US20090056267A1 - Expansible hole anchor - Google Patents

Expansible hole anchor Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090056267A1
US20090056267A1 US12/171,811 US17181108A US2009056267A1 US 20090056267 A1 US20090056267 A1 US 20090056267A1 US 17181108 A US17181108 A US 17181108A US 2009056267 A1 US2009056267 A1 US 2009056267A1
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Prior art keywords
chock
anchor
center
hole
cable
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Abandoned
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US12/171,811
Inventor
Eric William REEVES
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Reeves Eric William
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Priority to US95923207P priority Critical
Application filed by Reeves Eric William filed Critical Reeves Eric William
Priority to US12/171,811 priority patent/US20090056267A1/en
Publication of US20090056267A1 publication Critical patent/US20090056267A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G21/00Preparing, conveying, or working-up building materials or building elements in situ; Other devices or measures for constructional work
    • E04G21/32Safety or protective measures for persons during the construction of buildings
    • E04G21/3261Safety-nets; Safety mattresses; Arrangements on buildings for connecting safety-lines
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62BDEVICES, APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR LIFE-SAVING
    • A62B1/00Devices for lowering persons from buildings or the like
    • A62B1/02Devices for lowering persons from buildings or the like by making use of rescue cages, bags, or the like
    • A62B1/04Single parts, e.g. fastening devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62BDEVICES, APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR LIFE-SAVING
    • A62B35/00Safety belts or body harnesses; Similar equipment for limiting displacement of the human body, especially in case of sudden changes of motion
    • A62B35/0043Lifelines, lanyards, and anchors therefore
    • A62B35/0068Anchors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G21/00Preparing, conveying, or working-up building materials or building elements in situ; Other devices or measures for constructional work
    • E04G21/32Safety or protective measures for persons during the construction of buildings
    • E04G21/3261Safety-nets; Safety mattresses; Arrangements on buildings for connecting safety-lines
    • E04G21/3276Arrangements on buildings for connecting safety-lines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16BDEVICES FOR FASTENING OR SECURING CONSTRUCTIONAL ELEMENTS OR MACHINE PARTS TOGETHER, e.g. NAILS, BOLTS, CIRCLIPS, CLAMPS, CLIPS, WEDGES, JOINTS OR JOINTING
    • F16B19/00Bolts without screw-thread; Pins, including deformable elements; Rivets
    • F16B19/04Rivets; Spigots or the like fastened by riveting
    • F16B19/08Hollow rivets; Multi-part rivets
    • F16B19/10Hollow rivets; Multi-part rivets fastened by expanding mechanically
    • F16B19/1027Multi-part rivets
    • F16B19/1036Blind rivets
    • F16B19/109Temporary rivets, e.g. with a spring-loaded pin

Abstract

An expansible anchor is adapted for inserting into a hole formed with a structure. The anchor includes a load cable and a center chock attached to an end of the load cable. At least one side chock resides adjacent to the center chock, and is adapted for movement between an anchor-contracting position and an anchor-expanding position. In the anchor-contracting position, the anchor is readily inserted into and removed from the hole of the structure. In the anchor-expanding position, the anchor is locked inside the hole of the structure. A chock-release column bears against the center chock or may bear against the at least one side chock. The chock release column is in a fixed relation to the center chock via a fastener and has an enlarged head adapted for locating outside of the hole. The enlarged head defines a striking surface adapted for receiving a sudden force. This force is transferred through the chock-release column to the center chock and the at least one side chock, such that the at least one side chock is movable from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position to thereby dislodge the anchor from the hole of the structure.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • This application claims the benefit of priority of provisional application Ser. No. 60/959,232, filed on Jul. 12, 2007, entitled EXPANSIBLE HOLE ANCHOR, the content of all the aforesaid application(s) are relied upon and incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to safety devices and methods for fall protection, and more specifically, to safety devices, in an exemplary embodiment, including expansible hole anchors, operable for arresting the downward movement of a person or object after a fall.
