New! View global litigation for patent families

US20090076323A1 - Optical obturator - Google Patents

Optical obturator Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090076323A1
US20090076323A1 US12276632 US27663208A US2009076323A1 US 20090076323 A1 US20090076323 A1 US 20090076323A1 US 12276632 US12276632 US 12276632 US 27663208 A US27663208 A US 27663208A US 2009076323 A1 US2009076323 A1 US 2009076323A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
window
sleeve
optical
assembly
access
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US12276632
Inventor
Robert C. Smith
Thomas Wenchell
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Covidien LP
Original Assignee
Covidien LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3417Details of tips or shafts, e.g. grooves, expandable, bendable; Multiple coaxial sliding cannulas, e.g. for dilating
    • A61B17/3421Cannulas
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/0046Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets with a releasable handle; with handle and operating part separable
    • A61B2017/00473Distal part, e.g. tip or head
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3417Details of tips or shafts, e.g. grooves, expandable, bendable; Multiple coaxial sliding cannulas, e.g. for dilating
    • A61B2017/3454Details of tips
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B2017/347Locking means, e.g. for locking instrument in cannula
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/36Image-producing devices or illumination devices not otherwise provided for
    • A61B90/361Image-producing devices, e.g. surgical cameras

Abstract

An optical obturator apparatus includes an obturator sleeve defining a longitudinal axis and having a longitudinal bore for receiving surgical instrumentation and a transparent window mounted to the obturator sleeve and being dimensioned and configured to pass through tissue. The transparent window is mounted for movement between a first position in general alignment with the longitudinal axis of the obturator sleeve and a second position radially displaced from the longitudinal axis to thereby expose the longitudinal bore of the obturator sleeve to permit passage of the surgical instrumentation. The transparent window may include a cutting blade, or alternatively two cutting blades, adapted to penetrate tissue

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    The present application is a divisional application which claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/095,413 filed Mar. 31, 2005, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    1. Technical Field
  • [0003]
    The present disclosure relates to an apparatus for penetrating body tissue during minimally invasive surgical procedures, such as endoscopic or laparoscopic procedures. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to an access assembly having a transparent window for providing visual observation during penetration of the peritoneum or other body tissue.
  • [0004]
    2. Background of the Related Art
  • [0005]
    Minimally invasive surgical procedures including endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures permit surgery to be performed on organs, tissue and vessels far removed from an opening within the tissue. Laparoscopic and endoscopic procedures are performed in the interior of the abdomen through a small incision such as, for example, a narrow endoscopic tube or cannula inserted through a small entrance incision in the skin. Typically, after the abdominal cavity is insufflated, a trocar is used to puncture the cavity wall, i.e., the peritoneal lining, to create a pathway to the underlying surgical site. Generally, the trocar includes a stylet or obturator having a sharp tip for penetrating the body cavity, which is positioned coaxially within an outer cannula. The obturator is removed, leaving the outer cannula in place for reception of instrumentation utilized to perform the surgical procedure. An example of a known trocar is described in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 6,319,266 to Stellon, which issued Nov. 21, 2001, the contents of which are incorporated herein in its entirety by reference. However, with known trocars, advancement of the obturator through tissue is typically performed blind, i.e., without visualization of the tissue being entered. Obturators allowing visualization include U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,334,150, 5,431,151 and 5,441,041.
  • [0006]
    Accordingly, the present disclosure provides an optical access assembly which permits direct visualization of body tissue during penetration of the body cavity. Moreover, the optical access assembly of the present disclosure provides an improved structure for direct visualization of the body tissue being penetrated and serves as a conduit for subsequent introduction of surgical instrumentation required for performance of the surgical procedure.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0007]
    In one preferred embodiment, an optical obturator apparatus includes an obturator sleeve defining a longitudinal axis and having a longitudinal bore for receiving surgical instrumentation and a transparent window mounted to the obturator sleeve and being dimensioned and configured to pass through tissue. The transparent window is mounted for movement between a first position in general alignment with the longitudinal axis of the obturator sleeve and a second position radially displaced from the longitudinal axis to thereby expose the longitudinal bore of the obturator sleeve to permit passage of the surgical instrumentation. The transparent window may include a cutting blade, or alternatively two cutting blades, adapted to penetrate tissue.
  • [0008]
    A control member is connected to the transparent window and at least partially extends along the obturator sleeve. The control member is actuable to move the transparent window between the first position and the second position. The control member is adapted to rotate about an axis of rotation to cause movement of the transparent window between the first position and the second position. In this regard, the transparent window is adapted for pivotal movement about the axis of rotation to move between the first position and the second position thereof. The control member may be adapted to move in a longitudinal direction from a normal position to an extended position to displace the transparent window relative to the obturator sleeve.
  • [0009]
    An anti-rotation member may be associated with the transparent window to prevent pivotal movement of the transparent window when the transparent window is in the normal position thereof. The anti-rotational member includes a key extending from one of the transparent window and the obturator sleeve, the key receivable within a keyed port defined in the other of the transparent window and the obturator sleeve. The key is removed from the keyed port upon movement of the control member to the extended position.
  • [0010]
    A manually manipulative member may be operatively connected to the control member. The manually manipulative member is movable to move the control member.
  • [0011]
    In another preferred embodiment, a surgical optical viewing system includes an optical obturator having an obturator sleeve defining a longitudinal axis and a longitudinal bore for reception of surgical instrumentation. The optical obturator includes a transparent window for permitting passage of light into the obturator sleeve. The transparent window has at least two separable window sections. The at least two separable window sections are adapted for radial displacing movement to expose the longitudinal bore and to permit passage of the surgical instrumentation used for performing a surgical procedure. The transparent window may define a tapered configuration and at least one cutting blade adapted to penetrate tissue.
  • [0012]
    The optical viewing system may further include a surgical instrument positionable within the longitudinal bore of the obturator sleeve. The at least two separable sections of the transparent window are adapted for radially displacing movement in response to longitudinal movement of the surgical instrument relative to the obturator sleeve. In this regard, the surgical instrument is engageable with interior surfaces of the at least two separable sections of the transparent window upon relative longitudinal movement of the surgical instrument and the obturator sleeve to radially displace the at least two separable sections.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    Preferred embodiments of the present disclosure are described hereinbelow with references to the drawings, wherein:
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 is a side view in partial cross-section of one embodiment of an optical access assembly constructed in accordance with the present disclosure;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2 is an enlarged side cross-sectional view of the housing of the access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1 illustrating the sealing system for forming a fluid tight seal about a surgical instrument;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the obturator sleeve of the optical access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-2 and taken along section lines 3-3 of FIG. 1;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 4 is a view illustrating a bevel gear arrangement associated with the sleeve of the optical access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-3;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 5 is a an axial view illustrating the transparent window of the optical access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 6 is view of an alternative embodiment of the transparent window of the optical access assembly;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 7 is a side view in partial cross-section of the optical access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, illustrating movement of the transparent window from a first positioned aligned with the sleeve and a second position displaced from the sleeve;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 8 is an axial view further illustrating movement of the transparent window from the first position to the second position in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5 and 7;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 9 is a view similar to the view of FIG. 7 illustrating advancement of a surgical instrument through the sleeve and beyond the transparent window for performing a surgical procedure;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 10 is a side view in partial cross-section of an alternative embodiment of an optical access assembly of the present disclosure;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 11 is an axial view illustrating the transparent window in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 10;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 12 is a view similar to the view of FIG. 10 illustrating radial movement of the window segments of the transparent window to open the sleeve of the optical access assembly in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 10-11;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 13 is axial view further illustrating the radial movement of the window segment of the transparent window; and
  • [0027]
    FIG. 14 is a side view in partial cross-section of another embodiment of an optical access assembly of the present disclosure.
  • DETAIL DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0028]
    Referring now in detail to the drawing figures, in which, like reference numerals identify similar or identical elements, there is illustrated in FIG. 1, an optical access assembly constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present disclosure, and designated generally by reference numeral 100. Optical access assembly 100 contemplates the direct visualization of body tissue during penetration of the peritoneal cavity or other tissue portions. In addition, optical access assembly 100 facilitates the introduction of various types of surgical instruments such as, for example, an endoscopic clip applier, grasper, dissector, retractor, stapler, photographic device, tube, and the like. Optical access assembly 100 is dimensioned to pass through body tissue and may incorporate structure to cut, puncture, or pierce the body tissue.
  • [0029]
    Generally, optical access assembly 100 includes housing 102, sleeve 104 secured to housing 102 and extending distally therefrom and window 106 operatively connected to the distal end of sleeve 104. Housing 102 may incorporate several components connected to each other by conventional means or may be a single component. As best depicted in FIGS. 1-2, housing 102 is advantageously dimensioned to be grasped by the surgeon. Housing 102 includes an internal sealing system to receive a surgical instrument in substantial sealed relation therewith while also providing a substantial seal between the body cavity and the outside atmosphere both during, and subsequent to, insertion of the surgical instrument through sleeve 104. One exemplative sealing system suitable for use in optical obturator assembly 100 is shown in FIG. 2. This sealing system is disclosed in commonly assigned U.S. Published Application No. 2004/0066008 to Smith, the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference. The sealing system includes instrument seal 108 and zero-closure seal 110. Instrument seal 108 is formed of a resilient material and has an aperture 112 for sealed reception of a surgical instrument. A fabric layer 114 is juxtaposed relative to the resilient material and may be disposed on either, or both of, the proximally facing surface or distally facing surface of instrument seal 108. The preferred fabric includes a SPANDEX™ material containing 20% LYCRA from Milliken. Zero closure valve 110 is preferably a duck bill valve which opens to permit passage of the surgical instrument. Duck bill valve 110 desirably closes in the absence of the surgical instrument and/or in response to the pressure of the insufflation gases. Housing 102 further includes insufflation connector or port 116 (FIG. 1). Insufflation connector 116 is adapted for connection to a supply of insufflation gases for introduction within the peritoneal cavity as is conventional in the art. Further details of the sealing system may be ascertained by reference to the Smith '008 publication.
  • [0030]
    With reference to FIGS. 1 and 3, sleeve 104 defines longitudinal axis “x” and has longitudinal bore 118 extending the length of the sleeve 104. Longitudinal bore 118 permits the introduction of a surgical instrument utilized in the surgical procedure. Sleeve 104 preferably has a diameter of between about 4 millimeters to about 14 millimeters. Sleeve 104 may be constructed of a medical grade metal including stainless steel or titanium or a suitable biocompatible polymeric material. Sleeve 104 further includes control member 120 (shown partially in phantom in FIG. 1) which extends through passage 122 defined in the sleeve 104. Control member 120 serves to mount transparent window 106 and also moves the transparent window 106 between a first position aligned with longitudinal axis and a second position displaced from the longitudinal axis “x”. In this regard, control member 120 is adapted to rotate within passage 122 (i.e., about an axis of rotation “c” which is in general parallel to axis “x” of obturator sleeve 104) and is also adapted for limited longitudinal movement within passage 122.
  • [0031]
    A manual manipulative handle 124 extends radially outwardly from the proximal end of control member 120. Handle 124 is advantageously dimensioned for gripping engagement by the user and is actuable to effectuate rotational and/or longitudinal movement of control member 120 and thus corresponding movement of window 106. More specifically, handle 124 is mechanically connected to control member 120 in a manner whereby rotational movement of the handle 124 about handle axis “h” causes corresponding rotational movement of the control member 120 about axis “c”. Any means for transferring this rotational motion are envisioned including, e.g., the bevel gear arrangement depicted in FIG. 4. In this regard, handle 124 may be integrally formed with first gear 126 and control member 120 may be integrally formed with second gear 128. First and second gears 126, 128 cooperate whereby rotational movement of handle 124 and first gear 126 about handle axis “h” causes corresponding rotational movement of control member 120 about control axis “c”. The bevel gear arrangement may be appropriately miniaturized to reside within passage 122 of the wall of obturator sleeve 104 or may be disposed within housing 102. In addition, handle 124 is adapted to move in the longitudinal direction within slot 130 of obturator sleeve 104 in response to proximal and distal applications of force by the surgeon.
  • [0032]
    Sleeve 104 further defines keyed notch 132 in its distal end. Keyed notch 132 serves to prevent rotation of window 106 during introduction within the body tissue.
  • [0033]
    Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 5, window 106 will be discussed in detail. Window 106 permits visualization during penetration of the body tissue. Window 106 may comprise a transparent or translucent polymeric material and be fabricated via known injection molding techniques. Alternatively, window 106 may comprise an optical glass. The term “transparent” is to be interpreted as having the ability to permit the passage of light with or without clear imaging capabilities. Moreover, the transparent material includes any material which is not opaque. It is also to be appreciated that only a portion of transparent window 106 needs to be transparent. Thus, a portion of, or the entire window 106, may be transparent or translucent. Window 106 may have a unitary construction or be comprised of multiple parts.
  • [0034]
    Window 106 is generally tapered in configuration, e.g., bulbous, hemispherical, or pyramidal conically-shaped, to facilitate passage through body tissue. Window 106 may include an image directing member (not shown) for directing optical images into longitudinal bore 118 of sleeve 104 or back to an image apparatus. The image directing member may be a lens, an optical prism, an optical mirror, or like image directing medium.
  • [0035]
    As best depicted in FIG. 3, transparent window 106 preferably has at least one cutting blade 134. Cutting blade 134 is preferably centered with respect to the outer surface 136 of window 106, as shown. Thus during visualization, cutting blade 134 is seen as a thin line through the center, i.e. bisecting the viewing field so as not to substantially obstruct viewing of the body tissue. Cutting blade 134 may be an independent member secured to outer surface 136 by conventional means including welding, cements, etc. Alternatively, cutting blade 134 may be integrally formed with window 106 during, e.g., in a molding process. In this embodiment, cutting blade 134 is made of a polymeric material and is integrally formed with window 106. form. In one embodiment, cutting blade 134 includes a single cutting blade. Alternatively, two intersecting cutting blades 134 arranged in an X pattern, may be provided as shown in FIG. 6. Other arrangements of cutting blade 134 are envisioned, such as, for example, arrangements of three, four, etc., of the cutting blades 134. One or more cutting blades 134 may be disposed along lateral sides of window 106.
  • [0036]
    Window 106 further includes anti-rotation key 136. Anti rotation key 136 resides within keyed notch 134 of sleeve 104 to prevent rotation of the sleeve 104 during introduction of window 106.
  • [0037]
    In operation, the peritoneal cavity is insufflated to raise the cavity wall to provide greater access to tissue and organs therewithin. An endoscope 200 is inserted into optical access assembly 100, i.e., through housing 102 and into longitudinal bore 118, as shown in FIG. 2. One suitable endoscope for use with optical access assembly 100 is disclosed in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,718,664 to Peck et al., the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. Instrument seal 108 of housing 102 forms a fluid tight seal about the endoscope 200. As appreciated, endoscope 200 is advanced within sleeve 104 until the distal end of the endoscope 200 is adjacent window 106. In this position, the distal lens element of the endoscope 200 is capable of viewing the tissue being entered. Endoscope 200 may be secured relative to optical obturator assembly 100 with a locking system (not shown), at the proximal end of the optical access assembly 100, at some location along sleeve 104, or at the distal end of sleeve 104. For example, the locking mechanism may comprise a cam mechanism, or a ledge at the distal end of sleeve 104.
  • [0038]
    The procedure is continued by positioning window 106 against the body tissue “t” and advancing the assembly 100 to permit cutting blade 134 to penetrate the tissue. A skin incision may be made before pressing window 106 against the tissue, if desired. During penetration of the body tissue, the surgeon observes the underlying tissue through the endoscope 200 to ensure there is no undesired contact with organs, tissue, etc. lying beneath the peritoneal lining. In instances where a video system is utilized, the surgeon simply observes the penetration of body tissue “t” via any known video monitor. Once the surgeon penetrates the body tissue “t” as observed through the endoscope 200, the surgeon discontinues the application of force. For example, in penetration of the abdominal wall, the surgeon can observe the peritoneum and penetration thereof.
  • [0039]
    After penetration into the underlying body cavity, handle 124 is moved in the distal direction within slot 130 of obturator sleeve 104 to move control member 120 from its normal operative position depicted in FIG. 1 to the extended position depicted in FIG. 7. During this distal movement, anti-rotation key 136 of transparent window 106 clears keyed notch 134 within obturator sleeve 104. Once key 136 is cleared from its containment within keyed notch 134, handle 124 is rotated about handle axis “h” (FIG. 4) which causes corresponding rotation of control member 126. The rotational movement of control member 120 causes transparent window 106 to rotate around axis of rotation “c” to the radially displaced position depicted in FIGS. 7 and 8. In this position, longitudinal bore 118 of sleeve 104 is exposed. Endoscope 200 may then removed from longitudinal bore 120 for insertion of other desired surgical instruments 300 to carry out the desired procedure as shown in FIG. 9. Although FIG. 7 shows an endoscope 200 with an eye piece, the endoscope 200 may be additionally or alternatively connected to an imaging system, which may include a computer.
  • [0040]
    With reference to FIGS. 10-13, an alternative embodiment of an optical obturator assembly of the present disclosure is illustrated. In FIG. 10, optical access assembly 400 is shown with a cannula assembly 500 at least partially positioned therein and a conventional endoscope 200 introduced within the cannula assembly 500. Optical access assembly 400 generally includes handle 402 and sleeve 404 extending distally from the handle 402. Handle 402 and sleeve 404 may be separate components or integrally formed during manufacture. Adjacent the distal end of sleeve 404 is window 406. Window 406 is transparent or translucent as discussed hereinabove and preferably is integrally formed with sleeve 404. Window 406 includes a plurality of individual separable window sections 408 (FIG. 12) which are capable of radial displacement to permit passage of a surgical instrument. Desirably, window 406 and/or the entire sleeve 404 is made from a relatively flexible material. In the preferred embodiment, four window segments 408 are provided with each of the segments 408 separated from adjacent segment 408 by respective slits 410. Window 406 further includes a pair of intersecting cutting blades 412. Cutting blades 412 function in penetrating or piercing body tissue.
  • [0041]
    Cannula assembly 500 may be similar to any conventional cannula assembly adapted for use in laparoscopic surgery. Cannula assembly 500 includes cannula housing 502 and cannula 504 extending from the cannula housing 502. An internal seal assembly may be mounted within cannula housing 502 for sealed reception of a surgical instrument such as an endoscope. One suitable seal system is disclosed hereinabove in connection with the discussion of FIG. 2 any suitable seal system for cannula assemblies may be used.
  • [0042]
    In operation, cannula assembly 500 is positioned within optical access assembly 400 followed by insertion of an endoscope 200 within the cannula assembly 500. Endoscope 200 is positioned within access assembly 400 such that distal lens element 202 of endoscope 200 does not extend beyond the distal end of access assembly 400 as shown in FIG. 10. Thereafter, the surgeon penetrates the body tissue “t” while observing the penetration through the eyepiece of the endoscope 200 (or while observing the same on an imaging and/or computer screen), as described in detail hereinabove. Endoscope 200 may then be removed if desired. Subsequent to penetration of the body cavity, the surgeon engages handle 402 to move sleeve 404 in the proximal direction as depicted in FIG. 11. Proximal movement of obturator sleeve 404 causes the distal end of cannula 504 to engage internal surfaces 414 of window sections 408. Accordingly, window sections 408 are biased outwardly to the arrangement shown in FIG. 13. In this position, window sections 408 are radially displaced from longitudinal axis “X” to thereby expose cannula 504, thus permitting passage of surgical instrumentation through the cannula 504 and into the underlying body cavity.
  • [0043]
    With reference to FIG. 14, another embodiment of an optical access assembly of the present disclosure is illustrated and designated generally as optical access assembly 600. Access assembly 600 generally includes handle 602 and sleeve 604 defining a longitudinal axis “X”. A window 606 having cutting blade 608 is formed at the distal end of sleeve 604. Desirably, the window 606 is transparent or translucent, as discussed above in connection with FIGS. 1, 5 and 10. Endoscope 200 is positioned within sleeve 604 to provide for observation of the body tissue being penetrated. Endoscope 200 includes an endoscopic shaft 202 which is frictionally engaged by the internal surfaces of sleeve 604, i.e., sleeve 604 may be dimensioned to form a friction fit with the endoscopic shaft 202 to thereby retain endoscope in a desired position relative to sleeve 604 with the distal lens component adjacent window 606. Alternatively, a locking system, as discussed above in connection with FIG. 2, may be used. In use of this embodiment, endoscope 200 in positioned within access assembly 600 and the desired frictional relationship is established between endoscopic shaft 202 and access sleeve 604. The system is advanced through the tissue with visualization provided by endoscope 200 through window 206.
  • [0044]
    In further embodiments, the optical access assembly is as discussed above in connection with FIGS. 1-5 and 7-9, except that the window has window sections that are arranged as jaws pivotally mounted on the distal end of the sleeve. An elongated member extending proximally, along the sleeve, cooperates with a handle or other structure for actuating the jaws. During actuation, the jaws move from a closed position to an open position. The jaws may or may not include blades. The jaws, when in a closed position, may have any shape, such as pyramidal, conical, dolphin-nosed, hemispherical, etc. The pivotable jaws are translucent or transparent, as discussed above, and the user of the optical access assembly views tissue before, during and after advancement of the optical access assembly. The jaws may be actuated while the assembly is advanced through tissue, or after the tissue has been penetrated and the body cavity accessed.
  • [0045]
    In further embodiments, the optical access assembly is as discussed above in connection with FIGS. 1-5 and 7-9, except that the window comprises a closed, pyramidal, conical, dolphin-nosed, and/or preferably hemispherical shape. An elongated member extending proximally, along the sleeve, cooperates with a handle or other structure for rotating the window away from the distal end of the sleeve. The window rotates from a position closing the distal end of the sleeve, to a position that leaves the distal end of the sleeve open. The window may or may not include one or more blades. The user of the optical access assembly views tissue before, during and after advancement of the optical access assembly.
  • [0046]
    In each of the embodiments discussed above, the window may or may not include cutting blades. The window may have any shape, such as pyramidal, conical, dolphin-nosed, hemispherical, etc. In each of the embodiments discussed above, the endoscope may include an eyepiece, and/or a connection to imaging equipment which may include a computer. In each of the embodiments discussed above, the movement of the window, jaws, or window sections is driven by an electric motor, hydraulic driver or manual drive and may be controlled utilizing electrical or mechanical methods.
  • [0047]
    It will be understood that various modifications can be made to the embodiments of the present invention herein disclosed without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. For example, various diameters for the obturator assembly, cannula assembly, as well as various diameters for the surgical instruments are contemplated. Also, various modifications may be made in the configuration of the parts. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting the invention but merely as exemplifications of preferred embodiments thereof. Those skilled in the art will envision other modifications within the scope and spirit of the present invention as defined by the claims appended hereto.

Claims (10)

  1. 1. A surgical optical access system, which comprises:
    a cannula assembly having a cannula with open proximal and distal ends and a seal housing having a seal and being mounted on the proximal end of the cannula, the cannula defining a longitudinal bore for reception of surgical instrumentation;
    a window for permitting passage of light into the cannula and being mounted on the distal end of the cannula; and
    locking structure for securing an endoscope within the cannula assembly, the window permitting the passage of light to the endoscope when the endoscope is disposed within the cannula.
  2. 2. The surgical optical access system according to claim 1, wherein the window has at least two separable segments adapted for radial displacement with respect to the cannula to expose the bore of the cannula and permit the passage of the surgical instrumentation therethrough.
  3. 3. The surgical optical access system according to claim 2, wherein the segments are pivotally attached to the cannula.
  4. 4. The surgical optical access system according to claim 3, further comprising an elongated member for effecting displacement of the segments.
  5. 5. The surgical optical access system according to claim 2, wherein the segments are disposed around the distal end of the cannula and having a closed position closing the open distal end of the cannula.
  6. 6. The surgical optical access system according to claim 1, wherein the window defines a tapered configuration.
  7. 7. The surgical optical access system according to claim 6, wherein the window includes at least one cutting blade adapted to penetrate tissue.
  8. 8. The surgical optical access system according to claim 1, including a surgical instrument positionable within the longitudinal bore of the cannula.
  9. 9. The surgical optical access system according to claim 2, wherein the at least two separable segments are adapted for radially displacing movement in response to longitudinal movement of the cannula.
  10. 10. The surgical optical access system according to claim 2, wherein the at least two separable segments are connected to an elongated member that is movable for radially displacing the segment.
US12276632 2005-03-31 2008-11-24 Optical obturator Pending US20090076323A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11095413 US7470230B2 (en) 2005-03-31 2005-03-31 Optical obturator
US12276632 US20090076323A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2008-11-24 Optical obturator

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12276632 US20090076323A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2008-11-24 Optical obturator
US15689464 US20170360472A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2017-08-29 Optical obturator

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11095413 Division US7470230B2 (en) 2005-03-31 2005-03-31 Optical obturator

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15689464 Continuation US20170360472A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2017-08-29 Optical obturator

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090076323A1 true true US20090076323A1 (en) 2009-03-19

Family

ID=36570999

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11095413 Active 2026-06-01 US7470230B2 (en) 2005-03-31 2005-03-31 Optical obturator
US12276632 Pending US20090076323A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2008-11-24 Optical obturator
US15689464 Pending US20170360472A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2017-08-29 Optical obturator

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11095413 Active 2026-06-01 US7470230B2 (en) 2005-03-31 2005-03-31 Optical obturator

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15689464 Pending US20170360472A1 (en) 2005-03-31 2017-08-29 Optical obturator

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (3) US7470230B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1707132B1 (en)
JP (1) JP2006280918A (en)
CA (1) CA2541073C (en)
DE (1) DE602006001138D1 (en)
ES (1) ES2306309T3 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8821526B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2014-09-02 Specialtycare, Inc. Trocar
US9101315B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2015-08-11 Specialty Care, Inc. Cannula system
US9186173B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2015-11-17 Specialty Care, Inc. Optical obturator system
USD753745S1 (en) * 2013-04-15 2016-04-12 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Telescope
USD796037S1 (en) * 2015-10-08 2017-08-29 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Eyepiece for a sialendoscope

Families Citing this family (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP3175804A1 (en) 2004-06-29 2017-06-07 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Insufflating optical surgical instrument
EP2769683B1 (en) 2001-09-24 2017-07-12 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Bladeless obturator
CA2485481A1 (en) 2002-05-16 2003-11-27 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Cone tip obturator
EP2545861B1 (en) 2003-10-03 2014-02-12 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Bladeless optical obturator
US20060224045A1 (en) * 2005-03-31 2006-10-05 Depuy Spine, Inc. Integrated access device and light source for surgical procedures
CA2650474A1 (en) 2006-04-24 2007-11-08 Synecor, Llc Natural orifice surgical system
US8518024B2 (en) 2006-04-24 2013-08-27 Transenterix, Inc. System and method for multi-instrument surgical access using a single access port
US7846134B1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2010-12-07 Timothy Nadolski Flexible walled cannula
US9888940B2 (en) 2006-09-11 2018-02-13 Custom Medical Applications Neural injection system and related methods
US8377005B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2013-02-19 Custom Medical Applications Neural injection system and related methods
USD667954S1 (en) 2007-10-05 2012-09-25 Surgiquest, Inc. Visualization trocar
EP2984993A1 (en) 2006-10-06 2016-02-17 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Visual insufflation port
USD663838S1 (en) 2007-10-05 2012-07-17 Surgiquest, Inc. Visualization trocar
WO2008045316A3 (en) * 2006-10-06 2008-10-02 Surgiquest Inc Visualization trocar
JP5246959B2 (en) * 2006-12-20 2013-07-24 タイコ ヘルスケア グループ リミテッド パートナーシップ Surgical visual type occlusion device
US8348968B2 (en) * 2007-02-21 2013-01-08 Covidien Lp Obturator tips
CA2683968A1 (en) * 2007-04-17 2008-10-30 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Visual obturator with handle
US8192353B2 (en) * 2007-10-05 2012-06-05 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Visual obturator
EP2851020B1 (en) * 2008-01-25 2016-01-20 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Insufflating access system
US8506520B2 (en) 2008-09-29 2013-08-13 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Trocar system with laparoscope gas channel
DE102009060377B4 (en) * 2009-12-24 2016-10-20 Richard Wolf Gmbh trocar
US8449503B2 (en) 2010-11-30 2013-05-28 Custom Medical Applications Neural injection system and related methods
US8795223B2 (en) 2011-03-08 2014-08-05 Surgiquest, Inc. Trocar assembly with pneumatic sealing
WO2012142482A1 (en) * 2011-04-13 2012-10-18 Curax, Llc Multi-function cannulated surgical device
EP2704650A2 (en) 2011-05-02 2014-03-12 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Low-profile surgical universal access port
US20140249371A1 (en) * 2011-10-18 2014-09-04 Covidien Lp Optical trocar system
DE102011056705A1 (en) * 2011-12-20 2013-06-20 Aesculap Ag Medical trocar obturator and
US9693802B2 (en) * 2012-06-06 2017-07-04 Covidien Lp Obturator tip with insufflation pathway
US20140276930A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 Medtronic, Inc. Tunneling Tool and Method for an Implantable Medical Lead Extension
JP6088371B2 (en) * 2013-07-02 2017-03-01 東京応化工業株式会社 Fluorocarbon, a method of manufacturing a fluorocarbon, and use thereof

