US20090056258A1 - Forming Apparatus and System - Google Patents

Forming Apparatus and System Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090056258A1
US20090056258A1 US11/845,921 US84592107A US2009056258A1 US 20090056258 A1 US20090056258 A1 US 20090056258A1 US 84592107 A US84592107 A US 84592107A US 2009056258 A1 US2009056258 A1 US 2009056258A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
forming
member
panels
forming member
interconnectable
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/845,921
Inventor
Donald W. Currier
Original Assignee
Currier Donald W
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Currier Donald W filed Critical Currier Donald W
Priority to US11/845,921 priority Critical patent/US20090056258A1/en
Publication of US20090056258A1 publication Critical patent/US20090056258A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G11/00Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs
    • E04G11/06Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs for walls, e.g. curved end panels for wall shutterings; filler elements for wall shutterings; shutterings for vertical ducts
    • E04G11/08Forms, which are completely dismantled after setting of the concrete and re-built for next pouring
    • E04G11/10Forms, which are completely dismantled after setting of the concrete and re-built for next pouring of elements without beams which are mounted during erection of the shuttering to brace or couple the elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G17/00Connecting or other auxiliary members for forms, falsework structures, or shutterings
    • E04G17/04Connecting or fastening means for metallic forming or stiffening elements, e.g. for connecting metallic elements to non-metallic elements
    • E04G17/042Connecting or fastening means for metallic forming or stiffening elements, e.g. for connecting metallic elements to non-metallic elements being tensioned by threaded elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G17/00Connecting or other auxiliary members for forms, falsework structures, or shutterings
    • E04G17/06Tying means; Spacers ; Devices for extracting or inserting wall ties
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G9/00Forming or shuttering elements for general use
    • E04G9/10Forming or shuttering elements for general use with additional peculiarities such as surface shaping, insulating or heating, permeability to water or air