  • 2. Technical Background
  • In the construction industry, it is oftentimes necessary to provide fall protection for workers or objects suspended at heights. Conventionally, expansible hole anchor bolts are used to meet these needs. Contractors typically utilize the expansible hole anchors in the hopes that they provide a simple, reliable and relatively inexpensive means for connecting a cable, rope or wire to a drilled hole in a hard material, that is easy to install in and remove from the hole, and that effectively anchors to the hole while applying a minimum stress to the hole, while providing a minimum sensitivity to the angular orientation of the expansion bolt in the hole. However, substantial drawbacks and limitations exist in conventional expansible hole anchors, particularly those with spring-loaded retractable handles.
  • A first shortcoming of conventional hole anchors is that the handle is applicable for moving the anchor from a normal expanded condition to a contracted condition for inserting and removing the anchor from the hole. In order to remove the anchor, the user is typically instructed to manually retract the handle to disengage the anchor chocks from an inside wall of the hole. In many cases, the anchor is so tightly lodged inside the hole that movement of the handle is difficult, if not impossible. This occurs often, as the operating instructions call for a tug on the load cable to set the anchor during insertion. Additional forces exerted on the anchor caused by a worker's movement, or during a worker's fall cause even greater locking engagement of the anchor chocks. The instructions commonly provided for dislodging an embedded anchor are to insert a small, narrow flat screwdriver into the hole, and create an impact force on an end fitting to overcome the locking friction. In practice, this procedure is generally ineffective; often resulting in mangled or broken retraction cables, and rendering the anchor unsuitable for future use. This procedure further inconveniences the user by requiring the availability of special tools in order to access and release the anchor chocks. If all methods of removal fail, the exposed portion of the anchor is torched off, a new hole drilled, and the balance of the anchor is left in the old hole.
  • A further problem of conventional anchors relates to the exposure of control cables operable for moving the anchor from the expanded condition to the contracted condition. Typically, these cables will bear directly against an inside wall of the anchor hole, resulting in substantial abrasion and chaffing when the anchor is inserted into and removed from the hole. Further wear is created when the worker moves about causing the control cables to grind against the concrete lip of the hole. If left undetected, the worn cables will eventually foul the cable motion and cause the anchor to fail which may result in inoperability, serious injury, or death.
  • A further problem with conventional hole anchors is the number of components required for assembly and use. Existing hole anchors require a large number of parts which disadvantageously increase the complexity and cost of manufacture. In addition, conventional hole anchors disadvantageously have a striker head which may lose contact with the center chock, thus providing a defective unit. In addition, conventional hole anchors, are provided with chock cables which may kink caused by movement of the unit during normal use.
  • Accordingly, it would be desirable to have an improved expansible hole anchor which overcomes the noted shortcomings of conventional devices. In one such solution, it would be desirable to provide an expansible hole anchor which reduces the manufacturing costs and the complexity of assembly. In other solutions, it would be desirable to provide an expansible hole anchor with a chock releasing column which is secured to a center chock, thereby ensuring continuous contact between the center chock and the striker head and decreasing side load forces which may be applied to the center chock during use.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is designed to overcome the deficiencies and shortcomings of the devices described above. The present invention is designed to reduce the manufacturing costs and the complexity of assembly. In all exemplary embodiments, the present invention relates to an improved expansible hole anchor with a chock releasing column which is advantageously secured to a center chock of the hole anchor, thereby decreasing side load forces which may be applied to the center chock during use. The present invention is easily installed and removed from a hole formed with a solid structure. In one application, the present invention discloses a hole anchor that is inserted into a hole drilled in a concrete wall at a construction site. A safety harness, lifeline, and other fall protection gear is secured to the worker and to the anchor to arrest the worker in the event of a fall. In another application, the present invention is directed to a hole anchor that is applicable for use in securing equipment, such as scaffolding, to a concrete structure, or as a lift connection point for items with a suitable hole, such as preformed concrete or boulders, or for use in recreational rock climbing.
  • According to an exemplary embodiment, an expansible anchor adapted for inserting into a hole formed with a structure is provided. The hole anchor generally includes a load cable, a center chock attached to an end of said load cable, at least one, but preferably two, side chocks adjacent to said center chock and adapted for movement between an anchor-contracting position and an anchor-expanding position, whereby in said anchor-contracting position, said anchor is readily inserted into and removed from the hole of the structure, and in said anchor-expanding position, said anchor is locked inside the hole of the structure, and a chock release column fastened to and bearing against at least one of said center chock or at least one side chock by a fastener. The chock release column generally includes an enlarged head adapted for locating outside of the hole, said enlarged head defining a striking surface adapted for receiving a sudden force and transferring the force through said chock-release column to said center chock or at least one side chock, such that said at least one side chock is movable from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position to thereby dislodge said anchor from the hole of the structure.
  • In all exemplary embodiments, the chock release column is secured to the center chock such that the chock release column cannot translate or slide along the center chock and/or the load cable. The chock release column is secured to the center chock by a fastener. The fastener is preferably a pin type device. However, it may be any suitable fastening device including, but not limited to swaging, glue, rivets, screws, nails, rods, ties, or the like. In one exemplary embodiment, the fastener extends through a bore located in the chock release column and the center chock and at least partially into the load cable, thereby permitting the chock release column to pivot about the center chock, but not translate or slide along the longitudinal axis of the load cable.
  • In other exemplary embodiments, the fastener extends substantially through the chock release column, the cable connector and the cable load. In still other exemplary embodiments, a plurality of fasteners are employed to secure the chock release column to the center chock. Specifically, a first fastener extends through a first half of the chock release column and into the center chock. Further, a second fastener extends through an opposed half of the chock release column and into the center chock.
  • In still other exemplary embodiments, the center chock and the chock release column are a unitary component. The unitary component includes a tapered portion, a shaft, and an enlarged head. At least one, but preferably two, cable guides are provided about the shaft. The cable guides are preferably convexly curved plates which fit about the shaft.
  • Additional features and advantages of the invention will be set forth in the detailed description which follows, and in part will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art from that description or recognized by practicing the invention as described herein, including the detailed description which follows, the claims, as well as the appended drawings.
  • It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description present exemplary embodiments of the invention, and are intended to provide an overview or framework for understanding the nature and character of the invention as it is claimed. The accompanying drawings are included to provide a further understanding of the invention, and are incorporated into and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings illustrate various embodiments of the invention, and together with the detailed description, serve to explain the principles and operations thereof.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • These and other features, aspects and advantages of the present invention are better understood when the following detailed description of the invention is read with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is an exploded, perspective view and side views of an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with one exemplary embodiment of the present invention, wherein the chock release column is secured to the center chock by a fastener extending through the chock release column and the center chock and partially into the load cable;
  • FIG. 2 is side and cross sectional views of the hole anchor of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the hole anchor of FIG. 1 with the side chocks in an anchor-expanding position;
  • FIG. 4 is another perspective view of the hole anchor of FIG. 1 with the side chocks in an anchor-expanding position;
  • FIG. 5 is side and cross sectional views of an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, wherein the chock release column is secured to the center chock by a fastener extending through the chock release column, the center chock and the load cable;
  • FIG. 6 is side and cross sectional views of an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, wherein the chock release column is secured to the center chock by a plurality of fasteners extending through the chock release column and the center chock;
  • FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the hole anchor of FIG. 6;
  • FIG. 8 is side and cross sectional views of the hole anchor of FIG. 6;
  • FIG. 9 is an exploded, perspective view and side views of an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, wherein the chock release column and the center chock are a unitary component and cable guides are fitted thereto;
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, wherein the center chock is shown with another exemplary configuration; and
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view and side views of an expansible hole anchor of FIG. 10.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention will now be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings in which exemplary embodiments of the invention are shown. However, this invention may be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein. These exemplary embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be both thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. Like reference numbers refer to like elements throughout the various drawings. Further, as used in the description herein and throughout the claims that follow, the meaning of “a”, “an”, and “the” includes plural reference unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Also, as used in the description herein and throughout the claims that follow, the meaning of “in” includes “in” and “on” unless the context clearly dictates otherwise.