Citations (56)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3760810A (en) * 1970-12-11 1973-09-25 Hoorn M Van Surgical ligating instrument of the endoscope type
US4878485A (en) * 1989-02-03 1989-11-07 Adair Edwin Lloyd Rigid video endoscope with heat sterilizable sheath
US5169397A (en) * 1990-02-08 1992-12-08 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Medical instrument
US5176127A (en) * 1991-01-28 1993-01-05 Enrico Dormia Mandrel for medical endoscope
US5226890A (en) * 1991-11-13 1993-07-13 United States Surgical Corporation Tissue gripping device
US5250068A (en) * 1990-11-30 1993-10-05 Yakuouji Shinkiyu Chiryouin Optical transmission type acupuncture needle
US5256149A (en) * 1992-02-14 1993-10-26 Ethicon, Inc. Trocar having transparent cannula and method of using
US5271380A (en) * 1990-11-06 1993-12-21 Siegfried Riek Penetration instrument
US5290276A (en) * 1992-02-06 1994-03-01 Sewell Jr Frank Rotatable laparoscopic puncturing instrument
US5334150A (en) * 1992-11-17 1994-08-02 Kaali Steven G Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5354302A (en) * 1992-11-06 1994-10-11 Ko Sung Tao Medical device and method for facilitating intra-tissue visual observation and manipulation of distensible tissues
US5370640A (en) * 1993-07-01 1994-12-06 Kolff; Jack Intracorporeal catheter placement apparatus and method
US5385572A (en) * 1992-11-12 1995-01-31 Beowulf Holdings Trocar for endoscopic surgery
US5408992A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-04-25 British Technology Group Usa Inc. Endoscopic device for intraoral use
US5441041A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-08-15 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5445142A (en) * 1994-03-15 1995-08-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical trocars having optical tips defining one or more viewing ports
US5467762A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-11-21 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5563696A (en) * 1993-05-27 1996-10-08 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Image fixing apparatus with power control during sheet passage
US5569292A (en) * 1995-02-01 1996-10-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration instrument with transparent blades and tip cover
US5569291A (en) * 1995-02-01 1996-10-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration and dissection instrument
US5571133A (en) * 1995-06-01 1996-11-05 Yoon; Inbae Penetrating instrument with sequential indication of entry into anatomical cavities
US5591191A (en) * 1994-01-26 1997-01-07 Kieturakis; Maciej J. Surgical instrument and method for helically incising a pathway into the interior of the body
US5591192A (en) * 1995-02-01 1997-01-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration instrument including an imaging element
US5609562A (en) * 1993-11-16 1997-03-11 Worldwide Optical Trocar Licensing Corporation Visually directed trocar and method
US5632717A (en) * 1994-10-07 1997-05-27 Yoon; Inbae Penetrating endoscope
US5658306A (en) * 1994-07-01 1997-08-19 Archimedes Surgical, Inc. Method for making additional incisions in laparoscopic surgery
US5662613A (en) * 1996-05-14 1997-09-02 Astarita; Denis C. Endoscopic instrument lock
US5662673A (en) * 1995-04-05 1997-09-02 Kieturakis; Maciej J. Surgical trocar and method for placing a trocar sleeve in a body wall
US5681323A (en) * 1996-07-15 1997-10-28 Arick; Daniel S. Emergency cricothyrotomy tube insertion
US5685820A (en) * 1990-11-06 1997-11-11 Partomed Medizintechnik Gmbh Instrument for the penetration of body tissue
US5707382A (en) * 1995-03-24 1998-01-13 Ethicon Endo Surgery, Inc. Surgical dissector
US5720761A (en) * 1993-11-16 1998-02-24 Worldwide Optical Trocar Licensing Corp. Visually directed trocar and method
US5738628A (en) * 1995-03-24 1998-04-14 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical dissector and method for its use
US5797944A (en) * 1992-11-12 1998-08-25 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Visualization trocar
US5817061A (en) * 1997-05-16 1998-10-06 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Trocar assembly
US5843115A (en) * 1996-10-28 1998-12-01 Morejon; Orlando Trocar insertion device
US5857999A (en) * 1995-05-05 1999-01-12 Imagyn Medical Technologies, Inc. Small diameter introducer for laparoscopic instruments
US5860996A (en) * 1994-05-26 1999-01-19 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5873889A (en) * 1997-08-08 1999-02-23 Origin Medsystems, Inc. Tissue separation cannula with dissection probe and method
US5980549A (en) * 1995-07-13 1999-11-09 Origin Medsystems, Inc. Tissue separation cannula with dissection probe and method
US6007481A (en) * 1990-11-06 1999-12-28 Riek; Siegfried Instrument for the penetration of body tissue with cutting and viewing of body structure
US6176824B1 (en) * 1996-10-29 2001-01-23 James M. Davis Fiberoptically illuminated appliances
US6203557B1 (en) * 1995-07-13 2001-03-20 Origin Medsystems Tissue separation cannula and method
US6206823B1 (en) * 1999-08-02 2001-03-27 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument and method for endoscopic tissue dissection
US6228059B1 (en) * 1999-06-16 2001-05-08 Denis C. Astarita Endoscopic instrument locks
US6350233B1 (en) * 1998-07-30 2002-02-26 David Z. Lubowski Sigmoidoscope
US6402770B1 (en) * 1998-06-01 2002-06-11 Avatar Design & Development, Inc. Method and apparatus for placing and maintaining a percutaneous tube into a body cavity
US20020133188A1 (en) * 2001-03-15 2002-09-19 O'heeron Peter T. Trocar
US6478806B2 (en) * 2000-05-16 2002-11-12 Taut, Inc. Penetrating tip for trocar assembly
US20020169362A1 (en) * 1999-03-18 2002-11-14 Kazutoshi Kan Operating instrument insertion apparatus and operation supporting apparatus
US6692467B2 (en) * 2000-05-31 2004-02-17 Taut, Inc. Trocar assembly
US20040066008A1 (en) * 2002-10-04 2004-04-08 Smith Robert C. Introducer seal assembly
US20040082969A1 (en) * 2002-10-23 2004-04-29 Stephen Kerr Laparoscopic direct vision dissecting port
US20050033304A1 (en) * 2003-08-01 2005-02-10 O'heeron Peter T. Obturator tip for a trocar
US20050107816A1 (en) * 2001-09-24 2005-05-19 Pingleton Edward D. Bladeless obturator
US20050192613A1 (en) * 2004-03-01 2005-09-01 Lindsay Erin J. Method and apparatus for endoscopic dissection of blood vessels

Family Cites Families (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5372138A (en) * 1988-03-21 1994-12-13 Boston Scientific Corporation Acousting imaging catheters and the like
US5258149A (en) * 1990-11-27 1993-11-02 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Process of making a membrane for high efficiency removal of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol from whole blood
JP2615301B2 (en) * 1991-04-02 1997-05-28 オリンパス光学工業株式会社 Electronic laparoscopic
US5540711A (en) * 1992-06-02 1996-07-30 General Surgical Innovations, Inc. Apparatus and method for developing an anatomic space for laparoscopic procedures with laparoscopic visualization
USRE36434E (en) * 1993-11-05 1999-12-07 Hamlin; David Endoscopic device
FR2729582B1 (en) * 1995-01-25 1997-03-07
US6119031A (en) * 1996-11-21 2000-09-12 Boston Scientific Corporation Miniature spectrometer
US20020161387A1 (en) * 2000-06-22 2002-10-31 Blanco Ernesto E. Safety trocar with progressive cutting tip guards and gas jet tissue deflector
US6450992B1 (en) * 1999-07-02 2002-09-17 Smith & Nephew, Inc. Cannula interface
WO2002013683A1 (en) * 2000-08-14 2002-02-21 Michael Cooper An endoscopic surgical device
US20030050603A1 (en) * 2001-09-12 2003-03-13 Todd Erik F. Cannula that provides bi-directional fluid flow that is regulated by a single valve
JP4334885B2 (en) * 2003-02-28 2009-09-30 オリンパス株式会社 The endoscope apparatus and an endoscope conduit

Patent Citations (67)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3760810A (en) * 1970-12-11 1973-09-25 Hoorn M Van Surgical ligating instrument of the endoscope type
US4878485A (en) * 1989-02-03 1989-11-07 Adair Edwin Lloyd Rigid video endoscope with heat sterilizable sheath
US5169397A (en) * 1990-02-08 1992-12-08 Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. Medical instrument
US5271380A (en) * 1990-11-06 1993-12-21 Siegfried Riek Penetration instrument
US5431151A (en) * 1990-11-06 1995-07-11 Partomed Medizintechnik Gmbh Instrument for the penetration of body tissue
US6007481A (en) * 1990-11-06 1999-12-28 Riek; Siegfried Instrument for the penetration of body tissue with cutting and viewing of body structure
US5685820A (en) * 1990-11-06 1997-11-11 Partomed Medizintechnik Gmbh Instrument for the penetration of body tissue
US5250068A (en) * 1990-11-30 1993-10-05 Yakuouji Shinkiyu Chiryouin Optical transmission type acupuncture needle
US5176127A (en) * 1991-01-28 1993-01-05 Enrico Dormia Mandrel for medical endoscope
US5226890A (en) * 1991-11-13 1993-07-13 United States Surgical Corporation Tissue gripping device
US5290276A (en) * 1992-02-06 1994-03-01 Sewell Jr Frank Rotatable laparoscopic puncturing instrument
US5256149A (en) * 1992-02-14 1993-10-26 Ethicon, Inc. Trocar having transparent cannula and method of using
US5354302A (en) * 1992-11-06 1994-10-11 Ko Sung Tao Medical device and method for facilitating intra-tissue visual observation and manipulation of distensible tissues
US5797944A (en) * 1992-11-12 1998-08-25 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Visualization trocar
US5385572A (en) * 1992-11-12 1995-01-31 Beowulf Holdings Trocar for endoscopic surgery
US5334150A (en) * 1992-11-17 1994-08-02 Kaali Steven G Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5380291A (en) * 1992-11-17 1995-01-10 Kaali; Steven G. Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5376076A (en) * 1992-11-17 1994-12-27 Kaali; Steven G. Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5551947A (en) * 1992-11-17 1996-09-03 Worldwide Optical Trocar Licensing Corporation Visually directed trocar for laparoscopic surgical procedures and method of using same
US5563696A (en) * 1993-05-27 1996-10-08 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Image fixing apparatus with power control during sheet passage
US5370640A (en) * 1993-07-01 1994-12-06 Kolff; Jack Intracorporeal catheter placement apparatus and method
US5658236A (en) * 1993-09-13 1997-08-19 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5569160A (en) * 1993-09-13 1996-10-29 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US6685630B2 (en) * 1993-09-13 2004-02-03 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US20020143236A1 (en) * 1993-09-13 2002-10-03 Sauer Jude S. Optical trocar
US5441041A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-08-15 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5467762A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-11-21 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5408992A (en) * 1993-11-05 1995-04-25 British Technology Group Usa Inc. Endoscopic device for intraoral use
US5720761A (en) * 1993-11-16 1998-02-24 Worldwide Optical Trocar Licensing Corp. Visually directed trocar and method
US5609562A (en) * 1993-11-16 1997-03-11 Worldwide Optical Trocar Licensing Corporation Visually directed trocar and method
US5591191A (en) * 1994-01-26 1997-01-07 Kieturakis; Maciej J. Surgical instrument and method for helically incising a pathway into the interior of the body
US5445142A (en) * 1994-03-15 1995-08-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical trocars having optical tips defining one or more viewing ports
US5674184A (en) * 1994-03-15 1997-10-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical trocars with cutting electrode and viewing rod
US5860996A (en) * 1994-05-26 1999-01-19 United States Surgical Corporation Optical trocar
US5658306A (en) * 1994-07-01 1997-08-19 Archimedes Surgical, Inc. Method for making additional incisions in laparoscopic surgery
US5632717A (en) * 1994-10-07 1997-05-27 Yoon; Inbae Penetrating endoscope
US5569292A (en) * 1995-02-01 1996-10-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration instrument with transparent blades and tip cover
US5569291A (en) * 1995-02-01 1996-10-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration and dissection instrument
US5591192A (en) * 1995-02-01 1997-01-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical penetration instrument including an imaging element
US5738628A (en) * 1995-03-24 1998-04-14 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical dissector and method for its use
US5707382A (en) * 1995-03-24 1998-01-13 Ethicon Endo Surgery, Inc. Surgical dissector
US5662673A (en) * 1995-04-05 1997-09-02 Kieturakis; Maciej J. Surgical trocar and method for placing a trocar sleeve in a body wall
US5857999A (en) * 1995-05-05 1999-01-12 Imagyn Medical Technologies, Inc. Small diameter introducer for laparoscopic instruments
US5571133A (en) * 1995-06-01 1996-11-05 Yoon; Inbae Penetrating instrument with sequential indication of entry into anatomical cavities
US6203557B1 (en) * 1995-07-13 2001-03-20 Origin Medsystems Tissue separation cannula and method
US5980549A (en) * 1995-07-13 1999-11-09 Origin Medsystems, Inc. Tissue separation cannula with dissection probe and method
US5662613A (en) * 1996-05-14 1997-09-02 Astarita; Denis C. Endoscopic instrument lock
US5681323A (en) * 1996-07-15 1997-10-28 Arick; Daniel S. Emergency cricothyrotomy tube insertion
US5843115A (en) * 1996-10-28 1998-12-01 Morejon; Orlando Trocar insertion device
US6176824B1 (en) * 1996-10-29 2001-01-23 James M. Davis Fiberoptically illuminated appliances
US5817061A (en) * 1997-05-16 1998-10-06 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Trocar assembly
US5873889A (en) * 1997-08-08 1999-02-23 Origin Medsystems, Inc. Tissue separation cannula with dissection probe and method
US6402770B1 (en) * 1998-06-01 2002-06-11 Avatar Design & Development, Inc. Method and apparatus for placing and maintaining a percutaneous tube into a body cavity
US6350233B1 (en) * 1998-07-30 2002-02-26 David Z. Lubowski Sigmoidoscope
US7244228B2 (en) * 1998-07-30 2007-07-17 Lubowski David Z Sigmoidoscope
US20020169362A1 (en) * 1999-03-18 2002-11-14 Kazutoshi Kan Operating instrument insertion apparatus and operation supporting apparatus
US6228059B1 (en) * 1999-06-16 2001-05-08 Denis C. Astarita Endoscopic instrument locks
US6206823B1 (en) * 1999-08-02 2001-03-27 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument and method for endoscopic tissue dissection
US6478806B2 (en) * 2000-05-16 2002-11-12 Taut, Inc. Penetrating tip for trocar assembly
US6692467B2 (en) * 2000-05-31 2004-02-17 Taut, Inc. Trocar assembly
US20020133188A1 (en) * 2001-03-15 2002-09-19 O'heeron Peter T. Trocar
US20050107816A1 (en) * 2001-09-24 2005-05-19 Pingleton Edward D. Bladeless obturator
US20040066008A1 (en) * 2002-10-04 2004-04-08 Smith Robert C. Introducer seal assembly
US20040082969A1 (en) * 2002-10-23 2004-04-29 Stephen Kerr Laparoscopic direct vision dissecting port
US7056329B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2006-06-06 Intellimed Surgical Solutions, Llc Laparoscopic direct vision dissecting port
US20050033304A1 (en) * 2003-08-01 2005-02-10 O'heeron Peter T. Obturator tip for a trocar
US20050192613A1 (en) * 2004-03-01 2005-09-01 Lindsay Erin J. Method and apparatus for endoscopic dissection of blood vessels

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Dictionary.com, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/secure as accessed on 07/31/2015 *

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8821526B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2014-09-02 Specialtycare, Inc. Trocar
US9101315B2 (en) 2010-11-11 2015-08-11 Specialty Care, Inc. Cannula system
US9186173B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2015-11-17 Specialty Care, Inc. Optical obturator system
USD753745S1 (en) * 2013-04-15 2016-04-12 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Telescope
USD796037S1 (en) * 2015-10-08 2017-08-29 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Eyepiece for a sialendoscope

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE602006001138D1 (en) 2008-06-26 grant
EP1707132A3 (en) 2006-11-15 application
JP2006280918A (en) 2006-10-19 application
US7470230B2 (en) 2008-12-30 grant
US20060224174A1 (en) 2006-10-05 application
EP1707132B1 (en) 2008-05-14 grant
CA2541073C (en) 2014-03-11 grant
US20170360472A1 (en) 2017-12-21 application
ES2306309T3 (en) 2008-11-01 grant
CA2541073A1 (en) 2006-09-30 application
EP1707132A2 (en) 2006-10-04 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6685724B1 (en) Laparoscopic surgical instrument and method
US5403328A (en) Surgical apparatus and method for suturing body tissue
US7195592B2 (en) Surgical retractor apparatus for use with a surgical port
US5304190A (en) Endoscopic cutting apparatus
US4686965A (en) Instrument for endoscopic operations
US5554151A (en) Specimen retrieval container
US6001084A (en) Medical needle for endoscopic surgery
US6030402A (en) Apparatus and methods for the penetration of tissue, and the creation of an opening therein
US7056329B2 (en) Laparoscopic direct vision dissecting port
US7753901B2 (en) Laparoscopic instrument and cannula assembly and related surgical method
US7776057B2 (en) Methods and devices for tissue reconfiguration
US20090112062A1 (en) Detachable distal overtube section and methods for forming a sealable opening in the wall of an organ
US20060241344A1 (en) Intra-abdominal surgical method and associated apparatus
US5669883A (en) Veress needle and cannula assembly
EP0550069A1 (en) Variable interior dimension cannula assembly
US5569291A (en) Surgical penetration and dissection instrument
US20080086074A1 (en) Visual insufflation port
US20110275901A1 (en) Laparoscopic devices with articulating end effectors
US20040230217A1 (en) Offset trocar piercing tip
US5632717A (en) Penetrating endoscope
US20100081883A1 (en) Methods and devices for performing gastroplasties using a multiple port access device
US20040093000A1 (en) Direct vision port site dissector
US20090131751A1 (en) Anal surgical instrument guides
US6447527B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for the penetration of tissue
US5899919A (en) Miniature endoscopic surgical instrument assembly and method of use

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP`, CONNECTICUT

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SMITH, ROBERT C.;WENCHELL, THOMAS;REEL/FRAME:021881/0611;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050513 TO 20050525

AS Assignment

Owner name: COVIDIEN LP, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP;REEL/FRAME:029065/0448

Effective date: 20120928