Abstract

A forming system is provided for retaining a conformable material. The conformable material is, in one embodiment, concrete. The forming system includes one or more forming members, some comprising at least two panels connected in spaced relation so as to define a substantially linear passageway adapted to retain a first supply of concrete. In other embodiments, the forming member may comprise one or more panels forming various configurations so as to define substantially non-linear passageways or an end forming member to retain a conformable or settable material such as concrete which hardens in place. Each of at least two panels of the forming member further preferably comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element. The at least one interconnectable end, in some embodiments, forms an interengageable slot with the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other structure. The one other structure, in some embodiments, comprises one or more forming members being configured similarly. Additionally, the at least two panels, in one embodiment, are preferably adapted to be disconnectable after use to subsequently receive a second supply of conformable material.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to an apparatus, system and method for forming a material, and more particularly, to an apparatus, system and method for forming a conformable material, such as, for example, concrete.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • In the construction industry, numerous techniques, methods, and devices are available for building structures out of a variety of materials using different structural systems. Some construction methods use, for example, “wood frame walls”; others use “concrete block walls.” Many of these structural systems and construction methods, however, require time-consuming, heavy and cumbersome “component-by-component” construction—with relatively difficult to handle components (e.g., boards, concrete blocks, etc.). Moreover, these components must be secured together in some manner (e.g., nails, mortar, etc.) and typically require skilled, experienced labor.
  • Building a “concrete block wall,” for example, requires specialized masonry skills to properly handle and align blocks and apply mortar to join and secure the concrete blocks so as to form a uniform, vertically and horizontally aligned block wall; such specialized labor adds to the cost and time of a construction project.
  • In contrast to a “concrete block wall,” a poured concrete wall in many instances produces a stronger, longer-lasting wall, which provides more desirable sound and weather-resistant qualities. A poured concrete wall is effectively one solid structure while a “concrete block wall”—which in effect requires handling each cumbersome concrete block—is constructed, as noted, block-by-block with mortar for example. A solidly constructed poured concrete home would also provide durability and many other advantages typically needed where there is exposure to hurricanes, tornados or other harsh weather conditions. Additionally, unlike a “wood frame wall,” such a structure also is resistant to termites.
  • Various methods and devices for building concrete walls include, for example, first erecting forms usually consisting of several parallel walls which form a space therebetween for receiving and holding concrete. Such devices also usually require substantial alignment and bracing prior to pouring concrete. Once the poured concrete wall has fully cured, the forms may be removed.
  • Unfortunately, many of these processes and devices have drawbacks in that they utilize forming walls, complicated shoring reinforcements and alignment devices that are unwieldy, heavy, and require extensive effort and expense to transport to and from a construction site. Due to their weight and bulkiness, many of these form devices require large equipment to handle and position them during the set up and forming process—thus making them time-consuming and cumbersome to use prior to actually being able to pour concrete. Moreover, such hefty and awkward devices leave even fewer options for less-muscle bound individuals or elderly persons with certain ailments who desire—on their own—to set up and handle forms so as to form up some structure, building or the like.
  • There are also other types of forming systems—which are not reusable and remain permanently affixed to the building. Such systems typically include insulating features and also incorporate insulating materials and multi-layered forms having built in insulation. Unfortunately, these systems may be unnecessarily labor-intensive and may be too complex to efficiently use for many building structures thus driving up the effort and cost of a construction project. And, again, they can require specialized labor or training.
  • In addition, although some multiple form devices are reusable, these forms are not easily and quickly removable—especially when multiple adjacent forms are interconnected next to and/or stacked on one another using time-consuming, threaded fasteners.
  • The following U.S. patents disclose a variety of systems and devices, which have attempted to resolve at least some of the above problems:
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,405,505 to Alberti, entitled “Modular interlock wall form,” sets forth a modular interlock wall form for providing a sturdy wall structure that is easily assembled and disassembled. The modular interlock wall form includes a base frame for resting on a surface, and which includes a pair of elongate base rails extending in the longitudinal direction of the base frame. The base rails are laterally spaced, and at least one lateral member extends laterally across the base rails. The lateral member has a fascia support portion extending substantially perpendicular to an axis of a central portion of the lateral member. A face panel is provided for forming a face of the modular interlock wall form. The face panel has opposite surfaces and a perimeter edge. The perimeter edge comprises opposite end edges and opposite first and second edges. The first edge is adapted for being oriented downwardly and the second edge is adapted for being oriented upwardly.
  • The second edge has a tongue extending along the length of the second edge with at least one pocket recessed in the tongue. The first edge has a groove extending along the length of the first edge, and is also adapted to receive one of the base rails of the base frame and is adapted to receive the tongue of the first edge. The end edges also have grooves formed therein. A linking frame is provided for linking spaced tiers of face panels together. The linking frame comprises a pair of linking members extending in the longitudinal direction of the linking frame, and at least one spanning member extending laterally across the linking members. The spanning member is coupled to each of the linking members.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,363,683 to Moore, Jr., entitled “Insulated concrete form,” discloses an insulated concrete structure including at least one longitudinally-extending side panel and at least one web member partially disposed within the side panel. The web member extends from adjacent the external side of the side panel through and out of the interior surface of the side panel. The first embodiment of the present invention uses opposed side panels that form a cavity therebetween into which concrete is poured and cured. The second embodiment uses a single side panel as a form, onto which concrete is poured. Once the concrete cures on the single side panel, it is used as a tilt-up wall, floor, or roof panel.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,321,496 to Martin, Jr., entitled “Insulated form assembly for a poured concrete wall,” is directed to an insulated form assembly for a poured concrete wall which includes a plurality of insulated forms. Each insulated form includes two generally planar opposing panels, and a plurality of interior segments interconnecting the panels and defining a plurality of passageways. Each panel includes a vertically extending attachment channel and an attachment member disposed within the attachment channel.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,178,711 to Laird et al., entitled “Compactly-shipped site-assembled concrete forms for producing variable-width insulated-sidewall fastener-receiving building walls,” sets forth generally large, typically eight feet by two inches by ten or sixteen or twenty-four inches, sidewalls for modular concrete forms which are easily, efficiently and economically produced by cutting and by routing sheet-type polymeric material, preferably polyurethane or expanded polystyrene foam. Metal connecting members are produced in standard sizes by cutting and bending sheet steel and/or wire. The sidewalls and connecting members are transported to a building site tightly and compactly in pieces, and then flexibly assembled into precision wall forms at the site with good efficiency at any scale. The wall forms so assembled define a cavity into which reinforcing steel rod, electrical and/or communications conduit, plumbing, etc., may be entered. Concrete is poured into the cavity to create a wall having the form sidewalls as its permanent surfaces. These surfaces have and present visible regularly-spaced sheet steel strips suitable to receive and to engage sheet metal screws for mounting anything, including more sheet-type construction materials such as wallboard or paneling, to the wall. The thickness of the concrete wall is predetermined by the dimensions of its metal sidewall-connecting members, and may easily be varied such as during the fabrication of lower to upper wall courses of a multi-story building.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,735,093 to Grutsch, Jr., entitled “Concrete formwork with backing plates,” is directed to foam forms for use in making a concrete wall that are disclosed together with a method of making the forms. The forms are stackable to form a cavity that receives the concrete. Each form has two identical panels. The panels are molded separately by first placing a structure, consisting of backing plates that will be along one side of the mold, connecting members that will be along the opposite side of the mold and an apparatus that connects the backing plates to the connecting members, in the mold. The mold is then filled with foam which cures and produces a panel with the backing plates, connecting members and apparatus molded into the panel. The molded panels are then shipped to the job site where the forms are assembled. Each form is assembled as follows: The connecting members on one panel are interconnected, by tieing means, to the connecting members on a second panel to provide a form.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,936,540 to Boeshart, entitled “Tie for concrete forms,” sets forth a tie for concrete forms which includes an elongated strap with opposing first and second ends. The strap has an upwardly projecting intermediate portion which prevents the movement of form panels inwardly on one end of the strap. A notch in the first end of the strap receives a waler to hold form panel from moving outwardly along the strap. A fixed plate on the second end of the strap holds a form panel from moving outwardly along the strap. Beveled ends allow the strap to be forced through a polystyrene panel without the need for forming an aperture in the panel prior to insertion of the tie. A tubular spacer may be utilized on intermittent ties to prevent inward movement of the form panels. The spacer has a notch cut therein to allow concrete to flow within the spacer and around the tie.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,726,560 to Dotson, entitled “Concrete form tie assembly,” sets forth a concrete form tie assembly in which the tie rod is formed from a high tensile strength flexible wire member, with the sleeve being formed of a flexible or yieldable material. A short sleeve member is inserted into the spacer sleeve adjacent one end with washer members on opposite ends thereof for retaining on the tie rod member which is provided with spaced protrusions for coaction with the wash members, the tube and washer assembly serving to rigidify the assembly for assisting in insertion and removal of the tie rod and sleeve as a unit. The leading end of the tube and washer assembly may be provided with a conical end to act as a guide. The ends of the tie rod member are enlarged, such as by welding head members thereto, the head members being configured for coaction with conventional hairpin or snap tie wedge members.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,927,857 to Lovisa et al., entitled “Reusable tie assembly for concrete forms,” discloses a retractable, removable and reusable tie assembly for concrete forms which includes a single tie rod having a pipe slidably mounted on one end thereof and an internal spreader system interposed between its ends for spacing the forms a predetermined distance apart during concrete pour. The internal spreader system includes a loose cone adapted to be threadedly engaged with one end of the pipe and a rubber tube adapted to sealingly engage with this cone as well as a second cone secured to the other end of the tube. This connection includes a ferrule and insert engageable with a steel washer embedded in the secured cone. The insert is interiorly threaded to facilitate removal of the cone and attached rubber tube after the forms have been stripped. Interengaging surfaces of threaded insert and the rod assure the proper location of the internal spreader system after the first and closing form have been erected. Wedges at each end of the tie assembly complete the erection of the forms. After the concrete has been formed and satisfactorily hardened the forms are then stripped. Towards this end, the rod and associated pipe are removed by initially uncoupling one or both of the wedges and then unscrewing the pipe from its associated cone. Thereafter the loose cone may be removed with a suitable tool or bolt with a thread mating with the internal thread of this cone. The other cone and secured tube may then be removed by means of a second tool or bolt having a threaded portion mating with that of the thread of the insert. The tie assembly may then be reused where desired.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,858,993 to Lovisa et al., entitled “Reusable tie assembly for concrete forms,” is directed to a retractable, removable and reusable tie assembly for concrete forms which includes a single tie rod, and an internal spreader and spacing system which includes a sleeve means, the spreader system having built-in provisions for internal spreading and spacing of forms in such a manner as to permit the tie rod to be partially withdrawn on one side of the form facilitating the installation of the closing form, on the opposite side, and then to be inserted to engage and lock with the internal spreader system, thus keeping the two adjacent sides of the forms in a definite predetermined position apart during the concrete pour, then to be removed undamaged from the hardened concrete prior to dismantling of the forms, leaving the internal spreader in the concrete to be removed after stripping of the forms without damaging the internal spreader.
  • In addition, several examples of some publications related to building construction methods and devices include the following:
  • Concrete Homes, October/November 2006, (page 7), shown under the article entitled, “Fox Blocks T-Block now available in 6- and 8-inch sizes” offered through Airlite Plastics.
  • Concrete Homes, June/July 2006, (page 37), shown under the article entitled, “COMPLEXITY captures CFA award” offered through suppliers for Balmer Brothers Concrete Work, Inc.
  • Concrete Homes House Plans—2004, (page 9), shown under the article entitled “COUNTING ON CONCRETE” related to, for example, “Insulating Concrete Forms” (page 12), “Removable forms” (page 13), “Precast concrete panels” (page 14), etc.
  • http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/info/components/envelope/foundation.html (visited Apr. 1, 2007), entitled “Building Technologies Program.”
  • http://www.cfawalls.org/products/nat_suppliers/index.htm (visited Apr. 1, 2007), entitled “CFN National Suppliers.”
  • http://www.cfawalls.org/products/nat_suppliers/wallties.html (visited Apr. 1, 2007), entitled “Wall-ties & Forms, Inc.”
  • http://www.wallties.com/concrete_forms.htm (visited Apr. 1, 2007), entitled “Concrete Form Accessories” related to, for example, “Gang Adapters,” “Pins and Wedges,” “Waler Brackets,” Wall Ties,” “Laydown Applications,” “Blockouts/Blockdowns,” “Special Application Hardware,” “Wall Thickness Change,” “Concrete Form Stacking,” etc.
  • http://www.integraspec.com (visited Feb. 26, 2007), entitled “Insulating Concrete Forms—IntegraSpec®”
  • http://www.integraspec.com/product.html (visited Feb. 26, 2007), related to, for example, Phil-Insul Corp Product Descriptions for spacers, panels, etc.
  • However, in view of the foregoing, there still remains a need for a forming system, method and apparatus including a simple-to-manufacture, configurable forming member which is easy to set up, stack, and remove after the concrete wall is poured and has cured and which has a simple, reusable configuration which is adapted to be more easily and quickly installed, without requiring specialized and experienced skilled labor, so as to enable a person without such specialized training or education to form and build a wall.
  • Those of skill in the art will appreciate the present invention which addresses the above problems and other significant problems, the solutions to which are discussed hereinafter.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is one possible objective of one possible embodiment of the present invention to provide an improved method and apparatus for forming and retaining a material such as for example, concrete, to build various structures or for forming other materials.
  • These and other objectives, features, and advantages of embodiments of the present invention will become apparent from the drawings, the descriptions given herein, and the appended claims. However, it will be understood that the above-noted objectives of various embodiments are intended only as an aid in understanding aspects of the embodiments, and are not intended to limit the embodiments of the invention in any way, and therefore do not form a comprehensive or restrictive list of objectives, and/or features, and/or advantages of the various embodiments of the invention.
  • Accordingly, in one possible embodiment, an apparatus is provided for retaining a conformable material, including at least a forming member comprising at least two panels connected in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of conformable material which hardens in place, such as, in one embodiment, concrete. Each of the at least two panels of the forming member further preferably comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element. The at least one interconnectable end, in some embodiments, forms an interengageable slot with the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other structure. The one other structure in a preferred embodiment comprises one or more forming members being configured similarly. Additionally, the at least two panels, in one embodiment, are adapted to be disconnectable after use to subsequently receive a second supply of conformable material, which hardens in place.
  • Another possible embodiment further comprises an engagement member forming an interconnection slot. The engagement member is preferably receivable by both an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of a given forming member and an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of at least one other forming member, wherein the given forming member and the at least one other forming member may be interconnected.
  • In a possible embodiment, a plurality of forming members are selectively configurable and interconnectable in a desired arrangement such that at least a portion of an enclosure may be constructed from the forming members with the forming members defining a plurality of passageways for retaining the conformable material.
  • In another possible embodiment, each of the at least two panels further comprises a base flange and a support member. In one embodiment, each of the support members of a given forming member cooperate to alignably receive the base flanges of the at least one other forming member when stacked on the given forming member. In this way, a plurality of stacked forming members would define a wall of forming members defining a plurality of vertically-extending passageways to retain the conformable material. In another embodiment, each of the support members further includes at least a support flange and a guide flange. The guide flanges of the support members are preferably disposed in opposing spaced relation.
  • In other embodiments, at least two panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially ninety-degree configuration adapted to retain a conformable material. While in various other embodiments, at least three panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration adapted for retaining a conformable material.
  • Another embodiment further comprises a contour member being mountable within the passageway with the contour member having a selected surface contour facing the interior of the passageway.
  • In another possible embodiment, a forming system is provided for retaining a material with the forming system including at least a forming member comprising at least two panels in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of settable material. Each of the at feast two panels further comprises a base flange extending from each panel away from the passageway, and a support member on an opposite side from the base flange, with the support member extending away from the passageway. The support member further comprises a guide member adapted to alignably receive a base flange of another forming member when stacked on the forming member. In this way, the at least two panels are alignable with at least two panels of said another forming panel. The at least two panels are preferably, in some embodiments, adapted to be disconnectable after retaining the first supply of settable material for subsequently receiving a second supply of settable material. In one possible embodiment, the each of the at least two panels comprises at least one interconnectable end defining a securable flange with the securable flange adapted to be interconnectable with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member. The forming system preferably comprises, in some embodiment, an engagement component adapted to interconnect a securable flange of the forming member, with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member. In other embodiments, each of the at least two panels further comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element forming an interengageable slot, with the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other forming member. In such an embodiment, the forming system further comprises an engagement member forming an interconnection slot, with the engagement member receivable by both an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of a given forming member and an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of the at least one other forming member. In this way, the given forming member and the at least one other forming member may be interconnected. Moreover, a plurality of forming members having selected configurations may be interconnected and stacked, and a plurality of walls of forming members may be interconnected so as to form at least a portion of an enclosure. In other embodiments, the forming system also further comprising at least one spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a reusable connector, with the at least one spacer connector adapted to releaseably connect in spaced relation each of the at least two panels of at least one of the forming members. In another embodiment, the at least two panels may be configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially non-linear configuration adapted for retaining a settable material. In other embodiments, at least three panels may be configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration adapted for retaining a settable material.
  • In another possible embodiment, a unitary structure reusably combinable with other unitary structures to create forms to receive settable material may be provided, which includes at least a panel, at least one integrally formed interconnectable end defining a securable element, a base flange integrally formed at a first peripheral edge of the panel, and a support member integrally formed at a second peripheral edge of the panel. Preferably, the panel, at least one integrally formed interconnectable end, base flange, and support member are of one-piece construction and comprise at least one of sheet metal or plastic.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a further understanding of the nature and objects of various embodiments of the present invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member having two panels connected in spaced relation so as to define a passageway for receiving a material.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member having two panels in spaced relation without a spacer connector.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing a spacer element and a connector of one possible embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing an engagement member.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a plurality of forming members interconnected by a plurality of engagement members and stacked on one another so as to define a wall of forming members.
  • FIG. 6A is a perspective view of another possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member having two panels connected in spaced relation so as to define a passageway for receiving a material.
  • FIG. 6B is a top view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member.
  • FIG. 6C is a plan view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a portion of the forming member integrally formed from a unitary structure.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially non-linear configuration.
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a forming member configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration.
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing an end forming member configured to close off a portion of a passageway.
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing an end panel configured to close off a portion of a passageway, and further showing one possible embodiment of interconnectable ends with each interconnectable end having interengagable flanges.
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a form object preferably removably captured within a passageway between the panels of two stacked forming members.
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a contour member.
  • FIG. 13 is a perspective view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing an example of another contour member.
  • FIG. 14 is an elevational side view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a base flange of one forming member secured to a support member of another forming member by a retaining member.
  • FIG. 15 is an elevational side view of one possible embodiment of the invention showing a support connector having a portion insertable through a spacer element captured within a formed wall.
  • While the present invention will be described in connection with various example embodiments, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to those embodiments. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all alternatives, modifications, and equivalents included within the spirit of the invention.
  • GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • One possible preferred embodiment of the present invention effectively provides a system of easy to manufacture reusable forming members that can be used by a person (with or without specialized skills) to inexpensively and quickly build, for example, a concrete building or structure of various desired dimensions using locally available persons and materials. The system is especially ideal for use in regions or countries where there is a lack of skilled construction workers and a need for housing.
  • The same set of relatively inexpensive forms can be used—and reused—to build many types of houses or buildings having a variety of layouts and designs. The system is also ideal for implementing the “do-it-yourself” projects of homeowners, landowners, and the like who have some time, but little actual construction experience, and who wish to save money while effectively and quickly building a desired structure, building, shed, retaining wall, footing, or the like—or tying into or replacing an existing wooden wall or other structure. A possible embodiment of the present invention may comprise quite lightweight forming members which are easy to set up, stack, remove, and reuse after a concrete wall has been poured and has cured.
  • Now referring to all of the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1, there is shown one possible embodiment of the present invention comprising a forming member 10 adapted for retaining a material. Forming member 10 may preferably include at least two panels 12, 14 connected in spaced relation so as to define a passageway 16 adapted for retaining a material which is ideally conformable. In one possible embodiment, the passageway 16 may be adapted to retain a first supply of conformable material, which hardens in place. The conformable material may include concrete or any other material that can be poured, for example, into passageway 16 between the panels 12, 14.
  • If concrete is not available, then locally available materials such as mud, straw, shells, and the like may also be utilized. Other materials such as foam plastic, other fluid substances or any pourable medium may be utilized. Rebar or reinforcement wires or fibers may also be easily inserted into the pourable medium, or prior to pouring, as will be explained further.
  • Moreover, in view of the above, it should be noted, that the forming member and system is also modular, compactable, and portable—as well as selectively configurable—so as to be used for less heavy-duty applications and adapted, for example, to selectively create, design and form up a playhouse, fort, dollhouse, theater prop or other such structure using a light-weight, conformable material such as a suitable cellular foam material or the like (which could be readily poured—or blown—into the selectively formed up passageways).
  • In a possible embodiment, panel 12, as shown in FIG. 1, may include two interconnectable ends 18, 20. Each interconnectable end 18, 20 may define an interconnectable flange or other interconnectable element 22, 24. Each of the interconnectable elements 22, 24, in one example embodiment, may, for instance, define, form, and/or comprise an interengageable slot 26, 28, respectively.
  • In the same way, panel 14 may also include two interconnectable ends 30, 32. Each interconnectable end 30, 32 may also define an interconnectable flange or other element 34, 36, and each of the interconnectable elements 34, 36, in one example embodiment, may, for instance, define, form, and/or comprise an interengageable slot 38, 40, respectively. Thus, for example, each interconnectable element 22, 34 (at end 180 of forming member 10) and/or interconnectable element 24, 36 (at end 182 of forming member 10) may be adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other structure.
  • The modular forming member 10, shown in a “non-interconnected” mode in FIG. 1, comprises various features for use in an “interconnected” mode with, for example, various other forming members, as will be explained further hereinafter.
  • In one possible embodiment, each of the at least two panels 12,14 may further comprise at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable or other securable element forming an interengageable slot. The interconnectable or other securable element may preferably be adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other structure. For example, in one embodiment, each end (e.g., 180, 182) of forming member 10 could be connected to another forming member defining a passageway having a substantially linear configuration similar to forming member 10 as shown in FIG. 1. However, in other embodiments of the present invention, a forming member could have other linear or non-linear configurations (e.g., angled, curved, arched, irregular, etc.) or other shaped configurations which will be explained hereinafter.
  • It will also be appreciated that in one example embodiment, the at least two panels are adapted to be disconnectable after use. With such a configuration, the at least two panels (e.g., panels 12, 14) may be adapted to be disconnectable after use to subsequently receive a second supply of conformable material, for example, which hardens in place.
  • Each of the panels, interconnectable ends and interconnectable elements is preferably formed from metal or plastic but may be made of any other suitable material having desired properties and characteristics such as for example, sufficient strength and rigidity to withstand shoring or other forces imparted by any of a variety of materials being retained and formed by the forming member (e.g., to prevent possible bulging of the panels).
  • Referring still to FIG. 1, one possible embodiment further comprises at least one spacer connector. However, in a preferred embodiment, two spacer connectors 42, 44 are preferably used to connect the panels 12, 14 in spaced relation. Each spacer connector 42, 44, in an example embodiment, may preferably comprise a spacer element 46, 48 and a connector 50, 52 respectively. The connector is preferably a reusable connector adapted to enable the panels 12, 14 to be disconnected after use and reconnected for subsequent use. The example connector 50 in FIG. 1 comprises wing nut 65 and a bolt 67 which is selectively sized with a threaded distal end. With such a configuration, each spacer connector 42, 44 is adapted to releaseably connect the two panels 12, 14, respectively, in a selectively spaced relationship.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, it can be seen, that in one possible embodiment, two apertures 54, 58 and 56, 60 are formed in the panels 12, 14, respectively. As can be seen, FIG. 1 shows forming member 10 in an “assembled” mode. FIG. 2 shows forming member 10 without a spacer connector in a“disassembled” mode. The pair of apertures 54, 56 and pair of apertures 58, 60 in panels 12, 14 are complementary and located so as to line up with one another when installing the “variable-length” spacer connectors 42, 44 so as to releaseably connect the panels 12, 14 in spaced relation.
  • As can be seen, each multi-function spacer element 46, 48 serves, in one aspect, to separate and space apart sides 12, 14 such that passageway 16 therebetween has a desired width (i.e. the distance between sides 12,14). This desired width may vary depending on the application and may be established by the selected length of a spacer element. For example, spacer element 46, shown in FIG. 3 has a length equivalent to the desired width of the passageway, denoted as Pw. That is, this may be the desired width of the forming member passageways, denoted as Pw, for example as shown in FIG. 2.
  • It should also be recognized that the connector may be any one of various types of reusable, temporary, and/or permanent connectors or fasteners. For example, forming member 10, in some embodiments, could be permanently connected in an “assembled” mode.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 3, a threaded nut 64 and bolt 66, in one possible embodiment, as well those described earlier may also be used to releaseably secure panels 12, 14. However, at least one end of the connector is preferably a wing nut or other type of fastener end that can be readily tightened or untightened by hand. In other example embodiments, the connector may be adapted for latching or for slotted engagement or other types of threaded engagement, or may include other suitable connectors or fasteners known to a person of ordinary skill in the art. (For example, the connector could comprise an elongated pin having a slotted end adapted to receive a wedge-like member so as to secure the panels in spaced relation, but permit disconnection merely by backing the wedge-like member out of the slot in the end of the connector).
  • A spacer connector may be installed, in one possible embodiment, by first positioning a spacer element between the unconnected panels 12, 14 shown in FIG. 2 and then lined up between complementary apertures 54, 56 (which preferably have a smaller diameter than the spacer element to prevent the spacer connector from passing through the apertures). A connector is then passed (in either direction) through the complementary apertures, and a fastener element is, in one embodiment, screwed onto the threaded end of the connector and tightened to secure the panels in a desired spaced relationship.
  • As noted, the spacing between the panels generally depends on the desired thickness of the resulting formed wall. If a builder desires, for example, to pour a concrete wall having the actual width of a 2×4 (e.g., about 3½ inches), the builder may use a spacer element having substantially the same width as a 2×4. Of course, a spacer element could be selectively sized to space the panels apart at any desired width (e.g., 2×6, 2×8, 4 inches, 8 inches, etc.).
  • In one possible embodiment, prior to assembly of the forming member 10 (already shown assembled in FIG. 1), the spacer element 46 (of a disassembled spacer connector 42) would be positioned between the apertures 54, 56 shown in FIG. 2. Then, bolt 67 having a threaded end and a suitable length would be inserted, for example, through aperture 56 of panel 14, through the hollow spacer element 46 (being held between the apertures 56, 54 in the panels), and then finally through the complementary aperture 54 of panel 12. The threaded end of bolt 67 would then be secured with wing nut 65. The same procedure may be repeated to install the second spacer connector 44 (if needed, as will be explained further). In this way, the spacer connectors (e.g., 42, 44) are adapted to releaseably connect panels 12, 14 in a predetermined selected spaced relationship depending on the desired thickness of the formed wall.
  • It should be noted that if only one spacer connector is desired for use with a forming member, any other unused apertures in the panels can be plugged or sealed. Moreover, the panels can also be configured with only one aperture each and positioned as desired. In other embodiments, a forming member may be configured with no apertures and not held in spaced relation by a spacer connector—but instead by securing the interconnectable ends to another structure (or to adjacent forming members as will be explained further hereinafter).
  • Turning again to FIG. 1, in one possible embodiment of the present invention, the interconnectable ends (for example, 18, 30) of forming member 10 may be adapted to be interconnected to at least one other structure as noted. More particularly now in FIGS. 1-5, and as best shown in FIG. 5, in a possible embodiment of the present invention, the at least one other structure may comprise, for example, at least one other forming member 78. Forming member 10 is shown partly interconnected, while forming member 78 is shown in an “interconnected” mode with forming members 10 and 218 at the other end.
  • Forming member 78 is preferably interconnectable with forming member 10 at one end, by engagement member 68, forming an interconnection slot 70, and is interconnectable to forming member 218, at the other end, by similarly configured engagement member 81 (see FIGS. 4 and 5). As shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, the engagement member 68 is receivable by both an interengageable slot 28 of an interconnectable element 24 (see FIG. 1), and an interengageable slot (not shown) of interconnectable element 79 of forming member 78 as shown in FIG. 5. It will be appreciated that the features of the interconnection system, in this embodiment, enable adjacent forming members (e.g., 10 and 78; 78 and 218; etc.) to be easily and quickly interconnected without the need for multi-component fastening systems or time-consuming threaded fasteners. Also, it should be recognized that although FIG. 5 shows multiple forming members interconnected as well as stacked, one possible embodiment does not require stacking forming members to form up a desired wall as will be explained further herein.
  • To further illustrate an interconnectable feature of the forming system and member using an engagement member, another possible embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIG. 11. FIG. 11 provides a somewhat different perspective of another forming member 82 having panels 97A, 97B and complementary engagement members 84, 85 (and having other features that will be further explained in subsequent paragraphs). In the view shown, the engagement member 84 forms an interconnection slot 90. The engagement member 84 is selectively sized and shaped with interconnection slot 90 such that the engagement member 84 is adapted to be received by both the interengageable slot 92 of interconnectable end 93 and an adjacent interengageable slot from another forming member (not shown) which could be connected at a later time. (Preferably, in one embodiment, the slot 90 of the engagement member 84 extends downwardly such that the engagement member 84 is adapted to be received by upwardly extending interengageable slots (e.g., 92, etc.) of the forming member 82 and some other forming member which could be interconnected thereto).
  • Referring again to FIGS. 1, 4, and 5, in one possible embodiment, it should be recognized that the engagement member is selectively configured with various features for functional cooperation with the interconnectable ends of forming members adapted to be interconnected. That is, in an exemplary embodiment, engagement member 68 (as shown in FIG. 4) has various features adapted to foster securely interconnecting the slotted interconnectable elements of forming members positioned adjacent one another.
  • For example, an engagement member, in one embodiment shown in FIG. 4, preferably has a width denoted by Ew, a length denoted by El, a slot width denoted by Es, and an unslotted depth denoted by Ed. The forming member in FIG. 1, in one embodiment, has an interconnectable element (e.g., 34) with a slot depth as denoted by Sd (shown in FIG. 1).
  • It will be appreciated that in one embodiment, the un-slotted depth Ed, of the engagement member 68 is at least substantially equivalent to the slot depth as denoted by Sd of slot 38 of interconnectable element 34 (as shown in FIG. 1). In this way, the engagement member is configured to functionally cooperate with the configuration of interconnectable element 34, such that the unslotted portion 71 of engagement member 68 will be received (slidably in one embodiment) by the interengageable slot 38 of interconnectable element 34.
  • Likewise, the engagement member (shown in FIGS. 1 and 5) would also be configured to functionally cooperate with another similarly configured forming member having a complementary interconnectable element with an interengageable slot positioned immediately adjacent slot 38.
  • It should also be noted that, in one embodiment, the engagement member (with the slot width denoted by Es) is adapted to be received by both of the interconnectable ends of immediately adjacent forming members (e.g., see FIG. 5, slotted elements 24, 79 of forming members 10, 78 respectively). With such a configuration, a user could quickly and easily slide the engagement member so as to be received simultaneously by both adjacent interengageable slots—so as to connect the interconnectable ends of each of the forming members. The remaining interconnectable ends could be connected in the same manner. (Note that the geometry and structures shown in the figures are not to scale, do not necessarily depict the actual size of the structures, and may be varied as needed to effect any desired interconnectability between the forming members).
  • The interconnection slots of engagement members and the interengageable slots and interconnectable elements and ends of the forming members, in various embodiments, may be suitably sized and shaped to provide a snug or loose interconnection. Also, the engagement member and interengageable slots may be configured for frictional engagement to reduce the possibility of the engagement member disengaging or any undesirable disconnection between the ends of adjacent forming members. In one embodiment, for example, when using the forming system to form out a concrete wall, preferably in most instances, a substantially snug fit will be desired between adjacent forming members so as to avoid unwanted leakage through the seams between adjacent forming members. However, when using the forming system for less viscous materials, a looser fit may be suitable. In addition, in some situations (while retaining and forming certain materials), controlled seepage through the upper and lower portions of the seams between adjacent forming members may be desirable to promote and foster, for example, more uniform curing. Also, a sealer could be used along lateral and longitudinal seams between forming members to minimize leakage (and also to minimize resulting seams in the hardened wall; however, seams may also be shaved off as desired).
  • In view of the foregoing, an interconnectable (or securable) element of a “first” forming member may be disposed immediately adjacent an interconnectable (or securable) element of a “second” forming member. An engagement member forming an interconnection slot may be further included with the engagement member receivable by both an interengageable slot of a securable member of the “first” forming member and an interengageable slot of a securable element of the “second” forming member. In this way, the “first” and “second” forming members may be interconnected. Moreover, a plurality of forming members may be simply and easily interconnected next to one another so as to form a plurality of longitudinally extending passageways in communication with one another.
  • Turning again collectively to FIGS. 1-5, and in particular FIG. 1, in another possible preferred embodiment of the present invention, each of the panels 12, 14 may further preferably comprise a base flange 94, 98, respectively, and a support member 96, 100, respectively. With this configuration, the support members of a given forming member are adapted to cooperate to alignably receive the base flanges of another forming member being stacked on the given forming member.
  • The support members 96, 100 (see FIGS. 1 and 5) of forming member 10, in one embodiment, are adapted to cooperate to alignably receive the base flanges 104, 106 of forming member 156 (shown in FIG. 5) being stacked on forming member 10.
  • In this way, each of the support members of a given forming member may be preferably configured and oriented in opposing relation so as to alignably receive each complementary base flange of another forming member. Such a self-alignment feature fosters easy and simple stacking of forming members and aids in building a more plumb form wall.
  • In view of the foregoing, it can be seen in FIG. 5, that a plurality of stacked forming members would define a wall of forming members (e.g., 10, 156, 158, 160) defining a plurality of vertically-extending passageways to retain a conformable material.
  • It should be noted, however, that with the flexible and configurable design features of the panels 12, 14, the panels shown in FIG. 1, may not comprise (or need) any support members (e.g., 96, 100). That is, in some embodiments, the interconnectable forming member may be configured to be used to form a passageway (e.g., horizontally-extending and/or vertically-extending, etc.) to pour concrete to make a “footing,” “retaining wall,” or other structure. Moreover, the panels of each forming member could be cooperatively and sufficiently sized (as suitably large panels; e.g., 4 ft×4 ft; 4 ft×8 ft; etc.) and interconnected to form up a large wall (heightwise and/or lengthwise)—without the need for stacking other forming members.
  • Turning again to FIG. 1, it will also be appreciated that, in one possible embodiment, each support member 96, 100 is disposed at least in part proximate a top edge 116, 118 of a respective panel 12, 14 with each support member preferably being oriented substantially orthogonal with respect to its panel. In this way, the panel is, in one embodiment for example, further reinforced to inhibit unwanted flexing while the forming member is retaining concrete or some other material for extended periods of time (e.g., during the curing process). This reinforcing feature also aids in maintaining the overall conformation of a formed up wall of interconnected and stacked forming members (e.g., FIG. 5) as well as the conformation of the plurality of passageways.
  • A support member is preferably integrally formed with its respective panel so as to foster ease of manufacture and to strengthen the panel. However, a given support member can be further strengthened and/or disposed, or for example, connected to the top edge of its respective panel in any of various ways such as by welding, bracketing, bracing, riveting, adhering, or by other reinforcing or connection systems. In addition, if further reinforcement is desired, one or more vertically or otherwise oriented rib structure(s) could be connected between each support member and base flange of a panel and/or one or more horizontally or otherwise oriented spar structure(s) could be connected between each interconnectable end of a panel.
  • In one possible embodiment, each of the support members 96, 100 of the panels 12, 14 further comprises a support flange 108, 112 and a guide flange or guide member 110, 114, respectively. The guide flanges or members 110, 114 are preferably disposed in opposing spaced relation and are preferably oriented, at least in one embodiment, substantially orthogonal to the support flanges. In this way, opposing guide flanges of a given forming member are in functional cooperation with each other to reinforceably secure the base flanges of another forming member stacked thereon. In effect, the guide flanges may serve as alignment flanges. (For example, see FIGS. 1 and 5, forming member 156 stacked on forming member 10; forming member 158 stacked on forming member 156; forming member 160 stacked on forming member 158; etc.). It should also be noted that the guide members could also be flared out at the top edges (or at the bottoms) and inclined with respect to one another with the top edges further apart than the bottom edges to foster stacking.
  • In another possible embodiment of the present invention, each of the at least two panels (e.g., 12, 14) further comprises a base flange which is extending from each panel away from a passageway of the forming member, and a support member on an opposite side from the base flange with the support member extending away from the passageway. In such an embodiment, the support member further comprises a guide member adapted to alignably receive a base flange of another forming member when stacked on the forming member. In this way, the at least two panels are alignable with at least two panels of another forming panel.
  • In addition, it will be appreciated that the engagement member also has design features interoperable with the design features of the multi-purpose interconnectable ends and support members. In one example embodiment, as shown in FIG. 1, the top edge 35 of interconnectable end 30, is lower than the top edge 118 of panel 14. Thus, there is a space or gap as denoted by Eg (see FIG. 1). As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 together, flange 69 of engagement member 68 is disposed above the top edges of interconnectable ends 20, 77. In one embodiment, flange 69 is adapted to rest on the top edges of and be supported by interconnectable ends 20, 77 (of forming members 10, 78).
  • As illustrated in FIG. 5, the base flanges of forming member 212 (configured in a similar manner as forming member 10 in FIG. 1) are adapted to be alignably received by the support members of forming member 78. In addition, a portion of the base flange of member 212 may also, in a possible embodiment, be adapted to be supported by flange 69 of engagement member 68. With this interoperable configuration, it can now be seen that the interconnectable ends are configured to aid in supporting and reinforcing the flange 69 when forming member 212 is stacked on forming member 78.
  • As best shown in both FIGS. 4 and 5, another cooperatively functional design feature can be seen. In one possible embodiment, the engagement member 81 (as well as the various other engagement members) has a width denoted by Ewl, (see FIG. 5) adapted to fill in the space denoted by Sg between support members (e.g., of forming members 78, 218). In this way, the engagement member is also adapted to better support the base flanges of the form members stacked on it (e.g., 212, 220).
  • In another example embodiment, at least one aperture is formed in each base flange and at least one complementary aperture is formed in each support member. In a possible embodiment, as shown in FIG. 14, complementary apertures 150, 152 are formed in a base flange 140 and a support flange 144, respectively and are alignable such that a retaining member, fastener or connector or the like is insertable through the aperture 150 of the base flange 140 and the complementary aperture 152 of the support flange 144 to secure the base flange to the support flange. In one embodiment, a retaining member such as pin 154 may be inserted through apertures 150, 152, as shown in FIG. 14 to secure alignment of the base flange 140 with respect to the support flange 144. Such a configuration not only serves to selectively vertically align the stacked forming member—and secure the conformation of the respective passageways—but also aids in reinforcing the connection between the two forming members. Thus, in other embodiments, a guide flange 146 may not be needed.
  • In addition, the “multi-purpose” base flange, in one possible embodiment, also provides a stabilizing function. That is, with the base flange flared out or extending preferably substantially perpendicular with respect to the plane of its respective panel—and away from the passageway—the base flange serves as a platform-like structure to stabilize the forming member. Of course, the base flange may also be selectively widened (as well as the complementary support member(s)) to provide further stability. In addition, a forming member can be further stabilized by using the apertures of the base flange with a connector (e.g., nail, spike, connector, fastener, etc.) or the like inserted through the aperture to anchor the base flange to a surface—or another forming member.
  • It should also be recognized that various features of the versatile forming system may be selectively configured and dimensioned such that various components operate together to prevent shoring and misalignment when a plurality of interconnected and stacked forming members are being used. For example, the spacer can be enlarged, thickened, reinforced, and/or strengthened to maintain the inner configuration, alignment, and “conformation” of vertically- and horizontally-extending passageways created by a formed up wall of interconnected and stacked forming members.
  • In this way, the forming members are adapted to retain and keep concrete or cement for example, in a uniform thickness and height within the passageways—and thus produce a straight wall, vertically and horizontally. It should be appreciated, that with the configuration of the forming members, the forming members may be stacked directly on one another, or staggered such that any seam that might appear on the wall would also have a staggered, block wall-type appearance.
  • In addition, the spacer elements could also include one or more recesses and/or one or more protuberances, outwardly extending lugs, or other features to aid in more firmly tying rebar or the like in a vertical or horizontal manner to aid or to facilitate securing the formed up wall to a foundation, footing, roofing member or some anchoring structure. The spacer elements also may define a groove, aperture, or eyelet sized to complementarily receive rebar securely (with or without tying) in such a way as to provide further reinforcing strength to the formed wall. For example rebar may have a diameter of about one quarter inch or other dimension as required for desired reinforcement characteristics depending on the resulting thickness of, in one embodiment, a concrete wall and the engineering design specifications. The spacer element groove could be sized accordingly.
  • The outer surface of the elements or other passageway structures as noted herein may also be textured, coated or treated so as to promote and/or inhibit bonding or the like between such structures and a conformable or settable material (e.g., concrete, etc.). Also, the panels interconnectable ends and/or elements, support members and/or spacer connectors may be formed from a durable, heavier gauge metal depending on the use. For example, the panels may be made from galvanized steel sheets, aluminum, copper, tin, or various other metals depending on the application.
  • In view of the foregoing, the forming system effectively provides various interoperable and functionally cooperative reinforcing features, as well as others as noted herein, which foster more snuggly securing together an entire wall or enclosure of interconnected and stacked forming members (e.g., see FIG. 5, items 10, 78, 218, 156, 212, 220, 158, 214, 222, 160, 216, 224, etc.)—prior to pouring a desired material—and as such, the conformation of the plurality of passageways may be better maintained.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 6A and 6B, in another possible embodiment, a forming member 310 is shown. It should be appreciated that the size, dimensions and interrelationships of the various features of the forming member 310 may be different than that of forming member 10. That is, the overall dimensions, size, shape, and other physical features of any given forming member are selectively and flexibly configurable depending on the application the forming is being used for. For example, the spacing between panels 312, 314 may be configurable so as to form a narrower and/or taller passageway 316, or alternately a wider and/or shorter passageway. Also, the lengths of the support members 396, 400 may be shorter relative the lengths of panels 312, 314. Other components such as interconnectable ends 318, 320, 330, 332, interconnectable and/or or securable elements 322, 324, 334, 336 may have any of a various suitable dimensions, sizes, or shapes (or e.g., rounded shapes or corners, angled ends, etc.), and interengageable slots 326, 328, 338, 340 could be deeper or shallower or be oriented at an angle with respect to the vertical edges of the interconnectable ends with an engageable member having a complementary dimensioned slot or an angled slot. Moreover, the interconnectable ends could be hinged or bendable in such a way that adjacent forming members could be angled with respect to one another to create a variety of passageway arrangements and formed wall configurations.
  • Also, as shown in FIG. 6A, additional apertures (418, 420, 422, 424) may be provided in guide flanges (e.g., 414, 416) (to facilitate securing complementary base flanges of another forming member with a fastener or to secure the flanges to some other structure); moreover, apertures (e.g., 426, 428, 429, 430, 432, 434, 436, 438 (not shown)) of the interconnectable ends, apertures (e.g., 435, 437, 439, 441) of the base flanges (e.g., 394, 398) or apertures (e.g., 421, 423 (not shown), 425, 427) of the support flanges may also be selectively sized and positioned as needed for a particular forming layout. These features and apertures could be used with any forming member configuration (e.g., 10, 310, 78, 156, 224, 172, 230, etc.) and may be used for various purposes such as for example, securing the forming members to braces, other anchoring structures, other forming members, etc.
  • When forming up a “footing” for a wall for example, in one embodiment, any of the various apertures (e.g., 426, 428, 429, 430, 432, 434, 436, 438) of the interconnectable ends, may be used with a fastener to secure one end of a forming member to another. That is, for a formed up footing, or for the bottom row of forming members of a formed up wall (e.g., see 10, 78, 218 in FIG. 5), engagement members (e.g., 68, 81, etc.) may be used to secure the upper portions of the adjacent forms (e.g., 10, 78, 218). However, the lower portions (and/or the upper portions) of the forms could be secured together by inserting fasteners, connectors or the like through apertures (shown in FIG. 6A (but not shown in FIG. 1, but which could be provided)) in the interconnectable ends to more snuggly secure the lower portions of the adjacent forming members next to one another so as, for example, to further prevent shoring or buckling or the like once a heavy material (e.g., concrete, etc.) is poured into the formed up wall or footing.
  • Likewise, apertures (e.g., 435, 437, 439, 441) of the base flanges (e.g., 394, 398) may be used to anchor the forming members to the ground, foundation, sidewalk, flooring or some platform-like structure (or even a wall in some instances).
  • Moreover, it will be appreciated, that a footing for a retaining wall or the like could also be formed up and poured first before a retaining wall is formed up. The footing could be formed up by using a plurality of forming members that are wider than the width (in one embodiment as denoted by Pw in FIG. 2) of the forming members that will be used to form up the retaining wall. It should be recognized that the spacing between the support members of the forming members of the footing could be adapted, modified or reduced so that narrower forming members for the retaining wall could be stacked on the formed up footing before pouring any concrete. Also, the footer could be first formed up and poured; and after the concrete hardens, the retaining wall forming members could be positioned atop the footing and tied in as appropriate with rebar or the like.
  • With any type of forming system, it should be noted that a builder must ensure that needed bracing and supports are used as well as a proper base for the formed up wall before and after pouring a material such as, for example, concrete. Another consideration, however, is to not stack the forming members too high so as to create excessive pressure on lower rows of forming members to be filled with concrete. Instead, just the lower rows or levels could be filled with concrete first. After the concrete cures, then, successively higher rows can be filled and cured in stages as needed.
  • Referring now to FIG. 6B, in one possible embodiment, spacer connectors 452, 454 may be selectively dimensioned or located, for example, horizontally, vertically, or as desired within the passageway 455 as needed for a particular application. Each of the panels 440, 442 and their interconnectable ends 444, 446, 448, 450, respectively may be unitarily formed from one section of material or constructed in separable or connectable components having a material thickness suitable for heavy-duty or other applications. For example, the panels 440, 442 and the interconnectable ends could be formed from a higher gauge, thicker metal or other material. In addition, as shown, the base flanges could have the same length as the support members 456, 458.
  • The various components of the panel could also be connected together in various ways. For example, each of the interconnectable ends and/or elements could be connected to a respective panel by any of a variety of methods, such as welding, hinging, fastening (riveting, threaded fasteners, removable or permanent connectors, etc.)
  • It will also be appreciated that the forming member has a modular, portable configuration. The forming member could be constructed from only two unitary structures or integrated panels and at least one type of one spacer connector. Such a configuration would foster ease of assembly or disassembly as well as handling, transporting, and storage of the forming member(s).
  • Referring now to FIG. 6C, in one example embodiment, a unitary structure 460 is reusably combinable with other unitary structures to create forms or forming members to receive a settable material. The unitary structure 460 preferably comprises a panel 462, at least one integrally formed interconnectable end, but preferably two interconnectable ends 464, 465 with each interconnectable end defining a securable or interconnectable element 466, 467, respectively. The unitary structure 460 preferably further comprises a base flange 468 integrally formed at a first peripheral edge 470 of the panel 462, and a support member 472 integrally formed at a second peripheral edge 474.
  • The at least one integrally formed interconnectable end, in one embodiment, or preferably each of two integrally formed interconnectable ends, could also define an interconnectable element forming an interengageable slot with its respective interconnectable end integrally formed at a peripheral end of the panel.
  • The panel, the at least one integrally formed interconnectable end, base flange, and support member are preferably of a one-piece construction and comprise at least one of sheet metal or plastic. The spacer connector components may also be made from metals, plastics or other materials as noted herein. Also, the panels, interconnectable ends and/or elements, support members and/or spacer connectors may be formed from a durable, heavier gauge metal depending on the use. For example, the panels may be made from steel or galvanized steel sheets or aluminum as well as other metals (copper, tin, etc.). However, various other suitable materials, known to one of ordinary skill in the art, for forming applications could be used as well. Each panel may have a certain gauge wall thickness suitable for retaining and forming heavier or less viscous materials. On the other hand, each panel may have a lesser gauge wall thickness for retaining and forming lighter or more viscous materials. For example, forming members used for concrete may have a wall thickness, in one possible embodiment, in the range of 1/16 of an inch to ⅛ of an inch. In another possible embodiment, the wall thickness may be in the range of ⅛ of an inch to ¼ of an inch; in other embodiments the wall thickness of the various forming member components and structures may vary depending on the application. One possible material may be a steel sheet metal or aluminum; others will be explained further hereinafter.
  • In manufacture, the unitary structure could be formed with a press or other suitable machinery to form substantially orthogonal bends along peripheral edges of the panel 462 (e.g. 470, 474, 476, 478, 480) to form a unitary member as shown in for example, in FIG. 1 or 6A (e.g., 183, 185, 313, 317). Also, some or all edges and/or corners (e.g., 461, 463, 464, 465, 471, 473, etc.) and other structures may preferably be rounded or smoothed using a grinder or the like for ease of handling, to improve storage, etc.
  • It should also be recognized, that the same unitary structure 460 may be manufactured and used interchangeably for either side of the forming member; thus, a forming member could be manufactured from only two unique components: the unitary member and the spacer connector (comprising the spacer element and connector) and the entire forming member could be constructed from only two unitary members and one or two spacer connectors.
  • In addition, such a unitary structure and/or separable portions thereof (e.g., as described with respect to forming member 10, 172, etc.)—as well as the entire forming member—could be made from wood, fiberglass, or molded from plastic using injection molding or other suitable manufacturing processes. In some embodiments for certain applications, various structures of the forming member may be formed from high-density polyethylene, polypropylene or other suitable polymers or materials which satisfy desired strength requirements. At least some of the forming member may also be manufactured from various composite materials to make the forming member suitably lightweight and durable for various uses in the construction industry or for various applications in other technology areas or industries.
  • It will be appreciated, that with such a unitary, modular, and compactable configuration as noted herein, a plurality of forming members—in a “disassembled” mode—can be more efficiently and easily transported to a construction site. Once at the site, the forming members can then be assembled using whatever sized spacer connector lengths are needed for a desired wall thickness and the forming system can be easily installed on site. On the other hand, in view of the portability of the forming members, they can also be pre-assembled at a factory, and, if needed, be easily stacked in certain pre-determined formed up wall dimensions for shipment.
  • It should also be emphasized, that the weight and portability of the forming system provide many advantages compared to various other systems. With a lighter-weight configuration in use, the forming members could be easily lifted and stacked and/or interconnected. In addition, the forming member panels and spacer connectors are easy to store and would generally take up little space, comparatively, because the panels could be nested and stacked in a disassembled mode. Thus, many thousands of such “nestable” panels and spacer connectors could be manufactured and stored in inventory without requiring substantial space. Moreover, even in an “assembled” mode, a wall of portably and compactly configured forming members, could be stacked and conveniently kept in a storage facility.
  • In view of the foregoing, the simplicity and efficiency of the forming system can be appreciated. Exemplary embodiments of the present invention include various configurable features of a forming system fostering effective and versatile construction and a quick and easy method for manufacture and assembly of a plurality of forming members. In addition, the cost per individual form would be selectively variable and controllable depending on, for example, the manufacturing costs and the material used.
  • In effect, the modularity, flexibility, simplicity, and versatility of the forming members provides a selectively arrangeable forming system having features that foster a variety of designs, shapes and arrangements depending on what type of building, shed, containment wall, footing, garage, room, house (exterior walls, or interior walls) or other structure is being formed up and what type of material is being used. In addition, the forming member can be secured to existing building structures and for example, used to tie into and/or replace existing wood or other walls.
  • Turning now to FIGS. 7 and 8, several more of many possible embodiments are shown. The embodiment in FIG. 7 illustrates at least part of a substantially non-linear forming member 172 comprising at least two panels in spaced relation (not yet showing the spacer connector(s)) and configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially ninety-degree or right angle configuration adapted to retain a conformable material. Various embodiments may be formed as a corner-type forming member including forty-five-degree, thirty-degree angle corners, and other angled configurations or the like. Preferably, forming member 172 comprises a first panel 174 having a substantially ninety-degree configuration and a second panel 176 also having a complementary substantially ninety-degree configuration, with the first panel 174 being shorter, in one possible embodiment, than the second panel 176. Each of the panels 174, 176 may be formed from one panel which is bent into a ninety-degree configuration. Or, each panel could be comprised of two smaller panels connected together in any of a number of ways that would be known to a person of ordinary skill in the art.
  • Forming member 172 preferably further comprises spacer connectors (not shown in FIG. 7), with each spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a connector. In one embodiment, the spacer connectors may be similar to those used in forming member 10 (and/or 310, etc.). The spacer connectors are adapted to releaseably secure first panel 174 to second panel 176 in a manner somewhat similar to spacer connectors 42, 44 included with forming member 10 (in a possible embodiment as discussed above). To install the spacer connectors, the spacers may be positioned within the interior of the passageway 178 and located between the apertures (e.g., 184A of panel 174 and 184B (not shown) of panel 176 or 186A of panel 174 and 186B (not shown) of panel 176). A connector may be inserted, for example, first through aperture 184A formed in panel 174, then through the spacer element (preferably having a hollow tube-like body), through the complementary aperture 184B formed in panel 176 and then secured with a connector fastener so as to preferably releaseably connect panel 174 to panel 176. Another spacer connector could then be connected in a similar manner through apertures 186A, 186B. It should be appreciated that the connectors can be initially inserted either way, for example through 184A or 184B and thus be tightened or untightened from whichever side of the forming member is most desirable. With this bi-directional installation feature, all fastening members of a plurality of forming members (e.g., 10, 310, 172, etc.) can be configured such that they are manipulable from one or any side of a formed up wall. Or, moreover, if there is an obstacle blocking access to one side of a given forming member, the forming member connectors may be installed such that they are disconnectable and removable from the accessible side. It should be recognized, that if a side of one or more forming members is blocked by an existing permanent wall or other structure (e.g., when forming up a footing in a trench or the like), each connector, comprising for example, a bolt and nut in one possible embodiment, would need to be installed such that the bolt (having a desired length) can be pulled out on the side opposite (or in some instances on the same side as) the existing permanent wall or structure (e.g., side of the trench). In other words, there needs to be sufficient room on the side to remove the entire shaft of the bolt. Otherwise, the forms may not be removable. Thus, a row of forming members, in some embodiments, may be interconnected in a longitudinally-extending row parallel and positioned immediately adjacent an existing longitudinally-extending existing wall—if there is sufficient space between the side of the row of forming members and the existing wall. Also, the spacing in various embodiments should be sufficient so as to permit the bolt head and/or nut to be manipulated and removed so the panels can in turn be disconnected and removed. In other embodiments, the forming member may also have a nut that is fixed or welded in place on the panel such that it does not need to be manipulated by hand or with a tool to prevent it from turning when the bolt is being tightened or untightened.
  • The panels 174, 176 in one embodiment, also preferably comprise base flanges 204A, 204B, 206A, 206B and support members 208A, 208B, 210A, 210B, respectively with the support members being adapted to alignably receive the base flanges of another complementarily configured ninety-degree forming member (or corner) (or other stackable forming member 10, 310, etc.) being stacked on the forming member 172. Forming member 172 further preferably comprises interconnectable ends and elements similar to, in one embodiment, forming member 10, which are connectable with an engagement member. Also, forming member 172 could form any apertures as described above with respect to forming member 10 (and/or 310, etc.) as needed.
  • It should also be recognized that a forming member could define a passageway having any of a variety of substantially non-linear (or linear) configurations such as noted above, or for example, having a curved, arched, rounded, zigzagged, V-shaped, U-shaped, or other non-linear configuration, or any other shaped configuration suitable to form a passageway for receiving a material which is preferably conformable. The forming member could also have an X-shaped, T-shaped (as will be explained hereinafter) configuration and the forming system could include any of various combinations or arrangements of substantially linear and/or non-linear forming members or forming members having other configurations.
  • In addition, in view of the flexible configuration of the forming member, two or more panels (as well as the interconnectable ends) could be parallel or be selectively disposed at angles (laterally or longitudinally, or vertically or horizontally), or, for example, inclined with respect to each other, such that a passageway would have a wedge-shaped, trapezoidal cross-section, or other oriented configurations (e.g., as viewed from the top or an end of a forming member) (or at converging or diverging angles maintained with various spacer connector lengths), as desired along the span of a formed up wall. Of course, the panels of adjacent forming members would be oriented and configured such that the interconnectable ends, support members and/or base flanges had a complementary fit with other adjacent forming members as needed. In this way, forming members could be configured with various opposing panels at selected angles, or with interconnectable curved panels (e.g., intermittently located in a formed up wall as desired, perhaps with an inner panel being planar and an outer panel being curved—such that a poured concrete wall would have a selectively curved outer surface) or other geometrical patterns to as to define a passageway having any of a number of selected configurations or arrangements for various applications, design uses or aesthetic appeal.
  • Referring now to FIG. 8, another example embodiment is illustrated including at least three panels configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration adapted for retaining a conformable material.
  • In one embodiment, the preferably T-shaped forming member 230 comprises at least three panels disposed in a spaced relationship (not yet showing the spacer connectors) and configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration. Forming member 230 preferably, comprises a first panel 232 having a substantially ninety-degree or right angle configuration, a second panel 234 having a substantially linear configuration and a third panel 236 also having a substantially ninety-degree or right angle configuration. The three panels 232, 234, 236 are preferably dimensioned, shaped and disposed in a complementary arrangement, in one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 8, so as to form a T-shaped passageway. The first panel 232 and third panel 236 preferably have the same dimensions. As with forming member 172, each of the panels 232, 236 may be formed from one panel which is bent into a ninety-degree configuration or each panel could be comprised of two smaller panels connected together using any of a variety of ways known to one of ordinary skill in the art.
  • Forming member 230 preferably further comprises three spacer connectors (not shown in FIG. 8), with each spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a connector. In one embodiment, the spacer connectors are similar to those used in forming member 10. The spacer connectors are adapted to releaseably secure first panel 232 to second panel 234 in a manner somewhat similar to spacer connectors 42, 44 included with forming member 10 (in a possible embodiment as discussed above). To install the spacer connectors, the spacers may be positioned within the interior of the passageway 238A, 238B and secured through the apertures shown in a similar manner as discussed above with respect to forming members 10 (and/or 172, etc.). However, preferably three spacer connectors are used to releaseably secure the panels 232, 234, 236 together in a T-shaped configuration.
  • Also, as shown in FIG. 8, the panels 232, 234, 236, in one embodiment, also preferably comprise base flanges 240A, 240B, 242, 244A, 244B and support members 246A, 246B, 248, 250A, 250B, respectively with the support members being adapted to alignably receive the base flanges of another complementarily configured T-shaped forming member (or, for example, in part other complementary forming members 10, 172, 310, etc.) being stacked on the forming member 230. Forming member 230 further preferably comprises interconnectable ends and elements similar to, in one embodiment, forming members 10, 310 (and/or 172, etc.), which are connectable with an engagement member. Also, forming member 230 could also form various apertures as described above with respect to forming members 10, 310 (and/or 172) as needed.
  • In addition, it should also be emphasized that in a possible embodiment, each of the linear or non-linear forming members is preferably constructed with a spacer element having a pre-designated width. Thus, a formed up wall of forming members used for a retaining wall, for example, may be configured such that the poured retaining wall might have a width as denoted by the passageway width Pw (e.g., in FIG. 2). In some embodiments, each forming member of the formed up retaining wall would have a width Pw as shown in FIG. 2 and as established by, for example, a spacer element 46, as shown in FIG. 3.
  • In another possible embodiment, a forming member may be configured to close or seal off a passageway and in effect form an end panel (or wall) or end cap. The forming member may comprise one or more panels configured so as to define a passageway having a partially closed configuration. Referring to FIG. 9, in one embodiment, an end forming member 260 comprises a panel 262. Panel 262 may be three-sided (e.g., 264A, 264B, 264C) and may be formed from one panel or piece of material which is bent or formed into the end-shaped configuration as shown in FIG. 9. With this configuration, a portion of the panel including two sides 264A, 264B would be bent to form a substantially a 90-degree configuration. Then sides 264B, 264C, respectively would be bent to form another substantially a 90-degree configuration as shown in FIG. 9. In addition, in another embodiment, panel 262 could be comprised of, for example, three smaller panels configured so as to define a passageway having a partially closed configuration and with each of the panels connected together in any of a number of ways.
  • End forming member 260 may further comprise one or more spacer connectors (not shown in FIG. 9), with each spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a connector. The spacer connectors may be similar to those used in other forming members (e.g., 10, 310, etc.) and appropriately formed apertures could be provided as needed. However, side 264B serves as a spacing structure to separate and space apart sides 264A, 264C such that passageway 266 therebetween has a desired width (i.e., the distance between sides 264A, 264C). This desired width may vary depending on the application and may be established by the length of a spacer element. For example, spacer element 46, shown in FIG. 3 has a length equivalent to the width of the passageway, denoted as Pw. This may also be the desired width of the forming member passageways (e.g., see width denoted as Pw in FIG. 2) (As noted above, this width may be the same as the width of a 2×4 or other sized board, etc.). Thus, side 264B would, in certain embodiments preferably have a width substantially equivalent to the length of the spacer elements used to establish the passageway spacing in the forming members.
  • The panel 262 in one embodiment, also preferably comprises base flanges 268A, 268B, 268C and support members 270A, 270B, 270C, respectively with the support members being adapted to alignably receive the base flanges of another complementarily configured forming member (or other forming member 10, 172, 230, 310, etc.) being stacked on the end forming member 260. End forming member 260 further preferably comprises a pair of interconnectable ends and elements similar to, in one embodiment, forming member 10 (or 172, 310, etc.) which are connectable with an engagement member. Also, end forming member 260 could also form various apertures as described above with respect to forming member 10 (and/or 310, etc.) as needed.
  • In one other possible embodiment, an end panel or forming panel may be configured to seal off a passageway and in effect form an end wall. Referring to FIG. 10, in one embodiment, an end panel 272 comprises a panel 274. At least a portion of panel 274 could serve as a spacing member and would, in certain embodiments, preferably have a width substantially equivalent to the length of the spacer elements used to establish the passageway spacing of the forming members. That is, as noted above, the desired width may vary depending on the application and may be established by the selected length of a spacer element. For example, as noted, spacer element 46, shown in FIG. 3 has a length equivalent to the desired width of the passageway, denoted as Pw. This may also be the desired width of the forming member passageways (e.g., see width denoted as Pw in FIG. 2).
  • The panel 274, in one embodiment, also preferably comprises a base flange 276 and support member 278 with the support member being adapted to alignably receive the base flange of another complementarily configured end panel (or other forming member 10, 172, 230 310, etc.) being stacked on the end panel 272. Also, end panel 272 could also form various apertures in the panels, flanges, and/or members as described above with respect to forming members 10 or other forming members as needed.
  • It should be recognized that end panel or forming member 272, in one possible embodiment, preferably comprises two interconnectable ends 280, 282. Each interconnectable end, in one embodiment, comprises a pair of spaced interengageable flanges. With this configuration, interconnectable end 280 would preferably comprise a pair of spaced interengageable flanges 284A, 284B while interconnectable end 282 would preferably comprise a pair of spaced interengageable flanges 286A, 286B, as shown in FIG. 10. It will be appreciated that the interengageable flanges are specially configured such that they may be interconnected to the interconnectable ends of an adjacent forming member (such as, for example forming member 10)—without the use of an engagement member. With such a configuration, a selected pair of interconnectable ends of a forming member would not need a specially configured interconnectable element defining an interengageable slot; also, as noted, an engagement member would not be necessary. The interengageable flanges are spaced sufficiently apart as denoted by Fs, such that they may be positioned above the interconnectable ends of a given forming member and lowered (as indicated by the arrows designated with an “A” in FIG. 10) and connected with the interconnectable ends of the forming member. For example, in one embodiment, end panel 272 would have a length equivalent to the width denoted as Pw of forming member 10 (as shown in FIGS. 2 and 1). The interengageable flanges 284A, 284B and 286A, 286B of end panel 272 are adapted to be positioned above the interconnectable ends 18 and 30 respectively of forming member 10 as shown in FlG. 1; the interengageable flanges, then may be lowered down slidably over the interconnectable ends 18, 30. That is, a user would lower and slide the interengageable flanges 284A, 284B and 286A, 286B over the interconnectable ends 18, 30 (being slotted or unslotted) of forming member 10—and in place—so as to close off the passageway 16 of forming member 10.
  • Now turning again to FIG. 11, other features of the spacer connector and forming system should also be recognized. The forming member is advantageously configurable such that a given spacer element may be adapted to be selectively sized in relation to a desired form object. A form object may include any of a number of structures used in building construction, for example, to form out a window opening, doorway, crawl space, air space, or other opening or cavity before filling the passageways of a formed up wall with concrete or the like (e.g., boards, pre-made box forms, pipes (e.g., for plumbing or wiring), etc). Such a feature may also be used to form archways, curved or angular headers, or any of a number of openings within a wall.
  • The form object 89 in FIG. 11 may preferably be a wooden board (such as a 2×4, 2×6, 2×8, etc.) having a width which is equivalent to the length of the selectively sized spacer element 91B. For example, the spacer element may have a length equivalent to the passageway width as denoted by Pw as shown in FIG. 3, which would preferably be substantially the same as the width of the form object 89. In this way, the at least two panels 97A, 97B may be releaseably connected so as to removeably capture a desired form object 89 within the passageway 95. It should be further recognized that, in one embodiment, the conformable material comprises concrete and the form object may comprise one or more form boards which may be connectable in a desired configuration and be selectively sized. That is, a window or doorway opening, or other void, cavity or the like could be formed up by four 2×4 form boards connected to create the desired shape (e.g., square, rectangle, etc.) and having a dimensioned perimeter and lateral width corresponding to the required window or doorway opening dimensions. The form object could then be positioned in a desired location within the formed up passageway.
  • It should be noted that the formed up wall may include many interconnected and stacked forming members (e.g., shown in part in FIG. 5) or any number of a plurality of forming members. In this way, the formed up wall of forming members would be adapted to “nest” the form boards within the passageway so as to form a desired cavity within the passageway. Adjustable spacer connectors, may be positioned within the passageway as desired and be sufficiently tightened around the form object (e.g., to “squeeze off” the interface between the panel and form object and create a seal) so as to prevent unwanted leakage of concrete or the like into the cavity. After concrete has been poured into the passageway and cured, the spacer connectors (e.g., 91A, etc.) could be disconnected and the panels (e.g., 97A, 97B) could be removed—along with the “form object”—leaving the required window, doorway or other opening formed in the concrete wall.
  • Referring now to FIG. 15, the forming system also preferably further comprises a support connector 295 having a portion insertable through a spacer element 296 captured within a formed wall 297. That is, the spacer element 296 would remain, in some embodiments, after a material has been poured and has hardened around spacer element 296 and after the panels have been disconnected and removed. In one embodiment, the support connector 295 preferably comprises a fastener element and at least one support element, wherein the at least one support element is adapted to be secured proximate at least one surface (e.g., first surface or second surface (e.g., which may be inner and outer surfaces)—or both surfaces with multiple support elements) of a formed wall. In a possible embodiment, the support connector 295 preferably comprises a fastener element 298 and a support element 299, wherein the support element is adapted to be secured proximate an inner surface (e.g., inner 289) of a formed wall.
  • The support element 299 is, in some embodiments, preferably secured by the fastener element immediately adjacent the inner surface of a formed wall. In this way, the support element, in one embodiment, can be used inside a structure (such as, for example, an interior room, garage or other enclosure or wall) to support some interior object 293 (such as for example shelving, flooring, etc.). The support element 299 is preferably configured so as to form an aperture 299A through which a portion of the support connector 295 (such as for example, the shaft of a bolt or other connector (or part of fastener element 298)) may be inserted. In addition, the head 287 of the connector 295 could also be rounded-off or substantially flush-mounted, in some embodiments, with respect to surface 291 as desired.
  • It should be noted that a support connector could also be configured for use with a forming member. That is, the support element could be adapted to be secured adjacent to an interior surface of a forming member panel to support an object or forming object (see FIG. 11) or structure within the passageway (for example, to form a cavity or the like within the passageway, in some embodiments, in a similar manner as shown in FIG. 11).
  • Also, in one embodiment, after the panels are disconnected from the cured and formed wall of concrete, any aperture or opening in the formed concrete wall (or a selectively configured support element) may be used to attach a support member adapted to secure bricks, siding, paneling, insulation or insulating systems or some decorative or functional wall surface to the formed concrete wall. Openings could also be selectively sized with a spacer element (in some embodiments, with the spacer element being removable) and be selectively located such that wiring, plumbing, conduit, piping, other building systems or components or the like could be disposed through the opening to provide a passageway or means for locating, installing, or passing such building components from the outside to the inside of a formed structure such as a concrete shed, garage, or other building structure. In addition, if the apertures are not used, they may be sealed with suitable sealers, plugged or filled with suitable material.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 12 and 13, in some embodiments, it will be appreciated that a forming member may also further comprise a contour member being mountable within the passageway of the forming member.
  • For example, in FIG. 12, contour member 280 may be configured, in one embodiment, so as to be mounted on the inner surface of, for example, panel 14. The spacer elements 46, 48 (FIG. 1) would be sized and configured so as to be selectively insertable (e.g., through contour member apertures 284, 286) or have distal ends adapted to secure the contour member 280 immediately adjacent the inner surface of panel 14. The contour member could have the same perimeter dimensions as panel 14 or it could be dimensioned to cover a plurality of inner surfaces of various panels.
  • A contour member may have any number of a variety of surface patterns, reliefs, or other configurations. For example, as shown in FIG. 12, contour member 280 may have projections 282A, 282B, etc., forming an inner contoured surface having a plurality of ridges. These ridges would face into the passageway (e.g., 16 in FIG. 1) and create (or imprint) a corresponding pattern on the resulting outer surface of, for example, a formed concrete wall. In the same way, in FIG. 13, contour member 288 is shown having a raised star configuration 290 being mountable (e.g., via apertures 292, 294) within a passageway in a similar manner as contour member 280. Each of the contour members preferably has a selected surface contour facing the interior of the passageway.
  • With the design flexibility and configurability of the forming system, a variety of forming members having substantially linear and non-linear configurations (with inner and/or outer panels having any of a number of design and visual features) could be interconnected to form up a wall having various designs, shapes, outer and inner wall surface contours, and dimensions.
  • In view of the foregoing, it should be noted that, the various interconnecting, stacking, and other cooperative and interrelations features of the substantially linear and/or non-linear forming members provides a forming system and method and apparatus such that a plurality of forming members are selectively configurable and interconnectable in any of many desired arrangements. As such, at least a portion of an enclosure (e.g., a shed, garage, wall (e.g., see FIG. 5) or other structure to be formed with or without formed up windows, doors, or other features as explained hereinafter) may be constructed from the forming members, with the forming members defining a plurality of passageways for retaining a material which is, in one example embodiment, a conformable material such as concrete.
  • In use, the number of forming members, end panels, and other forming structures to be made ready for a particular project will generally depend on a pre-determined construction plan or blueprint or other building or structural layout. Typically, the dimensions of the building, wall or structure will determine the number of forming members needed for the project. Each of preferably a plurality of forming members and/or panels (e.g., linear and/or non-linear forming members, end forming members and/or end panels, etc., as needed) may be assembled in a similar manner as that described herein (e.g., as explained for each of the forming members, panels and structures with respect to FIGS. 1-15).
  • For example, a linear forming member similar to forming member 10 (and other forming members), in one embodiment, is preferably assembled using a desired selected spacer connector—which has a variable-length feature. That is, a spacer connector can be used which has a spacer element and connector having a selected length depending on the desired “finished” wall thickness (which should be indicated in, for example, a building plan). As an example, the panels 12, 14 of forming member 10 are preferably assembled and secured together with the selected spacer connector in the manner as described above with respect to FIGS. 2 and 3.
  • In one embodiment of a method, initially the base or ground level forming members are placed first—with additional layers stacked thereafter. Corner-shaped forming members (e.g., like forming member 172 in FIG. 7) or other forming members (or, for example, other non-linear forming members 230, etc.) are first preferably positioned according to the building plan. The forming members are positioned and lined up preferably level with the corner forming members so as to form a base or footing of forming members (e.g., to form up the base perimeter of the structure).
  • For example, with a forming member (e.g., 10) preferably positioned on a desired surface which is preferably flat and level, another forming member (e.g., such as forming member 78, see FIG. 5) in one embodiment, is positioned immediately adjacent forming member 10. Generally, all of the forming members along the base or ground level (or footing) would have the same width.
  • Preferably, the entire perimeter of forming members creating the base or ground level is laid out and interconnected, in one embodiment, with engagement members (e.g. 68, etc. in FIGS. 4 and 5) (or, in some embodiments, a suitably configured slotted exterior angle). This process will align the base or ground level perimeter to conform to the outline of the building, wall, or structure.
  • The perimeter of forming members is preferably leveled, squared up and made plumb as needed, by checking the horizontal and vertical alignment and positioning using a common level tool or certain conventional leveling equipment, shims or other systems and devices. Although it is preferable that the forming members be interconnected and stacked in a level row, the forming members may not be level in certain situations. In such instances, sometimes the fluidity of a poured conformable material such as, for example, concrete will generally level itself within the formed up wall (which effectively forms a plurality of passageways or channels in communication with one another).
  • In one embodiment, for example referring to FIGS. 1-5, to interconnect adjacent forming members, engagement member 68 is positioned (as oriented in FIG. 4) above the interconnectable ends 20, 77 of the forming members and lowered into the slot 28 of forming member 10 and the corresponding slot (not shown) of forming member 78 so as to interconnect the two forming members. Forming member 156, preferably having the same (or similar) configuration as forming member 10, is then preferably stacked on forming member 10 (as shown). That is, the base flanges 104, 106 of forming member 156 are lowered between the support members 96, 100 (see FIGS. 1 and 5) of forming member 10 so as to be alignably received and secured between the support members (e.g., in this way, forming member 156 rests or sits on top of forming member 10). A pin (e.g., 154 in FIG. 14) may also be inserted into corresponding apertures in the base flanges of forming member 156 and preferably horizontally oriented guide flanges of the support members 96, 100. In this way, the stacked forming member 156 may be more securely aligned with forming member 10. In addition, concrete nails, spikes, or other suitable anchoring devices may be used to secure the base flanges of forming members 10, 78, 218, etc., to a desired surface or the ground. Other forming members (e.g., having substantially linear configurations (e.g., straight or end forming members or panels, etc.) or substantially non-linear configurations (e.g., 90-degrees; 45-degrees; T-shaped forming members, etc.) may be interconnected and stacked in a similar manner to build a formed up wall (as shown FIG. 5 (not showing corner forming members, etc.)), enclosure, or other structure.
  • In some structures, it is at the base level that interior forming objects and the like are placed in the passageways (inside the forming members). That is, as explained before, form objects (form boards, boxes, pipes, etc.) may be installed within the passageways to create voids for window or doorway openings, holes for piping or plumbing (e.g., at the base or ground level) or other cavities. Forming objects for windows are placed at the level needed when forming up a wall.
  • Also, the formed up wall may be reinforced using steel rods or rebar or other structural reinforcements. Rebar, for example, may be positioned and oriented as desired (horizontally, vertically, diagonally, etc.) within the passageways or channels and tied or wired to spacer elements or just, in some appropriate instances, positioned in place as desired. Reinforcing structures secured vertically aid in joining each level of forming members and keeping the forming member rigid and in place. Bracing structures (e.g., boards, tension wires, cables, etc.) may also be installed or secured as needed. Moreover, other structures, connectors (e.g., such as J-anchors, anchor bolts, etc.) or the like, may be used in some instances (e.g., on top form rows) to attach, tie in or anchor a roof to a wall (or to tie a wall to an existing wall) or the like. The base (or ground) level may then receive concrete, or additional forming members may be stacked in the same conformity as the base level as noted herein. This process may be continued to the desired height of the wall. With this configuration, concrete may be poured in a one-pour process (or level-by-level as will be explained further.) (It should be noted that sometimes it might also be desirable to appropriately—and very carefully—vibrate or agitate the wet concrete to cause it to fill voids and flow more evenly throughout the passageway).
  • After the wall has been completely poured and has cured, the forming members and forming objects may be removed and the desired openings for windows, doors, plumbing, etc., will remain. Also, after removing the connectors and panels, the spacer elements will remain leaving openings that may be used (depending on what is built) or that may be filled with a sealer, foam, or concrete or plugged as noted earlier.
  • As noted above, with the modular, compact, and removable configuration of the forming members and system, a wall or structure could be built in one or more layers, levels, sections or stages at a time—as is convenient for the user. (It should also be recognized that with such a configuration, only the spacer element, in some embodiments, is generally not reusable).
  • For example, two rows of forming members could be formed up and reinforced with rebar, and then concrete could be poured. After the concrete hardens, the same forming members could be dissembled and used at a later time (e.g., over another weekend, etc.) to form up, tie in and pour another section of the wall. The same process could be followed—or be stopped and started as convenient for the user—until the desired building structure is completed. With such features, the forming system could readily be used, at a person's convenience, for example, in a person's backyard for weekend projects or the like.
  • In certain embodiments, it should be noted that the footings of wall sections (or the walls) could also have varying widths. For example, one footing section could have a width of eight inches (e.g., to support a wall of eight inches) and be connected to another footing section with a width of ten inches (e.g., to support a wall of ten inches). Thus, for example, in one embodiment, a selectively configured forming member would be provided and serve as an interface forming member to transition between walls of varying widths. Such an interface forming member would be configured such that each panel (e.g., modified panels 12, 14) would have extensions bent outwardly at a desired location away from the passageway (e.g. 16). Each of the panel extensions would extend sufficiently such that the interconnectable ends and slotted elements would be lined up and be interengageable with the interconnectable ends and slotted elements of the wider forming member. For example, panel extensions would be added to the eight-inch wide form so as to position and line up the interconnectable ends and slotted elements thereof such that they would be interengageable with the corresponding interconnectable ends and slotted elements of the wider ten-inch forming member—and be connectable with an engagement member (e.g., 68). In this way, an appropriate structural interface would be established between adjacent formed up walls with different widths.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, in one possible embodiment, each panel 12, 14 may preferably be sized, for example, to be about one foot high and two feet long. It should be recognized that each forming member (e.g., substantially linear, non-linear, etc.) may be uniformly or universally sized and interconnectable. In other embodiments, however, one panel may have a different size than its complementary panel. Various panels or forming members may have different sizes or shapes and be connected in spaced relation to create any of a number of formed wall designs and configurations. For example, the forming member could be configured as a first level forming member and adapted to be placed directly on a stepped region of a footing, foundation, sidewalk, walkway, street, curb, or some platform-like structure. That is, the panels would be shaped such that the body (e.g., 13 in FIG. 1) of the panel and base flanges would be formed or constructed so as to have a stepped configuration (e.g., or a variable shaped bottom flange or edge) that is complementary and in functional cooperation with the stepped surfaces or the like (or other surfaces). In this way, a wall could be formed up and directly poured on an irregular surface or foundation or other existing structure. The wall could be secured to or tied into the existing structure by interconnecting rebar or other components to the forming member (e.g., spacer element) and then to some anchoring component or member on the existing structure.
  • In addition, the panels are preferably connected with two uniformly configured spacer connectors. In other possible embodiments, however, each panel may be much larger or smaller and the number of spacer connectors can be increased or reduced as suitable.
  • It will be appreciated that a given forming member (e.g., 10, 172, 310, 230, etc.) may be used in certain situations without any spacer connectors. This is because, in a possible embodiment, as noted, a forming member (for example, 10, 172) has a pair of interconnectable ends (e.g., 18, 30 and 20, 32), at both ends (e.g., 180, 182), respectively, of the forming member (e.g., 10). Each of the ends 180, 182 of forming member 10 is adapted to be interconnected to complementary ends of adjacent forms. The interconnection with the adjacent forms, in some instances, may be sufficiently tight and firm to hold the panels of a given forming member in spaced relation without the need for having to install spacer members, connectors, standoffs, etc., to maintain the desired spacing.
  • In another possible embodiment of the present invention, with some features being similar, in one embodiment, to those in FIG. 1, a forming system to retain a material is provided. The forming system, in one embodiment preferably comprises a forming member comprising at least two panels in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of settable material. In such an embodiment, each of the at least two panels (e.g., in one embodiment, 12, 14) further comprises a base flange (e.g. in one embodiment 94, 98) extending from each panel away from a passageway of the forming member, and a support member (e.g. in one embodiment, 96 and 100) on an opposite side from the base flange with the support member extending away from the passageway. The support member further comprises a guide member (e.g. in one embodiment, 110 and 114) adapted to alignably receive a base flange of another forming member when stacked on the forming member. In this way, the at least two panels are alignable with at least two panels of another forming panel. In addition, the forming system may have a configuration wherein each of the support members further comprises a support flange and a guide flange with the guide flanges of the support members being disposed in opposing spaced relation. In one example embodiment, such a configuration is similar to that described above with respect to FIG. 1.
  • Moreover, each of the at least two panels (for example, items 12, 14 in one possible embodiment) of the forming system are adapted to be disconnectable, after retaining the first supply of settable material to subsequently receive a second supply of settable material.
  • The forming system also preferably further comprises a plurality of forming members with the plurality of stacked forming members defining a wall of forming members defining a plurality of vertically-extending passageways for retaining a material. In one example embodiment, such a configuration is similar to that described above with respect to FIG. 1.
  • In addition, in another possible embodiment, the forming system may also comprise at least two panels wherein each of the at least two panels comprises at least one interconnectable end defining a securable flange. The securable flange is preferably adapted to be interconnectable with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member. The forming system preferably further comprises an engagement component adapted to interconnect a securable flange (which in some embodiments, may form apertures adapted to be interconnected with other securable flanges by engagement components such as fasteners, connectors or the like) (as noted above and/or as noted in the embodiments explained hereinafter) of the forming member, with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member. It should be noted that in some embodiments the securable flanges may be slotted, however in other embodiments the securable flange may not be slotted. Moreover, in some embodiments, the engagement component may have a configuration similar to the engagement member described in the various embodiments described above and as follows; however, in other embodiments, the engagement component may have an unslotted configuration or some other different configuration adapted for securing the securable flange and corresponding securable flanges together. Such securing structures may comprise structures as described earlier herein or hereinafter or they may comprise clamping or vice grip-like devices, threaded or unthreaded fasteners, as well as other suitable securing systems and devices known in the art.
  • In one other embodiment, the forming system comprises a forming member comprising at least two panels in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of settable material. In such an embodiment, and in view of the interconnectable ends shown in FIG. 1, each of the at least two panels further comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element forming an interengageable slot, similar, in one embodiment, to the configuration shown in FIG. 1 (e.g., item 18, etc.), with the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other forming member. The forming system preferably further comprises an engagement member forming an interconnection slot, similar, in one embodiment, to that shown in FIG. 4 (e.g., item 68, etc.), with the engagement member receivable by both an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of a given forming member and an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of the at least one other forming member. With these features, the given forming member and the at least one other forming member may be interconnected and a plurality of forming members having selected configurations may be interconnected and stacked (e.g., see FIG. 5, showing one possible embodiment).
  • With this configuration and in view of other various features as noted herein, a plurality of walls of forming members may be interconnected so as to form at least a portion of an enclosure. Such an enclosure may be a shed, well or pool house, garage, home or addition, wall, or other building structure.
  • The forming system, in another possible embodiment also preferably comprises a forming member further comprising at least one spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a reusable connector, with the at least one spacer connector adapted to releaseably connect the at least two panels in spaced relation. The spacer connector and panels, in one example embodiment, have a configuration that is similar to that described above with respect to FIG. 1. In addition, the forming system may also comprise various forming members with the at least two panels having desired shapes and configurations so as to define a passageway having a substantially non-linear configuration adapted to retain a settable material. In some embodiments, the at least two panels may be configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially 90-degree configuration or a substantially T-shaped configuration as noted above adapted to retain a settable material.
  • In one other possible embodiment, the forming system may comprise an alternate forming member configured such that a first end comprises a pair of interconnectable ends 18, 30 (with or without slots) of a forming member 10 as shown in FIG. 1. However, the second end comprises a pair of “flanged” interconnectable ends similar to the flanged interconnectable ends 180, 182 shown in FIG. 10—and mounted at the distal edges of panel 274.
  • With such a configuration, a pair of interconnectable ends 18, 30 of an alternate forming member would not need a specially configured interconnectable element defining an interengageable slot (like that shown in FIG. 1). With a configuration similar to that described with respect to FIG. 10, the flanged interengageable ends 180, 182 mounted on the second end of the alternate forming member would be adapted to be positioned above the interconnectable ends 18 and 30 respectively of the first end of another alternate forming member. The flanged interconnectable ends 180, 182 would then be slidable over—and connectable with—the interconnectable ends 18, 30. In this way, a first alternate forming member could be connected in place immediately adjacent to another similarly configured second alternate forming member to continue a formed up passageway.
  • In addition, it will be appreciated that the above configuration is specially configured such that the first and second ends of two adjacent “alternate” forming members may be interconnected—without the use of an engagement member.
  • In other words, in one possible embodiment, a forming member preferably comprises a first end which comprises a pair of interconnectable ends, ears or securable flanges (e.g., configured similar to 18, 30 of forming member 10 but without defining any interengageable slots), protruding away from the passageway and being disposed substantially orthogonally with respect to its panel. The second end of the forming member may comprise a pair of different but corresponding flanged interconnectable ends (configured somewhat similar to flanged interconnectable end 280 (shown in FIG. 10), comprising a similar pair of spaced interengageable flanges 284A, 284B and configured somewhat similar to flanged interconnectable end 282 comprising a similar pair of spaced interengageable flanges 286A, 286B). On each panel of the forming member, each of the corresponding flanged interconnectable ends may be disposed so as to preferably protrude substantially orthogonally away from the passageway and its respective panel. With this alternate configuration, corresponding flanged interconnectable end (similar to 280) preferably comprises a pair of spaced interengageable flanges (similar to 284A, 284B) and corresponding flanged interconnectable end (similar to 282) preferably comprises a pair of spaced interengageable flanges (similar to 286A, 286B)—mounted on a forming member rather than an end panel (e.g., 272). In a similar manner as described with respect to FIGS. 1 and 10 (and in one embodiment similar to the “alternate” forming members above) it will be appreciated that the interengageable flanges are specially configured such that they may be interconnected to the interconnectable ends of an adjacent forming member—without the use of an engagement member. That is, a forming member with this configuration, has a first end with interconnectable ends similar to those shown in FIG. 1 (e.g., 18, 30) and a second end with corresponding flanged interconnectable ends similar to those shown in FIG. 10 (e.g., 280, 282). In addition, the first or second ends could be offset or angled or mounted in such a way as to foster a tighter connection between the adjacent forming members.
  • Thus, in view of the versatility and configurability of the forming member, in a possible embodiment, forming member 10 may include at least one but preferably two interconnectable ends with each interconnectable end defining a securable element or flange—with or without a slotted configuration. However, in another example embodiment, each of the securable elements, may, for instance, define, form, and/or comprise an interengageable slot, respectively or other securable structure. Each interconnectable end may also define a securable flange or other element and each of the securable elements, in one example embodiment, may, for instance, define, form, and/or comprise an interengageable slot respectively.
  • In one other possible embodiment, a forming member comprises at least two reusable panels with each panel being of one-piece construction comprising at least one of sheet metal or plastic. The forming member further preferably comprises at least one spacer connector (in one embodiment, similar to that described with respect to FIG. 1) comprising a spacer element and a connector with the at least one spacer connector adapted to releaseably connect the at least two reusable panels in spaced relation so as to define a passageway. Each of the at least two reusable panels preferably also comprises at least one interconnectable end adapted to be interconnectable with a securable flange of another forming member. The interconnectability of various such forming members may, in some example embodiments, have interconnectable ends configured in the same manner as those described with respect to FIG. 1 (or as other embodiments herein). In addition, in one other embodiment, each of the at least two reusable panels further comprises a base flange and a support member. (In some embodiments, the support member of the forming member is preferably adapted to alignably receive a base flange of another forming member, if stacked on the forming member). Moreover, in such an embodiment, each of the at least two panels, the at least one interconnectable end defining a securable flange, the base flange, and the support member are integrally formed from a unitary structure. (In some embodiments, such a unitary structure may be similar to that described with respect to FIG. 6C above). In another possible embodiment, the forming member also may further comprise at least one spacer connector with at least one corresponding aperture formed in the unitary structure for receiving at least a portion of the spacer connector. The spacer connector may also comprise a spacer element and a reusable connector with the reusable connector comprising a threaded fastener tightenable by hand. (Such an embodiment may be similar to that described with respect to other forming members herein).
  • Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2, 5-11 and 14, it will also be appreciated that the apertures formed in the various panels may be located at any desired position such that the spacer connectors may be selectively installed within a given passageway (e.g., 16, 316, 178, 238) at any desired location. For example, it may advantageous to locate the spacer connectors near the top of a forming member so that it could be used to aid in supporting or anchoring or securing some structure.
  • In addition, in some embodiments, the panels may form only a single complementary pair of apertures to accommodate only one selectively located spacer connector. As noted above, in other example embodiments, a pair of panels may not have any apertures formed therein and the panels may be held in spaced relation when interconnected to an adjacent forming member being secured in spaced relation by spacer connectors (or end forming members or end panels). For example, spacer connectors may only be installed in every other interconnected forming member.
  • The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention is illustrative and explanatory of presently preferred embodiments of the invention and variations thereof, and it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, that various changes in the design, organization, order of operation, means of operation, equipment structures and location, methodology, the use of mechanical equivalents, such as different types of spacer connector components, spacer devices, adjacent forming member connectors than as illustrated whereby different steps may be utilized, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction or combinations of features of the various elements may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. As well, the drawings are intended to describe the concepts of the invention so that the presently preferred embodiments of the invention will be plainly disclosed to one of skill in the art but are not intended to be manufacturing level drawings or renditions of final products and may include simplified conceptual views as desired for easier and quicker understanding or explanation of the invention. As well, the relative size and arrangement of the components may be varied from that shown and the invention still operate well within the spirit of the invention as described hereinbefore and in the appended claims. Thus, various changes and alternatives may be used that are contained within the spirit of the invention.
  • Because many varying and different embodiments may be made within the scope of the inventive concept(s) herein taught, and because many modifications may be made in the embodiment(s) herein detailed in accordance with the descriptive requirements of the law, it is to be understood that the details herein are to be interpreted as illustrative of a presently preferred embodiment and not in a limiting sense.

Claims (20)

1. An apparatus for retaining a conformable material, the apparatus comprising:
a forming member comprising at least two panels connected in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of conformable material, which hardens in place;
wherein each of the at least two panels further comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element forming an interengageable slot, the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other structure; and
wherein the at least two panels are adapted to be disconnectable after use to subsequently receive a second supply of conformable material, which hardens in place.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the at least one other structure comprises at least one other forming member, and further comprising an engagement member forming an interconnection slot, the engagement member receivable by both an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of a given forming member and an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of the at least one other forming member, wherein the given forming member and the at least one other forming member may be interconnected.
3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein a plurality of forming members are selectively configurable and interconnectable in a desired arrangement, and wherein at least a portion of an enclosure may be constructed from the forming members, the forming members defining a plurality of passageways for retaining the conformable material.
4. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein each of the at least two panels further comprises a base flange and a support member.
5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the at least one other structure comprises at least one other forming member, wherein the support members of a given forming member cooperate to alignably receive the base flanges of the at least one other forming member when stacked on the given forming member, and wherein a plurality of stacked forming members would define a wall of forming members defining a plurality of vertically-extending passageways to retain the conformable material.
6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein each of the support members further comprises a support flange and a guide flange, the guide flanges of the support members being disposed in opposing spaced relation.
7. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein each support member is disposed at least in part proximate a top edge of a respective panel with each support member being oriented substantially orthogonal with respect to the panel so as to reinforce the panel.
8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the forming member further comprises at least one spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a reusable connector, the at least one spacer connector adapted to releaseably connect the at least two panels in spaced relation.
9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein the spacer element is adapted to be selectively sized in relation to a desired form object, wherein the at least two panels may be releaseably connected so as to removeably capture a desired form object within the passageway.
10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the at least two panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially non-linear configuration adapted to retain a conformable material.
11. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least three panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration adapted to retain a conformable material.
12. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a contour member being mountable within the passageway, the contour member having a selected surface contour facing the interior of the passageway.
13. A forming system for retaining a material, the forming system comprising:
a forming member comprising at least two panels in spaced relation so as to define a passageway adapted to retain a first supply of settable material;
wherein each of the at least two panels further comprises a base flange extending from each panel away from the passageway, and a support member on an opposite side from the base flange, the support member extending away from the passageway, wherein the support member further comprises a guide member adapted to alignably receive a base flange of another forming member when stacked on the forming member, wherein the at least two panels are alignable with at least two panels of said another forming panel; and
wherein the at least two panels are adapted to be disconnectable after retaining the first supply of settable material to subsequently receive a second supply of settable material.
14. The forming system of claim 13, wherein each of the at least two panels comprises at least one interconnectable end defining a securable flange, the securable flange adapted to be interconnectable with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member, and further comprising an engagement component adapted to interconnect a securable flange of the forming member, with a corresponding securable flange of another forming member.
15. The forming system of claim 13, wherein each of the at least two panels further comprises at least one interconnectable end defining an interconnectable element forming an interengageable slot, the interconnectable element adapted to be interconnectable with at least one other forming member, and further comprising an engagement member forming an interconnection slot, the engagement member receivable by both an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of a given forming member and an interengageable slot of an interconnectable element of the at least one other forming member, wherein the given forming member and the at least one other forming member may be interconnected, wherein a plurality of forming members having selected configurations that may be interconnected and stacked, and wherein a plurality of walls of forming members may be interconnected so as to form at least a portion of an enclosure.
16. The forming system of claim 15, and further comprising at least one spacer connector comprising a spacer element and a reusable connector, the at least one spacer connector adapted to releaseably connect in spaced relation each of the at least two panels of at least one of the forming members.
17. The forming system of claim 13, wherein the at least two panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially non-linear configuration adapted to retain a settable material.
18. The forming system of claim 13, wherein at least three panels are configured so as to define a passageway having a substantially T-shaped configuration adapted to retain a settable material.
19. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising a support connector having a portion insertable through a spacer element captured within a formed wall, the support connector comprising a fastener element and at least one support element, wherein the at least one support element is adapted to be secured proximate at least one surface of a formed wall.
20. A unitary structure reusably combinable with other unitary structures to create forms to receive settable material, which comprises:
a panel;
at least one integrally formed interconnectable end defining a securable element;
a base flange integrally formed at a first peripheral edge of the panel; and
a support member integrally formed at a second peripheral edge of the panel, the panel, at least one integrally formed interconnectable end, base flange, and support member being of one-piece construction and comprising at least one of sheet metal or plastic.
US11/845,921 2007-08-28 2007-08-28 Forming Apparatus and System Abandoned US20090056258A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/845,921 US20090056258A1 (en) 2007-08-28 2007-08-28 Forming Apparatus and System

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/845,921 US20090056258A1 (en) 2007-08-28 2007-08-28 Forming Apparatus and System

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090056258A1 true US20090056258A1 (en) 2009-03-05

Family

ID=40405314

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/845,921 Abandoned US20090056258A1 (en) 2007-08-28 2007-08-28 Forming Apparatus and System

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20090056258A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090084059A1 (en) * 2007-10-01 2009-04-02 Jose Constantino Moreno Building framing beams or studs composed of a cementitious material and method of making
US20110214380A1 (en) * 2010-03-04 2011-09-08 Rush Michael G Reinforcement bar positioning system
US20110219724A1 (en) * 2010-03-13 2011-09-15 Mark Kevin Davis Framing guide
US20120110942A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2012-05-10 Young Fan Lim Wall block for a strawbale house, and strawbale-house construction method using the same
US8720160B1 (en) 2011-09-14 2014-05-13 Alan Brian Cooper Process for forming concrete walls and other vertically positioned shapes
US20150275462A1 (en) * 2012-02-02 2015-10-01 Empire Technology Development Llc Modular concrete reinforcement
AU2016256678B2 (en) * 2015-07-14 2019-02-14 Max & Wils Pty. Ltd. Creation of Surface-Mounted Sills or Hobs on Cast-in-situ Concrete Building Slabs
EP3517701A1 (en) 2018-01-30 2019-07-31 William H. Bigelow Improved building module with pourable foam and cable

Citations (74)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US677649A (en) * 1900-11-09 1901-07-02 Thomas C Farrell Combined box-cap and shoe-plank holder.
US839819A (en) * 1906-05-18 1907-01-01 William E De Lhorbe Form for plastic building-walls.
US929470A (en) * 1909-01-25 1909-07-27 Roy N Neil Concrete-mold.
US1014630A (en) * 1910-06-08 1912-01-09 Milton D Morrill Sectional mold for concrete construction.
US1042910A (en) * 1911-05-19 1912-10-29 Interstate Realty & Construction Company Concrete-form.
US1120569A (en) * 1912-08-29 1914-12-08 Le Roy K Van Horn Mold for making concrete structures.
US1123769A (en) * 1914-03-23 1915-01-05 Thomas Lightbody Mold for concrete walls.
US1250032A (en) * 1917-03-13 1917-12-11 Charles H Schub Sectional mold for concrete construction.
US1401898A (en) * 1920-12-14 1921-12-27 Farness Benjamin Form for hollow concrete walls
US1413693A (en) * 1919-08-27 1922-04-25 Blaw Knox Co Mold
US1482434A (en) * 1921-11-01 1924-02-05 Mark S Hotchkiss Concrete-wall form
US1552885A (en) * 1925-03-03 1925-09-08 Woodford O Seat Concrete wall-form construction
US1743136A (en) * 1928-01-23 1930-01-14 Hotchkiss Steel Products Compa Wall form
US1779908A (en) * 1929-06-07 1930-10-28 Graziano Nicholas Wall mold
US1991256A (en) * 1933-09-06 1935-02-12 Muntz Eric Percival Spreading device for concrete form work
US2019195A (en) * 1934-03-28 1935-10-29 Bascom E Simpson Self-supporting concrete form
US2099260A (en) * 1936-04-27 1937-11-16 Samuel S Colt Concrete form and reenforcement retaining means
US2511584A (en) * 1947-05-12 1950-06-13 Hayden C Hill Wall form construction
US2529648A (en) * 1947-11-20 1950-11-14 William E Borton Form for concrete construction
US2642646A (en) * 1950-03-03 1953-06-23 Ida Mae Johnston Concrete building form
US2709292A (en) * 1951-09-06 1955-05-31 Raymond L Otti Clamp for concrete forms
US2976597A (en) * 1958-11-03 1961-03-28 Symons Clamp & Mfg Co Concrete wall form extension
US3067479A (en) * 1960-05-23 1962-12-11 Symons Clamp & Mfg Co Panel-securing tie rod anchor bolt with offset anchor point
US3171186A (en) * 1963-04-05 1965-03-02 Symons Mfg Co Wall form panel with inherently reinforced crossbars
US3292893A (en) * 1964-11-16 1966-12-20 John R Williams Form system and hardware for concrete construction
US3357673A (en) * 1965-06-30 1967-12-12 Symons Mfg Co Concrete wall form with a particular panel hinge arrangement
US3362674A (en) * 1965-04-14 1968-01-09 Symons Mfg Co Adjustable concrete column form and panel therefor
US3410044A (en) * 1965-07-23 1968-11-12 Contemporary Walls Ltd Foamed plastic based construction elements
US3648961A (en) * 1970-04-30 1972-03-14 William H Farrow Wall tie for concrete forms
US3664630A (en) * 1970-06-19 1972-05-23 Symons Mfg Co Concrete wall form liner
US3683575A (en) * 1969-10-23 1972-08-15 Walter G Meziere Wall structure and method of installing same
US3754729A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-08-28 Symons Corp Groove-forming pattern assembly for a concrete wall form structure
US3858993A (en) * 1972-03-07 1975-01-07 Lovisa Tullio E Reusable tie assembly for concrete forms
US4076206A (en) * 1975-04-17 1978-02-28 Jorge Marseillan Panel forms having panel reinforcing means
US4159097A (en) * 1976-09-13 1979-06-26 Strickland Systems Inc. Tie having integrally molded sleeve
US4239173A (en) * 1978-04-13 1980-12-16 Sawyer Robert D Concrete construction form and tie rod
US4363462A (en) * 1980-01-26 1982-12-14 Dyckerhoff & Widmann Aktiengesellschaft Recoverable formwork part for forming the anchoring location of a tendon in a concrete structural component
US4372522A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-02-08 George Simeonoff Sectional wall form system
US4516372A (en) * 1981-08-14 1985-05-14 Grutsch George A Concrete formwork
US4726560A (en) * 1986-09-02 1988-02-23 Dotson Ray C Concrete form tie assembly
US4742985A (en) * 1984-11-16 1988-05-10 Rund-Stahl-Bau Gesellschaft M.B.H. Formwork assembly for a poured concrete structure
US4894969A (en) * 1988-05-18 1990-01-23 Ag-Tech Packaging, Inc. Insulating block form for constructing concrete wall structures
US4936540A (en) * 1989-02-13 1990-06-26 Boeshart Patrick E Tie for concrete forms
US5086600A (en) * 1990-04-26 1992-02-11 Revelation Builders, Inc. Block for concrete wall form construction
US5405119A (en) * 1994-03-07 1995-04-11 Maguire; James V. Sleeve assembly for forming openings in molded structures
US5459971A (en) * 1994-03-04 1995-10-24 Sparkman; Alan Connecting member for concrete form
US5465542A (en) * 1992-05-29 1995-11-14 Terry; Verl O. Interblocking concrete form modules
US5625989A (en) * 1995-07-28 1997-05-06 Huntington Foam Corp. Method and apparatus for forming of a poured concrete wall
US5657600A (en) * 1994-06-20 1997-08-19 Aab Building Systems Inc. Web member for concrete form walls
US5735093A (en) * 1996-02-13 1998-04-07 Grutsch; George A. Concrete formwork with backing plates
US5761874A (en) * 1995-08-30 1998-06-09 Hayakawa; Yoshiyuki Concrete form spacing fixture
US5803669A (en) * 1996-01-16 1998-09-08 Bullard; Waymon Thermal-insulated concrete forming system
US5809728A (en) * 1995-12-07 1998-09-22 Innovative Construction Technologies Corporation Self-supporting concrete form module
US5833873A (en) * 1997-08-21 1998-11-10 Structural Countours, Inc. Aluminum concrete forming system
US5839243A (en) * 1996-09-13 1998-11-24 New Energy Wall Systems, Inc. Interlocking and insulated form pattern assembly for creating a wall structure for receiving poured concrete
US5855807A (en) * 1996-06-24 1999-01-05 Hsieh; Ming-Huei Concrete form securing device
US5895188A (en) * 1997-09-03 1999-04-20 Cheng; Tsan-Hsiung Form panel quick fastener
US5922236A (en) * 1997-04-01 1999-07-13 Zuhl; David M. Modular forming system for forming concrete foundation walls
US5956922A (en) * 1997-10-16 1999-09-28 Liuska; Bruce Wall forming system and method of forming a wall of hardenable material
US5965053A (en) * 1997-04-07 1999-10-12 Western Forms, Inc. Penetratable form with stiffback
US6134853A (en) * 1997-02-24 2000-10-24 Haener; Juan Interlocking insulated building block system
US6159399A (en) * 1992-05-13 2000-12-12 Rascor Spezialbau Gmbh Procedure for the erection of concrete walls using braced boardings and device to carry out the same
US6178711B1 (en) * 1996-11-07 2001-01-30 Andrew Laird Compactly-shipped site-assembled concrete forms for producing variable-width insulated-sidewall fastener-receiving building walls
US6205726B1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2001-03-27 Theodore A. Hoadley Insulated masonry block and wall
US6253529B1 (en) * 1997-01-31 2001-07-03 Hermanus Petrus Maria De Boer Mounting plate for a partition system
US6321496B1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2001-11-27 Robert Martin, Jr. Insulated form assembly for a poured concrete wall
US6363683B1 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-04-02 James Daniel Moore, Jr. Insulated concrete form
US6405505B1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2002-06-18 Carlo Alberti Modular interlock wall form
US6438918B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-08-27 Eco-Block Latching system for components used in forming concrete structures
US6481178B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-11-19 Eco-Block, Llc Tilt-up wall
US6502802B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2003-01-07 Wilian Holding Company Double bias corner form
US6832456B1 (en) * 1997-12-18 2004-12-21 Peter Bilowol Frame unit for use in construction formwork
US6935607B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2005-08-30 Western Forms, Inc. Forming panel with extruded elongated threaded slot for receiving threaded attachment members
US7568676B2 (en) * 2001-11-26 2009-08-04 Fukuvi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd. Form panel for placing concrete

Patent Citations (76)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US677649A (en) * 1900-11-09 1901-07-02 Thomas C Farrell Combined box-cap and shoe-plank holder.
US839819A (en) * 1906-05-18 1907-01-01 William E De Lhorbe Form for plastic building-walls.
US929470A (en) * 1909-01-25 1909-07-27 Roy N Neil Concrete-mold.
US1014630A (en) * 1910-06-08 1912-01-09 Milton D Morrill Sectional mold for concrete construction.
US1042910A (en) * 1911-05-19 1912-10-29 Interstate Realty & Construction Company Concrete-form.
US1120569A (en) * 1912-08-29 1914-12-08 Le Roy K Van Horn Mold for making concrete structures.
US1123769A (en) * 1914-03-23 1915-01-05 Thomas Lightbody Mold for concrete walls.
US1250032A (en) * 1917-03-13 1917-12-11 Charles H Schub Sectional mold for concrete construction.
US1413693A (en) * 1919-08-27 1922-04-25 Blaw Knox Co Mold
US1401898A (en) * 1920-12-14 1921-12-27 Farness Benjamin Form for hollow concrete walls
US1482434A (en) * 1921-11-01 1924-02-05 Mark S Hotchkiss Concrete-wall form
US1552885A (en) * 1925-03-03 1925-09-08 Woodford O Seat Concrete wall-form construction
US1743136A (en) * 1928-01-23 1930-01-14 Hotchkiss Steel Products Compa Wall form
US1779908A (en) * 1929-06-07 1930-10-28 Graziano Nicholas Wall mold
US1991256A (en) * 1933-09-06 1935-02-12 Muntz Eric Percival Spreading device for concrete form work
US2019195A (en) * 1934-03-28 1935-10-29 Bascom E Simpson Self-supporting concrete form
US2099260A (en) * 1936-04-27 1937-11-16 Samuel S Colt Concrete form and reenforcement retaining means
US2511584A (en) * 1947-05-12 1950-06-13 Hayden C Hill Wall form construction
US2529648A (en) * 1947-11-20 1950-11-14 William E Borton Form for concrete construction
US2642646A (en) * 1950-03-03 1953-06-23 Ida Mae Johnston Concrete building form
US2709292A (en) * 1951-09-06 1955-05-31 Raymond L Otti Clamp for concrete forms
US2976597A (en) * 1958-11-03 1961-03-28 Symons Clamp & Mfg Co Concrete wall form extension
US3067479A (en) * 1960-05-23 1962-12-11 Symons Clamp & Mfg Co Panel-securing tie rod anchor bolt with offset anchor point
US3171186A (en) * 1963-04-05 1965-03-02 Symons Mfg Co Wall form panel with inherently reinforced crossbars
US3292893A (en) * 1964-11-16 1966-12-20 John R Williams Form system and hardware for concrete construction
US3362674A (en) * 1965-04-14 1968-01-09 Symons Mfg Co Adjustable concrete column form and panel therefor
US3357673A (en) * 1965-06-30 1967-12-12 Symons Mfg Co Concrete wall form with a particular panel hinge arrangement
US3410044A (en) * 1965-07-23 1968-11-12 Contemporary Walls Ltd Foamed plastic based construction elements
US3683575A (en) * 1969-10-23 1972-08-15 Walter G Meziere Wall structure and method of installing same
US3648961A (en) * 1970-04-30 1972-03-14 William H Farrow Wall tie for concrete forms
US3664630A (en) * 1970-06-19 1972-05-23 Symons Mfg Co Concrete wall form liner
US3754729A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-08-28 Symons Corp Groove-forming pattern assembly for a concrete wall form structure
US3858993A (en) * 1972-03-07 1975-01-07 Lovisa Tullio E Reusable tie assembly for concrete forms
US4076206A (en) * 1975-04-17 1978-02-28 Jorge Marseillan Panel forms having panel reinforcing means
US4159097A (en) * 1976-09-13 1979-06-26 Strickland Systems Inc. Tie having integrally molded sleeve
US4239173A (en) * 1978-04-13 1980-12-16 Sawyer Robert D Concrete construction form and tie rod
US4363462A (en) * 1980-01-26 1982-12-14 Dyckerhoff & Widmann Aktiengesellschaft Recoverable formwork part for forming the anchoring location of a tendon in a concrete structural component
US4372522A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-02-08 George Simeonoff Sectional wall form system
US4516372B1 (en) * 1981-08-14 2000-04-25 Ciu Corp Concrete formwork
US4516372A (en) * 1981-08-14 1985-05-14 Grutsch George A Concrete formwork
US4742985A (en) * 1984-11-16 1988-05-10 Rund-Stahl-Bau Gesellschaft M.B.H. Formwork assembly for a poured concrete structure
US4726560A (en) * 1986-09-02 1988-02-23 Dotson Ray C Concrete form tie assembly
US4894969A (en) * 1988-05-18 1990-01-23 Ag-Tech Packaging, Inc. Insulating block form for constructing concrete wall structures
US4936540A (en) * 1989-02-13 1990-06-26 Boeshart Patrick E Tie for concrete forms
US5086600A (en) * 1990-04-26 1992-02-11 Revelation Builders, Inc. Block for concrete wall form construction
US6159399A (en) * 1992-05-13 2000-12-12 Rascor Spezialbau Gmbh Procedure for the erection of concrete walls using braced boardings and device to carry out the same
US5465542A (en) * 1992-05-29 1995-11-14 Terry; Verl O. Interblocking concrete form modules
US5459971A (en) * 1994-03-04 1995-10-24 Sparkman; Alan Connecting member for concrete form
US5405119A (en) * 1994-03-07 1995-04-11 Maguire; James V. Sleeve assembly for forming openings in molded structures
US5657600A (en) * 1994-06-20 1997-08-19 Aab Building Systems Inc. Web member for concrete form walls
US5625989A (en) * 1995-07-28 1997-05-06 Huntington Foam Corp. Method and apparatus for forming of a poured concrete wall
US5761874A (en) * 1995-08-30 1998-06-09 Hayakawa; Yoshiyuki Concrete form spacing fixture
US5809728A (en) * 1995-12-07 1998-09-22 Innovative Construction Technologies Corporation Self-supporting concrete form module
US5803669A (en) * 1996-01-16 1998-09-08 Bullard; Waymon Thermal-insulated concrete forming system
US5735093A (en) * 1996-02-13 1998-04-07 Grutsch; George A. Concrete formwork with backing plates
US5855807A (en) * 1996-06-24 1999-01-05 Hsieh; Ming-Huei Concrete form securing device
US5839243A (en) * 1996-09-13 1998-11-24 New Energy Wall Systems, Inc. Interlocking and insulated form pattern assembly for creating a wall structure for receiving poured concrete
US6178711B1 (en) * 1996-11-07 2001-01-30 Andrew Laird Compactly-shipped site-assembled concrete forms for producing variable-width insulated-sidewall fastener-receiving building walls
US6253529B1 (en) * 1997-01-31 2001-07-03 Hermanus Petrus Maria De Boer Mounting plate for a partition system
US6134853A (en) * 1997-02-24 2000-10-24 Haener; Juan Interlocking insulated building block system
US5922236A (en) * 1997-04-01 1999-07-13 Zuhl; David M. Modular forming system for forming concrete foundation walls
US5965053A (en) * 1997-04-07 1999-10-12 Western Forms, Inc. Penetratable form with stiffback
US5833873A (en) * 1997-08-21 1998-11-10 Structural Countours, Inc. Aluminum concrete forming system
US5895188A (en) * 1997-09-03 1999-04-20 Cheng; Tsan-Hsiung Form panel quick fastener
US5956922A (en) * 1997-10-16 1999-09-28 Liuska; Bruce Wall forming system and method of forming a wall of hardenable material
US6832456B1 (en) * 1997-12-18 2004-12-21 Peter Bilowol Frame unit for use in construction formwork
US6363683B1 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-04-02 James Daniel Moore, Jr. Insulated concrete form
US6438918B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-08-27 Eco-Block Latching system for components used in forming concrete structures
US6481178B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2002-11-19 Eco-Block, Llc Tilt-up wall
US6321496B1 (en) * 1998-10-27 2001-11-27 Robert Martin, Jr. Insulated form assembly for a poured concrete wall
US6205726B1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2001-03-27 Theodore A. Hoadley Insulated masonry block and wall
US6405505B1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2002-06-18 Carlo Alberti Modular interlock wall form
US6502802B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2003-01-07 Wilian Holding Company Double bias corner form
US7568676B2 (en) * 2001-11-26 2009-08-04 Fukuvi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd. Form panel for placing concrete
US6935607B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2005-08-30 Western Forms, Inc. Forming panel with extruded elongated threaded slot for receiving threaded attachment members
US7144530B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2006-12-05 Western Forms, Inc. Concrete forming method employing threaded coupling slots

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090084059A1 (en) * 2007-10-01 2009-04-02 Jose Constantino Moreno Building framing beams or studs composed of a cementitious material and method of making
US20120110942A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2012-05-10 Young Fan Lim Wall block for a strawbale house, and strawbale-house construction method using the same
US20110214380A1 (en) * 2010-03-04 2011-09-08 Rush Michael G Reinforcement bar positioning system
US9021763B2 (en) 2010-03-04 2015-05-05 Michael G. RUSH Reinforcement bar positioning system
US20110219724A1 (en) * 2010-03-13 2011-09-15 Mark Kevin Davis Framing guide
US8191335B2 (en) * 2010-03-13 2012-06-05 Mark Kevin Davis Framing guide
US8720160B1 (en) 2011-09-14 2014-05-13 Alan Brian Cooper Process for forming concrete walls and other vertically positioned shapes
US20150275462A1 (en) * 2012-02-02 2015-10-01 Empire Technology Development Llc Modular concrete reinforcement
US9725867B2 (en) * 2012-02-02 2017-08-08 Empire Technology Development Llc Modular concrete reinforcement
AU2016256678B2 (en) * 2015-07-14 2019-02-14 Max & Wils Pty. Ltd. Creation of Surface-Mounted Sills or Hobs on Cast-in-situ Concrete Building Slabs
EP3517701A1 (en) 2018-01-30 2019-07-31 William H. Bigelow Improved building module with pourable foam and cable

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8782984B2 (en) Concrete fillable wall formwork assembly with interconnectable formwork elements
CA2821263C (en) Variable-geometry modular structure composed of thermo-acoustic caissons, particularly for buildings
US4765109A (en) Adjustable tie
AU2015100173B4 (en) An interlocking masonry block
US5570552A (en) Universal wall forming system
US7191571B2 (en) Modular construction blocks, building structures, kits, and methods for forming building structures
US9453350B2 (en) Shuttering
US7735292B2 (en) Masonry cavity wall construction and method of making same
US6167671B1 (en) Prefabricated concrete wall form system
CA2504851C (en) Stud system for insulation of concrete structures
US6536168B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for moldable and customizable structures
CA2660979C (en) Formwork and method for constructing rammed earth walls
US5970674A (en) Apparatus for dimensionally uniform building construction using interlocking connectors
US7337591B2 (en) Building construction system
US2316819A (en) Wall structure
CA2601457C (en) Concrete panel construction system
US6907704B2 (en) Interlocking mortarless load bearing building block system
US7958687B2 (en) Concrete panel construction system
US6026620A (en) Foundation construction system
US9033303B2 (en) Tie system for forming poured concrete walls over concrete footings
US4532745A (en) Channel and foam block wall construction
AU2009100907B4 (en) Building blocks and location devices for reinforced concrete walls
US8161699B2 (en) Building construction using structural insulating core
US8037652B2 (en) Insulated concrete form
US5611183A (en) Wall form structure and methods for their manufacture

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION