US20090011852A1 - Grooves with Multiple Channels and Methods to Manufacture Grooves of a Golf Club Head - Google Patents

Grooves with Multiple Channels and Methods to Manufacture Grooves of a Golf Club Head Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090011852A1
US20090011852A1 US11773851 US77385107A US2009011852A1 US 20090011852 A1 US20090011852 A1 US 20090011852A1 US 11773851 US11773851 US 11773851 US 77385107 A US77385107 A US 77385107A US 2009011852 A1 US2009011852 A1 US 2009011852A1
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Prior art keywords
portion
groove
defined
bottom
protruded portion
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Abandoned
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US11773851
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John A. Solheim
David L. Petersen
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Karsten Manufacturing Corp
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Karsten Manufacturing Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/047Heads iron-type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0408Heads with defined dimensions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0445Details of grooves or the like on impact surface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0466Heads wood-type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0487Heads for putters
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T408/00Cutting by use of rotating axially moving tool
    • Y10T408/03Processes

Abstract

Embodiments of grooves with multiple channels and methods to manufacture grooves of a golf club head are generally described herein. Other embodiments may be described and claimed.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates generally to golf equipment, and more particularly, to grooves with multiple channels and methods to manufacture grooves of a golf club head.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Typically, a golf club head may include a club face with a plurality of parallel grooves extending between the toe end and the heel end. In particular, the plurality of grooves in an iron-type club head may clear out water, sand, grass, and/or other debris between a golf ball and the club face. Golf club faces may have grooves with various shapes such as squared or box-shaped grooves, V-shaped grooves, or U-shaped grooves.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective diagram representation of an example golf club head according to an embodiment of the methods, apparatus, and articles of manufacture described herein.
  • FIG. 2 depicts a cross-section side view of an example groove.
  • FIG. 3 depicts another cross-section side view of the example groove of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 5 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 6 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 7 depicts a cross section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 8 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 9 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 10 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 11 depicts a cross-section side view of another example groove.
  • FIG. 12 is a flow diagram representation of one manner in which the example groove of FIG. 2 may be manufactured.
  • FIG. 13 depicts a top view of a club face.
  • FIG. 14 depicts a cross-section side view of an example groove of FIG. 13.
  • DESCRIPTION
  • In general, grooves with multiple channels and methods to manufacture grooves of a golf club head are described herein. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • In the example of FIG. 1, a golf club head 100 may include a club face 110. In general, the club face 110 may be used to impact a golf ball (not shown). For example, the club face 110 may be made of titanium material, titanium alloy material, titanium-based material, or other suitable types of material. The club face 110 may include one or more grooves 120 (e.g., generally shown as 122 and 124) and one or more land portions 170 (e.g., generally shown as 172 and 174). In general, two or more of the grooves 120 may be parallel to each other. For example, the grooves 172 and 174 may be parallel to each other. One or more of the grooves 120 may be substantially straight and extend between a toe end 180 and a heel end 190 of the golf club head 100. Two adjacent grooves such as grooves 122 and 124 may be separated by one of the land portions 170 (e.g., the land portion 172). That is, the land portion 172 may join the grooves 122 and 124. Although FIG. 1 may depict an iron-type club head, the apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein may be applicable other types of club head (e.g., a driver-type club head, a fairway wood-type club head, a hybrid-type club head, a putter, etc.). The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, for example, a groove 200 may include a first side wall 210, a second side wall 220, and a bottom 230. In one example, the first side wall 210 and/or the second side wall 220 may be substantially straight. Alternatively, the first side wall 210 and/or the second side wall 220 may be curved in a concave manner or a convex manner. The first side wall 210 may extend between a first land portion 272 and the bottom 230 of the groove 200 whereas the second side wall 220 may extend between a second land portion 274 and the bottom 230 of the groove 200. While FIG. 2 may depict the first and second side walls 210 and 220 tapering from the first and second land portions 272 and 274, respectively, to the bottom 230 of the groove 200, the first side wall 210 and/or the second side wall 220 may be substantially perpendicular relative to the first and second land portions 272 and 274, respectively.
  • The groove 200 may also include a first edge 282 and a second edge 284. The first edge 282 may join the first land portion 272 and the first side wall 210. In a similar manner, the second edge 284 may join the second land portion 274 and the first side wall 220. Although FIG. 2 may depict radius edges (e.g., curved edges), the first edge 282 and/or the second edge 284 may be sharp edge(s) and/or raised edge(s).
  • The bottom 230 of the groove 200 may include a first bottom surface 232, a second bottom surface 234, and a raised, projected, or protruded portion 240. In one example, the first bottom surface 232 and/or the second bottom surface 234 may be substantially parallel to the club face 110 (e.g., via the first and second land portions 272 and 274). Alternatively, the first bottom surface 232 and/or the second bottom surface 234 may not be substantially parallel to the club face 110 (e.g., via the first and second land portions 272 and 274).
  • The protruded portion 240 may extend from the bottom 230. In particular, the protruded portion 240 may include a first side portion 242, a second side portion 244, and a top portion 246. The first bottom surface 232 may join the first side wall 210 to the first side portion 242 of the protruded portion 240. In a similar manner, the second bottom surface 234 may join the second side wall 220 to the second side portion 244 of the protruded portion 240. The first side portion 242 may directly join the second side portion 244 to form the top portion 246. That is, the first and second side portions 242 and 244 may taper from the first and second bottom surfaces 232 and 234, respectively, to the top portion 246. For example, the top portion 246 may be a peak top portion.
  • With the first and second side walls 210 and 220, the protruded portion 240 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 250 and 260, respectively. In particular, the first side portion 210, the first bottom surface 232, and the first side portion 242 of the protruded portion 240 may form the first channel 250. For example, the first channel 250 may have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. That is, the first channel 250 may include relatively sharp lower corners where the first side wall 210 joins the first bottom surface 232 and where the first side portion 242 joins the first bottom surface 232. In a similar manner, the second side wall 220, the second bottom surface 234, and the second side portion 242 of the protruded portion 240 may form the second channel 260. The second channel 260 may also have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The second channel 260 may include relatively sharp lower corners where the second side wall 220 joins the second bottom surface 234 and where the second side portion 244 joins the second bottom surface 234. Accordingly, the groove 200 may have a segmented, W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile.
  • Turning to FIG. 3, for example, the groove 200 may be symmetrical along an axis A. The club face 110 (FIG. 1) may be substantially parallel to a plane P (e.g., via the first and second land portions 172 and 174). The axis A may extend normal to the Plane P (e.g., the axis A may be substantially perpendicular to the club face 110) and through the middle of the bottom 230 of the groove 200 (e.g., through the middle of the protruded portion 240).
  • The protruded portion 240 may extend from the bottom 230 of the groove 200 towards the Plane P. In particular, the protruded portion 240 may be associated with a height H. The height H may be a distance from the top portion 246 of the protruded portion 240 to the lowest point of a cross section associated with the groove 200 (e.g., the first bottom surface 232 and/or the second bottom surface 234). For example, the height H may be less than or equal to a depth D of the groove 200 (e.g., H≦D).
  • The depth D may be a distance substantially perpendicular to the Plane P from a land portion (e.g., the first land portion 272 and/or the second land portion 274) to the lowest point of a cross section associated with the groove 200 (e.g., the first bottom surface 232 and/or the second bottom surface 234). In one example, the depth D may be less than or equal to 0.020 inches (0.508 millimeters). Further, the groove 200 may be associated with a width W. The width W may be a distance between two points: (1) a first point on a first line that is tangent to the first edge 282, and (2) a second point on a second line that is tangent to the second edge 284. For example, the first and second lines may be inclined at 30° to the first and second land portions 272 and 274, respectively, of the club face 110. If the first point and second points are more than 0.003 inches from the first and second land portions 272 and 274, respectively, then the width W may be measured from two points on the groove 200 that are 0.003 inches below the first and second land portions 272 and 274. In one example, the width W may be less than or equal to 0.035 inches (0.9 millimeters).
  • The groove 200 may also be associated with a cross-sectional area and a groove pitch. The groove pitch may be the sum of the width W and the distance between edges of adjacent grooves (e.g., between the grooves 122 and 124 of FIG. 1). In one example, the distance between edges of adjacent grooves may greater than or equal than three times the width W and greater than or equal to 0.075 inches (1.905 millimeters). The cross-sectional area of the groove 200 may be less than or equal to 0.0025 of the groove pitch. Although the above examples may describe particular measurements, the groove 200 and various portions of the grooves 200 may be associated with various heights, widths, cross-sectional areas, groove pitches, etc.
  • The groove 200 may increase backspin and improve consistency in a variety of playing conditions. In wet, sand, and/or grassy lie conditions, for example, the first and second channels 250 and 260 of the groove 200 may clear out water, sand, grass, and/or other debris between a golf ball 290 and the club face 110 before, during, and/or after impact on the club face 110 by the golf ball 290. In contrast to other types of grooves, the protruded portion 240 of the groove 200 may provide more grip on the golf ball 290 while preventing portions of the golf ball 290 from reaching the bottom 230 of the groove 200. Accordingly, the groove 200 may impart more spin on the golf ball 290 relative to other groove configurations (e.g., V-shaped grooves) because the groove 200 may be in contact with more surface area of the golf ball 290 via the protruded portion 240 while evacuating water, sand, grass, and/or other debris between the golf ball 290 and the club face 110 via the first and second channels 250 and 260. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • The shape of the grooves 120 (FIG. 1) may vary based on the shape of the tool to manufacture the grooves 120. As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, for example, each of the first and second side portions 242 and 244 of the protruded portion 240 and the first and second bottom surfaces 232 and 234 of the bottom 230 may be substantially flat and straight surfaces. Alternatively as depicted in FIG. 4, a groove 400 may include curved bottom surfaces.
  • In the example of FIG. 4, a groove 400 may include a first side wall 410, a second side wall 420, and a bottom 430. The first side wall 410 may extend between a first land portion 472 and the bottom 430 of the groove 400 whereas the second side wall 420 may extend between a second land portion 474 and the bottom 430 of the groove 400.
  • The bottom 430 may include a first bottom surface 432, a second bottom surface 434, and a protruded portion 440. In contrast to the first and second bottom surfaces 232 and 234 of FIGS. 2 and 3, the first and second bottom surfaces 432 and 434 may be relatively curved, rounded, or parabolic in shape. The protruded portion 440 may extend from the bottom 430. In particular, the protruded portion 440 may include a first side portion 442, a second side portion 444, and a top portion 446. The first bottom surface 432 may join the first side wall 410 to the first side portion 442 of the protruded portion 440. In a similar manner, the second bottom surface 434 may join the second side wall 420 to the second side portion 444 of the protruded portion 440. The first side portion 442 may directly join the second side portion 444 to form the top portion 446. That is, the first and second side portions 442 and 444 may curve from the first and second bottom surfaces 432 and 434, respectively, towards the top portion 446. For example, the top portion 446 may be a peak top portion.
  • With the first and second side walls 410 and 420, the protruded portion 440 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 450 and 460, respectively. In particular, the first side portion 410, the first bottom surface 432, and the first side portion 442 of the protruded portion 440 may form the first channel 450. For example, the first channel 450 may have a U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile (e.g., a non-segmented U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile). In a similar manner, the second side wall 420, the second bottom surface 434, and the second side portion 442 of the protruded portion 440 may form the second channel 460. The second channel 460 may also have a U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. Accordingly, the groove 400 may have a curved, W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. As a result, the groove 400 may contact a golf ball via the peak top portion 446 of the protruded portion 440 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 450 and/or the second channel 460.
  • Although the above example may described the first side wall 410, the first bottom surface 432, and the first side portion 442 as separate segments forming the first channel 450, the first side wall 410, the bottom surface 432, and the first side portion 442 may be a single contiguously and concavely curved segment. In a similar manner, the second side wall 420, the second bottom surface 434, and the second side portion 444 may be described in the above example as separate segments forming the second channel 460 but the second side wall 420, the second bottom surface 434, and the second side portion 444 may be a single contiguously and concavely curved segment. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • In another example as shown in FIG. 5, a groove 500 may not include any bottom wall portions or bottom surfaces. In particular, the groove 500 may include a first side wall 510, a second side wall 520, and a bottom 530. The first side wall 510 may extend between a first land portion 572 and the bottom 530 of the groove 500 whereas the second side wall 520 may extend between a second land portion 574 and the bottom 530 of the groove 500.
  • The bottom 530 may include a protruded portion 540. The protruded portion 540 may extend from the bottom 530. In particular, the protruded portion 540 may include a first side portion 542, a second side portion 544, and a top portion 546. The first side portion 542 may directly join the second side portion 544 to form the top portion 546. That is, the first and second side portions 542 and 544 may taper from the first and second bottom surfaces 532 and 534, respectively, to the top portion 546. For example, the top portion 546 may be a peak top portion.
  • With the first and second side walls 510 and 520, the protruded portion 540 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 550 and 560, respectively. The first side wall 510 may directly join the first side portion 542 of the protruded portion 540 to form a first channel 550. For example, the first channel 550 may have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. That is, the first channel 550 may include relatively sharp lower corner where the first side wall 510 joins the first side portion 542. In a similar manner, the second side wall 520 may directly join the second side portion 544 of the protruded portion 540 to form a second channel 560. The second channel 560 may also have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The second channel 560 may include relatively sharp lower corner where the second side wall 520 joins the second side portion 544. Accordingly, the groove 500 may have a W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. As a result, the groove 500 may contact a golf ball via the peak top portion 546 of the protruded portion 540 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 550 and/or the second channel 560. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • Referring to FIG. 6, for example, a groove 600 may include a flat top portion instead of a peak portion (e.g., the peak portion 246 of FIG. 2 or the peak portion 446 of FIG. 4). In particular, the groove 600 may include a first side wall 610, a second side wall 620, and a bottom 630. The first side wall 610 may extend between a first land portion 672 and the bottom 630 of the groove 600 whereas the second side wall 620 may extend between a second land portion 674 and the bottom 630 of the groove 600.
  • The bottom 630 may include a first bottom surface 632, a second bottom surface 634, and a protruded portion 640. In one example, the first bottom surface 632 and/or the second bottom surface 634 may be substantially parallel to the Plane P (e.g., the club face 110 of FIG. 1). Alternatively, the first bottom surface 632 and/or the second bottom surface 634 may not be substantially parallel to the Plane P.
  • The protruded portion 640 may extend from the bottom 630. In particular, the protruded portion 640 may include a first side portion 642 and a second side portion 644. The first bottom surface 632 may join the first side wall 610 to the first side portion 642 of the protruded portion 640. In a similar manner, the second bottom surface 634 may join the second side wall 620 to the second side portion 644 of the protruded portion 640.
  • The protruded portion 640 may also include a top portion 646. The top portion 646 may join the first side portion 642 to the second side portion 644 to form the protruded portion 640. That is, the first and second side portions 642 and 644 may taper from the first and second bottom surfaces 632 and 634, respectively, to the top portion 646. For example, the top portion 646 may be a flat top portion. Accordingly, the top portion 646 may be substantially parallel to the first and second bottom surfaces 632 and 634. Further, the top portion 646 and the first and second bottom surfaces 632 and 634 may be substantially parallel to the impact surface 110 (e.g., Plane B). Alternatively, the top portion 646 may not substantially parallel to the first and second bottom surfaces 632 and/or 634.
  • With the first and second side walls 610 and 620, the projected portion 640 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 650 and 660, respectively. In particular, the first side wall 610, the first bottom surface 632, and the first side portion 642 of the protruded portion 640 may form the first channel 650. For example, the first channel 650 may have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In a similar manner, the second side portion 220 of the groove 200, the second bottom wall portion 234, and the second side portion 242 of the protruded portion 240 may form the second channel 660. The second channel 650 may also have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. Accordingly, the groove 600 may have a segmented, W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. As a result, the groove 600 may contact a golf ball via the flat top portion 646 of the protruded portion 640 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 650 and/or the second channel 660. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • Turning to FIG. 7, for example, a groove 700 may include a curved or rounded top portion instead of a peak portion (e.g., the peak portion 246 of FIG. 2 or the peak portion 446 of FIG. 4) or a flat top portion (e.g., the flat top portion 646 of FIG. 6). In particular, the groove 700 may include a first side wall 710, a second side wall 720, and a bottom 730. The first side wall 710 may extend between a first land portion 772 and the bottom 730 of the groove 700 whereas the second side wall 720 may extend between a second land portion 774 and the bottom 730 of the groove 700.
  • The bottom 730 may include a first bottom surface 732, a second bottom surface 734, and a protruded portion 740. The protruded portion 740 may extend from the bottom 730. In particular, the protruded portion 740 may include a first side portion 742 and a second side portion 744. The first bottom surface 732 may join the first side wall 710 to the first side portion 742 of the protruded portion 740. In a similar manner, the second bottom surface 734 may join the second side wall 720 to the second side portion 744 of the protruded portion 740.
  • The protruded portion 740 may also include a top portion 746. The top portion 746 may join the first side portion 742 to the second side portion 744 to form the protruded portion 740. For example, the top portion 746 may be a curved or rounded top portion. With the first and second side walls 710 and 720, the protruded portion 740 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 750 and 760, respectively. In particular, the first side portion 710, the first bottom surface 732, and the first side portion 742 of the protruded portion 740 may form the first channel 750. For example, the first channel 750 may have a U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In a similar manner, the second side wall 720, the second bottom surface 734, and the second side portion 742 of the protruded portion 740 may form the second channel 760. The second channel 760 may also have a U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. Accordingly, the groove 700 may have a curved, W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. As a result, the groove 700 may contact a golf ball via the top portion 746 of the protruded portion 740 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 750 and/or the second channel 760.
  • Although FIG. 7 may depict a convexly curved top portion, the top portion 746 may be a concavely curved top portion. In a similar manner, while FIG. 7 may depict a concavely curved bottom portions, the first bottom surface 732 and/or the second bottom surface 734 may be convexly curved bottom surface(s). The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • In the example of FIG. 8, a groove 800 may include a first side wall 810, a second side wall 820, and a bottom 830. The first side wall 810 may extend between a first land portion 872 and the bottom 830 of the groove 800 whereas the second side wall 820 may extend between a second land portion 874 and the bottom 830 of the groove 800.
  • The bottom 830 may include a first bottom surface 832, a second bottom surface 834, and a protruded portion 840. In one example, the first bottom surface 832 and/or the second bottom surface 834 may be substantially parallel to the Plane P (e.g., the club face 110 of FIG. 1). Alternatively, the first bottom surface 832 and/or the second bottom surface 834 may not be substantially parallel to the Plane P.
  • The protruded portion 840 may extend from the bottom 830 from the bottom of the groove 800. In particular, the protruded portion 840 may include a first side portion 842, and a second side portion 844. In contrast to the protruded portions 240 (FIG. 2), 540 (FIG. 5, and 640 (FIG. 6), the protruded portion 840 may not taper from the bottom 830 towards the Plane P. In one example, each of the first and second side portions 842 and 844 may be substantially parallel to each other and the Axis A. Accordingly, the first and second side portions 842 and 844 may be substantially perpendicular to the club face 110 (e.g., the Plane P). In another example, the first and second side portions 842 and 844 may be substantially parallel to the first and second side walls 810 and 820, respectively. The first bottom surface 832 may join the first side wall 810 to the first side portion 842 of the protruded portion 840. In a similar manner, the second bottom surface 834 may join the second side wall 820 to the second side portion 844 of the protruded portion 840.
  • The protruded portion 840 may also include a top portion 846. The top portion 846 may join the first side portion 842 to the second side portion 844 to form the protruded portion 840. For example, the top portion 846 may be a flat top portion. In particular, the top portion 846 may be substantially parallel to the first and second bottom surfaces 832 and 834. Further, the top portion 846 and the first and second bottom surfaces 832 and 834 may be substantially parallel to the Plane P (e.g., the club face 110 of FIG. 1). Alternatively, the top portion 846 may not be substantially parallel to the Plane P.
  • With the first and second side walls 810 and 820, the projected portion 840 may form two or more channels, generally shown as 850 and 860, respectively. In particular, the first side wall 810, the first bottom surface 832, and the first side portion 842 of the protruded portion 840 may form the first channel 850. In a similar manner, the second side wall 820, the second bottom surface 834, and the second side portion 842 of the protruded portion 840 may form the second channel 860. As a result, the groove 800 may contact a golf ball via the flat top portion 846 of the protruded portion 840 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 850 and/or the second channel 860.
  • Although FIG. 8 may depict substantially flat bottom surfaces, the first bottom surface 832 and/or the second bottom surface 834 may be concavely curved bottom surface(s) or convexly curved bottom surface(s). Alternatively, the groove 800 may not include the first bottom surface 832 and/or the second bottom surface 834. In particular, the first side wall 810 may directly join the first side portion 842 of the protruded portion 840 to form the first channel 850. The first channel 850 may have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In a similar manner, the second side wall may directly join the second side portion 844 of the protruded portion 840 to form the second channel 860. The second channel 860 may also have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • Referring to FIG. 9, for another example, a groove 900 may include a V-shaped top portion. In particular, the groove 900 may include a first side wall 910, a second side wall 920, and a bottom 930. The first side wall 910 may extend between a first land portion 972 and the bottom 930 of the groove 900 whereas the second side wall 920 may extend between a second land portion 974 and the bottom 930 of the groove 900.
  • The bottom 930 may include a first bottom surface 932, a second bottom surface 934, and a protruded portion 940. In one example, the first bottom surface 932 and/or the second bottom surface 934 may be substantially parallel to the Plane P (e.g., the club face 110 of FIG. 1). Alternatively, the first bottom surface 932 and/or the second bottom surface 934 may not be substantially parallel to the Plane P.
  • The protruded portion 940 may extend from the bottom 930 of the groove 900. In particular, the protruded portion 940 may include a first side portion 942, and a second side portion 944. In contrast to the protruded portions 240 (FIG. 2), 540 (FIG. 5), 640 (FIG. 6), the protruded portion 940 may taper to the bottom 930 of the groove 900 instead of from the bottom 930. In one example, the first and second side portions 942 and 944 may be substantially parallel to the first and second side walls 910 and 920, respectively. Alternatively, the first and second side portions 942 and 944 may be substantially parallel to each other and the Axis A. The first side wall 910 and the first side portion 942 of the protruded portion 940 may form a first channel 950. For example, the first channel 950 may have a slanted, segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The second side wall 820 and the second side portion 944 of the protruded portion 940 may form a second channel 960. The second channel 960 may also have a slanted, segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile.
  • The protruded portion 940 may also include a top portion 946. The top portion 946 may include a first top surface 982 and a second top surface 984. In one example, the first and second top surfaces 982 and 984 may be substantially parallel to the first and second side walls 910 and 920, respectively. However, the first and second top surfaces 982 and 984 may be not parallel to the first and second side portions 942 and 944, respectively. The first side portion 942 may join the first top surface 982 to form a first top edge 992. In a similar manner, the second side portion 944 may join the second top surface 984 to form a second top edge 994. The first top surface 982 may join the second top surface 984 to form the top portion 946. In one example, the top portion 946 may have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. As a result, the groove 900 may contact a golf ball via the first and second top edges 992 and 994 of the top portion 946 of the protruded portion 940 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 950 and/or the second channel 960. Alternatively, the protruded portion 940 may have a diamond-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In particular, the first and second top surfaces 982 and 984 may join to form a peak so that the top portion 946 may be convex instead of concave as in a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • Although the above examples may describe one protruded portion in each groove, the apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein may include a groove with multiple protruded portions. Referring to FIG. 10, for example, a groove 1000 may include a first side wall 1010, a second side wall 1020, a bottom 1030, and a plurality of protruded portions 1040 (e.g., generally shown as 1042, 1044, and 1046). In general, the plurality of protruded portions 1040 may extend from the bottom 1030. The first and second side walls 1010 and 1020 and the plurality of protruded portions 1040 may form a plurality of channels, generally shown as 1050, 1055, 1060, and 1065. As a result, the groove 1000 may contact a golf ball via one or more of the plurality of protruded portions 1040 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via one or more of the plurality of channels 1050, 1055, 1060, and 1066. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • While the above examples may describe particular configurations or cross-section profiles, the apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein may include other combinations of a peak top portion, a curved top portion, a flat top portion, a V-shaped top portion, a flat bottom surface, a curved bottom surface, no bottom surface, etc. Further, although the above examples may describe symmetrical configurations, the apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture may include asymmetrical configurations. In the example of FIG. 11, for example, the groove 1100 may include a first side wall 1110, a second side wall 1120, a bottom 1130, and a protruded portion 1140. The protruded portion 1140 may extend from the bottom 1130. The protruded portion 1140 may include a first side portion 1142 and a second side portion 1144. The protruded portion 1140 may be asymmetrical relative to Axis A. The first side wall 1110 and the first side portion 1142 of the protruded portion 1140 may form a first channel 1150. For example, the first channel 1150 may have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The second side wall 1120 and the second side portion 1144 of the protruded portion 1140 may form a second channel 1160. In contrast to the first channel 1150, the second channel 1160 may have a non-segmented, U-shaped configuration or a curved, U-shaped configuration. As a result, the groove 1100 may contact a golf ball via the protruded portion 1140 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 1150 and/or the second channel 1160. The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • FIG. 12 depicts one manner in which a groove with multiple channels (e.g., the groove 200 of FIG. 2) may be manufactured. For example, the groove 200 may be formed on a club face (e.g., the club face 110 of FIG. 1) of a golf club head (e.g., the golf club head 100 of FIG. 1). In the example of FIG. 12, the process 1200 may begin with forming a first channel associated with the groove 200 (e.g., the first channel 250 of FIG. 2) (block 1210). The first channel 250 may be formed by various manufacturing processes such as a micro-machining process and/or other suitable types of processes. In particular, materials may be removed from the club face 110 to form the first channel 250.
  • As described above, the first channel 250 may have various configurations or cross-section profiles. In one example, the first channel 250 may have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In another example, the first channel 250 may have a non-segmented U-shaped configuration or a curved, U-shaped configuration. Alternatively, the first channel 250 may have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile.
  • The process 1200 may form a second channel associated with the groove 200 (e.g., the second channel 260 of FIG. 2) (block 1220). In particular, the second channel 260 may be formed by removing additional material from the club face 110. In one example, the second channel 260 may have a segmented, U-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. In another example, the second channel 260 may have a non-segmented U-shaped configuration or a curved, U-shaped configuration. Alternatively, the second channel 260 may have a V-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. Accordingly, the first and second channels 250 and 260 may form a W-shaped configuration or cross-section profile. The second channel 260 may abut the first channel 250 to form the protruded portion 240.
  • The process 1200 may form a top portion of the protruded portion 240 associated with the groove 200 (e.g., the top portion 246 of FIG. 2) (block 1230). The first and second channels 250 and 260 may abut each other to form the top portion 246 of the protruded portion 240. As a result, the groove 200 may contact a golf ball via the protruded portion 240 and evacuate water, sand, grass, and/or other debris via the first channel 250 and/or the second channel 260.
  • Alternatively, additional material may be removed to form a top portion of a protruded portion. In one example, additional material may be removed from the protruded portion 240 (FIG. 2) to form the top portion 646 (FIG. 6) of the groove 600 (FIG. 6). In another example, additional material may be removed from the protruded portion 840 (FIG. 8) to form the top portion 946 (FIG. 9). The apparatus, methods, and articles of manufacture described herein are not limited in this regard.
  • The example process 1200 of FIG. 12 is merely provided and described in conjunction with the groove 200 of FIG. 2 as an example of one way to manufacture a groove with multiple channels. While a particular order of actions is illustrated in FIG. 12, these actions may be performed in other temporal sequences. For example, two or more actions depicted in FIG. 12 may be performed sequentially, concurrently, or simultaneously. In one example, blocks 1210, 1220, and/or 1230 may be performed simultaneously or concurrently. Although FIG. 12 depicts a particular number of blocks, the process 1200 may not perform one or more blocks. In one example, the process 1200 may not include the block 1230 because the top portion of the protruded portion may be formed in response to forming the first and second channels in blocks 1210 and 1220. The methods, apparatus, and articles of manufacture are not limited in this regard.
  • Turning to FIG. 13, for example, a club face 1310 may include one or more grooves 1320, generally shown as 1322 and 1324. The grooves 1320 may extend between a toe end 1380 and a heel end 1390. In one example, the groove 1322 may include a protruded portion 1340. In particular, the protruded portion 1340 may substantially extend the entire length of the groove 1322 (e.g., a continuous protruded portion). That is, the length of the protruded portion 1340 may be substantially equal to the length of the groove 1322. For example, the groove 1322 may be associated with a cross section as shown in FIG. 2.
  • In another example, the groove 1324 may include two or more protruded portion segments, generally shown as 1344 and 1346 (e.g., a segmented protruded portion). One or more sections of the groove 1324, generally shown as 1314 and 1316, may be associated with a cross section as shown in FIG. 2. Further, one or more sections of the grooves 1324, generally shown as 1318, may be associated with a cross section 1400 as shown in FIG. 14. That is, the cross section 1400 may include a non-protruded portion 1430 (e.g., a substantially flat bottom).
  • Although the above example may describe a club face with a groove having a continuous protruded portion and a groove having a segmented protruded portion (e.g., as depicted in FIG. 13), the methods, apparatus, and articles of manufacture described herein may include grooves with continuous protruded portion only or grooves with segmented protruded portions only. The methods, apparatus, and articles of manufacture are not limited in this regard.
  • While the above examples may be described with respect to a club face of a golf club head, the methods, apparatus, and articles of manufacture described herein may be applicable to other suitable types of sport equipments or surfaces. For example, the grooves described herein may be applicable to tires for vehicles, soles for shoes, etc.
  • Although certain example methods, apparatus, and/or articles of manufacture have been described herein, the scope of coverage of this disclosure is not limited thereto. On the contrary, this disclosure covers all methods, apparatus, and/or articles of manufacture fairly falling within the scope of the appended claims either literally or under the doctrine of equivalents.

Claims (34)

  1. 1. A golf club head comprising:
    a club face to engage a golf ball; and
    at least one groove on the club face, the at least one groove having a first side wall, a second side wall, a bottom, and at least one protruded portion extending from the bottom of the groove,
    wherein the at least one protruded portion forms two or more channels between the first and second side walls.
  2. 2. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of the two or more channels comprises at least one of a segmented U-shaped configuration, a non-segmented U-shaped configuration, or a V-shaped configuration.
  3. 3. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises at least one of a peak top portion, a flat top portion, a curved top portion, a V-shaped top portion, or a top portion substantially parallel to a plane associated with two or more land portions of the club face.
  4. 4. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises a first side portion and a second side portion, and wherein the first and second side portions comprise at least one of side portions substantially parallel to each other, side portions tapering from the bottom to a top portion of the protruded portion, or side portions tapering from the top portion of the protruded portion to the bottom.
  5. 5. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises a height less than or equal to a depth of the groove.
  6. 6. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the golf club head comprises at least one of an iron-type club head, a driver-type club head, a fairway wood-type club head, a hybrid-type club head, a putter-type club head.
  7. 7. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the bottom comprises two or more bottom surfaces, and wherein at least one of the two or more bottom surfaces comprises at least one of a flat bottom surface, a curved bottom surface, or a surface substantially parallel to a plane associated with two or more land portions of the club face.
  8. 8. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one groove comprises at least one of a segmented W-shaped configuration or a non-segmented W-shaped configuration.
  9. 9. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one groove comprises at least one of an asymmetrical configuration or a symmetrical configuration relative to an axis extending normal to the surface.
  10. 10. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises at least one of a continuous protruded portion or a segmented protruded portion having two or more sections.
  11. 11. A golf club head as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least one groove comprises a cross-sectional area and a groove pitch, and wherein the cross-sectional area is less than or equal to 0.0025 of the groove pitch.
  12. 12. An apparatus comprising:
    a bottom;
    a first side wall;
    a second side wall; and
    at least one protruded portion extending from the bottom, the projected portion forming two or more channels with the first and second side walls.
  13. 13. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein at least one of the two or more channels comprises at least one of a segmented U-shaped configuration, a non-segmented U-shaped configuration, or a V-shaped configuration.
  14. 14. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises at least one of a peak top portion, a flat top portion, a curved top portion, or a V-shaped top portion.
  15. 15. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises a first side portion and a second side portion, and wherein the first and second side portions comprise at least one of side portions substantially parallel to each other, side portions tapering from the bottom to a top portion of the at least one protruded portion, or side portions tapering from the top portion of the at least one protruded portion to the bottom.
  16. 16. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises a height less than or equal to a depth of the groove.
  17. 17. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the first side wall, the second wall, and the at least one protruded portion comprise a cross-section configuration, the cross-section configuration being at least one of a segmented W-shaped configuration or a non-segmented W-shaped configuration.
  18. 18. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the bottom comprises two or more bottom surfaces, and wherein at least one of the two or more bottom surfaces comprises at least one of a flat bottom surface, a curved bottom surface, or a surface substantially parallel to a plane associated with two or more land portions of the club face.
  19. 19. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the apparatus comprises at least one of an asymmetrical configuration or a symmetrical configuration relative to an axis extending normal to a plane associated with two or more land portions.
  20. 20. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the at least one protruded portion comprises at least one of a continuous protruded portion or a segmented protruded portion having two or more sections.
  21. 21. An apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the apparatus is associated with at least one of a club face of a golf club head, a thread of a tire, or a sole of a shoe.
  22. 22. A method comprising:
    forming a first channel between a first side wall of a groove and a first side portion of a protruded portion extending from a bottom of the groove; and
    forming a second channel between a second side wall of the groove and a second side portion of the protruded portion from the bottom of the groove.
  23. 23. A method as defined in claim 22, wherein at least one of forming the first channel or forming the second channel comprises removing material to form at least one of a segmented U-shaped configuration, a non-segmented U-shaped configuration, or a V-shaped configuration.
  24. 24. A method as defined in claim 22 further comprising forming a top portion of the protruded portion, wherein the top portion comprises at least one of a peak top portion, a flat top portion, a curved top portion, or a V-shaped top portion.
  25. 25. A method as defined in claim 22 further comprising forming a first side portion and a second side portion of the protruded portion, wherein the first and second side portions comprise at least one of side portions substantially parallel to each other, side portions tapering from the bottom to a top portion of the at least one protruded portion, or side portions tapering from the top portion of the at least one protruded portion to the bottom.
  26. 26. A method as defined in claim 22, wherein forming the first channel comprises forming at least one of an asymmetrical channel or a symmetrical channel relative to the second channel.
  27. 27. A method as defined in claim 22, wherein the groove comprises at least one of a segmented W-shaped configuration or a non-segmented W-shaped configuration.
  28. 28. A method as defined in claim 22, wherein the protruded portion comprises at least one of a continuous protruded portion or a segmented protruded portion having two or more sections.
  29. 29. A method as defined in claim 22 further comprising forming the groove on at least one of a club face of a golf club head, a tread of a tire, or a sole of a shoe.
  30. 30. A method comprising:
    forming a club face of a golf club head to engage a golf ball; and
    forming at least one groove on the club face, the at least one groove having a first side wall, a second side wall, a bottom, and at least one protruded portion extending from the bottom of the groove,
    wherein the at least one protruded portion forms two or more channels between the first and second side walls.
  31. 31. A method as defined in claim 30, wherein forming the at least one groove on the club face comprises removing material from the club face to form the two or more channels, and wherein at least one of the two or more channels comprises at least one of a segmented U-shaped configuration, a non-segmented U-shaped configuration, or a V-shaped configuration.
  32. 32. A method as defined in claim 30, wherein forming the at least one groove on the club face comprises removing material from the club face to form the protruded portion having a top portion, and wherein the top portion comprises at least one of a peak top portion, a flat top portion, a curved top portion, or a V-shaped top portion.
  33. 33. A method as defined in claim 30, wherein forming the at least one groove on the club face comprises forming a groove having at least one of a segmented W-shaped configuration or a non-segmented W-shaped configuration.
  34. 34. A method as defined in claim 30, wherein comprises the at least one protruded portion comprises at least one of a continuous protruded portion or a segmented protruded portion having two or more sections.
US11773851 2007-07-05 2007-07-05 Grooves with Multiple Channels and Methods to Manufacture Grooves of a Golf Club Head Abandoned US20090011852A1 (en)

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US11773851 US20090011852A1 (en) 2007-07-05 2007-07-05 Grooves with Multiple Channels and Methods to Manufacture Grooves of a Golf Club Head
CA 2636132 CA2636132A1 (en) 2007-07-05 2008-06-26 Grooves with multiple channels and methods to manufacture grooves of a golf club head
GB0811834A GB0811834D0 (en) 2007-07-05 2008-06-27 Grooves with multiple channels and methods to manufacture grooves of a golf club head

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US7186188B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2007-03-06 Acushnet Company Iron-type golf clubs
US7186187B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2007-03-06 Acushnet Company Iron-type golf clubs
US7192361B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2007-03-20 Acushnet Company Iron-type golf clubs
US7192362B2 (en) * 2005-04-14 2007-03-20 Acushnet Company Iron-type golf clubs
US20060234811A1 (en) * 2005-04-14 2006-10-19 Gilbert Peter J Iron-type golf clubs
US20060234809A1 (en) * 2005-04-14 2006-10-19 Gilbert Peter J Iron-type golf clubs
US20070078027A1 (en) * 2005-09-30 2007-04-05 Luk-Shan Wong Clubface of a golf club and method for fabricating the same
US20080039230A1 (en) * 2006-08-11 2008-02-14 Chon-Chen Lin Striking plate for a golf club head
US7594863B2 (en) * 2006-11-28 2009-09-29 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US20090247318A1 (en) * 2008-04-01 2009-10-01 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf Club Head

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US20080032814A1 (en) * 2006-08-07 2008-02-07 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US20080102981A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2008-05-01 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7798917B2 (en) 2006-10-31 2010-09-21 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7846040B2 (en) 2006-11-28 2010-12-07 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7828671B2 (en) 2006-11-28 2010-11-09 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7674188B2 (en) 2006-11-28 2010-03-09 Bridgestone Sports Co, Ltd. Golf club head
US7677990B2 (en) 2006-11-30 2010-03-16 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US20080132352A1 (en) * 2006-11-30 2008-06-05 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7815521B2 (en) 2006-12-01 2010-10-19 Bridgestone Sports, Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US20080132351A1 (en) * 2006-12-01 2008-06-05 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US20080167138A1 (en) * 2007-01-04 2008-07-10 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7691007B2 (en) 2007-01-04 2010-04-06 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf club head
US7798918B2 (en) * 2007-07-24 2010-09-21 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing golf club head and golf club head
US20090029797A1 (en) * 2007-07-24 2009-01-29 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing golf club head and golf club head
US20090036228A1 (en) * 2007-08-02 2009-02-05 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing golf club head and golf club head
US20090082129A1 (en) * 2007-09-26 2009-03-26 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Method of Manufacturing Golf Club Head and Golf Club Head
US8105180B1 (en) * 2009-07-10 2012-01-31 Callaway Golf Company Iron-type golf club head with groove profile in ceramic face

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GB0811834D0 (en) 2008-07-30 grant
CA2636132A1 (en) 2009-01-05 application

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