US20090120334A1 - Tabletop for Outdoor Use Having Metal Frame - Google Patents

Tabletop for Outdoor Use Having Metal Frame Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090120334A1
US20090120334A1 US11/939,629 US93962907A US2009120334A1 US 20090120334 A1 US20090120334 A1 US 20090120334A1 US 93962907 A US93962907 A US 93962907A US 2009120334 A1 US2009120334 A1 US 2009120334A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
layer
tabletop
binder
fiber fabric
decorative
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/939,629
Inventor
Oliver Wang
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY Ltd
Original Assignee
AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY Ltd filed Critical AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY Ltd
Priority to US11/939,629 priority Critical patent/US20090120334A1/en
Assigned to AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY, LIMITED reassignment AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY, LIMITED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: WANG, OLIVER
Publication of US20090120334A1 publication Critical patent/US20090120334A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B13/00Details of tables or desks
    • A47B13/08Table tops; Rims therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B37/00Tables adapted for other particular purposes
    • A47B37/04Tables specially adapted for use in the garden or otherwise in the open air, e.g. with means for holding umbrellas or umbrella-like sunshades

Abstract

A tabletop for use on an outdoor table is disclosed. A metal frame having at least one horizontally oriented transverse member defines the general shape of the tabletop. A fiber fabric layer is affixed to the top of the transverse member. A decorative layer comprising a plurality of spaced apart decorative elements provides the outer surface of the table top. A mesh layer is positioned between the fiber fabric layer and the decorative layer. The elements are adhered together by a binder comprised of adhesive material. The binder is interposed between and contacting the at least one transverse member and the decorative layer so that the layers of fiber fabric and mesh are embedded within the binder and the decorative layer is fixedly adhered to the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member.