  • The present invention overcomes the shortcomings of conventional hole anchors by securing a chock release column of a hole anchor device to a center chock. This method of securing the chock release column and the center chock together reduces the overall cost and the number of components required for manufacture. Further, the present invention prevents the chock release column from defectively losing contact with the center chock and provides space for an ergonomic pivot handle to be used, while shortening the overall length of the unit. Still further, the chock release column of the present invention advantageously enters into the inside of the hole during use, thus decreasing side loads which may be placed upon the center chock.
  • In exemplary embodiments of the present invention, an expansible hole anchor is provided which generally includes a load cable having a center chock connected to one end and a loop at the opposite end, at least one side chock movably abutting the outer surfaces of the center chock such that they may translate between an expanded position and a retracted position, a pivot handle interconnected to the at least one side chock by at least one chock cable, a retractor spring to bias the at least one side chock in the extended position, and a chock release column having an enlarged head and being interposed between the pivot handle and the center chock. In all exemplary embodiments, the chock release column is secured about the load cable and bears against the center chock such that it cannot translate or slide along the longitudinal axis of load cable.
  • In exemplary embodiments, the expansible hole anchor is generally operated by pulling back the pivot handle which retracts the at least one side chock, reducing the outside diameter over the combination of the center chock and the at least one side chock. The anchor is then inserted into a hole (in rock, concrete, etc.) and the pivot handle is released. Spring pressure causes the at least one side chock to translate along the center chock and expand to the hole diameter. When tension is placed upon the load cable, it pulls the center chock outward. The at least one side chock tends to remain stationary because of friction between the hole and their outer surfaces. This, in turn, results in the center chock being driven between the at least one side chock, expanding laterally and increasing the outward gripping pressure. The greater the external load placed upon the anchor, the higher the gripping pressure.
  • To release the anchor, the pivot handle is again retracted. This, in turn, retracts the at least one side chock to a diameter smaller than the hole. If the pivot handle is stuck in position, an enlarged head of the chock release column, exposed outside the hole, may be pushed by hand or struck with a hammer or other tool to dislodge the center chock and allow the at least one side chock to retract.
  • Referring now specifically to the drawings, an expansible hole anchor constructed in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1, and shown generally at reference numeral 10. The hole anchor 10 is adapted for insertion into a hole (not shown) formed with a solid structure, such as a concrete wall, and is applicable for use with safety harnesses, lifelines, and other fall protection devices (not shown) worn by a worker to arrest the worker in the event of a fall. In exemplary embodiments, the anchor 10 comprises a load cable 12 looped at one end 14 for attaching a safety device, and a center chock 16 located at an opposite end. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that the load cable 12 may be comprised of a steel wire. Further, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that any suitable material may be used. Still further, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the load cable 12 may be a rod or rod like structure as opposed to a flexible cable type structure. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that the center chock 16 may be attached to the load cable 12 by any conventional means. At least one side chock 18 is provided along the center chock 16 and cooperates, as described below, to constrict and expand the anchor 10 relative to the hole of the structure. In the exemplary embodiments described herein two side chocks are shown 18, 20 for purposes of illustration only.
