-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Exterior supported self-expanding stent-graft
US6015429A (en) 1994-09-08 2000-01-18 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Procedures for introducing stents and stent-grafts
US5653743A (en) 1994-09-09 1997-08-05 Martin; Eric C. Hypogastric artery bifurcation graft and method of implantation
US5723003A (en) 1994-09-13 1998-03-03 Ultrasonic Sensing And Monitoring Systems Expandable graft assembly and method of use
ES2242132T3 (en) 1994-09-15 2005-11-01 C.R. Bard Inc. Stent and associated placement device.
US5545210A (en) 1994-09-22 1996-08-13 Advanced Coronary Technology, Inc. Method of implanting a permanent shape memory alloy stent
US5562727A (en) 1994-10-07 1996-10-08 Aeroquip Corporation Intraluminal graft and method for insertion thereof
US5507769A (en) 1994-10-18 1996-04-16 Stentco, Inc. Method and apparatus for forming an endoluminal bifurcated graft
US5599305A (en) 1994-10-24 1997-02-04 Cardiovascular Concepts, Inc. Large-diameter introducer sheath having hemostasis valve and removable steering mechanism
US5800521A (en) 1994-11-09 1998-09-01 Endotex Interventional Systems, Inc. Prosthetic graft and method for aneurysm repair
US5669930A (en) 1994-12-08 1997-09-23 Fuji Systems Corporation Stent for intracorporeal retention
US5637113A (en) 1994-12-13 1997-06-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer film for wrapping a stent structure
WO1996018360A1 (en) 1994-12-16 1996-06-20 X-Trode S.R.L. A prosthesis for a blood vessel
NL9500094A (en) 1995-01-19 1996-09-02 Industrial Res Bv Y-shaped stent and method of the locations thereof.
US5683449A (en) 1995-02-24 1997-11-04 Marcade; Jean Paul Modular bifurcated intraluminal grafts and methods for delivering and assembling same
US5662675A (en) 1995-02-24 1997-09-02 Intervascular, Inc. Delivery catheter assembly
JP3640696B2 (en) * 1995-02-27 2005-04-20 テルモ株式会社 Tubular organ treatment device
US5681345A (en) * 1995-03-01 1997-10-28 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Sleeve carrying stent
US5591197A (en) 1995-03-14 1997-01-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Expandable stent forming projecting barbs and method for deploying
US5693089A (en) 1995-04-12 1997-12-02 Inoue; Kanji Method of collapsing an implantable appliance
US5591198A (en) 1995-04-27 1997-01-07 Medtronic, Inc. Multiple sinusoidal wave configuration stent
US5667523A (en) 1995-04-28 1997-09-16 Impra, Inc. Dual supported intraluminal graft
US5591228A (en) 1995-05-09 1997-01-07 Edoga; John K. Methods for treating abdominal aortic aneurysms
US5662614A (en) 1995-05-09 1997-09-02 Edoga; John K. Balloon expandable universal access sheath
US5730698A (en) 1995-05-09 1998-03-24 Fischell; Robert E. Balloon expandable temporary radioisotope stent system
DE69630266D1 (en) 1995-06-07 2003-11-13 Gore Hybrid Technologies Inc Implantable cradle for a therapeutic device
US5647380A (en) 1995-06-07 1997-07-15 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Method of making a left ventricular assist device
US5626561A (en) 1995-06-07 1997-05-06 Gore Hybrid Technologies, Inc. Implantable containment apparatus for a therapeutical device and method for loading and reloading the device therein
US5728131A (en) 1995-06-12 1998-03-17 Endotex Interventional Systems, Inc. Coupling device and method of use
US5554180A (en) 1995-07-07 1996-09-10 Aeroquip Corporation Intraluminal stenting graft
DE69635112T2 (en) 1995-07-07 2006-05-18 W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Newark Internal coating for pipes and blood vessels
US5713948A (en) * 1995-07-19 1998-02-03 Uflacker; Renan Adjustable and retrievable graft and graft delivery system for stent-graft system
US5769882A (en) 1995-09-08 1998-06-23 Medtronic, Inc. Methods and apparatus for conformably sealing prostheses within body lumens
EP0851746A1 (en) 1995-09-18 1998-07-08 W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC. A delivery system for intraluminal vascular grafts
US5868704A (en) 1995-09-18 1999-02-09 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Balloon catheter device
US6193745B1 (en) 1995-10-03 2001-02-27 Medtronic, Inc. Modular intraluminal prosteheses construction and methods
US5776161A (en) * 1995-10-16 1998-07-07 Instent, Inc. Medical stents, apparatus and method for making same
US5669924A (en) 1995-10-26 1997-09-23 Shaknovich; Alexander Y-shuttle stent assembly for bifurcating vessels and method of using the same
US5591195A (en) 1995-10-30 1997-01-07 Taheri; Syde Apparatus and method for engrafting a blood vessel
US5628788A (en) 1995-11-07 1997-05-13 Corvita Corporation Self-expanding endoluminal stent-graft
US5607442A (en) 1995-11-13 1997-03-04 Isostent, Inc. Stent with improved radiopacity and appearance characteristics
US5665117A (en) 1995-11-27 1997-09-09 Rhodes; Valentine J. Endovascular prosthesis with improved sealing means for aneurysmal arterial disease and method of use
US6576009B2 (en) * 1995-12-01 2003-06-10 Medtronic Ave, Inc. Bifurcated intraluminal prostheses construction and methods
US6042605A (en) 1995-12-14 2000-03-28 Gore Enterprose Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant stent-graft
EP0950385A3 (en) * 1995-12-14 1999-10-27 Prograft Medical, Inc. Stent-graft deployment apparatus and method
US5741274A (en) 1995-12-22 1998-04-21 Cardio Vascular Concepts, Inc. Method and apparatus for laparoscopically reinforcing vascular stent-grafts
US5865723A (en) 1995-12-29 1999-02-02 Ramus Medical Technologies Method and apparatus for forming vascular prostheses
US5747128A (en) 1996-01-29 1998-05-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Radially supported polytetrafluoroethylene vascular graft
US5749921A (en) * 1996-02-20 1998-05-12 Medtronic, Inc. Apparatus and methods for compression of endoluminal prostheses
US5824042A (en) 1996-04-05 1998-10-20 Medtronic, Inc. Endoluminal prostheses having position indicating markers
DE19617823A1 (en) 1996-05-03 1997-11-13 Sitomed Medizintechnik Vertrie Vascular prosthesis for coronary use
US5928279A (en) * 1996-07-03 1999-07-27 Baxter International Inc. Stented, radially expandable, tubular PTFE grafts
US5728150A (en) 1996-07-29 1998-03-17 Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc. Expandable microporous prosthesis
US5676697A (en) 1996-07-29 1997-10-14 Cardiovascular Dynamics, Inc. Two-piece, bifurcated intraluminal graft for repair of aneurysm
US5749825A (en) 1996-09-18 1998-05-12 Isostent, Inc. Means method for treatment of stenosed arterial bifurcations
US6019788A (en) 1996-11-08 2000-02-01 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Vascular shunt graft and junction for same
DE69737208T2 (en) * 1996-11-15 2007-11-08 Cook Inc., Bloomington The stent delivery device having a separable case
US6254628B1 (en) * 1996-12-09 2001-07-03 Micro Therapeutics, Inc. Intracranial stent
US6015431A (en) 1996-12-23 2000-01-18 Prograft Medical, Inc. Endolumenal stent-graft with leak-resistant seal
US6352561B1 (en) * 1996-12-23 2002-03-05 W. L. Gore & Associates Implant deployment apparatus
US6551350B1 (en) * 1996-12-23 2003-04-22 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Kink resistant bifurcated prosthesis
US5925061A (en) 1997-01-13 1999-07-20 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Low profile vascular stent
US5843166A (en) * 1997-01-17 1998-12-01 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Composite graft-stent having pockets for accomodating movement
US5779732A (en) * 1997-03-31 1998-07-14 Medtronic, Inc. Method and apparatus for implanting a film with an exandable stent
JP6007454B2 (en) 2012-08-22 2016-10-12 国立研究開発法人日本原子力研究開発機構 Moisture sensor

Patent Citations (100)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2638093A (en) * 1949-12-20 1953-05-12 Kulick George Vaginal insert
US3096560A (en) * 1958-11-21 1963-07-09 William J Liebig Process for synthetic vascular implants
US3142067A (en) * 1958-11-21 1964-07-28 William J Liebig Synthetic vascular implants
