US20090082141A1 - Lacrosse practice tethered assembly - Google Patents

Lacrosse practice tethered assembly Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090082141A1
US20090082141A1 US12/237,720 US23772008A US2009082141A1 US 20090082141 A1 US20090082141 A1 US 20090082141A1 US 23772008 A US23772008 A US 23772008A US 2009082141 A1 US2009082141 A1 US 2009082141A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
lacrosse
elastic cord
cord
described
tethered assembly
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/237,720
Inventor
Curtis Lee Wilton
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Curtis Lee Wilton
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US99496707P priority Critical
Application filed by Curtis Lee Wilton filed Critical Curtis Lee Wilton
Priority to US12/237,720 priority patent/US20090082141A1/en
Publication of US20090082141A1 publication Critical patent/US20090082141A1/en
Priority claimed from US12/468,920 external-priority patent/US20090291779A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0073Means for releasably holding a ball in position; Balls constrained to move around a fixed point, e.g. by tethering
    • A63B69/0079Balls tethered to a line or cord
    • A63B69/0088Balls tethered to a line or cord the line or cord having a handle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/14Lacrosse
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • A63B2209/10Characteristics of used materials with adhesive type surfaces, i.e. hook and loop-type fastener
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B43/00Balls with special arrangements
    • A63B43/007Arrangements on balls for connecting lines or cords

Abstract

A lacrosse practice tethered assembly includes a fastener loop, an elastic cord, and a lacrosse ball. The elastic cord is secured to the fastener loop on one end of the cord and the lacrosse ball on the second end of the cord. The elastic cord includes braided elastic strands within a yarn sheath.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/994,967, filed Sep. 25, 2007 and entitled “Lacrosse Practice Tethered Assembly”. The field of invention is the sport of lacrosse, and specifically a device for use when practicing lacrosse stick skills.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Lacrosse is a sport of growing popularity. The number of participants and teams has increased rapidly over recent years. At present, players typically practice the sport by throwing a lacrosse ball back and forth with each other. An individual player may also throw a ball against a wall to himself/herself or against a spring net. The person may practice shots on goal by simply throwing a ball into an empty lacrosse net.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to allow an individual user to practice their lacrosse sticks skills such as scooping the lacrosse ball, passing the lacrosse ball, catching the lacrosse ball, negotiating bouncing lacrosse balls, goal tending and shooting lacrosse balls on goal. In one embodiment, a lacrosse practice tethered assembly comprises a fastener loop, an elastic cord, and a lacrosse ball. The fastener loop comprises a strap that comprises a fastener on opposite ends of the strap that may be releasably secured to each other to form a loop. The elastic cord is secured to the fastener loop on one end of the cord and the lacrosse ball on the second end of the cord, wherein the elastic cord comprises braided elastic strands within a yarn sheath. The fastener loop may comprise hook and loop fasteners on opposite ends of the strap. The lacrosse ball may comprise a hole bored therethrough and the elastic cord secured to the ball by inserting the cord through the hole in the ball. The length of the elastic cord may be at least about eight feet, or alternatively between about seven to ten feet, or still further alternatively, between about six to twelve feet in length. The elastic cord may have a diameter in the range of 1/16 and 5/32 of an inch. The yarn sheath may be comprised of a composition selected from the group consisting of polyester, nylon and polypropylene. In one embodiment, the elastic cord is 104 inches long and 3/32 of an inch in diameter and has a polyester yarn sheath.
  • In another embodiment, the lacrosse practice tethered assembly described herein may be attached to a lacrosse stick wherein the fastener loop is removably secured to the shaft of a lacrosse stick. The fastener loop may alternatively be removably secured to the head of the lacrosse stick. Still further alternatively, the fastener loop may be removably secured to the mesh portion of the head of the lacrosse stick or proximate to the top of the head of the lacrosse stick.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a lacrosse practice tethered assembly in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a lacrosse practice tethered assembly further attached to the top of a head component of a lacrosse stick.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a lacrosse practice tethered assembly attached to the top of a lacrosse stick shaft adjacent to the head of the lacrosse stick.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a lacrosse practice tethered assembly attached to the mesh portion of a lacrosse stick head.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a lacrosse practice tethered assembly attached to the bottom of a lacrosse stick shaft.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a lacrosse practice tethered assembly that includes a fastener loop, an elastic cord, and a lacrosse ball. The elastic cord is connected to the fastener loop and to the lacrosse ball. The fastener loop is further adapted to be secured to a lacrosse stick. A player may then use the lacrosse practice tethered assembly to practice lacrosse stick skills such as scooping the lacrosse ball, passing the lacrosse ball, catching the lacrosse ball, negotiating bouncing lacrosse balls, shooting lacrosse balls on goal, goal tending and other lacrosse stick skills to be discovered. The lacrosse practice tethered assembly can be attached to and detached from any part of the lacrosse head or stick.
  • Reference will now be made to an example of the present invention as shown in FIGS. 1-5.
  • The fastener loop 10 is a strap that has fasteners on opposite ends thereof that allow the strap to be releasably secured to itself to form a loop. In one example, the fastener may be a hook and loop style fastener. As shown in FIG. 1, one side 11 of the strap 10 is made up of female loops. The other side (not shown) includes hooks to releasably engage the female loops shown when the strap 10 is overlapped upon itself. Alternatively, the fastener may be a snap or button or other means for releasably securing the strap to itself to form a loop. The fastener must likewise be strong enough to withstand the pressure and repetition of a lacrosse ball being thrown and pulled back from the fastener loop. In one example, the fastener loop 10 is a strap approximately four inches long by ¾ of an inch wide.
  • The elastic cord 20 is tied on one end to the fastener loop 10 and on its opposite end to the lacrosse ball 30. On the fastener loop end, the elastic cord 20 is tied in a knot 22 to form a loop 21 that will receive the fastener loop 10. On the opposite end of the elastic cord 20 there is a second loop 23 formed by knot 24. The portion of the cord 20 that forms the loops 23 extends through a hole 31 that is bored through the center of the lacrosse ball 30.
  • The length of the elastic cord 20 enables the player to use the assembly to practice. Different lengths of the cord may be used to maximize different practice purposes. For instance, a longer cord 20 may be used for shooting practice. A shorter cord may be used to practice ground balls or other skills. It is believed that a useful length of the elastic cord 20 is between about seven to ten feet, or alternatively, about six to twelve feet. If the elastic cord 20 is too long, then it may become tangled and knotted upon itself. If the elastic cord 20 is too short, then it may not allow for useful distance of throwing and practicing.
  • The physics of the invention involves a lacrosse ball weighing approximately 5.3 ounces being attached to an elastic cord. The elastic cord has to have certain characteristics or specifications allowing the lacrosse ball to be thrown out of the lacrosse head with force; the weight of the lacrosse ball pulling or stretching the elastic cord out to its farthest point and then the elastic cord returning the attached lacrosse ball with even a greater force back toward the lacrosse head. The weight of approximately 5.3 ounces requires an elastic cord that has a combination of substantial elongation or stretchiness and a strong modulus (point of breaking). If the elastic cord is stretchy but does not have strong modulus, the lacrosse ball will take the elastic cord out with the throw but will break when the weight of the lacrosse ball (thrown with force from the lacrosse head) reaches the farthest stretchy point of the elastic cord. If the elastic cord has a stronger than needed modulus, then the elastic cord would not have the stretchiness to bring the lacrosse ball back with the force needed to make the assembly work well.
  • Elastic cord is manufactured by combining strands of natural or synthetic rubber with a sheathing of yarn. In the case of elastic shock cords, a number of braided rubber strands are encased in a cover of one or more layers of yarn. Cords are made with a core of elastic rubber strands with an outside layer(s) of braided yarn. Cords can vary tremendously in size and characteristics. Diameters range from under 1/16″ to over 1″. The size is not the sole determining factor in the modulus (force required to stretch). The modulus of any size cord can be increased by packing the rubber tighter. Generally, the harder the cord, the greater the modulus. The present assembly worked well with a cord that was relatively softer or more flexible than harder cords with a higher modulus. Varying the ratio of yarn to rubber also controls modulus. The yarn sheath used in the cords was made of nylon, polypropylene and polyester. Polyester yarn proved to add flexibility without taking away stretchiness of the cord. The polyester sheath was also less prone to significant tangling during use as compared with the nylon and polypropylene.
  • The length of the elastic cord is also important. If the elastic cord is short; the lacrosse ball will not leave the lacrosse head on an attempted throw or cradle. If the elastic cord is too long, the weight of the lacrosse ball and the force of the throw will not create the force needed to return the lacrosse ball back toward the lacrosse head.
  • EXAMPLE
  • The physics of the assembly led to much experimenting with several types, sizes and lengths of elastic cords. A round CO23 braided elastic cord with a width of 3/32″ and length of one hundred and four (104) inches was finally used to manufacture a commercial embodiment. This elastic cord is of the “bungee” style with ten (10) twisted or braided fibers inside a polyester yarn sheath. The elastic fibers are braided sixty-four (64) ±5% times every inch (picks); it weighs 1.072 pounds for every one hundred (100) yards and has an elongation or stretchiness factor of one hundred twenty (120%). All of following cords were tested, but the CO23 braided elastic ( 3/32″) cord lasted the longest before failure while maintaining elongation or stretchiness, and because of the smooth texture of the polyester sheath, tangled much less than the cords encased in the other materials of nylon or polypropylene. This cord is sometimes called textured polyester elastic cord because of this unique texture it possesses. The following Table 1 shows modulus and elasticity of some cords used in the experimentation.
  • TABLE 1 Cord Name (each is a braided Width Type Elongation elastic) (+/− 1/64 inch) Yarn Sheath Stretch (+1/−15%) Modulus CO23 1/16″ Polyester 120% Failed at 12 lbs. CO23 3/32″ Polyester 120% Failed at 22 lbs. CO23 ⅛″ Polyester 120% Failed at 25 lbs. CO23 5/32″ Polyester 120% Failed at 34 lbs. CO21 1/16″ Polypropylene 100% Failed at 12.3 lbs. CO21 3/32″ Polypropylene 100% Failed at 21 lbs. CO21 ⅛″ Polypropylene 100% Failed at 26.7 lbs. CO21 5/32″ Polypropylene 100% Failed at 39.3 lbs. CO24 1/16″ Nylon 100% Failed at 18.7 lbs. CO24 3/32″ Nylon 100% Failed at 39.5 lbs. CO24 ⅛″ Nylon 100% Failed at 85.5 lbs. CO24 5/32″ Nylon 100% Failed at 103.9 lbs.
  • A single rubber strand was also tested for use as the elastic cord. A round silicone rubber o-ring stock of varying sizes and modulus was used as shown in Table 2, but none of the cord was strong enough in practice.
  • TABLE 2 Cord Name Width Stretch Modulus Silicone O-ring Stock Cord .07″ 100% Failed at 51 ounces Silicone O-ring Stock Cord .103″ 100% Failed at 115 ounces Silicone O-ring Stock Cord .139″ 100% Failed at 148 ounces
  • In view of the foregoing testing, it is believed that an elastic cord should have a modulus of at least about 12 pounds but less than about 40 pounds, or alternatively between 20 and 30 pounds.
  • The lacrosse practice tethered assembly may be attached at multiple locations on a lacrosse stick 40. In FIG. 2, the fastener loop 10 is attached proximate the top of the head 42 of the lacrosse stick 40. In FIG. 3, the fastener loop 10 is releasably connected proximate the top of the shaft 41 of the lacrosse stick 40. In FIG. 4, the fastener loop 10 is releasably secured around the mesh 43 that makes up a part of the head 42 of the lacrosse stick 40. FIG. 5 shows the fastener loop 10 secured around the base of the shaft 41 of the lacrosse stick 40. The lacrosse practice tethered assembly may be releasably attached at these multiple locations for different practice purposes. They may be also used to develop new skills.
  • Many modifications and other embodiments of the invention will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which this invention pertains having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed and that modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims. Although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

Claims (19)

1. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly comprising:
a fastener loop, an elastic cord, and a lacrosse ball;
the fastener loop comprising a strap that comprises a fastener on opposite ends of the strap that may be releasably secured to each other to form a loop;
the elastic cord secured to the fastener loop on one end of the cord and the lacrosse ball on the second end of the cord;
wherein the elastic cord comprises braided elastic strands within a yarn sheath.
2. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the fastener loop comprises hook and loop fasteners on opposite ends of the strap.
3. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claims 1, wherein the lacrosse ball comprises a hole bored therethrough and the elastic cord is secured to the ball by inserting the cord through the hole in the ball.
4. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the length of the elastic cord is at least about eight feet.
5. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the length of the elastic cord is between about seven to ten feet.
6. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the length of the elastic cord is between about six to twelve feet.
7. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the elastic cord has a diameter in the range of 1/16 to 5/32 of an inch.
8. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the elastic cord has a yarn sheath comprised of a composition selected from the group consisting of polyester, nylon and polypropylene.
9. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 1, wherein the elastic cord is 104 inches long and 3/32″ in diameter and has a polyester yarn sheath.
10. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly comprising:
a fastener loop, an elastic cord, and a lacrosse ball;
the fastener loop comprising a strap that comprises a fastener on opposite ends of the strap that may be releasably secured to each other to form a loop;
the elastic cord secured to the fastener loop on one end of the cord and the lacrosse ball on the second end of the cord;
wherein the elastic cord comprises braided elastic strands within a yarn sheath; and
a lacrosse stick, wherein the fastener loop is removably secured to the lacrosse stick.
11. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the fastener loop comprises hook and loop fasteners on opposite ends of the strap.
12. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claims 10, wherein the lacrosse ball comprises a hole bored therethrough and the elastic cord is secured to the ball by inserting the cord through the hole in the ball.
13. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the length of the elastic cord is at least about eight feet.
14. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the elastic cord has a diameter in the range of 1/16 to 5/32 of an inch.
15. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the elastic cord is 104 inches long and 3/32″ in diameter and has a polyester yarn sheath.
16. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the lacrosse stick comprises a shaft and a head, and the fastener loop is removably secured to the shaft.
17. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 10, wherein the lacrosse stick comprises a shaft and a head, and the fastener loop is removably secured to the head.
18. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 17, wherein the head comprises a mesh portion, and the fastener loop is removably secured to the mesh portion.
19. A lacrosse practice tethered assembly as described in claim 17, wherein the fastener loop is removably secured proximate to the top of the head.
US12/237,720 2007-09-25 2008-09-25 Lacrosse practice tethered assembly Abandoned US20090082141A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

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US99496707P true 2007-09-25 2007-09-25
US12/237,720 US20090082141A1 (en) 2007-09-25 2008-09-25 Lacrosse practice tethered assembly

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US12/237,720 US20090082141A1 (en) 2007-09-25 2008-09-25 Lacrosse practice tethered assembly
US12/468,920 US20090291779A1 (en) 2008-05-20 2009-05-20 Field hockey practice tethered assembly

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090291779A1 (en) * 2008-05-20 2009-11-26 Curtis Lee Wilton Field hockey practice tethered assembly
US8876636B2 (en) 2012-04-05 2014-11-04 Trevor Rubel Lacrosse cradleball

Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US667563A (en) * 1900-01-15 1901-02-05 Francis Oakley Practice-ball.
US795960A (en) * 1903-01-09 1905-08-01 Thomas Cook Toy-snap-back ball.
US2942883A (en) * 1958-08-11 1960-06-28 William H Moore Baseball batting device
US3214166A (en) * 1963-03-06 1965-10-26 Traina Ball Inc Ball game device
US3531115A (en) * 1966-12-13 1970-09-29 Robert A Alexander Batting practice device
US3843126A (en) * 1973-11-05 1974-10-22 L Bandy Tethered ball and resilient covering for both right and left hands
US4247117A (en) * 1978-11-13 1981-01-27 Zeppa, Inc. Torso tethered training device
US4261564A (en) * 1979-09-27 1981-04-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Practice apparatus for punting, passing or kicking a ball
US4687209A (en) * 1986-10-03 1987-08-18 Carey Robert G Soccer training ball assembly
US5094462A (en) * 1990-12-24 1992-03-10 Boyle Matthew D Soccer training device
US5209489A (en) * 1991-12-02 1993-05-11 Dorny Christopher M Ball return device
US5586940A (en) * 1994-11-14 1996-12-24 Dosch; Thomas J. Golf practice apparatus
US5681168A (en) * 1995-02-22 1997-10-28 Brown; Alton R. Tethered ball device having chaotic motion and methods for training
US5957781A (en) * 1997-01-24 1999-09-28 Kelly; Patrick J. Tethered-ball training device
US6168539B1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2001-01-02 Ryan Maina Soccer ball spin training tether
US20030162610A1 (en) * 2000-05-02 2003-08-28 Wilson George M. Method for manufacturing a robust tethered ball
US20040009833A1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-15 Ja-Ru, Inc. Glow-in-the-dark wrist toy
US6685582B2 (en) * 1996-08-16 2004-02-03 Jeffrey T. Abel Wrist toy
US6837808B1 (en) * 2003-05-05 2005-01-04 Garland Hatch Sport training device
US6976926B2 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-12-20 Pro Performance Sports, Llc Extended-use ball striking training device

Patent Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US667563A (en) * 1900-01-15 1901-02-05 Francis Oakley Practice-ball.
US795960A (en) * 1903-01-09 1905-08-01 Thomas Cook Toy-snap-back ball.
US2942883A (en) * 1958-08-11 1960-06-28 William H Moore Baseball batting device
US3214166A (en) * 1963-03-06 1965-10-26 Traina Ball Inc Ball game device
US3531115A (en) * 1966-12-13 1970-09-29 Robert A Alexander Batting practice device
US3843126A (en) * 1973-11-05 1974-10-22 L Bandy Tethered ball and resilient covering for both right and left hands
US4247117A (en) * 1978-11-13 1981-01-27 Zeppa, Inc. Torso tethered training device
US4261564A (en) * 1979-09-27 1981-04-14 Marvin Glass & Associates Practice apparatus for punting, passing or kicking a ball
US4687209A (en) * 1986-10-03 1987-08-18 Carey Robert G Soccer training ball assembly
US5094462A (en) * 1990-12-24 1992-03-10 Boyle Matthew D Soccer training device
US5209489A (en) * 1991-12-02 1993-05-11 Dorny Christopher M Ball return device
US5586940A (en) * 1994-11-14 1996-12-24 Dosch; Thomas J. Golf practice apparatus
US5681168A (en) * 1995-02-22 1997-10-28 Brown; Alton R. Tethered ball device having chaotic motion and methods for training
US6685582B2 (en) * 1996-08-16 2004-02-03 Jeffrey T. Abel Wrist toy
US5957781A (en) * 1997-01-24 1999-09-28 Kelly; Patrick J. Tethered-ball training device
US6168539B1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2001-01-02 Ryan Maina Soccer ball spin training tether
US20030162610A1 (en) * 2000-05-02 2003-08-28 Wilson George M. Method for manufacturing a robust tethered ball
US20040009833A1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-15 Ja-Ru, Inc. Glow-in-the-dark wrist toy
US6837808B1 (en) * 2003-05-05 2005-01-04 Garland Hatch Sport training device
US6976926B2 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-12-20 Pro Performance Sports, Llc Extended-use ball striking training device

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090291779A1 (en) * 2008-05-20 2009-11-26 Curtis Lee Wilton Field hockey practice tethered assembly
US8876636B2 (en) 2012-04-05 2014-11-04 Trevor Rubel Lacrosse cradleball

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