  • In exemplary embodiments and as best shown in FIGS. 1-9, the center chock 16 has a generally wedge-shaped body, arcuate shoulders 22 and 24, and an integrally-formed rearward extending cable connector 26. In other exemplary embodiments as best shown in FIGS. 10-11, the center chock may be provided with a relief slot 116. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the use of the relief slot 116 provides both decreased weight to the overall anchor 10 and decreased stresses. Further, it will be appreciated that the use of the relief slot 116 increases the overall flexibility of the anchor 10. The cable connector 26 attaches the center chock 16 directly to the load cable 12. The side chocks 18 and 20 reside adjacent the center chock 16, and have complementary angled profiles designed to provide maximum uniform gripping action when set inside the structure hole. The outside surface of each side chock 18 and 20 is preferably curved to conform to an inside wall of the structure hole, while the inside surface is substantially planar for sliding along a flat outside surface of the center chock 16. In other exemplary embodiments, the inside surface of each side chock 18, 20 may be slightly convex, while the outside surfaces of the center chock 16 are either planar or slightly concave.
  • The side chocks 18 and 20 are attached to respective steel-wire chock cables 28 and 30. The chock cables 28, 30 extend rearward to a spring-loaded pivot handle 32. The pivot handle 32 is carried on the load cable 12, and is adapted for being manually retracted by the user to move the side chocks 18, 20 from a normal anchor-expanding position, best shown in FIG. 1 to an anchor-contracting position shown in FIG. 9. In the anchor-contracting position, the side chocks 18, 20 are more closely spaced apart on opposite sides of the center chock 16 and immediately forward of the arcuate shoulders 22 and 24, such that the anchor 10 is readily inserted into and removed from the hole of the structure. The spaces 34 and 36 formed between the shoulders 22 and 24 allow passage of the chock cables 28, 30 rearwardly towards the handle 32. The rear portion of the center chock 16 is relatively thin, thereby allowing substantial contraction of the anchor 10. Preferably, the thinnest section of the center chock 16 forward of the arcuate shoulders 22, 24 has a profile dimension less than the diameter of the load cable 12 (See FIGS. 1-11. In the anchor-expanding position, the side chocks 18, 20 are urged forward along diverging outer surfaces of the center chock 16. In use, the anchor 10 does not fully expand inside the hole, but instead forces the side chocks 18, 20 into sufficient frictional engagement with the inside wall of the structure hole to prevent inadvertent dislodging of the anchor 10. After inserting the anchor 10 into the hole, the side chocks 18, 20 are set by one controlled pull on the cable loop 14.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, a chock-release column 38 is carried on the load cable 12 adjacent the center chock 16, and comprises an integral cable cylinder 40 and enlarged-diameter head 42. In other exemplary embodiments, the chock release column 38 may comprise the cable cylinder 40 and the enlarged head 42 as separate components, as opposed to integral ones. The cable cylinder 40 is positioned over the cable connector 26 of the center chock 16 and bears directly against the arcuate shoulders 22, 24. The enlarged head 42 locates outside of the structure hole, and defines a flat annular striking or bearing surface 44 designed to receive a force applied using the thumbs or any rigid object, such as a snap hook. The force is transferred directly through the chock-release column 38 to the center chock 16 to dislodge the side chocks 18, 20 from friction-locking engagement inside the hole. Once dislodged, the side chocks 18, 20 are easily retracted by the handle 32; moving from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position to remove the anchor 10 from the structure hole.
  • In exemplary embodiments, the preferable maximum diameter of the striking head 42 is greater than the maximum distance between the side chocks 18 and 20 in the anchor-expanding condition. As such, upon insertion of the anchor 10 into the hole, the enlarged striking head 42 is pushed directly against the mouth of the hole, thereby locating the anchor chocks 16, 18 and 20 inside the hole in a position of maximum effectiveness and safety, while maintaining ready access to the exposed striking surface 44.
  • According to one embodiment, the enlarged head 42 of the chock-release column 38 has three openings for receiving the load cable 12 and chock cables 28, 30, respectively. Preferably, the center opening has a radiused edge to minimize wear on the load cable 12 when pulled vertically. A reduced diameter, integral neck 50 extends forward of the enlarged head 42 has interior passages or longitudinal exterior grooves to designed receive the chock cables 28, 30. The neck 50 cooperates with the arcuate shoulders 22, 24 to further position the side chocks 18, 20 relative to the center chock 16. The chock cables 28, 30 extend from the side chocks 18, 20, and are directed along a length of the anchor 10 by a fixed positioning block 52 located adjacent the pivot handle 32. The positioning block 52 likewise has three openings for receiving the load cable 12 and chock cables 28, 30, respectively.
  • The pivot handle 32 generally comprises an assembly of links 54, 56, 58, 60 and rockers 62, 64 (See, FIGS. 1 and 7) attached together on opposite sides of the load cable 12 by rivets 66. Respective ends of the chock cables 28, 30 are fixed to the rockers 62, 64. When assembled, as shown in FIGS. 1, and 6, the rockers 62, 64 cooperate to allow kink-controlling movement of the chock cables 28, 30 relative to the load cable 12. The handle 32 rocks or pivots when one chock cable 28, 30 is in tension and the other cable 28, 30 is in compression, thereby discouraging cable kinking or excessive bending which may foul effective operation of the anchor 10. Preferably, to facilitate retraction of the handle 32, respective finger curves 68 and 70 are formed with the rockers 62, 64.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, the pivot handle 32 generally comprises an assembly of links 98, 100, 102, 104 and rockers 106, 108 (See, FIG. 9) attached together on opposite sides of the load cable 12 by rivets 110. Respective ends of the chock cables 28, 30 are fixed to the rockers 106, 108. When assembled, as shown in FIGS. 2-5, 8-11, the rockers 106, 108 cooperate to allow kink-controlling movement of the chock cables 28, 30 relative to the load cable 12. The handle 32 rocks or pivots when one chock cable 28, 30 is in tension and the other cable 28, 30 is in compression, thereby discouraging cable kinking or excessive bending which may foul effective operation of the anchor 10. Preferably, to facilitate retraction of the handle 32, respective finger indents 112 and 114 are formed with the rockers 106, 108 and interposed between links 98, 100 and 102, 104, respectively.
  • A washer 72 and retractor spring 74 are carried on the load cable 12 rearward of the pivot handle 32. The retractor spring 74 is compressed between the handle 32 and cable loop 14, and operates to normally urge the handle 32 and chock cables 28, 30 forward thereby biasing the side chocks 18 and 20 in the anchor-expanding position. The retractor spring 74 is preferably pre-loaded in the anchor-expanding position at greater than 20% of its maximum compression force. Preferably, the cable loop 14 is secured by a duplex ferrule 76 and reinforced with a metal thimble (not shown). An equipment tag 78 provides relevant product information.
  • In all exemplary embodiments, the chock release column 38 is secured to the center chock 16 such that the chock release column 38 cannot translate or slide along the center chock 16 and/or the load cable 12. In an exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, the chock release column 38 is secured to the center chock 16 by a fastener 80. As illustrated throughout the figures, the fastener 80 is shown as a pin type device. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the fastener 80 may be any suitable fastening device for securing the chock release column 38 to the center chock 16 including, but not limited to rivets, screws, nails, rods, ties, pins, plates, glues, swages, etc. As shown, the fastener 80 extends through a bore located in the cable cylinder 40 and the cable connector 26 and at least partially into the load cable 12. Advantageously, this manner of attachment permits the chock release column 38 to pivot about the center chock 16, but not translate or slide. In exemplary embodiments, as best shown in FIGS. 5 and 8, a pivot relief angle may be provided at the left edge of the chock release column 38. Further, this manner of attachment permits the use of a unit having a smaller overall length when compared to conventional hole anchors.
  • In another exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the fastener 80 extends substantially through the chock release column 38, the cable connector 26 and the cable load 12. Again, this manner of attachment permits the chock release column to pivot about the center chock but not slide. In still another exemplary embodiment, shown in FIGS. 6-8, a plurality of fasteners are employed to secure the chock release column 38 to the center chock 16. As shown, a first fastener 82 extends through a first half of the cable cylinder 40 and into the cable connector 26. Further, a second fastener 84 extends through an opposed half of the cable cylinder 40 and into the cable connector 26.
  • In still another exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 9, the center chock and the chock release column are a unitary component and generally referred to as 86. The unitary component 86 includes a tapered portion 88, a shaft 90, and an enlarged head 92. At least one, but preferably two, cable guides 94 and 96 are provided about the shaft 90. The use of the cable guides 94, 96 decreases the side load forces which may be exerted upon the unitary component 86. Further, in the exemplary embodiment shown, the cable guides 94, 96 are illustrated as convexly curved plates which fit about the shaft 90. These cable guides 94, 96 are half cylindrical in shape. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that any suitable shape may be used.
  • The embodiments described above provide advantages over conventional expansible hole anchors and associated methods of manufacture. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made to the present invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Thus, it is intended that the present invention cover the modifications and variations of this invention provided they come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents. Furthermore, the foregoing description of the preferred embodiment of the invention and best mode for practicing the invention are provided for the purpose of illustration only and not for the purpose of limitation—the invention being defined by the claims.

Claims (20)

1. An expansible anchor adapted for inserting into a hole formed with a structure, said anchor comprising:
a load cable;
a center chock attached to an end of said load cable;
at least one side chock adjacent to said center chock and adapted for movement between an anchor-contracting position and an anchor-expanding position, whereby in said anchor-contracting position, said anchor is readily inserted into and removed from the hole of the structure, and in said anchor-expanding position, said anchor is locked inside the hole of the structure;
and a chock release column fastened to and bearing against at least one of said center chock or the at least one side chock by a fastener; and
wherein said chock release column comprises an enlarged head adapted for locating outside of the hole, said enlarged head defining a surface adapted for receiving a force and transferring the force through said chock-release column to said center chock or at least one side chock, such that said at least one side chock is movable from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position to thereby dislodge said anchor from the hole of the structure.
2. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, and comprising a handle carried by said load cable and adapted for moving said at least one side chock from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position.
3. An expansible anchor according to claim 2, and comprising a chock cable interconnecting said handle and said at least one side chock.
4. An expansible anchor according to claim 3, wherein said handle comprises a rocker assembly allowing kink-controlling movement of said chock cable relative to said load cable.
5. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said chock release column further comprises a cable guide defining a contoured opening receiving said load cable and said chock cable.
6. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said fastener is selected from the group consisting of a swage, a glue, a pin, a plurality of pins and a plurality of plates.
7. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said at least one side chock defines a generally convex inner surface adapted for sliding movement against an inner surface of said center chock.
8. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said center chock comprises a bearing shoulder against which said chock release column is forced.
9. An expansible anchor according to claim 8, wherein said center chock further comprises an integrally formed cable connector secured to said load cable, and extending through a hollow end of said chock release column.
10. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said the fastener extends through the chock release column and into a portion of the center chock.
11. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said the fastener extends through the chock release column, the center chock and the load cable.
12. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said the fastener comprises a first fastener which extends through a first half of the chock release column and into the center chock and a second fastener which extends through an opposed half of the chock release column and into the center chock.
13. An expansible anchor adapted for inserting into a hole formed with a structure, said anchor comprising:
a load cable;
a center chock attached to an end of said load cable, said center chock comprises a tapered portion, a shaft, and an enlarged head; and
at least one side chock adjacent to said center chock and adapted for movement between an anchor-contracting position and an anchor-expanding position, whereby in said anchor-contracting position, said anchor is readily inserted into and removed from the hole of the structure, and in said anchor-expanding position, said anchor is locked inside the hole of the structure.