US3152618A (en) * 1959-03-30 1964-10-13 Dayco Corp Flexible conduit
US3029819A (en) * 1959-07-30 1962-04-17 J L Mcatee Artery graft and method of producing artery grafts
US3174851A (en) * 1961-12-01 1965-03-23 William J Buehler Nickel-base alloys
US3351463A (en) * 1965-08-20 1967-11-07 Alexander G Rozner High strength nickel-base alloys
US3562820A (en) * 1966-08-22 1971-02-16 Bernhard Braun Tubular sheet and strip form prostheses on a basis of biological tissue
US3479670A (en) * 1966-10-19 1969-11-25 Ethicon Inc Tubular prosthetic implant having helical thermoplastic wrapping therearound
US3514791A (en) * 1967-07-25 1970-06-02 Charles H Sparks Tissue grafts
US3657744A (en) * 1970-05-08 1972-04-25 Univ Minnesota Method for fixing prosthetic implants in a living body
US4187390A (en) * 1970-05-21 1980-02-05 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Porous products and process therefor
US3710777A (en) * 1970-12-23 1973-01-16 C Sparks Method and apparatus for growing graft tubes in place
US4355426A (en) * 1975-05-09 1982-10-26 Macgregor David C Porous flexible vascular graft
US4118806A (en) * 1976-02-04 1978-10-10 Thermo Electron Corporation Prosthetic blood vessel
US4140126A (en) * 1977-02-18 1979-02-20 Choudhury M Hasan Method for performing aneurysm repair
US4164045A (en) * 1977-08-03 1979-08-14 Carbomedics, Inc. Artificial vascular and patch grafts
US4319363A (en) * 1978-05-23 1982-03-16 Vettivetpillai Ketharanathan Vascular prostheses
US4300244A (en) * 1979-09-19 1981-11-17 Carbomedics, Inc. Cardiovascular grafts
US4604762A (en) * 1981-02-13 1986-08-12 Thoratec Laboratories Corporation Arterial graft prosthesis
US4546500A (en) * 1981-05-08 1985-10-15 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Fabrication of living blood vessels and glandular tissues
US4425908A (en) * 1981-10-22 1984-01-17 Beth Israel Hospital Blood clot filter
US4411655A (en) * 1981-11-30 1983-10-25 Schreck David M Apparatus and method for percutaneous catheterization
US4424208A (en) * 1982-01-11 1984-01-03 Collagen Corporation Collagen implant material and method for augmenting soft tissue
US4582640A (en) * 1982-03-08 1986-04-15 Collagen Corporation Injectable cross-linked collagen implant material
US4502159A (en) * 1982-08-12 1985-03-05 Shiley Incorporated Tubular prostheses prepared from pericardial tissue
US4494531A (en) * 1982-12-06 1985-01-22 Cook, Incorporated Expandable blood clot filter
US4512338A (en) * 1983-01-25 1985-04-23 Balko Alexander B Process for restoring patency to body vessels
US4503569A (en) * 1983-03-03 1985-03-12 Dotter Charles T Transluminally placed expandable graft prosthesis
US4530113A (en) * 1983-05-20 1985-07-23 Intervascular, Inc. Vascular grafts with cross-weave patterns
US4592754A (en) * 1983-09-09 1986-06-03 Gupte Pradeep M Surgical prosthetic vessel graft and catheter combination and method
US5397345A (en) * 1983-12-09 1995-03-14 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Artificial graft and implantation method
US5275622A (en) * 1983-12-09 1994-01-04 Harrison Medical Technologies, Inc. Endovascular grafting apparatus, system and method and devices for use therewith
US4842575A (en) * 1984-01-30 1989-06-27 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Method for forming impregnated synthetic vascular grafts
US5108424A (en) * 1984-01-30 1992-04-28 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Collagen-impregnated dacron graft
US5197977A (en) * 1984-01-30 1993-03-30 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Drug delivery collagen-impregnated synthetic vascular graft
US4562596A (en) * 1984-04-25 1986-01-07 Elliot Kornberg Aortic graft, device and method for performing an intraluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair
US4617932A (en) * 1984-04-25 1986-10-21 Elliot Kornberg Device and method for performing an intraluminal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair
US4580568A (en) * 1984-10-01 1986-04-08 Cook, Incorporated Percutaneous endovascular stent and method for insertion thereof
US5037377A (en) * 1984-11-28 1991-08-06 Medtronic, Inc. Means for improving biocompatibility of implants, particularly of vascular grafts
US4798606A (en) * 1985-02-26 1989-01-17 Corvita Corporation Reinforcing structure for cardiovascular graft
US5102417A (en) * 1985-11-07 1992-04-07 Expandable Grafts Partnership Expandable intraluminal graft, and method and apparatus for implanting an expandable intraluminal graft
US4957508A (en) * 1986-10-31 1990-09-18 Ube Industries, Ltd. Medical tubes
US4941870A (en) * 1986-11-10 1990-07-17 Ube-Nitto Kasei Co., Ltd. Method for manufacturing a synthetic vascular prosthesis
US4800882A (en) * 1987-03-13 1989-01-31 Cook Incorporated Endovascular stent and delivery system
US4816339A (en) * 1987-04-28 1989-03-28 Baxter International Inc. Multi-layered poly(tetrafluoroethylene)/elastomer materials useful for in vivo implantation
US4816028A (en) * 1987-07-01 1989-03-28 Indu Kapadia Woven vascular graft
US4795458A (en) * 1987-07-02 1989-01-03 Regan Barrie F Stent for use following balloon angioplasty
US4921479A (en) * 1987-10-02 1990-05-01 Joseph Grayzel Catheter sheath with longitudinal seam
US5133732A (en) * 1987-10-19 1992-07-28 Medtronic, Inc. Intravascular stent
US4820298A (en) * 1987-11-20 1989-04-11 Leveen Eric G Internal vascular prosthesis
US4892539A (en) * 1988-02-08 1990-01-09 D-R Medical Systems, Inc. Vascular graft
US4830003A (en) * 1988-06-17 1989-05-16 Wolff Rodney G Compressive stent and delivery system
US5276276A (en) * 1988-07-18 1994-01-04 Gunn Dennis R Coil transducer
US5213580A (en) * 1988-08-24 1993-05-25 Endoluminal Therapeutics, Inc. Biodegradable polymeric endoluminal sealing process
US5019090A (en) * 1988-09-01 1991-05-28 Corvita Corporation Radially expandable endoprosthesis and the like
US5226913A (en) * 1988-09-01 1993-07-13 Corvita Corporation Method of making a radially expandable prosthesis
US5092877A (en) * 1988-09-01 1992-03-03 Corvita Corporation Radially expandable endoprosthesis
US4990151A (en) * 1988-09-28 1991-02-05 Medinvent S.A. Device for transluminal implantation or extraction
US4877025A (en) * 1988-10-06 1989-10-31 Hanson Donald W Tracheostomy tube valve apparatus
US5019085A (en) * 1988-10-25 1991-05-28 Cordis Corporation Apparatus and method for placement of a stent within a subject vessel
US4913141A (en) * 1988-10-25 1990-04-03 Cordis Corporation Apparatus and method for placement of a stent within a subject vessel
US4950227A (en) * 1988-11-07 1990-08-21 Boston Scientific Corporation Stent delivery system
US5209735A (en) * 1988-11-07 1993-05-11 Lazarus Harrison M External guide wire and enlargement means
US4957504A (en) * 1988-12-02 1990-09-18 Chardack William M Implantable blood pump
US5127919A (en) * 1988-12-14 1992-07-07 Vascutec Corporation Woven vascular graft
US4856516A (en) * 1989-01-09 1989-08-15 Cordis Corporation Endovascular stent apparatus and method
US5078726A (en) * 1989-02-01 1992-01-07 Kreamer Jeffry W Graft stent and method of repairing blood vessels
US5007926A (en) * 1989-02-24 1991-04-16 The Trustees Of The University Of Pennsylvania Expandable transluminally implantable tubular prosthesis
US5192289A (en) * 1989-03-09 1993-03-09 Avatar Design And Development, Inc. Anastomosis stent and stent selection system
US5100429A (en) * 1989-04-28 1992-03-31 C. R. Bard, Inc. Endovascular stent and delivery system
US4990155A (en) * 1989-05-19 1991-02-05 Wilkoff Howard M Surgical stent method and apparatus
US4994071A (en) * 1989-05-22 1991-02-19 Cordis Corporation Bifurcating stent apparatus and method
US4955899A (en) * 1989-05-26 1990-09-11 Impra, Inc. Longitudinally compliant vascular graft
US5037392A (en) * 1989-06-06 1991-08-06 Cordis Corporation Stent-implanting balloon assembly
US5015253A (en) * 1989-06-15 1991-05-14 Cordis Corporation Non-woven endoprosthesis
US5104404A (en) * 1989-10-02 1992-04-14 Medtronic, Inc. Articulated stent
US5035706A (en) * 1989-10-17 1991-07-30 Cook Incorporated Percutaneous stent and method for retrieval thereof
US5221261A (en) * 1990-04-12 1993-06-22 Schneider (Usa) Inc. Radially expandable fixation member
US5123917A (en) * 1990-04-27 1992-06-23 Lee Peter Y Expandable intraluminal vascular graft
US5156619A (en) * 1990-06-15 1992-10-20 Ehrenfeld William K Flanged end-to-side vascular graft
US5122154A (en) * 1990-08-15 1992-06-16 Rhodes Valentine J Endovascular bypass graft
US5139480A (en) * 1990-08-22 1992-08-18 Biotech Laboratories, Inc. Necking stents
US5178630A (en) * 1990-08-28 1993-01-12 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Ravel-resistant, self-supporting woven graft
US5282824A (en) * 1990-10-09 1994-02-01 Cook, Incorporated Percutaneous stent assembly
US5217483A (en) * 1990-11-28 1993-06-08 Numed, Inc. Intravascular radially expandable stent
US5192984A (en) * 1990-12-19 1993-03-09 Environmental Analytical Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for determination of concentrations
US5282847A (en) * 1991-02-28 1994-02-01 Medtronic, Inc. Prosthetic vascular grafts with a pleated structure
US5197978A (en) * 1991-04-26 1993-03-30 Advanced Coronary Technology, Inc. Removable heat-recoverable tissue supporting device
US5197978B1 (en) * 1991-04-26 1996-05-28 Advanced Coronary Tech Removable heat-recoverable tissue supporting device
US5147370A (en) * 1991-06-12 1992-09-15 Mcnamara Thomas O Nitinol stent for hollow body conduits
US5151105A (en) * 1991-10-07 1992-09-29 Kwan Gett Clifford Collapsible vessel sleeve implant
US5282860A (en) * 1991-10-16 1994-02-01 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Stent tube for medical use
US5211658A (en) * 1991-11-05 1993-05-18 New England Deaconess Hospital Corporation Method and device for performing endovascular repair of aneurysms
US5201757A (en) * 1992-04-03 1993-04-13 Schneider (Usa) Inc. Medial region deployment of radially self-expanding stents
US5246452A (en) * 1992-04-13 1993-09-21 Impra, Inc. Vascular graft with removable sheath
US20070067024A1 (en) * 1993-09-30 2007-03-22 White Geoffrey H Intraluminal Graft
US5749880A (en) * 1995-03-10 1998-05-12 Impra, Inc. Endoluminal encapsulated stent and methods of manufacture and endoluminal delivery
US20020107561A1 (en) * 1995-06-01 2002-08-08 Meadox Medicals, Inc. Implantable intraluminal prosthesis
US5755778A (en) * 1996-10-16 1998-05-26 Nitinol Medical Technologies, Inc. Anastomosis device

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apices?s=t&path=/ printed 5/20/2013. *

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7939000B2 (en) * 1995-03-10 2011-05-10 Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. Methods for making an encapsulated stent and intraluminal delivery thereof
US20090125092A1 (en) * 1995-03-10 2009-05-14 C.R. Bard, Inc. Methods for making an encapsulated stent and intraluminal delivery thereof
US9849014B2 (en) 2002-03-12 2017-12-26 Covidien Lp Medical device delivery
US20100305590A1 (en) * 2009-05-29 2010-12-02 Gi Dynamics, Inc. Transpyloric Anchoring
US20120165915A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Cook Incorporated (d/b/a Cook Critical Care Incorporated) Emergency vascular repair prosthesis deployment system
US9314358B2 (en) 2010-12-22 2016-04-19 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Emergency vascular repair prosthesis deployment system
US8657866B2 (en) * 2010-12-22 2014-02-25 Cook Medical Technologies Llc Emergency vascular repair prosthesis deployment system
WO2012150941A1 (en) * 2011-05-05 2012-11-08 Eva Corporation Apparatus and method for delivering a surgical fastener
US9724221B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2017-08-08 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9072624B2 (en) * 2012-02-23 2015-07-07 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9192498B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2015-11-24 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9675488B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2017-06-13 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US20140172067A1 (en) * 2012-02-23 2014-06-19 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9308110B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2016-04-12 Covidien Lp Luminal stenting
US9220588B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2015-12-29 Javelin Medical Ltd. Systems, methods and devices for embolic protection
US9724222B2 (en) 2012-07-20 2017-08-08 Covidien Lp Resheathable stent delivery system
WO2014111911A1 (en) * 2013-01-18 2014-07-24 Javelin Medical Ltd. Monofilament implants and systems for delivery thereof
US9782186B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2017-10-10 Covidien Lp Vascular intervention system
US9827126B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2017-11-28 Covidien Lp Delivery of medical devices
US9775733B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2017-10-03 Covidien Lp Delivery of medical devices
US9474639B2 (en) 2013-08-27 2016-10-25 Covidien Lp Delivery of medical devices
US9592110B1 (en) 2013-12-06 2017-03-14 Javelin Medical, Ltd. Systems and methods for implant delivery
CN106132357A (en) * 2014-04-04 2016-11-16 W.L.戈尔及同仁股份有限公司 Method of manufacturing a deployment handle of a medical device deployment system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JP2006326328A (en) 2006-12-07 application
DE69739148D1 (en) 2009-01-15 grant
JP2009106761A (en) 2009-05-21 application
JP4327256B2 (en) 2009-09-09 grant
JP4021882B2 (en) 2007-12-12 grant
CA2275921A1 (en) 1998-07-02 application
WO1998027894A8 (en) 1999-05-20 application
JP2004305778A (en) 2004-11-04 application
EP0971642B1 (en) 2008-12-03 grant
US20140074218A1 (en) 2014-03-13 application
EP0971642A1 (en) 2000-01-19 application
EP2065014A1 (en) 2009-06-03 application
US6352561B1 (en) 2002-03-05 grant
JP4460553B2 (en) 2010-05-12 grant
US20020029077A1 (en) 2002-03-07 application
JP2001506902A (en) 2001-05-29 application
CA2275921C (en) 2007-04-17 grant
WO1998027894A1 (en) 1998-07-02 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6416542B1 (en) Modular bifurcated intraluminal grafts and methods for delivering and assembling same
US6491719B1 (en) Tubular endoluminar prosthesis having oblique ends
US5824036A (en) Stent for intraluminal grafts and device and methods for delivering and assembling same
US6517572B2 (en) Endovascular graft system
US6878161B2 (en) Stent graft loading and deployment device and method
US6176875B1 (en) Limited expansion endoluminal prostheses and methods for their use
US5779732A (en) Method and apparatus for implanting a film with an exandable stent
US7229472B2 (en) Thoracic aneurysm repair prosthesis and system
US6729356B1 (en) Endovascular graft for providing a seal with vasculature
US6576009B2 (en) Bifurcated intraluminal prostheses construction and methods
US7056336B2 (en) Covered endoprosthesis and delivery system
US6156063A (en) Method of deploying bifurcated vascular graft
US6478813B1 (en) Method for joining grafts in a common body passageway
US6964679B1 (en) Bifurcated graft with a superior extension
US5782904A (en) Intraluminal graft
US5843158A (en) Limited expansion endoluminal prostheses and methods for their use
US6942691B1 (en) Modular bifurcated graft for endovascular aneurysm repair
EP1000590B1 (en) An improved stent which is easly recaptured and repositioned within the body
US7232459B2 (en) Thoracic aortic aneurysm stent graft
US7112217B1 (en) Biluminal endovascular graft system
US6261316B1 (en) Single puncture bifurcation graft deployment system
US20020045930A1 (en) Stent-graft deployment apparatus and method
EP0792627A2 (en) System for endoluminal graft placement
US20090318949A1 (en) Sealing apparatus and methods of use
US6685736B1 (en) Intraluminal graft

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: W. L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC., DELAWARE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GORE ENTERPRISE HOLDINGS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:027906/0508

Effective date: 20120130