US20090113760A1 - Sports shoe - Google Patents

Sports shoe Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090113760A1
US20090113760A1 US12/264,897 US26489708A US2009113760A1 US 20090113760 A1 US20090113760 A1 US 20090113760A1 US 26489708 A US26489708 A US 26489708A US 2009113760 A1 US2009113760 A1 US 2009113760A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
supports
shoe
plurality
forward
rearward
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/264,897
Inventor
Tim Dominguez
Original Assignee
Tim Dominguez
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US192407P priority Critical
Priority to US7221508P priority
Application filed by Tim Dominguez filed Critical Tim Dominguez
Priority to US12/264,897 priority patent/US20090113760A1/en
Publication of US20090113760A1 publication Critical patent/US20090113760A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/182Helicoidal springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/143Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form provided with wedged, concave or convex end portions, e.g. for improving roll-off of the foot
    • A43B13/145Convex portions, e.g. with a bump or projection, e.g. 'Masai' type shoes

Abstract

Arrays of resilient supports provide an energy absorbing shoe suitable for enhancing an exercise regime involving leg-shoe interactions.

Description

    PRIORITY CLAIM
  • This utility patent application claims the benefit of U.S. Prov. Pat. Appl. No. 61/072,215 filed Mar. 28, 2008 and U.S. Prov. Pat. Appl. No. 61/001,924 filed Nov. 5, 2007.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to a device for enhancing an exercise regime involving leg-shoe interactions such as running, jumping, hopping, leaping and the like. In particular, the invention concerns the mechanical arts and the use of resilient shoe components.
  • 2. Discussion of the Related Art
  • Designing for look and style are dominant forces among shoemakers. But, such designs frequently compromise utility and rarely lead to products with novel, useful design features unrelated to style.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A shoe comprises a shoe upper and a shoe sole where a first plurality of energy absorbing resilient supports is arranged as a forward array extending from the toe of the shoe rearward and a second plurality of energy absorbing resilient supports is arranged as rearward array extending from the rear of the shoe forward, a region between said forward and rearward arrays having no supports and the number of supports in the first and second arrays not exceeding forty in embodiments based on a sparse array.
  • In an embodiment, an imaginary line in the form of a curve extending from the toe to the rear of the shoe and about dividing the shoe into equal parts and from the first plurality of supports, a third plurality of supports being arranged to either side of the shoe curve and from the second plurality of supports, a fourth plurality of supports being arranged to either side of the shoe curve.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is described with reference to the accompanying figures. These figures, incorporated herein and forming part of the specification, illustrate the present invention and, together with the description, further serve to explain the principles of the invention and to enable a person skilled in the relevant art to make and use the invention.
  • FIG. 1 shows a side-view of a sports shoe in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIGS. 2A-2C show arrays of supports of the sports shoe of FIG. 1.
  • FIGS. 3A-F show shapes of supports of the sports shoe of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The disclosure provided in the following pages describes examples of some embodiments of the invention. The designs, figures, and description are non-limiting examples of certain embodiments of the invention. For example, other embodiments of the disclosed device may or may not include the features described herein. Moreover, disclosed advantages and benefits may apply to only certain embodiments of the invention and should be not used to limit the disclosed inventions.
  • FIG. 1 shows a side view of a shoe made in accordance with the present invention 100. The shoe has an upper portion 102, a sole portion 104 and supports 106.
  • Projecting downward from the shoe's outsole 105 is an array of supports 106. The supports are in arranged in a plurality of groups including a forward group 114 and a rearward group 110. In various embodiments, the forward and rearward groups are separated by an unpopulated region 112 having no supports.
  • As shown in the figure, there are a plurality of supports 106 in each of the forward 114 and rearward 110 groups. In the embodiment shown, three supports are visible in the side-view of the rearward group and three supports are visible in the side-view of the forward group. In various embodiments, matching adjacent supports are located on the opposite side of the shoe.
  • FIGS. 2A-2C show embodiments of various forward and rearward arrays of supports. Any of the forward and rearward groups may be exchanged among the embodiments shown. For example, the forward array 206 of FIG. 2B may be replaced by the forward array 202 of FIG. 2A and vice versa.
  • FIG. 2A shows a forward array of supports 202 and a rearward array of supports 204. In an embodiment, the forward array consists of six supports arranged three to either side of a central shoe curve z1-z1 and forming three pairs of substantially side-by-side supports. As used herein, a central shoe curve extends from the toe to the rear of a shoe and about evenly divides the shoe. In another embodiment, the forward array includes the six supports and a seventh support on the shoe curve near the toe of the shoe. The rearward array of supports 204 consists of four supports arranged two to either side of the shoe curve z1-z1.
  • FIG. 2B shows a forward array of supports 206 and a rearward array of supports 208. The forward array consists of seven supports. Near the toe, a central shoe curve z2-z2 separates first and second substantially adjacent supports. To the rear of these supports, a third support is located on the shoe curve and further to the rear four supports are arranged two to either side of the shoe curve forming two pairs of substantially side-by-side supports.
  • In an embodiment, the rearward array of supports 208 consists of four supports arranged two to either side of the shoe curve z2-z2 forming two pairs of substantially side-by-side supports. In another embodiment the rearward array includes the four supports and an additional two supports arranged one to either side of the shoe curve and forward of the four supports forming a third pair of substantially side-by-side supports.
  • FIG. 2C shows a forward array of supports 210 and a rearward array of supports 212. The forward array consists of six supports; to one side of a central shoe curve z3-z3 three supports are arranged in staggered relationship with three supports to the other side of the shoe curve. In some embodiments, the supports nearest the toe are staggered such that innermost supports are nearest the shoe toe (as shown). In other embodiments, the supports nearest the toe are staggered such that the outermost supports are nearest the shoe toe.
  • The rearward array of supports 212 consists of four supports; to one side of the central shoe curve z3-z3 two supports are arranged in staggered relationship with two supports to the other side of the shoe curve. In some embodiments, the supports nearest the heel are staggered such that the outermost supports are nearest the shoe rear (as shown). In other embodiments, the supports nearest the heel are staggered such that the innermost supports are nearest the shoe rear (as shown).
  • Embodiments of the invention thus utilize sparse arrays of supports arranged on and/or to either side of a shoe-curve extending from the shoe toe to the shoe rear and about dividing the shoe into two equal portions. Sparse arrays here refers to arrays of between one and thirty-nine supports. In some embodiments, the number of supports in the forward array is in the range of one to seven supports and the number of supports in the rearward array is in the range of one to six supports. In yet other embodiments, the number of supports in forward and rearward arrays of a single shoe is in a range of 14 to 40 supports.
  • As mentioned above, it is anticipated that the present disclosure will enable persons of ordinary skill in the art to make yet other support arrays based on the support arrays disclosed herein. Such other arrays are within the scope of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 3A-3G show embodiments of variously shaped three-dimensional supports. Generally, the figures are oriented such that the upward facing portions are the support's interface with the outsole 105 of a shoe. The downward facing portions of the figures are therefore the support tips or interfaces that contact surface(s) supporting the user.
  • FIGS. 3A-B show supports having generally rounded tips 302, 304. In particular, FIG. 3A shows a substantially hemispherical shape and FIG. 3B shows a substantially parabolic or elliptical shape. Other shapes having rounded tips will also be known to persons of ordinary skill in the art and are included in the scope of the invention.
  • FIGS. 3C and 3E show frustrums of cones. FIG. 3C shows a circular cone while FIG. 3E shows a multi-sided, here five-sided, cone. The tips 306, 310 of these supports are shown to be flat; in other embodiments, they are rounded.
  • FIGS. 3D and 3F show conical shapes. FIG. 3D shows a circular cone with tip 308 while FIG. 3F shows a multi-sided, here five-sided, cone with tip 312.
  • In various embodiments, supports 106 may have any one or any combination of these shapes. And, in various embodiments the supports are sized such that the average width of the shoe will accommodate two to four supports arranged side-by-side.
  • In some embodiments the supports are solid and resilience is determined mainly by the material properties. In other embodiments, the supports are hollow and resilience is determined by material properties. In yet other embodiments, the supports are hollow but provide a gas tight chamber such that resilience is strongly influenced by the pressure of the gas therein and the elasticity of the material.
  • In an embodiment, forward and rearward arrays use a single shape. In another embodiment, forward arrays have a first shape while rearward arrays have a second shape. In yet other embodiments, particular arrays have a plurality of different shapes. Among other things, shapes may be chosen to vary a spring rate and/or damping rate of a portion of the shoe.
  • In some embodiments shoes 100 are manufactured complete with the supports 106 of the present invention. Here, in various embodiments, the supports are formed integral with all or a portion of the sole 104, 105, are formed integral with the entire shoe, are adhered to a sole of the shoe or are otherwise attached to the shoe using a suitable method known to persons of ordinary skill in the art. Where separate supports are attached to a sole of the shoe, the means of attachment includes mechanical attachment as with fasteners such as screw fasteners, bonding attachment by melting material of one or both of the sole and the support and adhesive attachment by use of an adhesive known in the art.
  • And in some embodiments, supports 106 are assembled onto the shoe 100 after the shoe is manufactured. For example, a support “kit” is used by a shoe shop or a shoe owner to refit shoes with the supports of the present invention. Here, separate supports are attached to a sole 104, 105 of the shoe, the means of attachment includes mechanical attachment as with fasteners such as screw fasteners, bonding attachment by melting material of one or both of the sole and the support and adhesive attachment by use of an adhesive known in the art.
  • The supports 106 may be made from any resilient material suitable for use with shoes. For example, in various embodiments natural materials including plant derived materials such as rubber and cork may be used alone or in combination with natural and man-made materials. And in various embodiments man-made materials including polymers such as rubbers, silicone polymers, dense foams, and man-made rubber-like materials such as industrial polymers including butyl rubber are used. In yet other embodiments, any one or more of the above mentioned materials and rubber, styrene, SBS, HDPE, other ethylenic materials, silicone materials, regrind rubbers, suitable binding materials, elastomers, LLDPE cellular rubber, cellular polymers, and other suitable materials known to persons of ordinary skill in the art may be used to make the supports.
  • In operation shoes having the supports of the present invention provide a resilient platform for users. Supports that are compressed between the user's foot and an external support, such as a floor or another surface, provide a spring-like action, returning energy stored in the support to the user in a rebounding action as the supports tend to resume their normal shape after absorbing an impact.
  • In an embodiment, the impact absorbing capability of suitable resilient supports reduces shock loads otherwise supported by the human body and in particular by the skeletal joints of the human body. By cushioning impacts the stress on joints is reduced during exercise tending to preserve proper joint function and prevent joint injury.
  • In some embodiments, sparse arrays of supports increase heel-to-toe shock absorption available to users of the present invention. In addition, the number, placement and shape of the supports provide ready means for adjusting the load distribution on the user's feet, the spring rate of the combined supports and the load capacity of the shoe. For example, a hemispherical support provides a relatively stiff support as compared to a conical support having a similar major diameter.
  • Choice of materials also plays an important role in adjusting the resilience of the support system and the longevity of the support, the harder, tougher man-made materials providing less energy absorption but providing longer life as compared to softer rubbers commonly found in shoes.
  • In an embodiment, a shoe spring rate is adjusted to match the weight of the user and the particular sport being played, the adjustment being accomplished by selecting suitable combinations of the support material, support shape and number of supports.
  • While various embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not limitation. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in the form and details can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. As such, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and equivalents thereof.

Claims (7)

1. A shoe comprising:
a shoe upper and a shoe sole;
a first plurality of energy absorbing resilient supports arranged as a forward array extending from the toe of the shoe rearward;
a second plurality of energy absorbing resilient supports arranged as rearward array extending from the rear of the shoe forward;
the supports transferring loads between the shoe sole and one or more surfaces supporting the shoe;
a region between said forward and rearward arrays having no supports; and,
the number of supports in the first and second arrays not exceeding forty.
2. The shoe of claim 1 further comprising:
an imaginary line in the form of a curve extending from the toe to the rear of the shoe and about dividing the shoe into equal parts;
from the first plurality of supports, a third plurality of supports being arranged to either side of the shoe curve; and,
from the second plurality of supports, a fourth plurality of supports being arranged to either side of the shoe curve.
3. The shoe of claim 2 wherein:
the first plurality of supports consists of no more than seven supports; and,
the second plurality of supports consists of no more than six supports.
4. The shoe of claim 3 wherein the first plurality of supports are in the shape of a hemisphere.
5. The shoe of claim 4 wherein the second plurality of supports are in the shape of a hemisphere.
6. The shoe of claim 5 wherein the hemispherical supports have a major diameter of between about 25 and 50 percent of the average width of the shoe.
7. The shoe of claim 6 further comprising a spring rate adjusted to match the weight of the user and the particular sport being played, the adjustment being accomplished by selecting suitable combinations of support material, support shape and number of supports.
US12/264,897 2007-11-05 2008-11-04 Sports shoe Abandoned US20090113760A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US192407P true 2007-11-05 2007-11-05
US7221508P true 2008-03-28 2008-03-28
US12/264,897 US20090113760A1 (en) 2007-11-05 2008-11-04 Sports shoe

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/264,897 US20090113760A1 (en) 2007-11-05 2008-11-04 Sports shoe

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US20090113760A1 true US20090113760A1 (en) 2009-05-07

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100257752A1 (en) * 2009-04-10 2010-10-14 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US20100325919A1 (en) * 2002-08-19 2010-12-30 Avi Elbaz Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US20120060394A1 (en) * 2009-05-21 2012-03-15 Hyuk Soo Kwon Human body-balancing footwear capable of preventing knock-knees and providing cushioning suitable for the weight of wearer
USD680312S1 (en) 2013-01-11 2013-04-23 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe bottom
US8495825B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2013-07-30 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Forefoot catapult for athletic shoes
USD690490S1 (en) 2011-05-13 2013-10-01 Crispin Porter & Bogusky LLC Footwear sole
US20140109444A1 (en) * 2012-10-19 2014-04-24 Herve Dumont Shoe outsole
US8752306B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2014-06-17 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US9357812B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2016-06-07 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US20160242496A1 (en) * 2015-02-20 2016-08-25 Kelly Barnes Article of footwear
USD788430S1 (en) * 2016-03-28 2017-06-06 Norie Eguchi Insole
WO2018014132A1 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-01-25 Rudan Michael Material for enhancing the effects of exercise
US9955750B2 (en) * 2012-07-10 2018-05-01 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear with sole projections

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US340135A (en) * 1886-04-20 Boot or shoe
US1749351A (en) * 1928-06-25 1930-03-04 Mcqueen Alexander Boot or shoe
US2090881A (en) * 1936-04-20 1937-08-24 Wilmer S Wilson Footwear
US2627676A (en) * 1949-12-10 1953-02-10 Hack Shoe Company Corrugated sole and heel tread for shoes
US2853809A (en) * 1957-10-25 1958-09-30 Bianchi Carlo Process for making footwear with elastic material projections and the footwear obtained by the said process
US4161828A (en) * 1975-06-09 1979-07-24 Puma-Sportschuhfabriken Rudolf Dassler Kg Outer sole for shoe especially sport shoes as well as shoes provided with such outer sole
US4223456A (en) * 1979-01-05 1980-09-23 Jacques Cohen Shoe sole assembly
US4769931A (en) * 1987-08-06 1988-09-13 Morrow Donald W Cleated sole for footwear
US4887367A (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-12-19 Hi-Tec Sports Plc Shock absorbing shoe sole and shoe incorporating the same
US4972611A (en) * 1988-08-15 1990-11-27 Ryka, Inc. Shoe construction with resilient, absorption and visual components based on spherical pocket inclusions
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USD516283S1 (en) * 2003-02-04 2006-03-07 Anywear Shoe Company Portion of a shoe
US7213350B2 (en) * 1991-05-07 2007-05-08 B & B Technologies Lp Shock reducing footwear
US7219447B2 (en) * 1999-04-29 2007-05-22 Levert Francis E Spring cushioned shoe
US7607241B2 (en) * 2003-10-09 2009-10-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US7827705B2 (en) * 2007-03-08 2010-11-09 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with multiple cleat sizes
US7941941B2 (en) * 2007-07-13 2011-05-17 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear incorporating foam-filled elements and methods for manufacturing the foam-filled elements

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US340135A (en) * 1886-04-20 Boot or shoe
US1749351A (en) * 1928-06-25 1930-03-04 Mcqueen Alexander Boot or shoe
US2090881A (en) * 1936-04-20 1937-08-24 Wilmer S Wilson Footwear
US2627676A (en) * 1949-12-10 1953-02-10 Hack Shoe Company Corrugated sole and heel tread for shoes
US2853809A (en) * 1957-10-25 1958-09-30 Bianchi Carlo Process for making footwear with elastic material projections and the footwear obtained by the said process
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US4223456A (en) * 1979-01-05 1980-09-23 Jacques Cohen Shoe sole assembly
US4887367A (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-12-19 Hi-Tec Sports Plc Shock absorbing shoe sole and shoe incorporating the same
US4769931A (en) * 1987-08-06 1988-09-13 Morrow Donald W Cleated sole for footwear
US4972611A (en) * 1988-08-15 1990-11-27 Ryka, Inc. Shoe construction with resilient, absorption and visual components based on spherical pocket inclusions
US7213350B2 (en) * 1991-05-07 2007-05-08 B & B Technologies Lp Shock reducing footwear
US6516540B2 (en) * 1994-10-21 2003-02-11 Adidas Ag Ground contacting systems having 3D deformation elements for use in footwear
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US7607241B2 (en) * 2003-10-09 2009-10-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US7827705B2 (en) * 2007-03-08 2010-11-09 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with multiple cleat sizes
US7941941B2 (en) * 2007-07-13 2011-05-17 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear incorporating foam-filled elements and methods for manufacturing the foam-filled elements

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8758207B2 (en) * 2002-08-19 2014-06-24 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US20100325919A1 (en) * 2002-08-19 2010-12-30 Avi Elbaz Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US9788597B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2017-10-17 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US9357812B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2016-06-07 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US9055788B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2015-06-16 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
US8347526B2 (en) * 2009-04-10 2013-01-08 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US9364044B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2016-06-14 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US8495825B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2013-07-30 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Forefoot catapult for athletic shoes
US8621766B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2014-01-07 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US8732983B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2014-05-27 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US8752306B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2014-06-17 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US20100257752A1 (en) * 2009-04-10 2010-10-14 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US10085514B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2018-10-02 Athletic Propulsion Labs LLC Shoes, devices for shoes, and methods of using shoes
US20120060394A1 (en) * 2009-05-21 2012-03-15 Hyuk Soo Kwon Human body-balancing footwear capable of preventing knock-knees and providing cushioning suitable for the weight of wearer
USD690490S1 (en) 2011-05-13 2013-10-01 Crispin Porter & Bogusky LLC Footwear sole
US9955750B2 (en) * 2012-07-10 2018-05-01 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear with sole projections
US20140109444A1 (en) * 2012-10-19 2014-04-24 Herve Dumont Shoe outsole
USD680312S1 (en) 2013-01-11 2013-04-23 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe bottom
US20160242496A1 (en) * 2015-02-20 2016-08-25 Kelly Barnes Article of footwear
USD788430S1 (en) * 2016-03-28 2017-06-06 Norie Eguchi Insole
WO2018014132A1 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-01-25 Rudan Michael Material for enhancing the effects of exercise

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