14. An expansible anchor according to claim 13, further comprising at least one cable guide fitted about the shaft.
15. An expansible anchor adapted, comprising:
a load cable;
a center chock attached to an end of said load cable;
at least one side chock adjacent to said center chock and adapted for movement between an anchor-contracting position and an anchor-expanding position;
and a chock release column fastened to the load cable by a fastener and abutting said center chock; and
wherein said chock release column comprises an enlarged head adapted for locating outside of a hole, said enlarged head defining a surface adapted for receiving a force and transferring the force through said chock-release column to said center chock or said at least one side chock such that said at least one side chock is movable from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position to thereby dislodge said anchor from the hole of the structure.
16. An expansible anchor according to claim 15, and comprising a handle carried by said load cable and adapted for moving said at least one side chock from the anchor-expanding position to the anchor-contracting position.
17. An expansible anchor according to claim 16, and comprising a chock cable interconnecting said handle and said at least one side chock.
18. An expansible anchor according to claim 15, wherein said fastener is selected from the group consisting of a swage, a glue, a pin, a plate, a tube, a plurality of pins and a plurality of plates.
19. An expansible anchor according to claim 1, wherein said the fastener comprises a first fastener which extends through a first half of the chock release column and the center chock and into a portion of the load cable and a second fastener which extends through an opposed half of the chock release column and the center chock and into a portion of the load cable.
20. An expansible anchor according to claim 15, wherein the fastener substantially extends through the chock release column, the center chock and the load cable.
US12/171,811 2007-07-12 2008-07-11 Expansible hole anchor Abandoned US20090056267A1 (en)

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US12/171,811 US20090056267A1 (en) 2007-07-12 2008-07-11 Expansible hole anchor

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Cited By (6)

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US20070267558A1 (en) * 2004-07-27 2007-11-22 Sigma Industries, Llc Chock release column for use with expansible hole anchor
RU2496950C2 (en) * 2011-12-08 2013-10-27 Владимир Павлович Блажко Device to join building structures
WO2013173216A3 (en) * 2012-05-14 2014-02-27 Climb Tech, Llc Concrete anchor point system
US20140263903A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 Meyer Ostrobrod Concrete Anchor
US20150068841A1 (en) * 2013-09-10 2015-03-12 9020-4983 Quebec, Inc. Vertical Support Member for a Suspended Scaffold Assembly, Kit for Mounting a Suspended Scaffold Assembly, Suspended Scaffold Assembly and Method for Mounting the Same
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070267558A1 (en) * 2004-07-27 2007-11-22 Sigma Industries, Llc Chock release column for use with expansible hole anchor
RU2496950C2 (en) * 2011-12-08 2013-10-27 Владимир Павлович Блажко Device to join building structures
WO2013173216A3 (en) * 2012-05-14 2014-02-27 Climb Tech, Llc Concrete anchor point system
US8839591B2 (en) 2012-05-14 2014-09-23 Climb Tech, Llc Concrete anchor point system
US9212677B2 (en) 2012-05-14 2015-12-15 Thomas Dale Owen Blind hole anchor, cable tie and method of securing an anchor in a blind hole
US20140263903A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-18 Meyer Ostrobrod Concrete Anchor
US9163651B2 (en) * 2013-03-14 2015-10-20 Meyer Ostrobrod Concrete anchor
US20150068841A1 (en) * 2013-09-10 2015-03-12 9020-4983 Quebec, Inc. Vertical Support Member for a Suspended Scaffold Assembly, Kit for Mounting a Suspended Scaffold Assembly, Suspended Scaffold Assembly and Method for Mounting the Same
US9765537B2 (en) * 2013-09-10 2017-09-19 9020-4983 Quebec Inc. Vertical support member for a suspended scaffold assembly, kit for mounting a suspended scaffold assembly, suspended scaffold assembly and method for mounting the same

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