US20080289217A1 - Footwear - Google Patents

Footwear Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080289217A1
US20080289217A1 US11753122 US75312207A US2008289217A1 US 20080289217 A1 US20080289217 A1 US 20080289217A1 US 11753122 US11753122 US 11753122 US 75312207 A US75312207 A US 75312207A US 2008289217 A1 US2008289217 A1 US 2008289217A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
contact
sole
foot
configured
adjacent
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11753122
Inventor
Juliu Horvath
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
RASMUSSEN FOOTWEAR LLC
Original Assignee
RASMUSSEN FOOTWEAR LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/36Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements with earthing or grounding means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/10Low shoes; Slippers
    • A43B3/108Low shoes; Slippers characterised by the sole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/12Sandals provided with an anklestrap; Strap guides thereon
    • A43B3/128Sandals provided with an anklestrap; Strap guides thereon characterised by the sole

Abstract

A sole assembly for footwear supporting a foot over a ground surface. The sole assembly includes a sole made of insulating material. The sole has a top surface configured to support the foot, and a bottom surface opposite the top surface configured to contact the ground surface. At least one contact extends between the top and bottom surfaces and is generally surrounded by the sole. The at least one contact has a conducting material that is configured to allow a flow of electrical current between the foot adjacent the top surface and the ground surface adjacent the bottom surface.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • The present invention relates to footwear, such as sandals, shoes, boots, etc. More specifically, the present invention relates to the construction of a sole assembly of the footwear.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one embodiment, the invention provides a sole assembly for footwear supporting a foot over a ground surface. The sole assembly includes a sole made of insulating material. The sole has a top surface configured to support the foot, and a bottom surface opposite the top surface configured to contact the ground surface. At least one contact extends between the top and bottom surfaces and is generally surrounded by the sole. The at least one contact has a conducting material that is configured to allow a flow of electrical current between the foot adjacent the top surface and the ground surface adjacent the bottom surface.
  • In another embodiment, the invention provides a footwear assembly for supporting a foot over a ground surface. The footwear assembly includes a sole made of insulating material. The sole has a top surface configured to support the foot and a bottom surface opposite the top surface that is configured to contact the ground surface. At least one contact extends between the top and bottom surfaces and is generally surrounded by the sole. The at least one contact has conducting material configured to allow flow of electrical current between the foot adjacent the top surface and the ground surface adjacent the bottom surface.
  • In another embodiment the invention provides a method of transferring electrical energy through a sole assembly of footwear. The method includes providing at least one contact in a sole of the sole assembly, such that the contact extends completely through the sole between top and bottom surfaces of the sole. The method further includes placing the sole on a ground surface, inserting a foot into the footwear, and supporting a foot with the sole. The method further includes positioning at least a portion of the foot adjacent the contact, resisting electrical energy through the sole, and communicating electrical energy through the contact between the ground and the foot.
  • Other aspects of the invention will become apparent by consideration of the detailed description and accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a sandal according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of the sole assembly of the sandal of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the sole assembly of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-section view of a contact of the sole assembly of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 5 is a side view of a sandal according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of a shoe according to yet another embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Before any embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the following drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or of being carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including,” “comprising,” or “having” and variations thereof herein is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items. Unless specified or limited otherwise, the terms “mounted,” “connected,” “supported,” and “coupled” and variations thereof are used broadly and encompass both direct and indirect mountings, connections, supports, and couplings. Further, “connected” and “coupled” are not restricted to physical or mechanical connections or couplings.
  • FIG. 1 shows a foot 10 positioned in a sandal 12 that has a sole 14 and a plurality of straps 16 a-16 c that secure the foot 10 against the sole 14. Although a sandal 12 is illustrated, other footwear can also be used in other embodiments such as a shoe, boot, slipper, “flip-flop”, etc. The sole 14 has a top surface 18 that is shaped to support the foot 10 and a bottom surface 20 opposite the top surface 18 and configured to contact a ground surface. The illustrated sole 14 comprises a polymer or other similar resilient material. In other embodiments, other materials, such as wood, cork, or other such materials can comprise the sole 14, in addition to or in lieu or a polymer.
  • The illustrated embodiment includes two top straps 16 a, 16 b extending across the width of the foot 10 that connect to heel strap 16 c. The heel strap 16 c is coupled to the sole 14 at the top surface 18 and extends around the back of a heel 22 of the foot 10. Other quantities and locations of straps 16 are possible on the sandal 12, and are considered to be within the scope of the present invention.
  • Two portions of the sole 14 are cutaway to reveal heel and toe contacts 26, 28, that extend between the top and bottom surfaces 18, 20. The contacts 26, 28 include contact top surfaces 30, 32, that are generally coplanar with the top surface 18 of the sole 14 and contact bottom surfaces 34, 36, that are generally coplanar with the bottom surface 20 of the sole 14. The heel contact 26 illustrated in FIG. 1 is positioned adjacent to the heel 22. The heel contact top surface 30 is configured to abut against the heel 22, and the heel contact bottom surface 34 is configured to contact a ground surface. The toe contact 28 illustrated in FIG. 1 is positioned adjacent to one toe 24 of the foot 10. The toe contact top surface 32 is configured to abut against the toe 24, and the toe contact bottom surface 36 is configured to contact the ground surface.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the sole top surface 18 including the heel contact 26 for contacting the heel 22 and five toe contacts 28 a-28 e for contacting respective toes 24 of the foot 10 of the wearer. The toe contacts 28 a, 28 b, 28 c, 28 d, 28 e are similar to each other, but the illustrated contact 28 a is the largest toe contact 28 and is configured to engage the largest toe of the foot 10, whereas the contact 28 e is the smallest toe contact 28 and is configured to engage the smallest toe of the foot 10. The illustrated toe contacts become smaller moving from 28 a to 28 e. Other configurations are possible, such as making the toe contacts 28 to all be essentially the same size. In another embodiment, the toe contacts 28 c, 28 d, and 28 e are substantially the same size, but toe contact 28 b is larger than 28 c, 28 d, 28 e and toe contact 28 a is larger than 28 b, 28 c, 28 d, and 28 e. In yet another embodiment, toe contacts 28 b, 28 c, 28 d and 28 e are substantially the same size whereas toe contact 28 a is larger in size.
  • An arch contact 38 is configured to engage an arch 40 of the foot 10 of the wearer. The arch contact 38 illustrated in FIG. 2 has a top surface 42 with a larger diameter than the top surfaces 30, 32 of the other contacts 26, 28 a-28 e. In the illustrated embodiment, the arch contact 38 is positioned adjacent the top surface 18 and does not extend through the sole 14 to the bottom surface 20. In other, non-illustrated embodiments, the arch contact 38 is configured similarly to the other contacts 26, 28 a-28 e and extends through the sole 14 to the bottom surface 20 to engage the ground surface.
  • The sandal 12 further includes a first set of lengths of electrically conductive material 44 positioned between the heel contact 26 and the arch contact 38, and a second set of lengths of electrically conductive material 46 between the toe contacts 28 a-28 e and the arch contact 38. The lengths of material 44, 46 electrically connect the various contacts 26 and 28 a-28 e to contact 38 on the top surface 18. In another embodiment, the lengths 44, 46 are positioned in the sole 14 between the sole top and bottom surfaces 18 and 20, respectively. In yet another embodiment, the lengths 44, 46 are positioned adjacent the sole bottom surface 20. The material can comprise any conductive material, such as a metal. Some examples include gold, silver, copper, platinum, titanium etc.
  • FIG. 3 shows the sole bottom surface 20 that is configured to contact a ground surface. The sole bottom surface 20 includes the toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e. In the illustrated embodiment, each toe contact bottom surface 36 a-36 e is generally in alignment with the respective top surface 32 a-32 e. The illustrated toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e have a smaller diameter than the illustrated toe contact top surfaces 32 a-32 e. In another embodiment, the toe contact top surfaces 32 a-32 e are similar in size to the respective toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e. In yet another embodiment, at least some of the toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e are larger than the respective toe contact top surfaces 32 a-32 e. The illustrated toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e are generally the same size as the other toe contact bottom surfaces 32 a-32 e. In another embodiment, the toe contact bottom surfaces 36 a-36 e are different sizes, for example, toe contact 32 a has the largest bottom surface 36 a, whereas toe contact 32 e has the smallest bottom surface 36 e. Other relative sizes and configurations are possible and are considered to be within the scope of the present invention. The heel contact bottom surface 34 is also illustrated in FIG. 3 and is smaller than the heel contact top surface 30, but the relative sizes of the heel contact top and bottom surfaces 30, 34 can be varied in different embodiments.
  • FIG. 4 shows one of the toe contacts 28 including the top surface 32 and the bottom surface 36. A middle portion 48 extends between the top and bottom surfaces 32, 36. The middle portion 48 includes a tubular portion 50, part of which is cutaway in FIG. 4. The middle portion 48 further includes a conductive material 52 generally contained within the tubular portion 50 and electrically coupling the top and bottom surfaces 32, 36. Some examples of conductive material are gold, silver, copper, platinum, titanium etc. In various embodiments, varying degrees of conductivity are desired, so the conductive material is chosen to suit the desired conductivity of each particular embodiment. The illustrated conductive contact material 52 is arranged in a double helix formation. Other arrangements and configurations of the conductive material are possible, such as a single helix, a triple helix, a straight line, etc.
  • The sole 14 and the contacts 26, 28, 38 are collectively referred to as the sole assembly.
  • In one embodiment, the tubular portion 50 comprises the same material as the top and bottom surfaces 32, 36, respectively. The top surface 32 and the bottom surface 36 can comprise the same material as the conductive material 52, or can comprise a different conductive material. The tubular portion 50 can comprise the same material as the conductive material 52, the top and bottom surfaces 32, 36, respectively. In another embodiment, the tubular portion 50 includes a first material, the top and bottom surfaces 32, 36, respectively include a second material and the conductive material 52 includes a third material. A similar contact arrangement is utilized for all of the toe contacts 28 a-28 e and for the heel contact 26. For example, energy can flow from the arch 38 though the conductive strips 44, 46 and out to the contacts 26, 28 where the energy exits into the ground surface. In addition, energy can flow from the heel 22 through the contact 26 to the ground surface and the energy can flow from the toes 24 through the contacts 28 to the ground surface.
  • A common Eastern medicine belief is that flow of energy into and out of the body is accomplished at the head, hands and feet. This flow of energy promotes blood flow and general health. Typical footwear has insulating soles that block this flow of energy from the feet. It is believed that allowing a flow of energy between the feet and the earth will enhance blood flow and increase overall health. The sole 14 and contacts 26, 28 a-28 e, and 38 of the present invention allow energy to flow between the feet 10 and the earth.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a similar sandal configuration, with items being represented in the one hundred series, (e.g. 110, 112 etc.). Unless otherwise indicated, item 10 is similar to item 110 and so on. Sandal 112 includes a first toe strap 154 a positioned adjacent at least one of the toes 124 of the foot 110 and a second toe strap 154 b positioned over the top of the foot 110. The toe straps 154 a, 154 b are coupled to the sole 114 and to each other to hold the foot 110 adjacent the sole 114. The sole 114 of FIG. 5 is very similar to the sole 14 of FIGS. 1-3. The sole 114 includes a plurality of contacts 126 and 128, shown here in cutaway portions of the sole 114. The contacts 126 and 128 extend between the sole top and bottom surfaces 118 and 120, respectively. The contacts 126 and 128 have contact top surfaces 130 and 132, respectively that are configured to engage the respective heel 122 and toe 124 of the foot 110. The contacts 126 and 128 further have respective bottom surfaces 134 and 136 that are configured to engage the ground surface.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a tennis shoe or sneaker 256 that utilizes the sole 214 and the contacts 226, 228 as previously discussed. The shoe 256 is operable to receive the foot 210 and hold the foot 210 adjacent the contacts 226, 228, through sock 258. Adjacent is being used as indirect contact, allowing an intervening member or members, such as a sock 258 to be positioned between adjacent foot 210 and contacts 226, 228. The sock 258 includes a material that conducts electricity between the contacts 226, 228 and the foot 210. The material can be interwoven with the sock 258, infused into the sock 258, or otherwise integrated with the sock 258 to conduct electricity through the sock 258.
  • Various features and advantages of the invention are set forth in the following claims.

Claims (20)

1. A sole assembly for footwear supporting a foot over a ground surface, the sole assembly comprising:
a sole made of insulating material, the sole having a top surface configured to support the foot and a bottom surface opposite the top surface and configured to contact the ground surface;
at least one contact extending between the top and bottom surfaces and generally surrounded by the sole, the at least one contact having a conducting material configured to allow a flow of electrical current between the foot adjacent the top surface and the ground surface adjacent the bottom surface.
2. The sole of claim 1, wherein the insulating material includes a polymer.
3. The sole of claim 1, wherein the at least one contact is a first contact configured to be positioned adjacent an arch of the foot.
4. The sole of claim 3, further comprising a second contact, wherein the second contact is configured to be positioned adjacent a heel of the foot.
5. The sole of claim 4, further comprising five additional contacts, each additional contact of the five additional contacts is configured to be positioned adjacent a respective toe of the foot.
6. The sole of claim 4, further comprising a length of conductive material positioned along the top surface to electrically connect the first and second contacts.
7. A footwear assembly for supporting a foot over a ground surface, the footwear assembly comprising:
a sole made of insulating material, the sole having
a top surface configured to support the foot, and
a bottom surface opposite the top surface and configured to contact the ground surface; and
at least one contact extending between the top and bottom surfaces and generally surrounded by the sole, the at least one contact having conducting material configured to allow flow of electrical current between the foot adjacent the top surface and the ground surface adjacent the bottom surface.
8. The footwear assembly of claim 7, wherein the insulating material includes a polymer.
9. The footwear assembly of claim 7, wherein the at least one contact is a first contact configured to be positioned adjacent an arch of the foot.
10. The footwear assembly of claim 9, further comprising a second contact configured to be positioned adjacent a heel of the foot.
11. The footwear assembly of claim 10, further comprising a length of conductive material positioned along the top surface to electrically connect the first and second contacts.
12. The footwear assembly of claim 10, further comprising five additional contacts, each additional contact of the five additional contacts configured to be positioned adjacent a respective toe of the foot.
13. The footwear assembly of claim 12, further comprising a length of conductive material positioned along the length of the footwear assembly to electrically connect the five additional contacts with the first contact.
14. A method of transferring electrical energy through a sole assembly of footwear, the method comprising;
providing at least one contact in a sole of the sole assembly, such that the contact extends through the sole between top and bottom surfaces of the sole;
placing the bottom surface of the sole on a ground surface;
inserting a foot into the footwear adjacent the top surface of the sole;
supporting a foot with the sole;
positioning at least a portion of the foot adjacent the contact;
resisting electrical energy through the sole; and
communicating electrical current through the contact between the ground and the foot.
15. The method of claim 14, further comprising inserting an electrically conductive sock into the footwear between the foot and the at least one contact.
16. The method of claim 14, wherein the contact is a first contact, and wherein the method further comprises electrically connecting the first contact and a second contact with a length of electrically conductive material on the top surface.
17. The method of claim 16, further comprising positioning the first contact adjacent an arch of the foot.
18. The method of claim 17, further comprising positioning the second contact adjacent a heel of the foot.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising positioning five additional contacts adjacent respective toes of the foot.
20. The method of claim 18, further comprising electrically connecting the first and second contacts and the five additional contacts with electrically conductive material along the top surface.
US11753122 2007-05-24 2007-05-24 Footwear Abandoned US20080289217A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11753122 US20080289217A1 (en) 2007-05-24 2007-05-24 Footwear

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11753122 US20080289217A1 (en) 2007-05-24 2007-05-24 Footwear
PCT/US2008/064185 WO2008147759A1 (en) 2007-05-24 2008-05-20 Footwear

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080289217A1 true true US20080289217A1 (en) 2008-11-27

Family

ID=40071070

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11753122 Abandoned US20080289217A1 (en) 2007-05-24 2007-05-24 Footwear

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20080289217A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2008147759A1 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120060391A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2012-03-15 Sun Goo Hong Functional footwear
US20120151794A1 (en) * 2009-08-26 2012-06-21 Christian Thagaard Hansen Insole for shoes
US20130047461A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Tzann-Yuh TZENG Foot balance device
US20150143714A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2015-05-28 Varithotics Co., Ltd. Foot balancing device
JP2016019751A (en) * 2011-02-17 2016-02-04 ナイキ イノベイト シーブイ Footwear having sensor system
US10024740B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-07-17 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US10143262B2 (en) * 2014-01-02 2018-12-04 Markus HARML Anti-static sports equipment, sports system having an anti-static function and sports clothing system for a sports system
US10151648B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2018-12-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system

Citations (53)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US46234A (en) * 1865-02-07 Improvement in
US495782A (en) * 1893-04-18 Electric shoe-sole
US2261072A (en) * 1941-04-19 1941-10-28 Donnell Shoe Company O Conductive shoe
US2279094A (en) * 1941-03-22 1942-04-07 Donnell Shoe Company O Conductive footwear
US2407189A (en) * 1942-01-26 1946-09-03 Mishawaka Rubber & Woolen Mfg Shoe
US2586747A (en) * 1949-05-10 1952-02-19 Atta Van Detachable body grounding device
US2641068A (en) * 1950-04-04 1953-06-09 Thompson Clifford James Reversible insole
US2671185A (en) * 1952-03-15 1954-03-02 Otto I Bloom Conductive shoe device
US2710366A (en) * 1952-12-08 1955-06-07 Jr Joseph S Stern Static discharging shoe
US2712098A (en) * 1955-06-28 legge
US2879452A (en) * 1959-03-24 Goodrich Co B F Conductive article of footwear
US2933651A (en) * 1957-09-03 1960-04-19 Walter G Legge Company Inc Body grounding devices
US2955234A (en) * 1956-02-24 1960-10-04 Russell W Price Conductive tape for shoes
US3007083A (en) * 1957-08-28 1961-10-31 Int Shoe Co Perforated conductive insole
US3274442A (en) * 1963-11-19 1966-09-20 James R Peel Conductive footwear
US3449844A (en) * 1967-05-05 1969-06-17 Spenco Corp Protective inner sole
US3596134A (en) * 1968-10-08 1971-07-27 Frederick D Burke Apparatus for discharging electrostatic energy
US3852897A (en) * 1968-07-23 1974-12-10 F Bridge Footwear
US3898538A (en) * 1972-12-12 1975-08-05 Stat E Con Pty Limited Anti-static footwear
US3993932A (en) * 1976-01-16 1976-11-23 Weigl John W Antistatic footwear
US4015347A (en) * 1974-12-28 1977-04-05 Kazuyoshi Morishita Insoles effective for curing and preventing athlete's foot
US4033054A (en) * 1975-08-11 1977-07-05 Tatsuo Fukuoka Footwear
US4150418A (en) * 1977-08-12 1979-04-17 Charleswater Products, Inc. Electrically conductive footwear
US4223458A (en) * 1978-03-31 1980-09-23 Kihara Sangyo Kabushiki Kaisha Laminated shoe insole
US4249226A (en) * 1979-02-22 1981-02-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Grounding strap
US4262321A (en) * 1979-09-26 1981-04-14 Dayton-Granger, Inc. Aircraft static discharger and mounting base therefor
US4546555A (en) * 1983-03-21 1985-10-15 Spademan Richard George Shoe with shock absorbing and stabiizing means
US4642912A (en) * 1984-05-02 1987-02-17 Scholl, Inc. Shoe insole
US4703754A (en) * 1983-04-19 1987-11-03 Ibbott Jack Kenneth Insole employing sheetlike battery
US4727452A (en) * 1986-07-07 1988-02-23 Brownlee William L Conductor device for footwear
US4785371A (en) * 1986-11-28 1988-11-15 Interco Incorporated Electrostatic dissipating footwear
US4813405A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-03-21 Stanislaw Filip Device for stimulating feet having rigid spheroids in dampening medium
US4864740A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-09-12 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable hygienic shoe insole and method for making the same
US4925724A (en) * 1988-01-11 1990-05-15 Ogden Inc. Slip-resistant, cushioning material
US4926570A (en) * 1987-07-22 1990-05-22 Lohmann Gmbh & Co. Kg Shoe inner sole, particularly insole or welt
US5233769A (en) * 1990-07-17 1993-08-10 Spenco Medical Corporation Electrically conductive shoe insole
US5319867A (en) * 1991-12-12 1994-06-14 Spenco Medical Corporation Electrically conductive shoe insole
US5448840A (en) * 1991-05-16 1995-09-12 Cheskin; Melvyn Shoe containing electrically conductive integral elements
USD388242S (en) * 1996-08-30 1997-12-30 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products Men's insole
US6032386A (en) * 1998-06-23 2000-03-07 Partners In Innovation, Llc Golf shoe with removable sole
US6315786B1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2001-11-13 Partnership Of Arthur H. Smuckler, James Grimes, Niko Efstathiou And Charles A. Sarris Device for treating heel pain
US6320160B1 (en) * 1997-06-30 2001-11-20 Consensus Ab Method of fluid transport
US6327795B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2001-12-11 Britek Footwear Development, Llc Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
US6405456B1 (en) * 2000-04-11 2002-06-18 Gregg R. Nichelson Shock reducing innersole
US6421222B1 (en) * 2000-01-11 2002-07-16 Warson Group, Inc. Precision fail-safe electrostatic dissipating device
US6632188B2 (en) * 2001-01-08 2003-10-14 D2Rm Corp. Foot massaging apparatus utilizing air inflated nodes and air inflated nodes combined with a fluid
US6669657B1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2003-12-30 Deanna Thurman Ongwela Massage and tactile stimulation device
US6721161B2 (en) * 2001-03-21 2004-04-13 Iron Age Corporation Sole structure for electrostatic dissipative footwear and method of making same
US7037571B2 (en) * 2000-12-28 2006-05-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Disposable shoe liner
US7055266B2 (en) * 2002-04-01 2006-06-06 Wayne Elsey Electrostatically dissipative athletic shoe
US7107705B2 (en) * 2002-12-23 2006-09-19 Spenco Medical Corporation Insole with improved cushioning and anatomical centering device
US20070000155A1 (en) * 2005-07-01 2007-01-04 Mark Laufer Shoes with electrostatical grounding
US7471497B1 (en) * 2007-04-16 2008-12-30 Knight Sr William C Electrostatic discharge prevention device

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR19980015002U (en) * 1996-09-05 1998-06-25 조윤제 Energized, energized work shoes off
JP2005007113A (en) * 2003-06-19 2005-01-13 Seiji Yamada Discharge body for footwear
JP2006311988A (en) * 2005-05-06 2006-11-16 Tokumi Shibayama Shoe with earth
KR100767992B1 (en) * 2006-09-25 2007-10-18 주식회사영풍제화 The sole for preventing static electricity

Patent Citations (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2712098A (en) * 1955-06-28 legge
US495782A (en) * 1893-04-18 Electric shoe-sole
US2879452A (en) * 1959-03-24 Goodrich Co B F Conductive article of footwear
US46234A (en) * 1865-02-07 Improvement in
US2279094A (en) * 1941-03-22 1942-04-07 Donnell Shoe Company O Conductive footwear
US2261072A (en) * 1941-04-19 1941-10-28 Donnell Shoe Company O Conductive shoe
US2407189A (en) * 1942-01-26 1946-09-03 Mishawaka Rubber & Woolen Mfg Shoe
US2586747A (en) * 1949-05-10 1952-02-19 Atta Van Detachable body grounding device
US2641068A (en) * 1950-04-04 1953-06-09 Thompson Clifford James Reversible insole
US2671185A (en) * 1952-03-15 1954-03-02 Otto I Bloom Conductive shoe device
US2710366A (en) * 1952-12-08 1955-06-07 Jr Joseph S Stern Static discharging shoe
US2955234A (en) * 1956-02-24 1960-10-04 Russell W Price Conductive tape for shoes
US3007083A (en) * 1957-08-28 1961-10-31 Int Shoe Co Perforated conductive insole
US2933651A (en) * 1957-09-03 1960-04-19 Walter G Legge Company Inc Body grounding devices
US3274442A (en) * 1963-11-19 1966-09-20 James R Peel Conductive footwear
US3449844A (en) * 1967-05-05 1969-06-17 Spenco Corp Protective inner sole
US3852897A (en) * 1968-07-23 1974-12-10 F Bridge Footwear
US3596134A (en) * 1968-10-08 1971-07-27 Frederick D Burke Apparatus for discharging electrostatic energy
US3898538A (en) * 1972-12-12 1975-08-05 Stat E Con Pty Limited Anti-static footwear
US4015347A (en) * 1974-12-28 1977-04-05 Kazuyoshi Morishita Insoles effective for curing and preventing athlete's foot
US4033054A (en) * 1975-08-11 1977-07-05 Tatsuo Fukuoka Footwear
US3993932A (en) * 1976-01-16 1976-11-23 Weigl John W Antistatic footwear
US4150418A (en) * 1977-08-12 1979-04-17 Charleswater Products, Inc. Electrically conductive footwear
US4223458A (en) * 1978-03-31 1980-09-23 Kihara Sangyo Kabushiki Kaisha Laminated shoe insole
US4249226A (en) * 1979-02-22 1981-02-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Grounding strap
US4262321A (en) * 1979-09-26 1981-04-14 Dayton-Granger, Inc. Aircraft static discharger and mounting base therefor
US4546555A (en) * 1983-03-21 1985-10-15 Spademan Richard George Shoe with shock absorbing and stabiizing means
US4703754A (en) * 1983-04-19 1987-11-03 Ibbott Jack Kenneth Insole employing sheetlike battery
US4642912A (en) * 1984-05-02 1987-02-17 Scholl, Inc. Shoe insole
US4727452A (en) * 1986-07-07 1988-02-23 Brownlee William L Conductor device for footwear
US4785371A (en) * 1986-11-28 1988-11-15 Interco Incorporated Electrostatic dissipating footwear
US4864740A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-09-12 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable hygienic shoe insole and method for making the same
US4926570A (en) * 1987-07-22 1990-05-22 Lohmann Gmbh & Co. Kg Shoe inner sole, particularly insole or welt
US4926570B1 (en) * 1987-07-22 1996-03-19 Lohmann Gmbh & Co Kg Shoe inner sole particularly insole or welt
US4813405A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-03-21 Stanislaw Filip Device for stimulating feet having rigid spheroids in dampening medium
US4925724A (en) * 1988-01-11 1990-05-15 Ogden Inc. Slip-resistant, cushioning material
US5233769A (en) * 1990-07-17 1993-08-10 Spenco Medical Corporation Electrically conductive shoe insole
US5448840A (en) * 1991-05-16 1995-09-12 Cheskin; Melvyn Shoe containing electrically conductive integral elements
US5319867A (en) * 1991-12-12 1994-06-14 Spenco Medical Corporation Electrically conductive shoe insole
USD388242S (en) * 1996-08-30 1997-12-30 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products Men's insole
US6320160B1 (en) * 1997-06-30 2001-11-20 Consensus Ab Method of fluid transport
US6327795B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2001-12-11 Britek Footwear Development, Llc Sole construction for energy storage and rebound
US6032386A (en) * 1998-06-23 2000-03-07 Partners In Innovation, Llc Golf shoe with removable sole
US6315786B1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2001-11-13 Partnership Of Arthur H. Smuckler, James Grimes, Niko Efstathiou And Charles A. Sarris Device for treating heel pain
US6421222B1 (en) * 2000-01-11 2002-07-16 Warson Group, Inc. Precision fail-safe electrostatic dissipating device
US6405456B1 (en) * 2000-04-11 2002-06-18 Gregg R. Nichelson Shock reducing innersole
US6669657B1 (en) * 2000-09-20 2003-12-30 Deanna Thurman Ongwela Massage and tactile stimulation device
US7037571B2 (en) * 2000-12-28 2006-05-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Disposable shoe liner
US6632188B2 (en) * 2001-01-08 2003-10-14 D2Rm Corp. Foot massaging apparatus utilizing air inflated nodes and air inflated nodes combined with a fluid
US6721161B2 (en) * 2001-03-21 2004-04-13 Iron Age Corporation Sole structure for electrostatic dissipative footwear and method of making same
US6982861B2 (en) * 2001-03-21 2006-01-03 Chien Lee Sole structure for electrostatic dissipative footwear and method of making same
US7055266B2 (en) * 2002-04-01 2006-06-06 Wayne Elsey Electrostatically dissipative athletic shoe
US7107705B2 (en) * 2002-12-23 2006-09-19 Spenco Medical Corporation Insole with improved cushioning and anatomical centering device
US20070000155A1 (en) * 2005-07-01 2007-01-04 Mark Laufer Shoes with electrostatical grounding
US7471497B1 (en) * 2007-04-16 2008-12-30 Knight Sr William C Electrostatic discharge prevention device

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120060391A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2012-03-15 Sun Goo Hong Functional footwear
US20120151794A1 (en) * 2009-08-26 2012-06-21 Christian Thagaard Hansen Insole for shoes
JP2016019751A (en) * 2011-02-17 2016-02-04 ナイキ イノベイト シーブイ Footwear having sensor system
US20130047461A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Tzann-Yuh TZENG Foot balance device
US20150143714A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2015-05-28 Varithotics Co., Ltd. Foot balancing device
US9913508B2 (en) * 2011-08-31 2018-03-13 Varithotics Co., Ltd. Foot balancing device
US10151648B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2018-12-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US10024740B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-07-17 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US10143262B2 (en) * 2014-01-02 2018-12-04 Markus HARML Anti-static sports equipment, sports system having an anti-static function and sports clothing system for a sports system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2008147759A1 (en) 2008-12-04 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4075772A (en) Insole for footwears
US7484319B2 (en) Shoe insole
US6082023A (en) Shoe sole
US6389713B1 (en) Athletic shoe midsole design and construction
US20080289220A1 (en) Supporting plate apparatus for shoes
US6021588A (en) Shoe assembly
US8387279B2 (en) Shoe sole for increasing instability
US8959796B2 (en) Footwear
US20040098881A1 (en) Shoe structure
US2780013A (en) Footwear
US20120159814A1 (en) Footwear with orthotic midsole
JP2001057901A (en) Out-sole divided structure of shoe sole
US20130019497A1 (en) Footwear
US20070017123A1 (en) Insert for footwear midsole
US20070289163A1 (en) Foot support
US8079159B1 (en) Footwear
US4222185A (en) Plastic shoe sole for sandals and the like
US2072785A (en) Footwear
US5893221A (en) Footwear having a protuberance
CN201319906Y (en) Sports shoe sole with functions of internal/external balance transfer and whole-sole shock absorption
US8387278B2 (en) Sole for footwear
US3383559A (en) Antistatic footwear, such as shoes, boots, sandals and the like
US2167035A (en) Rubber sole for sandals
US20080005927A1 (en) Multi-function shoe having flexible sock body
US20080196272A1 (en) Shoe Sole With Pivotal Ground Engaging Plate

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RASMUSSEN FOOTWEAR, LLC, WISCONSIN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HORVATH, JULIU;REEL/FRAME:019339/0485

Effective date: 20070515