Description

    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to a tabletop, and more particularly to a tabletop for outdoor use that is reinforced with a metal frame.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Tabletops are generally made of wood. However, wood tabletops are often subject to deterioration due to acidic, basic, air or water conditions over time. Therefore, tabletops, especially those for outdoor uses, are now made of other materials such as plastics, metals, or composite materials.
  • Since plastic materials are light weight and can more readily withstand harsh environmental conditions, the majority of tabletops for outdoor use are currently made of plastic materials. If such lighter materials are employed, sufficient supporting strength and rigidity cannot be achieved without additional structure. Some designs include a base plate, with the object of having sufficient strength to avoid warping, giving, or bending, especially for larger tables. However, tabletops made of bulky plastic materials and large supporting plates are too heavy in weight, especially for portable tables. It is still necessary, however, for the tables to provide sufficient strength and rigidity to support normal activities without warping or bending.
  • Tables have been made with cement board as a base plate. These tables typically include a magnesium silicate plate including magnesium oxide (MgO) as the main component, or other similar composite plate. The table top made of such material remains reasonably flat, but only for smaller size tables, up to about 20 or 30 inches in diameter. If the plate used in larger tables having diameters of 42 inches and up to 80 inches for a rectangular table top, the table warps in extreme temperatures. This is because the poly resin included as a binder or media used to adhere the support plate to the stone layer expands and contracts based on temperature gradients. Resin expands when the temperature increases and contracts when the temperature drops. The volume of the resin varies with the temperature change. If the base plate which is adhered to the resin shows a certain level of flexibility, it tends to bend with resin. The whole table then warps.
  • Some table tops have been made using a metal plate, which is strong and tough to resist bending, but adds significant weight to the table. In addition, the metal plate usually does not have good adhesion with the resin and may separate from the resin easily. Glue has been used to attempt to keep the plate adhered to the stone top. In some cases, when a much stronger table is desired, a single or double frame underneath of the plate may be used to provide additional strength. This only adds to the problem of the heavy weight. Such tables are a burden to ship, deliver, and move.
  • The type of binder used for outdoor table tops may also be a factor in warping. Polyester resin is a frequently used binder due to its cost. The drawback of polyester resin is its thermal expansion and contraction properties. The resin tends to expand and/or contract significantly with changes in temperature causing it to change volume. If the frame does not provide sufficient resistance to bending, the whole table will warp. If the deformation and temperature cycling is frequent, the table may even crack.
  • Thus, there is a need for relatively low cost tabletops with sufficient support strength to resist warping, and sufficiently light weight to be portable.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Embodiments of the invention relate to a tabletop for use on an outdoor table that includes a metal supporting frame having at least one portion that forms a substantially horizontally oriented transverse member. The tabletop further includes a layer of horizontally oriented fiber fabric affixed to the top of the supporting frame transverse member by adhesive material, substantially horizontal decorative layer positioned above and proximate to the transverse member, and a layer of horizontally oriented fiber mesh affixed to the bottom of the decorative layer by adhesive material, a substantially horizontal layer of adhesive material interposed between and contacting the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member and the horizontal decorative layer so that the layers of fiber fabric or fiber mesh are embedded within the adhesive material. The decorative layer is adhered to the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member.
  • The adhesive material may be a binder material, such as resin formed of an unsaturated polyester resin, a vinyl ester resin, or an epoxy resin. The decorative layer typically resembles stone and is formed of one or more of stone, marble, clay, slate, granite, tile, ceramic, or porcelain. The supporting frame may be formed of aluminum, iron, or steel and the fiber fabric may have a random orientation or have a woven pattern. A metal mesh may be used in place of the fiber fabric.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tabletop frame for one embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 2A-2D illustrates exemplary shapes of the tabletop frame for various embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a tabletop for one embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a tabletop for another embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is a data flow diagram describing a method of creating a tabletop according to an embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Embodiments of the present invention provide a tabletop for outdoor use that is light weight while maintaining support strength and rigidity. The tabletop has sufficient strength in the adhesion among its components to resist deformation or warping. Further, the tabletop is resistant to common outdoor environmental conditions, such as acidic, basic, air, and wet conditions.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a perspective view of a tabletop frame 20 of an embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. The metal frame 20 includes at least one horizontally oriented transverse member 21. A rim 22 is coupled with and surrounds the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 defining the shape of the tabletop. In the present illustration, the rim 22 defines the shape of a circle and there are four horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 that extend from the rim 22 at ninety degree intervals and meet in the center of the defined circle. The horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 coupled with the rim 22 add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20.
  • FIGS. 2A-2D illustrate several other exemplary shapes of the metal frame 20 that may be used with various sized tabletops.
  • FIG. 2A shows a tabletop frame 20 having an outer rim 22 also in the shape of a circle. In this embodiment illustration, there is a concentric circular horizontally oriented transverse member 21 a that is in the same horizontal plane as but smaller than rim 22. Further illustrated are four horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 that extend from the rim 22 at ninety degree intervals and meet the inner circular horizontally oriented transverse member 21 a at ninety degree intervals. Again, the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 and 21 a coupled with the rim 22 add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20.
  • FIG. 2B shows a tabletop frame 20 having an outer rim 22 also in the shape of a circle. In this embodiment illustration, there is a rectangular shaped horizontally oriented transverse member 21 b that is in the same horizontal plane as but smaller than rim 22. Both the rim 22 and the rectangular shaped horizontally oriented transverse member 21 b share the same center point. Further illustrated are four horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 that extend from the rim 22 at ninety degree intervals and meet the inner rectangular shaped horizontally oriented transverse member 21 b such that each bisects one side of the rectangular shaped horizontally oriented transverse member 21 b. Again, the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 and 21 b coupled with the rim 22 add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20.
  • FIG. 2C shows a tabletop frame 20 having a rectangular shaped rim 22 a-b with the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c-e in a particular configuration. Such configurations become favorable when as the overall size of the tabletop gets larger. The additional horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c-e coupled with the rim 22 a-b add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20. In this particular example configuration, a first set of horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c extend perpendicularly from the long side of the rectangular rim 22 a and terminate at the opposite side of the rectangular rim 22 a. A second set of horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 d extend perpendicularly from the short sides of the rectangular rim 22 b and terminate when they encounter one of the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c of the first set. A third set of horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 e extend perpendicularly between two of the first set of horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c. Again, the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 c-e and 21 b coupled with the rim 22 a-b add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20.
  • FIG. 2D shows a tabletop frame 20 having a rectangular shape with rounded corners with the horizontally oriented transverse members 21 at various acute and obtuse angles to each other and the outer rim 22. Again, the horizontally oriented transverse member(s) 21 coupled with the rim 22 add to the overall stability, strength, and rigidity of the metal frame 20.
  • The metal frame 20 helps to keep the table from warping and provides additional strength. The metal frame 20 may be formed of aluminum, iron, steel, or similar metals or alloys. The metal frame 20 also provides a convenient means of connecting with the tabletop with the table legs.
  • Several exemplary arrangements of transverse members 21 and rims 22 have been illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2A-D. The arrangements need not be so limited, however, with respect to the present invention. The transverse members 21 may be arranged in any manner, so long as they provide sufficient support for the tabletop 10. Rim 22, or additional transverse members 21 may define any shape desired for the perimeter of a tabletop. Spaces formed between various transverse members 21 and rim 22 may be open, reinforced with an inner structure, or may comprise some other desired structure. Any number of transverse members 21 may be used within the scope of the present invention.
  • Tabletops according to embodiments of the present invention may be used for outdoor use, and are often used in conjunction with an umbrella to provide shade or protection of individuals from rain or sun. In one embodiment of the invention, the center of the tabletop 10 can include an intersection of the transverse members 21 that define a hole for an umbrella. Such an umbrella hole is optional, and mostly suitable for dining tables, bar tables, conference tables, or large tables. Smaller tables, such as balcony tables, coffee tables, side tables, or end tables, may not require an umbrella.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of an embodiment of the present invention. As shown, a tabletop 10 is comprised of a metal frame 20 covered by a fiber fabric layer 25. The fiber fabric layer 25 is adhered to the metal frame 20 by a binder 30, such as a resin or other adhesive material. Typically, the binder 30 soaks through the fiber fabric layer 25 and adheres to the metal frame 20. On top of the fiber fabric layer 25, there is a mesh layer 28 covered by a decorative layer 40. The binder 30 is also used to adhere the decorative layer 40 to the mesh layer 28.
  • A sufficient amount of binder 30 surrounds and fills the gaps between individual spaced apart elements/pieces 45 of the decorative layer 40. The use of individual spaced apart decorative elements/pieces 45 enhances the bond with binder 30. For instance, if a single piece decorative layer 40 were to be used, there would be a likelihood of separation from binder 30 due to variation in thermal expansion or contraction. By using a plurality of spaced apart decorative elements 45, however, the thermal expansion or contraction effect is substantially reduced. Binder 30 saturates mesh layer 28 affixing it to decorative layer 40. The binder 30 further saturates and adheres the fiber fabric layer 25 to the metal frame 20
  • The fiber fabric layer 25 and mesh layer 28 used in the embodiments of the present invention can be embedded into the binder 30. The primary function of the mesh layer 28 is to anchor the decorative elements 45 of the decorative layer 40 and to improve the strength of the adhesion between the binder 30 and the decorative layer 40. The loose weave of the mesh layer 28 permits binder 30 to freely surround and penetrate through the mesh layer 28 to embed the layer. The mesh layer 28 also lowers the brittleness of the binder 30, simultaneously enhancing the tensile strength properties of the binder 30. The loose weave is also flexible, which can avoid or reduce cracking or chipping of the binder 30, further preventing the whole table top from warping and cracking.
  • The mesh layer 28 typically may have openings or spaces of about 10 mm by 15 mm, although larger or smaller dimensions may be used as known to those of ordinary skill in the art, depending in part on the size of elements 45. In general, when a woven opening is not generally visible, the material would be considered fabric.
  • The fiber fabric 25 can be a glass fiber “random” matting, in which the fibers are oriented generally randomly. This type of matting gives great strength in all directions. A second type of fiber fabric 25, known as “woven” matting could also be used. Such a fiber fabric 25 is tightly woven in a similar manner as a cotton sheet. The fiber fabric 25 tends to provide greater vertical support strength and rigidity in that deformation stress is randomized along the various fibers. During temperature cycling, the binder 30 expands and contracts at a different rate from the metal frame. This can cause de-lamination of support layers. Even with less planar metal frames, the variation in thermal expansion and contraction properties may cause the binder 30 to separate from the metal frame 20 in extreme conditions. By adding a layer of fiber fabric 25, the deformation stress tends to be more randomized and controlled. Further, when the fiber fabric 25 is embedded in cured binder 30, it binds well to transverse members 21 and provides enhanced vertical support strength to a table.
  • The mesh layer 28 is typically formed from nylon thread, although other natural or synthetic fibers may be used. For example, the mesh layer 28 can be fiber glass formed of continuous fibers, such as those used in electrical insulation, cement, or plastics reinforcement. The mesh layer 28 often has the appearance of thin netting. The mesh layer 28 typically has a density of about 300 g/m2. Mineral fibers may also be used. During assembly, the mesh layer 28 provides temporary fixing to hold the decorative elements 45 in position. Great strength is not needed at that step, but it is important that the resin is able to penetrate through the openings in the mesh layer 28 onto the decorative elements 45 below to ensure good adhesion.
  • In some embodiments, the mesh layer 28 or fiber fabric layer 25 may also be replaced by a layer of metal screen (not shown). The metal screen would typically be attached to the metal frame 20 by standard metal fasteners, such as screws, bolts, rivets, or the like. Of course, a metal screen replacing mesh layer 28 would generally be required to provide a desired level of vertical support. A variety of metals may be used, such as aluminum, steel, iron, or alloys thereof. Preferably, the screen would be sufficiently flexible to lie flat within the binder 30. Otherwise, portions of the screen might protrude from the binder 30, causing irregularities or exposed screen, which might require grinding and/or painting.
  • The tabletop 10 may further comprise a decorative layer 40 adhered to the mesh layer 28 with the binder 30. The decorative layer 40 will typically contain a decorative design. For example, the decorative layer 40 may be configured to resemble stone or similar materials. The particular design chosen is not a limiting feature of the present invention. The decorative layer 40 may include one or more of stone, marble, clay, slate, granite, tile, ceramic, porcelain or a decorative design that resembles stone. The decorative layer 40 may include one or more stone material, including marble, clay, slate, or granite, or may include tile, ceramic, porcelain or a decorative design that resembles stone. The decorative layer 40 may include a mixture of stone powder, coloring powder, and calcium powder to resemble stone.
  • A decorative layer 40 is shown adhered to the mesh layer 28. The decorative layer 40 is formed of individual elements 45 having gaps therein, as shown. In an embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the top and side pieces of the decorative layer 40 are separate, and a gap is shown between pieces of the decorative layer 40 on the top surface of the table.
  • Binders 30 that may be used with the present invention include unsaturated polyester resin, vinyl ester resin, epoxy resin, or similar such resins. The binder 30 may include a pigment to enhance its color. In one binder 30 example, 1 Kg of resin is added to 7-15 g of an adhesive formed of calcium powder and color pigment. Alternatively, we can also use vinyl ester resin and epoxy resin. Fine sand may be added to the resin if a rough texture is desired. A curing agent may be added to speed the drying time of the resin.
  • FIG. 5 is a data flow diagram describing a method of creating a tabletop according to an embodiment of the present invention. The first step is to place a layer of fiber fabric on top of a metal frame that defines the outline of a tabletop 50. Next, cover the layer of fiber fabric with a binder such that it soaks through the layer of fiber fabric and adheres the layer of fiber fabric to the metal frame forming a metal-fiber reinforced structure 52. A decorative layer is placed face down and covered with a mesh layer. Some binder is poured/spread atop the mesh layer to provide a temporary bond between the decorative layer and the mesh layer 54. More binder is then added to substantially completely impregnate the decorative and mesh layers creating a binder layer 56. The binder layer is then smoothed out. The metal-fiber reinforced structure is then placed atop the binder layer allowing the binder layer to further soak through the metal-fiber reinforced structure and cure 58. The result is a finished tabletop.
  • It is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the exact configuration as illustrated and described herein. Accordingly, all expedient modifications readily attainable by one of ordinary skill in the art from the disclosure set forth herein, or by routine experimentation therefrom, are deemed to be within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. A tabletop for use on an outdoor table comprising:
a metal frame having at least one horizontally oriented transverse member wherein the metal frame defines the general shape of the tabletop;
a horizontally oriented fiber fabric layer affixed to the top of the horizontally oriented transverse member;
a substantially horizontal decorative layer, wherein the decorative layer comprises a plurality of spaced apart decorative elements;
a horizontally oriented mesh layer positioned between the fiber fabric layer and the decorative layer; and
a binder comprised of adhesive material, said binder interposed between and contacting the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member and the horizontal decorative layer so that the layers of fiber fabric and mesh are embedded within the binder and the decorative layer is fixedly adhered to the at least one horizontally oriented transverse member.
2. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the binder is a resin.
3. The tabletop of claim 2, wherein the resin is one or more of an unsaturated polyester resin, a vinyl ester resin, or an epoxy resin.
4. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the decorative layer resembles stone.
5. The tabletop of claim 4, wherein the decorative elements comprise one or more of stone, marble, clay, slate, granite, tile, ceramic, or porcelain.
6. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the metal frame is formed of one or more of aluminum, iron, or steel.
7. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the fibers in the fiber fabric layer have a random orientation.
8. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of fiber glass.
9. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of nylon thread.
10. The tabletop of claim 1, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of a metal screen.
11. A method of forming a tabletop comprising:
placing a layer of fiber fabric on top of a metal frame that defines the outline of a tabletop;
substantially covering the layer of fiber fabric with a binder such that it soaks through the layer of fiber fabric and adheres the layer of fiber fabric to the metal frame forming a metal-fiber reinforced structure;
placing a decorative layer face down and covering the decorative layer with a mesh layer;
adding binder on top of the mesh layer to impregnate and bond the decorative layer and mesh layer together creating a binder layer;
smoothing out the binder layer; and
placing the metal-fiber reinforced structure onto the binder layer allowing the binder layer to further soak through the fiber layer and cure.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the binder is a resin.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the resin is one or more of an unsaturated polyester resin, a vinyl ester resin, or an epoxy resin.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the decorative layer resembles stone.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the decorative elements comprise one or more of stone, marble, clay, slate, granite, tile, ceramic, or porcelain.
16. The method of claim 11, wherein the metal frame is formed of one or more of aluminum, iron, or steel.
17. The method of claim 11, wherein the fibers in the fiber fabric layer have a random orientation.
18. The method of claim 11, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of fiber glass.
19. The method of claim 11, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of nylon thread.
20. The method of claim 11, wherein the mesh layer is comprised of a metal screen.
US11/939,629 2007-11-14 2007-11-14 Tabletop for Outdoor Use Having Metal Frame Abandoned US20090120334A1 (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9095208B1 (en) 2011-11-28 2015-08-04 Agio International Company, Limited Tabletop system
US20180215505A1 (en) * 2017-01-30 2018-08-02 Integrated Composite Products, Inc. Composite pallet

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1684966A (en) * 1923-08-13 1928-09-18 Simmons Co Metal table
US3521418A (en) * 1967-09-25 1970-07-21 Ceramic Tile Walls Inc Pre-finished decorative rigid panel
US3884737A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-05-20 Beaman Corp Method of forming a decorative panel and wall
US4089783A (en) * 1974-02-08 1978-05-16 Crosland Filters Limited Filter
US4456944A (en) * 1980-08-25 1984-06-26 Industrial Management Company Table with conductive top
US5080960A (en) * 1989-10-10 1992-01-14 Reemay, Inc. Composite sheet of polypropylene film and non-woven fabric for separating stacked groups of containers
US5759658A (en) * 1996-04-26 1998-06-02 Tables International Corporation Composite panels, articles incorporating same and method
US20040200392A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Sun Isle Inc. Table top and process of making the same
US20050005827A1 (en) * 2003-07-09 2005-01-13 Kun-Shung Chang Table top
US20070094963A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2007-05-03 Mcdonald Frank Modular building panels, method of assembly of building panels and method of making building panels
US20070227416A1 (en) * 2004-10-19 2007-10-04 Oliver Wang Tabletop for outdoor use reinforced with foam material and metal frame

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1684966A (en) * 1923-08-13 1928-09-18 Simmons Co Metal table
US3521418A (en) * 1967-09-25 1970-07-21 Ceramic Tile Walls Inc Pre-finished decorative rigid panel
US3884737A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-05-20 Beaman Corp Method of forming a decorative panel and wall
US4089783A (en) * 1974-02-08 1978-05-16 Crosland Filters Limited Filter
US4456944A (en) * 1980-08-25 1984-06-26 Industrial Management Company Table with conductive top
US5080960A (en) * 1989-10-10 1992-01-14 Reemay, Inc. Composite sheet of polypropylene film and non-woven fabric for separating stacked groups of containers
US5759658A (en) * 1996-04-26 1998-06-02 Tables International Corporation Composite panels, articles incorporating same and method
US20040200392A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Sun Isle Inc. Table top and process of making the same
US20070094963A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2007-05-03 Mcdonald Frank Modular building panels, method of assembly of building panels and method of making building panels
US20050005827A1 (en) * 2003-07-09 2005-01-13 Kun-Shung Chang Table top
US20070227416A1 (en) * 2004-10-19 2007-10-04 Oliver Wang Tabletop for outdoor use reinforced with foam material and metal frame

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9095208B1 (en) 2011-11-28 2015-08-04 Agio International Company, Limited Tabletop system
US20180215505A1 (en) * 2017-01-30 2018-08-02 Integrated Composite Products, Inc. Composite pallet
US10457442B2 (en) * 2017-01-30 2019-10-29 Integrated Composite Products, Inc. Composite pallet

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Owner name: AGIO INERNATIONAL COMPANY, LIMITED, CHINA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WANG, OLIVER;REEL/FRAME:020453/0801

Effective date: 20080120

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION