US20090127216A1 - Ceiling mounted hanging shelving system - Google Patents

Ceiling mounted hanging shelving system Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090127216A1
US20090127216A1 US11/986,384 US98638407A US2009127216A1 US 20090127216 A1 US20090127216 A1 US 20090127216A1 US 98638407 A US98638407 A US 98638407A US 2009127216 A1 US2009127216 A1 US 2009127216A1
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shelving
coupled
support units
system
pair
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Abandoned
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US11/986,384
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John Young
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YOUNG INTERNATIONAL LLC
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YOUNG INTERNATIONAL LLC
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Priority to US11/986,384 priority Critical patent/US20090127216A1/en
Assigned to YOUNG INTERNATIONAL LLC reassignment YOUNG INTERNATIONAL LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: YOUNG, JOHN
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F5/00Show stands, hangers, or shelves characterised by their constructional features
    • A47F5/08Show stands, hangers, or shelves characterised by their constructional features secured to the wall, ceiling, or the like; Wall-bracket display devices
    • A47F5/0892Suspended show stands, e.g. secured to the ceiling by means of cords or chains

Abstract

A shelving system having a plurality of shelving support units spanned from each other in a parallel fashion and hanging from a ceiling, each support unit being suspended and supported by a pair of vertical hanging rods and a pair of mounting plates. Each shelving support unit having an aperture panel configured with a plurality of apertures or shelving holes wherein a plurality of cylindrical pipes are coupled between the shelving support units, the pipes being inserted through the apertures in the aperture panels of the shelving support units.

Description

    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to shelving. More specifically, the present invention relates to a ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system comprised of one or more shelving support units which may be used in homes, businesses, and/or industrial settings.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Ceiling mounted, hanging shelving systems are well known in the art and allow users to store items without having to sacrifice and/or dedicate floor space. Such systems are ideal for areas in which square footage is limited or in which maximum use of square footage is desired. FIG. 1 illustrates a typical prior art ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system. As shown in FIG. 1, the prior art ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system is typically comprised of a top surface which has one or more hooks (in this case two) protruding therefrom. The top surface may be made from wood, plastic or metal and the hooks are preferably made from metal and of a thick and sturdy quality. The hooks which protrude from the top surface will typically engage sturdy loops/hooks (not shown) which are securely fastened within a ceiling, preferably being coupled to a tress or beam in the ceiling for added support. Some prior art ceiling mounted, hanging shelving systems may use one or more chains coupled between the hooks in the top surface and the loops/hooks which are securely fastened to the ceiling beam.
  • As further shown in FIG. 1, a prior art ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system also preferably includes two side walls which are coupled to the top surface and which each extend down laterally from the top surface on opposite sides thereof. Again these side walls are preferably formed from wood, plastic or metal. A plurality of shelving platforms are then coupled between these two side walls. These shelving platforms are also typically preferably formed of wood, plastic or metal. As shown in FIG. 1, the shelving platforms may be uniformly spaced apart or spaced at different intervals along the height of the side walls, as desired, in order to accommodate storage of larger items on the shelving system.
  • A shortcoming of prior art ceiling mounted, hanging shelving systems is that such systems are often inflexible. First, the width or distance between the two side walls is normally fixed as a function of the width of the top surface and cannot be adjusted. Moreover, the depth of the shelving platforms is typically fixed as well (again as a function of the size of the top surface). These limitations prevent a user from easily adjusting the span and/or depth of such shelving systems. In short, storage needs of a user tend to change over time and prior art systems do not allow users to easily adapt such shelving systems to accommodate changing needs.
  • An additional shortcoming in the prior art is that shelving platforms comprising pre-fabricated side walls and shelving platforms tend to have limited load-bearing capacity. More specifically, in this type of prior art shelving configuration, the hooks in the top surface must support the weight of the entire shelving structure, thereby reducing the load amount the structure can support. Industrial facilities typically require shelving systems capable of carrying large and heavy loads. As a result, industrial facilities often have to construct expensive, custom built systems, capable of holding heavy loads.
  • Accordingly, what is needed is a ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system which allows a user to easily adjust the span and depth of the system in order to accommodate the user's ever-changing storage needs. What is further needed is a lighter weight ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system which can support large heavy, industrial sized items; but which is easy to assemble and use as storage needs change.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention addresses the above shortcomings by teaching a flexible ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system in which the height, width and the depth of the shelving system can be easily adjusted for the user's particular purposes. In short, the ceiling mounted, hanging shelving system can be designed to span a variable space such that it can be used to store large or small items. Moreover, the height of the shelves in the shelving system, the number of shelves, and the width of each individual shelve is completely adjustable, variable. The invention incorporates prefabricated steel pipes, or PVC piping to form shelf platforms used within the system. The length of the steel pipes used may vary, as well as the number of pipes of used. In this way the size of each individual shelf in the shelving system is completely flexible and variable in order to accommodate any user's needs.
  • Therefore, unlike prior art hanging shelving systems, the size and shape (and thus the weight) of the shelving system in the present invention are easily changed/adjusted in accordance with a user's needs, so the invention represents a more efficient, lighter weight hanging shelving system. In short, larger and heavier items can be shelved without significantly increasing the weight of the shelving system itself. Moreover, the system can be configured to span a larger area without significant increased weight.
  • Finally, prefabricated steel pipes and/or PVP piping are widely available to the general public in building material stores and can be easily cut to the user's specifications. Such materials are also relatively inexpensive. Thus, the present invention teaches a low cost system for constructing a sturdy, customized shelving system.
  • DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a typical prior art ceiling mounted shelving system;
  • FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of a single shelving support unit used in the shelving system of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 shows a side view of a single shelving support unit used in the shelving system of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 shows a bottom view of a single shelving support unit used in the shelving system of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5, shows a close-up, perspective view of a threaded vertical rod and locking washer/nut pair in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6, shows a close-up, perspective view of a mounting plate in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention
  • FIG. 7, shows a mounting surface view of a mounting plate in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8, shows a close up top down view of a mounting plate and a central sleeve of said plate in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 9, shows a first assembled side for a shelving system comprised of a pair of mounting plates, a pair of support rods, and a shelving support unit;
  • FIG. 10 shows a perspective view of a shelving system comprised of two assembled sides (each side having a pair of mounting plates, a pair of support rods, and a pair of shelving support units) with rack pipes coupled laterally therebetween, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 11 and 12 show close-up views of a preferred embodiment of a locking mechanism used to secure support pipes which form the shelf platforms to the shelving support units; and
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a locking cap in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a shelving support unit 100 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As will be described further hereinafter, a plurality of such units may be used in order to construct an entire shelving system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, in a preferred embodiment, a shelving support unit is constructed as a single steel unit. The unit may be constructed from less expensive material, however, if the needs of the user do not require the load bearing capacity of steel. Such materials may include, among others, plastic, light weight metals or metal alloys, and/or fiberglass. Additionally, the unit may be painted and/or otherwise coated with a protective enamel if used in a corrosive environment.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the shelving support unit is comprised of an elongated arm 110 having a rounded base with curved edges 120. Coupled to the elongated arm, and extending in a preferably upward fashion from said rounded base is an aperture panel 130. The aperture panel is provided for creating a shelf platform component of the system and will be used to couple support pipes between two opposing shelving support units. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the aperture panel 130 is configured with apertures or shelving holes 140, each having a diameter suitable for insertion of cylindrical steel or PVC pipe components. These components are well known in the art and are typically available at any building supply store.
  • The aperture panel may provide gaps 150 of various lengths between each of the apertures or shelving holes 140. More specifically, for storage of larger items, a shelving support unit having an aperture panel with larger gaps 150 between said apertures or shelving holes 140 may be used. Conversely, storage of smaller objects will require smaller gaps between the apertures or shelving holes 140 so that said items do not fall through the gaps 150. Further, for larger items, the cylindrical steel or PVC pipes may be spaced and/or positioned further apart, in every other aperature or shelving hole for example, thereby reducing the number of cylindrical steel or PVC pipes used and reducing the relative weight of the system.
  • Additionally, it is understood that the length of the elongated arm 110, and the length of the aperture panel 130, and the number of apertures or shelving holes 140 may vary dependent upon the particular size of shelving desired. However, in a preferred embodiment, an elongated arm/aperture plane will be long enough to include anywhere from four to eight apertures or shelving holes, each having a diameter large enough to accommodate standard sized steel or PVC piping and each spaced approximately four (4) inches from each other, center to center (i.e. having a gap distance of approximately 2½ inch between each aperture or shelving hole).
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 each, respectively, show side and bottom views of a single shelving support unit used in the shelving system of the present invention. As shown in these figures, there are threaded rod sleeves 160, one located at and coupled to each opposite end of the elongated arm 110. As will be described in greater detail further hereinafter, a shelving support unit is coupled to the ceiling via a pair of vertical hanging rods which pass through these threaded rod sleeves 160. More specifically, a threaded rod (as shown in FIG. 5) is coupled through the threaded rod sleeve 160 on each side of the elongated arm 110. The shelving support unit may be positioned at any point along the threaded rod. A washer/nut pair is utilized on opposite sides of the threaded rod sleeve 160 to lock the rod 200 into position within the sleeve 160.
  • As described earlier herein, in a preferred embodiment a shelving support unit is coupled to the ceiling via a pair of vertical hanging rods which pass through the threaded rod sleeves located at opposite ends of the elongated arm. In a preferred embodiment these rods are mounted to the ceiling via mounting plates. FIG. 5, shows a close-up, perspective view of a vertical hanging rod 200 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 5, the hanging rod is preferably cylindrically shaped and made of sturdy steel; but, it may also be made of a lighter weight metal alloys, thick sturdy plastic, wood and/or fiberglass. A hanging rod is a threaded rod which may be cut to any desired length, depending upon the height at which the shelving system will be hung. A preferred diameter for a hanging, threaded rod is ¼ inch for residential applications and ½ inch for commercial/industrial applications although other diameters are possible and contemplated within the spirit and scope of the invention.
  • FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 illustrate close-up perspective, front and top side views (respectively) of a mounting plate 300 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIGS. 6 and 8, the mounting plate has a flat mounting surface 310 and a central sleeve 320 which preferably spans the entire height of the mounting plate and is positioned on a rear side of the plate, opposite the mounting surface 310. The central sleeve 320 is preferably positioned midway along the length of the mounting plate and has a hollow central cavity 330 of a preferred inside diameter of ⅝ inches, thereby allowing a threaded rod of 1 inch diameter to be easily inserted into the sleeve 320. It is understood that for threaded rods having a larger diameter, the central sleeve 320 may be configured with a larger hollow central cavity 330.
  • Referring now to FIG. 7, there is shown a close-up view of the flat mounting surface 310 of a mounting plate 300 in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, and as shown in FIG. 7, there are two pairs of mounting holes 340 a,b which are positioned on opposite sides of the mounting plate 300. These pairs of mounting holes 340 a,b allow the plate to be screwed/coupled to a ceiling beam. In a preferred embodiment, the mounting holes have a diameter of ⅜ inches and are designed to accommodate a 5/16 inch bolt or lag screw. Of course, it is understood that these figures merely illustrate preferred embodiments and that the actual mounting plate may have variable sized mounting surfaces (having different dimensions) with any number of mounting holes positioned on opposite sides of the plate for screwing the plate into a ceiling beam.
  • The mounting plates are designed to be coupled to one side of a ceiling beam or truss in a conventional ceiling environment. The plates are preferably screwed to the same side of a beam, two plates for each shelving support unit. After a mounting plate is coupled to the ceiling beam, a vertical hanging threaded rod is inserted into the central sleeve 320 on the rear side of the mounting plate and secured within the channel using a nut/washer pair on each side of the sleeve. In an alternative environment, a threaded rod may be attached to ceiling beam using any anchored threaded rod attachment known in the art, such as a Sammy Xpress™.
  • In a preferred embodiment, two mounting plates are used, along with two vertical hanging rods in order to support at least one single shelving support unit. Together, these all form a first assembled side for a ceiling mounted shelving system, as explained in great detail hereinafter. More specifically, FIG. 9 shows a first assembled side for a shelving system comprised of a pair of mounting plates 300, a pair of vertical hanging rods 200, and at least one shelving support unit 100. As shown, the vertical hanging rods are coupled to respective mounting plates and extend downward laterally therefrom. The mounting plates are preferably fastened or mounted to a ceiling support beam (not shown) when the shelving system is in use. As further shown in FIG. 9, at any point along the span of the vertical hanging rods, at least one shelving support unit is coupled to and between both rods. More specifically, the threaded rods 200 are inserted into threaded rod sleeves 160 located at the ends of each shelving support unit 100. The support unit 100 is then positioned anywhere along the rods to a desired height/position and is then secured to the threaded rod. The support unit and threaded rod are preferably secured together using washer/nut pairs above and below the threaded sleever 160. The nut on each side is tightened in order to secure the support unit 100 into position. It is understood that a plurality of shelving support units may be coupled between both rods, said units being interspersed along the length of the rods at various points/positions.
  • FIG. 10 shows a perspective view of a complete shelving system in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the shelving system is comprised of a plurality of shelving support units 100 having a shelf platform coupled laterally therebetween, in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As further shown in FIG. 10, each support unit 100 is suspended in mid-air via a pair of vertical hanging rods 200, with the support units being arranged in a parallel fashion to each other such that opposing support units are positioned along a common horizontal plane. Although the shelving system shown in FIG. 10 only has two pairs of opposing support units, it is understood that multiple support units can be coupled to the same pair of hanging rods such that each support unit is supported and suspended between the rods in a common vertical plane, with opposing support units being arranged in a common horizontal plane.
  • As further shown in FIG. 10, the vertical hanging rods 200 are equal in length and the support units are coupled to the rods at the same point on both ends so as to be suspended in a substantially flat, planar fashion The vertical hanging rods are coupled to mounting plates 300, which will be fastened/screwed or otherwise coupled to ceiling beams when the shelving system is in use, thereby supporting and suspending the shelving support units in mid-air.
  • As shown in FIG. 10, the shelf platform 900 which extends between the parallel support units is actually comprised of a plurality of cylindrical steel or PVC pipes, which are widely available in building supply and home improvement stores. The pipes are cut a length that is slightly larger than the span between the two shelving support units. The pipes are inserted in the apertures located in the multiple aperture panels of the shelving support units. It is understood that the length of the pipes may vary such that the shelving support units may be positioned at different distances from each other in order to offer a wider span or they may be positioned closer together in order to offer a smaller span. The distance is really only limited by the ceiling space available (since the shelving support units are coupled to mounting plates via vertical hanging rods and these plates must be mounted to beams within the ceiling), and the size of the object to be placed on the shelving system.
  • Additionally, the shelf platform width may vary in size depending on the needs of the user. More specifically, the width of the platform is a function of the number of pipes coupled between the support unit. The greater the number of pipes used, the wider the shelf platform. Accordingly, the number of pipes inserted may vary such that by adding additional pipes, a wider shelf platform may be created. It is understood that larger shelf platforms may require shelving support units having longer elongated arms/aperture panels with a larger number of apertures or shelving holes. Conversely, smaller shelf platforms may require smaller shelving support units of a shorter length with fewer apertures or shelving holes. In either event, the user may modify the number of pipes that are inserted in the holes/apertures of the aperture panels in order to accommodate the user's intended use of the system.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the outermost apertures or shelving holes on a shelving support unit include small securing holes 12 which are positioned directly therebelow. This hole will be used to couple locking mechanisms to the shelving support unit, in order to secure the cylindrical pipes on the outer edges when they are inserted into the apertures. FIGS. 11 and 12 show close-up views of a preferred embodiment of a locking mechanism used to secure outermost support pipes to the shelving support units. When a locking mechanism is coupled to the shelving support unit, it will prevent a cylindrical pipe from moving horizontally and help to provide one unitary and secure shelving system, as described further hereinafter. As shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, the locking mechanism includes an eyebolt inserted through the securing hole and preferably screwed to the shelving support unit on both sides. The locking mechanism further includes a self-tapping screw which is connected between the eyebolt and an outermost support pipe, thereby coupling the outermost pipe to the shelving support unit. Alternatively, small securing holes 12 may be positioned below each aperture 140 in the aperture panel 130 of each shelving support unit 100 in order to secure any and all cylindrical pipes which may be inserted through the apertures to the shelving support unit.
  • In a preferred embodiment the pipes which are inserted into the holes/apertures of the aperture panels are covered with locking caps. These caps help protect against any rough edges which may exist when the pipes are cut and also help to keep the pipes in place, thereby ensuring one secure unit. FIG. 13 illustrates a locking cap in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the locking cap is preferably round in shape and designed to fit around the end of the pipe after it is inserted through the apertures. Each locking cap preferably has a diameter slightly larger then the aperture such that when a pair of caps are secured to opposite end of a pipe, they prevent the pipe from sliding or moving horizontally, securing the pipe within the apertures.
  • Manufacture of the present invention is simple. Steel tubes may be bent using methods known in the art to form the elongated arms 110, while steel plates may be welded to the tubes to provide the aperture panels 130. One inch galvanized steel pipes or standard sized PVC pipes are preferably used to form the shelf platform structure. For a less industrial appearance, injection molded plastic may be used. This list is not exhaustive however and numerous prefabricated materials are suitable for use.
  • The user is afforded great flexibility using the present invention because the shelf platform can be easily and inexpensively modified when desired. Steel and plastic piping are readily available and inexpensive when compared to custom cut pieces of wood or plastic panels. Expanding or reducing the span of the shelf platform of the present invention both in length and depth is easily accomplished.
  • In summary, the present invention is a novel, inventive shelving system that addresses many of the shortcomings in the art. With respect to the above description, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function, manner and use are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention.
  • Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, while still falling within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A shelving system comprising:
at least two pairs of vertical hanging rods designed to extend downward from a ceiling;
a first shelving support unit suspended by and coupled between one pair of the vertical hanging rods; and
a second shelving support unit suspended by and coupled between the other pair of vertical hanging rods, said second shelving support unit being arranged a distance from but in parallel with said first shelving support unit such that both units are positioned along a common horizontal plane.
2. The shelving system of claim 1 further comprising at least two pairs of mounting plates, wherein said mounting plates in each pair are coupled to parallel ceiling beams and further wherein the two pairs of vertical hanging rods are coupled to the mounting plates, extending downward therefrom, away from the ceiling beams.
3. The shelving system of claim 1 wherein said first and second shelving support units are each configured with an aperture panel having a plurality of shelving holes positioned therein.
4. The shelving system of claim 3 wherein a plurality of cylindrical pipes are coupled between the first and second shelving support units, thereby forming a shelving platform which spans the distance between said first and second shelving support units.
5. The shelving system of claim 4 wherein the length of the shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by using longer cylindrical pipes and increasing the distance between the first and second shelving support units.
6. The shelving system of claim 4 wherein the width of the shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by increasing or decreasing the actual number of cylindrical pipes in the plurality that are coupled between the first and second shelving support units.
7. A shelving system comprising:
at least one pair of shelving support units arranged in a parallel fashion along a common horizontal plane but spaced apart from each other by a lateral span, each support unit being supported and suspended from a ceiling via a pair of vertical hanging rods; and
a plurality of cylindrical pipes coupled between the shelving support units, traversing the span, thereby providing a shelf platform that is positioned between the support units and suspended from said ceiling.
8. The shelving system of claim 7 further comprising at least two pairs of mounting plates, wherein said mounting plates in each pair are coupled to a ceiling beam and further wherein the vertical hanging rods in each pair are coupled to a respective pair of mounting plates, extending downward therefrom, away from the ceiling.
9. The shelving system of claim 7 wherein said shelving support units are each configured with an aperture panel having a plurality of shelving holes positioned therein.
10. The shelving system of claim 9 wherein the plurality of cylindrical pipes are coupled between the shelving support units via the shelving holes such that the cylindrical pipes are inserted through the parallel shelving holes in both of the shelving support units.
11. The shelving system of claim 7 wherein the length of the shelving platform may be varied by using longer cylindrical pipes thereby increasing the span between the pair of shelving support units.
12. The shelving system of claim 6 wherein the number of cylindrical pipes coupled between the shelving support units may be selectively adjusted and varied, thereby altering the width of the shelving platform.
13. A shelving system comprising:
a first set of shelving support units suspended by and coupled between a first pair of the vertical hanging rods, the shelving units being coupled in a vertically parallel fashion such that they share a common vertical plane;
a second set of shelving support unit suspended by and coupled between a second pair of vertical hanging rods, said second set shelving support unit being coupled in a vertically parallel fashion such that they share a common vertical plane;
wherein first shelving support units in said first and second sets are arranged a distance from but in parallel with each other that both units are positioned along a first common horizontal plane; and
further wherein second shelving support units in the first and second sets are arranged a distance from but in parallel with each other that both units are positioned along a second common horizontal plane.
14. The shelving system of claim 13 wherein the shelving support units in the first and second sets are each configured with an aperture panel having a plurality of shelving holes positioned therein.
15. The shelving system of claim 13 wherein a plurality of cylindrical pipes are coupled between the first shelving support units in the first and second sets, thereby forming a first shelving platform which spans the distance between said first shelving support units.
16. The shelving system of claim 15 wherein a plurality of cylindrical pipes are coupled between the second shelving support units in the first and second sets, thereby forming a second shelving platform which spans the distance between said second shelving support units.
17. The shelving system of claim 15 wherein the length of the first shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by using longer cylindrical pipes and increasing the distance between the first shelving support units in the first and second sets.
18. The shelving system of claim 16 wherein the length of the second shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by using longer cylindrical pipes and increasing the distance between the second shelving support units in the first and second sets.
19. The shelving system of claim 15 wherein the width of the first shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by increasing or decreasing the actual number of cylindrical pipes in the plurality that are coupled between the first shelving support units in the first and second sets.
20. The shelving system of claim 16 wherein the width of the second shelving platform may be selectively adjusted by increasing or decreasing the actual number of cylindrical pipes in the plurality that are coupled between the second shelving support units in the first and second sets.
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US8590714B1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2013-11-26 Jose L. Osuna-Valerio Cash box holding apparatus

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US8590714B1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2013-11-26 Jose L. Osuna-Valerio Cash box holding apparatus

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