US20080235603A1 - Digital file management system with dynamic roles assignment and user level image/data interchange - Google Patents

Digital file management system with dynamic roles assignment and user level image/data interchange Download PDF

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US20080235603A1
US20080235603A1 US11873892 US87389207A US2008235603A1 US 20080235603 A1 US20080235603 A1 US 20080235603A1 US 11873892 US11873892 US 11873892 US 87389207 A US87389207 A US 87389207A US 2008235603 A1 US2008235603 A1 US 2008235603A1
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individuals
group
role
respect
particular
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Aaron H. Holm
Steven P. Kalalian
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Capital One NA
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Industrial Color Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/10Office automation, e.g. computer aided management of electronic mail or groupware; Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings or time accounting

Abstract

A digital asset management system includes dynamic roles assignment and user level image/data interchange. The system stores digital asset files, where different subsets of one or more of the files are associated with respective jobs. In addition, the system stores information that defines access privileges for various features and capabilities with respect to respective roles, information indicating which one or more roles are associated with each respective job, and information indicating which individuals or groups of individuals are assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job. A graphical user interface is displayed to allow a particular individual or group to take specified actions with respect to the digital asset files associated with a particular job. The specified actions made available through the graphical user interface depend on the respective role assigned to that individual or group of individuals with respect to the particular job.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • This application claims the benefit of priority of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/896,186, filed on Mar. 21, 2007.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Digital file management can include a wide range of processes such as capturing the digital files, processing the files and delivering the finished files. Many individuals with different roles may be involved in various aspects of the process. In addition, the individuals who are collaborating on a particular project often are in different geographical locations.
  • For example, in the context of a digital photograph shoot, the parties involved may include the photographer, the talent, the art director and the client. Each of those parties may be in a different geographical location, yet they may need to collaborate on certain aspects of the project. Thus, while the photographer may be at the site of the shoot, the art director, whose input is required as the shoot proceeds, may be located far away in a different part of the world.
  • U.S. Patent Publication No. 2007/0073776, which is assigned to the assignee of this current application, discloses an enterprise-level, digital asset management system that enables users to upload digital assets (e.g., digital image files such as photographs) to a central on-line site and to view, edit, manage, arrange, organize, annotate and adjust the digital images. Multiple parties can communicate and collaborate with one another substantially in real-time in connection with a project involving the digital images. The images can be stored, archived, edited, sorted and sent using a central web-accessible workspace that can be accessed remotely by the various persons working on the project. Users (e.g., clients) can order post-production services such as file processing, direct print output, downloads to media, file transfers, file archiving and retrieval. The system can be fully automated to allow users to access their digital assets independently, as well as order and pay for services through a built-in ordering component. The system can consolidate various aspects of the digital photography workflow.
  • The present disclosure relates to additional features that can be incorporated into a digital asset management system, such as the system disclosed in the foregoing patent application.
  • SUMMARY
  • This disclosure relates to digital file management.
  • Various aspects are disclosed in the detailed description below, the accompanying drawings, and the claims.
  • For example, in one aspect, a machine-implemented method for a digital asset management system includes storing digital asset files, wherein different subsets of one or more of the files are associated with respective jobs, storing information that defines access privileges for various features and capabilities with respect to respective roles, storing information indicating which one or more roles are associated with each respective job, and storing information indicating which individuals or groups of individuals are assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job. The method includes displaying a graphical user interface to allow a particular individual or group to take specified actions with respect to the digital asset files associated with a particular job. The specified actions made available through the graphical user interface depend on the respective role assigned to that individual or group of individuals with respect to the particular job.
  • In some implementations, one or more of the following features are present. The graphical user interface can make available to the particular individual or group a first set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a first job and can make available to that same individual or group a different second set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a second job.
  • In some cases, the method includes storing information indicating whether particular features or capabilities for which a specific role has access privileges are to be hidden, viewable, or modifiable for the individuals or group assigned to that role. The method can include storing ratings provided by individuals with respect to the digital asset files, wherein at least some of the roles are implemented as shared such that ratings provided by individuals in the shared roles are viewable through the graphical user interface by other individuals in another of the shared roles. A predetermined time can be stored with respect to an individual's assignment to a particular role. After expiration of the predetermined time, the individual's assignment to that role lapses.
  • In some implementations, the method includes storing information indicative of whether user interactions with the system by individuals in a group assigned to a first role are enabled in an isolated mode or a shared mode. When enabled in the isolated mode, user interactions are isolated for each individual in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they cannot be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group. When enabled in the shared mode, user interactions are shared with respect to the individuals in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they can be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group. The method also can include storing information indicating that individuals in a group assigned to a second role are enabled to review user interactions with the system by individuals in the group assigned to the first role regardless of whether user interactions by individuals in the group assigned to the first role are enabled in the isolated or shared mode.
  • The disclosure also relates to an article that includes a machine-readable medium storing machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to perform aspects of the method.
  • In addition, the disclosure relates to a digital asset management system to implement aspects of the method.
  • Other features and various advantages will be apparent from the following detailed description, the accompanying drawings, and the claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a digital asset management system.
  • FIG. 2 is an example of a user interface screen that facilitates management of digital images.
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram that illustrates features of the system relating to uploading digital assets to the system.
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram that illustrates features of the system relating to mapping high resolution files to their counterparts.
  • FIG. 4A illustrates an example of an administrator interface screen to facilitate uploading a job.
  • FIG. 5 is an example of administrator interface screen to facilitate high resolution file mapping.
  • FIG. 6 Illustrates an example of a user interface to allow the user to download any available asset derivative.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an example of the relationship between roles and jobs.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates an example of a user interface screen that allows the administrator to assign a user to particular roles and jobs.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates an example of a user interface screen that allows an administrator to assign a user to particular roles and jobs.
  • FIG. 10A illustrates an example of the relationship between users and their access to information about digital assets associated with a particular job in an isolated mode.
  • FIG. 10B illustrates an example of the relationship between users and their access to information about digital assets associated with a particular job in a shared mode.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of an implementation of a digital asset management system 20. The system includes various modules, each of which may be implemented in hardware, software or a combination of hardware and software, and may include, for example, one or more databases and servers. The various modules may be implemented separately or they may be integrated, depending on the particular needs of the system. Some features of the system can be implemented in computer programs executing on programmable computers. Each program can be implemented, for example, in a high level procedural or object-oriented programming language to communicate with a computer system. Furthermore, each such computer program can be stored on a storage medium, such as memory readable by a general or special purpose programmable computer or processor, for configuring and operating the computer when the storage medium is read by the computer to perform the functions described.
  • The system 20 includes a data input/upload module 22, which allows digital files to be uploaded to the system. Although the particular implementation described below focuses on digital image files such as digital photographs, various implementations may incorporate other types of digital files including, for example, data files, video files, audio files, application files and other documents. In some implementations, the digital files can be uploaded directly to a file server. Other implementations may use a remote upload, for example, via the Internet or other network. A data pre-processing module 24 performs such processes as tagging the uploaded files with metadata and keywords, creating preview images from raw and high resolution image files, and linking the preview and high resolution files. The system includes a file storage and network module 26 as well as a file management module 28.
  • A main module 30 has several sub-modules that allow users to interact with the system. The main module 30 includes an administration sub-module 32, a client or user interface sub-module 34, a collaboration sub-module 36 and a work order processing sub-module 38. The administration sub-module 32 allows an administrator to establish accounts, jobs and permitted activities for individual users. The client or user interface sub-module 34 allows a user to log into the on-line system, view image files stored in the system, search and sort image files, view options, rank or compare image files, store selected image files in separate folders, and edit and annotate image files, among other functions. The collaboration sub-module 36 allows multiple users of the system effectively to share an on-line workspace in real-time. The work order processing sub-module 38 allows a user to place selected image files in an electronic shopping cart and to place orders for prints of the selected files.
  • A web-interface module 40 allows users using external devices 42 (e.g., personal or laptop computers) to access the system 10 through a website on the Internet or other network. User applications residing on the external devices 42 may include, for example, an Internet browser, a file transfer protocol (FTP) client application, e-mail and a virtual private network (VPN) for approved client access.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an example of a screenshot that allows a user to access, manipulate and manage its image files. Once the user logs in, the system 20 provides customized access and views based on parameters established for that user by a system administrator. As shown in FIG. 2, after logging in, the system provides a screenshot 50 that has several tabs (43 through 48) that allow the user to select the various functions available from the system. In the illustrated example, the default view corresponds to tab 43, labeled “Image Library.” Other tabs are labeled “Search” tab 44, “My Lightboxes” tab 45, “My Cart” tab 46, “My Orders” tab 47 and “My Account” tab 47. The screen view for administrative users may include an additional tab labeled, for example, “Administration.”
  • As shown in the example of FIG. 2, the screen 50 displayed to a user is divided into three section: an image library section 51, an image gallery section 54, and an image preview section 56.
  • The image library section 51 displays a job tree or directory 52. In the context of digital images (e.g., photographs), for example, the job tree provides a hierarchical listing of jobs, shoot dates, shots and images. A particular job may include data from one or more shoot dates each of which has one or more shots associated with it. Each shot includes one or more images. The user can navigate through the job tree 52 and select a particular job, shoot date or shot by moving the cursor on the computer screen display to a particular item and clicking on that item. An electronic mouse or similar device can be used to move the cursor to the desired area of the screen. A user can search for a particular item in the job tree 52 by entering the name of the individual file or collection of files into a search area 53, and clicking the adjacent “quick search” button.
  • The screen 50 allows the user to select one of several views in which the selected image files are presented in the image gallery section 54 by moving the cursor and clicking on one of several icons 58 that appear in the screen. The default view, which is shown in FIG. 2, is a thumbnail presentation of the images. Other views that can be provided include a listing of the image files and a metadata view of the images. The metadata view allows the user to view the image of each selected file together with certain metadata related to the image.
  • The image preview section 56 displays a medium size view of a particular one of the images that can be selected, for example, by clicking on that image in the image gallery 54. In the illustrated implementation, the image preview section 56 is present regardless of which view of the image gallery 54 is selected (e.g., thumbnail, list or metadata).
  • The user can enter various information into the system in connection with a particular image in the image preview section 56 or with respect to an image in the default view of the image gallery section 54. For example, the user can click on one of the boxes 70 in the image preview section 56 so as to rank or score the image on a scale of one to five. Another group of boxes 72A allows the user to indicate an action that is to be taken with respect to the particular image. In the illustrated implementation, possible actions include “select,” “alternate,” “approve,” “kill” and “flag.” The boxes labeled “select,” “alternate,” “approve” and “kill” also reflect a form of user ratings. For example, a user may wish to indicate that a particular image is approved for use in the particular project or that the image is “killed” and should not be considered for use in the project. Additional groups of boxes 72B appear beneath each image in the default view of the image gallery 54 (FIG. 2). The functions of the boxes 72B is the same as the function of the corresponding boxes 72A in the image preview section 56. If the box labeled “flag” is selected, then the particular image will be acted upon when the “compare flagged images” button 66 (located at the lower right-hand side of the screen) is selected. The functionality of the “compare flagged images” button 66 is discussed below. The image preview section 56 also lists information 74 as to who initiated a particular action with respect to the displayed image and when the action took place.
  • A drop-down menu 76A in the image preview section 56 allows the user to add the displayed image to one of several folders (e.g., a lightbox or shopping cart). Below each image in the default view of the image gallery 54 is a drop-down menu 76B that functions in a similar manner to the drop-down menu 76A. Images also can be added to a lightbox or cart by clicking the button 68.
  • The image preview section 56 includes an area 78 where the user can enter text notes relating to the image. Information entered in the text notes section 78 can be saved by clicking the “save” button 80 in the image preview section 56. The notes are saved in a database and are tracked so that all notes associated with a particular image can be viewed in a history thread.
  • The screen of FIG. 2 includes a drop-down menu that allows the user to apply one of several filters and sorting arrangements to the content that appears in the image gallery 54. In the default mode, information for all the images in the selected section of the image library 52 are displayed in the image gallery 54. However, the drop-down menu 64 labeled “view” allows the user to limit the images that appear in the gallery 54 based on criteria selected by the user. For example, the images can be filtered according to the ranking applied to the image or according to some other status information applied to the images (e.g., “selected,” “alternative,” “approved,” “killed,” “not killed” or some combination of those choices). Similarly, the user can select the order in which the image information appears in the image gallery 54 by using the “sort by” drop-down menu 62. For example, the image information can be sorted so that the images in the gallery section 54 appear in order of ranking or other status information. The upper limit on the number of images that appear in the gallery section 54 can be selected using a drop-down menu 60 labeled “# of results.”
  • By clicking on the “compare flagged images” button 66, the system displays selected images to allow side-by-side comparison. The images can be selected for inclusion in the side-by-side comparison by clicking on the boxes 72A (or 72B) labeled “flag” corresponding to the desired images.
  • The system also includes an image editor that provides various tools to allow a user to view magnified versions of the images and to make annotations and mark-ups on the image or to make various color or other changes to the image.
  • Some of the foregoing features are discussed in greater detail in U.S. Patent Publication No. 2007/0073776, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.
  • Unstructured Job Uploads
  • An additional aspect relates to how the job tree 52 (see FIG. 2) is populated and addresses navigating a digital file storage directory structure via a World Wide Web user interface.
  • In some implementations, the digital assets that are to be uploaded into the system need to be pre-arranged into a set folder structure so that they can be uploaded accurately.
  • In other implementations, a job ingestion engine is provided to allow a user to select a job (which can include, for example, any number of folders, shoots and images or other digital files) from any storage point in the system so that the job can be uploaded to the user's account through a World Wide Web interface without having to pre-arrange the files that are to be uploaded in a pre-specified format.
  • In a particular implementation, the digital file management system includes a job ingestion engine which facilitates the ingestion of a job from any directory point on storage. The functions of the job ingestion engine can be implemented, for example, as part of the data input/upload module 22 and the data pre-process module 24 (FIG. 1). Any storage point registered with the system configuration is available as a source of the digital assets through the user interface. Storage points from any available network location (local area network, wide area network, client location, remote location) can be registered on the system and serve as an upload source. The system uses an unstructured upload of digital assets (e.g., digital images) through a web interface such that the files to be uploaded need not be in a pre-specified format.
  • The source directory can contain images or sub-directories that contain other directories or images. The user can choose how to organize digital assets in the source directory; the digital asset management system then takes a snapshot of the directory structure.
  • In the following paragraphs, an example is described using Extensible Markup Language (“XML”). Other implementations, however, use different extensible, markup and/or text-based serialization languages such as JavaScript Object Notation (“JSON”).
  • In a preferred implementation, uploading is accomplished, as illustrated in FIG. 3, by recursively traversing the source media directory 102 and building an Extensible Markup Language (“XML”) document that captures and represents the original directory tree along with all JPEG images (or other digital files) contained in each directory. Subsequently, the backend service, which in some cases is implemented as a Windows™ service, continues to process the directory by storing the digital images or other digital files, as well as various data about folders that contain the JPEG images or other digital files, in a database 100.
  • To record the source media directory structure 102 accurately at the time of the upload, the job upload server 106 takes a snapshot of the directory structure and expresses the hierarchy in XML format in the database 100. This XML entry includes the relational folder structure (e.g., where the folders are in relation to each other; sub-folders) and the location of all JPEG images or other digital files in the directory tree. In this way, the system is aware of the relative location of all images and directories and can determine the access rights and conditions for any system user. The job upload server 106 converts the size and color profile of each digital asset at the time of the upload.
  • To allow a user to access the directory tree structure quickly, the backend service preferably also generates a second XML entry, which contains the folder structure only along with any necessary database directory mapping, but no information regarding the location, name and properties of any images. The second XML document is processed by the system user interface to show the user a correct representation 104 of the directory structure uploaded to the system. This allows the user to navigate through the stored files quickly so that the system provides the larger XML data for the particular digital assets (e.g., images) to the user interface only when a request to view images is made. By storing the directory contents in XML format in the database 100, the system can provide granular access permissions to each folder and image on the system.
  • By taking a snapshot of the directory structure and ingesting this information in XML format in the database 100, the system does not require that media be pre-arranged into a set folder structure to be uploaded accurately. Any directory containing any number of sub-directories and images can be added to the system without preparatory work.
  • From an administrator's perspective, the unstructured file upload allows for fast content upload without requiring a pre-defined directory structure. The original media folder structure 102 is preserved in the database 100 and presented to the user through a user interface via the web provider server 108. The job (i.e., directory and digital images) seen through the user interface is identical in structure to the media provided for upload. Each customer account can have a default upload point such as a FTP server of local server. The administrative user selects the source root directory from an ‘upload job’ interface (see FIG. 4A). A drop-down menu, for example, can be provided to permit selection of a desired root node in the directory. All folders and images below the selected root node are included in the job upload and indexed in the database 100 in XML format. The administrative user also can apply privileges within the context of a role against any folder within the job directory structure.
  • The unstructured file upload can take the form of a distributed service. Thus, the service can be installed multiple times on the same server or on multiple servers so that it can implement multiple applications at the same time.
  • Access to folders and images is determined according to permissions for each folder and the respective role assigned to each individual.
  • High Resolution File Mapping
  • In some cases, different asset derivatives can arrive at the system at different times and in different formats. For example, some digital assets may arrive electronically, whereas other digital assets may arrive by physical media. Thus, a user may upload a large number of jpg files via FTP, and then upload a large number of DNG files at a later date.
  • In the context of digital image files, for example, when uploading the files for a particular job, the web-enabled user interface initially receives, for example, only low-resolution files of the digital images for display. Subsequently, in response to the request of a user, the user interface can receive and display the corresponding high resolution images. By deferring transmission of the high resolution files until they are requested by a user, the overall efficiency and speed of the system can be enhanced. To make the high resolution files available through the web-enabled user interface, the high resolution files need to be associated with the corresponding low resolution files previously received through the web-enabled user interface.
  • This section addresses how, in some implementations, digital asset files (e.g., raw files, TIF files, high resolution files) in the source media and in the destination directory are associated with one another. More generally, this section provides a mechanism that allows the system to sift through hundreds or thousands of digital files and logically link them so the user can download or work with any available file for a given record. As explained below, the system compares the database against the files on storage and indexes all files that have the same name, but different extensions.
  • The digital file management system includes a high resolution file mapping service that allows administrators (or other users) to upload high resolution images by mapping existing job assets with their derivatives (i.e., the various versions of substantially the same image or other digital asset stored as files with different file extensions or as different file types). The system allows this task to be implemented not only at the shoot folder level, but also at the job level. As illustrated in FIG. 4, a high resolution mapping server 110 finds all images in the destination directory 114 that have the same file name (but different file extension or type) as a high resolution image in the source directory 112 and appends this high resolution image to the existing job asset in the destination directory. The system registers the derivative asset by interpreting the file extension or type and associating the appropriate format. If synchronization is performed at the job or shoot date level, then it opens the possibility that images in the source folder exist with identical filenames. In that case, the system prompts the user as to whether it should skip this file and continue to the next file, or whether it should abort the task. In the latter case, the system can suggest running the task for each shoot folder where a copy of the image exists.
  • The foregoing task can, in many cases, require a significant amount time to complete, particularly for jobs containing thousands of images. Accordingly, an Application Programming Interface (API) can be used for this feature implementation. The workflow can be described as follows. First, the user interface layer initiates a handshake with the high resolution mapping service (represented by 110 in FIG. 4) to verify that it is ready to receive data before sending it. The high resolution mapping service 110 returns a response containing all found high resolution images that match file extensions that the system supports. The response is then converted into JavaScript array. The JavaScript driven front-end scans this array by feeding each found file information back to the server. The high resolution mapping service 110 verifies whether the file is qualified as a new high resolution asset derivative. If a successful match is found, the file is copied from its source location 112 to the designated file storage, a record transaction is entered in the database 116, and the result of this operation is returned back to the caller. The database 116 can be the same as or different from the database 100 of FIG. 3.
  • The high resolution storage endpoint configured in the database makes it very easy to switch to a different network attached storage (NAS) box or cluster should the need arise.
  • A purpose of the high resolution file mapping service is to provide access to the various file versions that are produced through the lifecycle of digital media production. The initial job upload makes the low resolution preview assets available to the user for review. Once the high resolution files are available to the system (e.g., uploaded to any storage node registered in the system configuration) the high resolution file mapping service provides a mechanism for the administrator to make the high resolution files available for download to system users.
  • Using the high resolution file mapping administrator user interface (see FIG. 5), the administrator chooses an account, which causes the user interface to display a default storage point for that account. The administrator then navigates the destination directory to choose the job or folder for the existing assets. Next, the administrator chooses a location in storage for the high resolution files to be associated with the low resolution files. When the administrator clicks on the “SYNCHRONIZE” button 120 (using, for example, an electronic mouse), the system searches through the designated storage point and finds all filenames that match files available in the existing job or shot. All known file types are copied to the system storage, and the database 116 is updated to reference the link between the high resolution images and the corresponding low-resolution images. In addition, the file type (e.g., PSD, RAW, CR2, TIFF) is recorded in the database along with the size of the file (e.g., in megabytes).
  • Users on the system can download all available file types through the user interface. Thus, when a user selects a particular thumbnail image from the images displayed, for example, in the screen of FIG. 2, the user interface displays an enlarged version of the selected image and displays an icon to permit the user to obtain a list of all available files having the same name, but different extensions, as the selected image file (see FIG. 6). In a particular implementation, upon selection of the download “Action” icon 122, a list 124 is displayed of all available files, their file formats, and the size (e.g., in megabytes) of each file. The user then can click the desired file to cause the system to present that file to the browser for user download so that the particular digital image in the file is displayed through the user interface. In some implementations, upon selection of a particular file for download, the system automatically sends a message to an administrator to permit tracking of downloaded high-resolution or other images so as to facilitate billing.
  • As explained below, in the illustrated implementation, the availability to a particular user of the high resolution file mapping service is determined by the particular role associated with that user for the specific job.
  • Dynamic Roles Assignment and User Level Image/Data Interchange
  • In another aspect, the system allows an administrator (or other user) to define customized roles each of which combines elements of functionality and access privileges. For example, each role defines what features and capabilities of the system individuals in that role have access to. Individual users or groups of users then are assigned access to individual jobs within the context of a role. Preferably individual user and groups cannot be assigned access to a job without first assigning a role to the user or group. Each user then can navigate the system user interface and is presented with the functions and privileges provided by the user's role for each individual job. As illustrated generally by FIG. 7, different roles may be associated with different jobs such that an individual assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job has access privileges and capabilities defined by that role.
  • An administrator can utilize the dynamic role assignment functionality in several ways, including creating and managing system roles on a per-account basis or assigning system roles to individual users on a per-job basis. FIG. 8 illustrates an example of a user interface screen that allows the administrator to create and define roles. All or some of the available features can be grouped together to define the features permitted for a particular role. The roles creation and management function allows all available ratings and tools to be assembled into granular roles. The administrator can assign various capabilities (e.g., kill, select, alternate, approve, and notes) to any role and determine whether the particular function should be hidden, viewable, or modifiable for that role. In addition, the system allows the administrator to implement the role as one that is shared (i.e., all ratings are viewable by other shared roles) or as one that is private (i.e., ratings are saved and viewable for each individual user in that role).
  • Once a role is defined, it can be applied to a user and mapped to any job on the system. FIG. 9 illustrates an example of a user interface screen that allows the administrator to assign a user to particular roles and jobs. To have access to a job on the system, a user must be assigned to a job in a particular role. Thus, roles can be assigned to individual users not only at the system level, but at the job level. This allows the administrator to provide varying levels of access to jobs for each user on the system. Thus, a particular user may be assigned to a role that provides one set of functions and access privileges with respect to a first job and may be assigned to another role that provides him with a different set of functions and access privileges with respect to a second job. For example, with respect to a first job, the user may be granted the rights to mark “selects” only, whereas with respect to a second job the user may have full rights to mark “selects,” “kills,” “alternates,” “approvals” and “notes.” Preferably, only the tools for which the user has permissions to use are made available to that user, regardless of where the digital assets (e.g., images) from a given job are moved on the system (e.g., library, lightboxes, cart, portfolios). To facilitate the administrator's establishing roles, one or more pre-defined roles can be defined and made available to provide a starting point. Nevertheless, the administrator can define an unlimited number of custom roles.
  • Similar techniques can be used to define roles not only at the system or job level, but also at any other level (e.g., at an individual folder level).
  • Job access can also be marked for expiration on a certain date or after a specified time elapses. In that case, the user will have access to the job within the context of the applied role until the expiration date occurs. Once that date comes, access can be revoked, or the role can change. For instance, a user may have seven days during which he is permitted to mark ratings for a job. After the seven day period, the user may have the right to review images only and have no permissions to change ratings options.
  • Image/Data interchange describes the system interactions captured by the system. The interactions can be stored, for example, in a database. These interactions include, but are not limited to, entries made by users to indicate image ratings (e.g., select, alternate, kill, approve), notes and other edits as well as interactions such as access history.
  • User interactions with the system can be enabled in isolated, shared, or hybrid mode. In particular, at the role level, image/data interchange can be implemented in any of those modes. Thus, user image/data sharing is defined at the role level where rights are granted and implemented per job as described above.
  • In the isolated mode, user interaction is isolated for each user in that role (see FIG. 10A). Thus, for example, all ratings and notes to the digital assets made by a particular user in that role can be viewed and edited by that user only. Nevertheless, administrators or others assigned to a different role may still be able to access such ratings and notes depending on the privileges assigned to that role.
  • In the shared mode, user interaction is shared (see FIG. 110B). Thus, for example, all users in a particular role can view and edit image ratings and notes, regardless of which user assigned to that role initially made the ratings or notes.
  • In the hybrid mode, users assigned to the role can review ratings and notes made by all other users. The hybrid mode can be useful, for example, for management and executive usage and collaborative decision making purposes.
  • The system can facilitate hybrid/shared mode for every tool on the system for each job. For example, the image ratings feature can be enabled in the shared mode while the image notes feature is enabled in the isolated mode with respect to the same image and the same user. This allows for a fundamental separation of shared and private data within the same interface accessing the same content.
  • For the administrator, the user level image/data interchange provides the flexibility to isolate users from each other and reduce error. It also provides the opportunity for managers to review the work of multiple people to better inform creative decision making. Once the administrator assigns a user to a job in an isolated role, all ratings and information entered into the system for that job can be edited by that user only. In this scenario, the asset ratings are stored separately for each user rather than universally for the asset itself. As a result, many users can be assigned to a single job in isolated roles without requiring the same job to be uploaded multiple times.
  • For the user, the system provides multiple levels of user level image/data functionality. For example, a supervising user has the ability to review image/data interchange for all users on the system assigned to the same jobs. In this case, the filtering, sorting and review features allow the supervising user to view system conditions for specific users or groups of users. For instance, a user in a supervisory role could review “selected” or “killed” images for a specific user or group of users. The separation of ratings from the asset also enables the system to generate aggregate information about an asset or collection of assets. For instance, a supervisor may want to review all “selected” images in two recent jobs by two users in a group, but not by a third user in the group.
  • Also, the user level image/data interchange provides “aggregate” and “rules driven” views. For instance, for a network entertainment advertising partner to gain access to a digital asset (e.g., an image), that image must not have been “killed” or marked as not eligible for publicity materials. This condition is set by the system which tracks all users with access to a given image and determines whether it has been marked as a “kill.” Similarly, photo editors working in groups can decide, for example, that an image may be approved only if a predetermined fraction (e.g., two-thirds or four-fifths) of the photo editors mark it as a “select.” Such information is stored by the system, which automatically applies any such conditions to the status of the image. In this way, individual users work in isolation, but contribute to a collaborative decision-making process determined by the collective input of all users with access to certain media.
  • Other implementations are within the scope of the claims.

Claims (21)

  1. 1. A machine-implemented method for a digital asset management system, the method comprising:
    storing digital asset files, wherein different subsets of one or more of the files are associated with respective jobs;
    storing information that defines access privileges for various features and capabilities with respect to respective roles;
    storing information indicating which one or more roles are associated with each respective job;
    storing information indicating which individuals or groups of individuals are assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job; and
    displaying a graphical user interface to allow a particular individual or group to take specified actions with respect to the digital asset files associated with a particular job, wherein the specified actions made available through the graphical user interface depend on the respective role assigned to that individual or group of individuals with respect to the particular job.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein the graphical user interface makes available to the particular individual or group a first set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a first job and makes available to that same individual or group a different second set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a second job.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1 including storing information indicating whether particular features or capabilities for which a specific role has access privileges are to be hidden, viewable, or modifiable for the individuals or group assigned to that role.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1 including storing ratings provided by individuals with respect to the digital asset files, wherein at least some of the roles are implemented as shared such that ratings provided by individuals in the shared roles are viewable through the graphical user interface by other individuals in another of the shared roles.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 including storing a predetermined time with respect to an individual's assignment to a particular role, wherein after expiration of the predetermined time, the individual's assignment to that role lapses.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1 including storing information indicative of whether user interactions with the system by individuals in a group assigned to a first role are enabled in an isolated mode or a shared mode, wherein, when enabled in the isolated mode, user interactions are isolated for each individual in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they cannot be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group, and wherein, when enabled in the shared mode, user interactions are shared with respect to the individuals in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they can be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6 including storing information indicating that individuals in a group assigned to a second role are enabled to review user interactions with the system by individuals in the group assigned to the first role regardless of whether user interactions by individuals in the group assigned to the first role are enabled in the isolated or shared mode.
  8. 8. An article comprising a machine-readable medium storing machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to:
    store digital asset files, wherein different subsets of one or more of the files are associated with respective jobs;
    store information that defines access privileges for various features and capabilities with respect to respective roles;
    store information indicating which one or more roles are associated with each respective job;
    store information indicating which individuals or groups of individuals are assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job; and
    display a graphical user interface to allow a particular individual or group to take specified actions with respect to the digital asset files associated with a particular job, wherein the specified actions made available through the graphical user interface depend on the respective role assigned to that individual or group of individuals with respect to the particular job.
  9. 9. The article of claim 8 wherein the displayed graphical user interface makes available to the particular individual or group a first set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a first job and makes available to that same individual or group a different second set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a second job.
  10. 10. The article of claim 8 including machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to store information indicating whether particular features or capabilities for which a specific role has access privileges are to be hidden, viewable, or modifiable for the individuals or group assigned to that role.
  11. 11. The article of claim 8 including machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to store ratings provided by individuals with respect to the digital asset files, wherein at least some of the roles are implemented as shared such that ratings provided by individuals in the shared roles are viewable through the graphical user interface by other individuals in another of the shared roles.
  12. 12. The article of claim 8 including machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to store a predetermined time with respect to an individual's assignment to a particular role, wherein after expiration of the predetermined time, the individual's assignment to that role lapses.
  13. 13. The article of claim 8 including machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to store information indicative of whether user interactions with the system by individuals in a group assigned to a first role are enabled in an isolated mode or a shared mode, wherein, when enabled in the isolated mode, user interactions are isolated for each individual in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they cannot be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group, and wherein, when enabled in the shared mode, user interactions are shared with respect to the individuals in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they can be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group.
  14. 14. The article of claim 13 including machine-readable instructions that, when applied to the machine, cause the machine to store information indicating that individuals in a group assigned to a second role are enabled to review user interactions with the system by individuals in the group assigned to the first role regardless of whether user interactions by individuals in the group assigned to the first role are enabled in the isolated or shared mode.
  15. 15. A digital asset management system comprising:
    a database storing:
    digital asset files, wherein different subsets of one or more of the files are associated with respective jobs;
    information that defines access privileges for various features and capabilities with respect to respective roles;
    information indicating which one or more roles are associated with each respective job; and
    information indicating which individuals or groups of individuals are assigned to a particular role with respect to a particular job; and
    a server operable to display a graphical user interface to allow a particular individual or group to take specified actions with respect to the digital asset files associated with a particular job, wherein the specified actions made available through the graphical user interface depend on the respective role assigned to that individual or group of individuals with respect to the particular job.
  16. 16. The system of claim 15 wherein the displayed graphical user interface is operable to make available to the particular individual or group a first set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a first job and to make available to that same individual or group a different second set of features and capabilities with respect to digital asset files associated with a second job.
  17. 17. The system of claim 15 wherein the database stores information indicating whether particular features or capabilities for which a specific role has access privileges are to be hidden, viewable, or modifiable for the individuals or group assigned to that role.
  18. 18. The system of claim 15 wherein the database stores ratings provided by individuals with respect to the digital asset files, wherein at least some of the roles are implemented as shared such that ratings provided by individuals in the shared roles are viewable through the graphical user interface by other individuals in another of the shared roles.
  19. 19. The system of claim 15 wherein the database stores a predetermined time with respect to an individual's assignment to a particular role, wherein after expiration of the predetermined time, the individual's assignment to that role lapses.
  20. 20. The system of claim 15 wherein the database stores information indicative of whether user interactions with the system by individuals in a group assigned to a first role are enabled in an isolated mode or a shared mode, wherein, when enabled in the isolated mode, user interactions are isolated for each individual in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they cannot be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group, and wherein, when enabled in the shared mode, user interactions are shared with respect to the individuals in the group such that the system stores the interactions in a manner that they can be viewed or edited through the graphical user interface by other individuals in the group.
  21. 21. The system of claim 20 wherein the database stores information indicating that individuals in a group assigned to a second role are enabled to review user interactions with the system by individuals in the group assigned to the first role regardless of whether user interactions by individuals in the group assigned to the first role are enabled in the isolated or shared mode.
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US8156447B2 (en) 2012-04-10 grant
US20080235625A1 (en) 2008-09-25 application
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US20080235262A1 (en) 2008-09-25 application

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