Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Air quality sensor/interruptor

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080220384A1
US20080220384A1 US12126215 US12621508A US2008220384A1 US 20080220384 A1 US20080220384 A1 US 20080220384A1 US 12126215 US12126215 US 12126215 US 12621508 A US12621508 A US 12621508A US 2008220384 A1 US2008220384 A1 US 2008220384A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
air
system
gas
appliance
sensor
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12126215
Inventor
Jon Bridgwater
Martin Yan
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
RH Peterson Co
Original Assignee
RH Peterson Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D14/00Burners for combustion of a gas, e.g. of a gas stored under pressure as a liquid
    • F23D14/46Details, e.g. noise reduction means
    • F23D14/72Safety devices, e.g. operative in case of failure of gas supply
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D14/00Burners for combustion of a gas, e.g. of a gas stored under pressure as a liquid
    • F23D14/46Details, e.g. noise reduction means
    • F23D14/72Safety devices, e.g. operative in case of failure of gas supply
    • F23D14/80Selection of a non-toxic gas
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23NREGULATING OR CONTROLLING COMBUSTION
    • F23N5/00Systems for controlling combustion
    • F23N5/24Preventing development of abnormal or undesired conditions, i.e. safety arrangements
    • F23N5/242Preventing development of abnormal or undesired conditions, i.e. safety arrangements using electronic means

Abstract

An air quality sensor and interrupter system includes an air quality sensor to measure the air quality around a gas appliance and an appliance shut-off device to turn off the gas appliance in response to a signal from the sensor indicating unsafe air. An exhaust can also be activated to remove the unsafe air. Unsafe air can be indicated by a measurement of 18.5% or less oxygen in the air. If the sensor fails, an alarm can alert the user and the appliance shut off until the sensor is replaced or repaired. A bypass allows the user to keep the appliance turned on, but only for a limited amount of time. The user can keep utilizing the bypass to keep the appliance turned on for extended periods of time.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present invention is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/404,313, filed Apr. 14, 2006, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/671,952, filed Apr. 15, 2005.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    1. Field of Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates generally to air quality detection systems, and in particular, to such systems that take action based on the air quality detected.
  • [0004]
    2. Related Art
  • [0005]
    Gas appliances can generate unsafe levels of various gases, such as carbon monoxide (CO), into the air. Such gases need to be detected so that people within the air space do not get ill or suffer any other health-related problems. For example if a burner system in a gas appliance is not burning properly, unsafe levels of combustion by-products are released into the environment because of incomplete combustion.
  • [0006]
    One type of gas detection system uses the oxygen detection safety-pilot (ODS) technology on gas appliances. A typical ODS pilot system includes an oxygen-sensitive pilot burner that regulates flame characteristics, a thermocouple positioned in the mantle of the pilot flame, and a safety shut-off valve. The pilot flame is designed to be stable within a very narrow operating range. The thermocouple responds to changes in the pilot flame characteristics and, when heated, generates a voltage, e.g., in the millivolt range, which keeps the gas supply valve in the open position.
  • [0007]
    However, if low levels of oxygen are detected by the ODS system, the flame extinguishes. The loss of flame causes the thermocouple to cool. This cooling reduces the voltage, which causes the gas valve to return to its normally closed position, thus turning off the fuel supply to the appliance. The unit will not operate until the space is properly ventilated and adequate oxygen is introduced, and the appliance is restarted.
  • [0008]
    Although relatively effective, there are several inherent problems with ODS systems. These include, but are not limited, to susceptibility to drafts, pilot positioning, gas supply, orifice sizing, and heating value of the gas. Due to the nature of the ODS pilot system, it is subject to nuisance shutdowns from overheating conditions on the thermocouple cold junction.
  • [0009]
    Non-pilot light based systems, such as described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,482,311, address some of the deficiencies of ODS pilot systems. However, the system of the '311 patent and known systems for automatic shut-off of a heating system based on carbon monoxide detection, such as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,793,296, do not go much beyond shutting off the system. With these systems, when a sensor/detector fails, the system is no longer functional. In addition, when low oxygen is detected, the system simply shuts off the heating system. However, dangerous amounts of low oxygen may still be present.
  • [0010]
    Therefore, there is a need for an air quality detection system that overcomes the disadvantages of conventional systems discussed above.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0011]
    According to one aspect of the invention, an air quality sensor/interrupter includes an air quality sensor and a means of interrupting the operation of the appliance when a low air quality is detected. In one embodiment, when the oxygen level is approximately 18.0% or lower, a signal is sent to the shut-down mechanism to shut down the gas appliance.
  • [0012]
    The air quality sensor/interrupter is a device that measures air quality in a confined space, and if unsafe air is detected, shuts down the appliance(s) affecting the air in the monitored space. The sensor may communicate to the interrupter or shut-down mechanism by a wired or a wireless system. Upon receipt of the signal, the interrupter will stop the flow of power, gas, or electricity to the heating element of the appliance(s). In one embodiment, the interrupter may shut down only the heater or burner element of the system and allow the rest of the appliance to function, such as blowers and lights. The appliance is not turned back on until the interrupter or system is reset, either by the user or automatically upon detection of “safe” air.
  • [0013]
    Thus, because the air quality sensor/interrupter measures the actual air quality in the space and shuts down the appliance based on a detection of unsafe air, the present invention does not have many of the inherence problems of conventional ODS systems.
  • [0014]
    When unsafe air is detected, the system also activates an exhaust to clear away the unsafe air. The exhaust may be a fan or any conventional exhaust device. Once the system is reset, either with a “safe” air detection or by the user, the exhaust is turned off. This ensures the space proximate the sensor does not retain unsafe air, which is especially desirable in areas with human or animal contact.
  • [0015]
    In another embodiment, if the sensor/interrupter fails, the gas supply to appliances connected to the system will be shut off and an alarm will be activated to let the user know of the faulty device. Once a new and operational device is installed, the system opens up the gas supply, assuming the air quality is safe. However, if a new device is not readily available, the system may be equipped with a user-enabled bypass switch, which allows gas to flow to the appliances for operation. In one embodiment, when the bypass switch is enabled, the switch is only operational for a set period of time, such as 36 hours. After 36 hours, the gas supply is shut off again to the appliances, although the user may again trigger the bypass switch. Such a mechanism enables the appliances to operate even without a functional sensor/interruptor, but does not allow continuous operation unless a functional sensor/interruptor is installed.
  • [0016]
    Thus, features of the present invention provide a safer detection and shut-off system, as unsafe air is automatically removed upon an unsafe air detection and the user is warned when the detection mechanism fails, while still allowing the connected appliances to operate.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • [0017]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an air quality detection/shut-down system according to one embodiment;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2 is a flow chart showing steps for shutting down an appliance when unsafe air is detected according to one embodiment;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an air quality detection/shut-down system with an automated exhaust system according to one embodiment;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an air quality detection/shut-down system with a faulty detector warning system according to one embodiment; and
  • [0021]
    FIG. 5 is a flow chart showing steps for removing unsafe air when unsafe air is detected and/or warning the user of a faulty detection mechanism.
  • [0022]
    Embodiments of the present invention and their advantages are best understood by referring to the detailed description that follows.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0023]
    According to one embodiment of the present invention, a sensor is used to measure the quality of air in a room or area. If the measurement indicates unsafe air, a signal is sent to a shut-down device, which then shuts down the appliance or appliances in the monitored air space.
  • [0024]
    The sensor may employ one of several known technologies and products, such as electromechanical, semiconductor, catalytic bead, and zirconia lambda. Suitable sensors or detectors include the TX-2000 Toxic Gas and OX-2000 Oxygen Intrinsically Safe series of detectors from Enmet Corporation of Ann Arbor, Mich. These detectors are capable of continually monitoring toxic gases or oxygen and indicating when a certain gas is detected or a certain gas has reached a threshold, such as by an audio alarm or visual display. Gases that can be monitored include, but may not be limited to chlorine (Cl2), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), oxygen (O2), and ozone (O3).
  • [0025]
    In one embodiment, when the sensor detects low oxygen levels, such as at 18.0% or less, an alarm will sound and a signal will be sent to a shut-down device or interrupter. The signal can be sent along a wired channel, such as along a wire, or through a wireless communication. An example of a wireless shut-down device is a RR-1 or RR-1A remote system receiver and transmitter from the Robert H. Peterson Company, the City of Industry, Calif. The RR-1 or RR-1A system can be modified to act as transmitter and receiver grounding device.
  • [0026]
    Thus, once a signal is received indicating that the quality of the air has dropped below an acceptable level, the grounding circuit will activate or close and either directly ground the thermocouple/thermopile/battery or magnet power circuit. This would then result in the magnet/valve dropping out or shutting off, causing the gas appliance to shut down. Alternatively, a remote transmitter may be activated to send a signal to a grounding system which would shut down the gas appliance.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing one embodiment of the just-described invention. In FIG. 1, an air quality sensor and control system 100 is shown in use with a gas appliance 102. Gas appliance 102 is shown as a gas log system, although any suitable gas appliance can be used with the present invention. Gas appliance 102 is connected to a receiver 104, which operates to receive signals and in response to the signals, turn gas appliance 102 off or on. Receiver 104 receives signals transmitted by a transmitter 106. Signals can be transmitted wireless or over a wired connection. Receiver 104 and transmitter 106 are conventional components to a system, such as the Model # RR-1 or RR-1A kit from the RH Peterson Co. of the City of Industry. An oxygen sensor 108 is connected to transmitter 106. The sensor may be located in the whole house or room area dependent on the sensitivity of the detector. Multiple detectors may be required in a whole house situation.
  • [0028]
    When oxygen sensor 108 detects low oxygen, e.g., 18.0% or lower, or a toxic gas, it sends a signal to transmitter 106. In response, transmitter 106 sends a turn-off signal to receiver 104. Receiver 104 then turns off gas appliance 102, such as by closing a hot lead/ground circuit 110 in gas appliance 102. In one embodiment, only the burner or gas supply is shut down, while leaving other components of the appliance functional. In other embodiments, all functions or components of the appliance are shut down upon receiving indication of low oxygen environment or toxic air quality.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating steps for shutting down a gas appliance, according to one embodiment of the present invention. In step 200, the quality of the air proximate to the gas appliance is sensed or measured. Sensing can be with any conventional air quality sensor to detect oxygen levels in the air or to detect the presence of toxic gas. In step 202, a determination is made whether the air quality is safe. In one embodiment, unsafe air quality occurs when the oxygen level is approximately 18.0% or lower. If an unsafe air quality is detected, as determined in step 202, a signal is sent, in step 204, to a device or system for turning off the gas appliance. The device or system may comprise of a transmitter/receiver pair or a single transceiver. If the air quality is not classified as unsafe, then no signal is sent and the gas appliance continues its normal operation in step 206. In step 208, upon receipt of a signal indicating unsafe air quality, the gas appliance is shut down or turned off, either in whole or only specific parts, such as the gas burners. The gas appliance remains shut down until the quality of air is no longer unsafe.
  • [0030]
    As a result, the gas appliance does not continue generating fire or producing unsafe air, such as with an excess of carbon monoxide, when unsafe air is detected without being dependent on the pilot light. Consequently, reliance on the pilot light is eliminated, thereby eliminating disadvantages of conventional systems using the pilot light.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an air quality detection/shut-down system 300 with an automated exhaust system according to one embodiment. System 300 is the same as system 100 described above, but includes an exhaust system 302 in communication with receiver 104. Note that in other embodiments, exhaust system can be in communication directly with transmitter 106. When oxygen sensor 108 detects unsafe air, receiver 104 turns off the gas supply to gas appliance 102, as described above. With this embodiment, when oxygen sensor 108 detects unsafe air, exhaust system 302 also receives a signal, either through transmitter 106 or receiver 104. In response, exhaust system 302 removes the unsafe air surrounding sensor 108 and/or appliance 102. As a result, the corresponding surrounding area is made safe to humans, animals, or anything in contact with the area.
  • [0032]
    The exhaust system can be any conventional exhaust, including vacuum systems that suck in and/or filter the air and fan systems that blow out the unsafe air. The exhaust systems may be activated upon immediate receipt of the unsafe air detection signal and may operate simultaneously with the appliance shut off system. However, simultaneous operation is not required. Furthermore, multiple exhaust systems or devices may be utilized, depending in part on various factors, including the number of sensors 108, the size of the affected area, the efficiency of the exhaust systems, and the urgency or time requirements for removing the unsafe air upon an unsafe air detection. After the unsafe air is removed, system 300 resets itself. System reset can be triggered in any number of ways, including when sensor 108 detects safe air again, the user manually resetting the system, or after the exhaust system has been operating for a specified period of time.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an air quality detection/shut-down system 400, in which an alarm system 402 and a bypass system 404 are in communication with sensor 108. In system 400, when sensor 108 fails or otherwise becomes inoperative, such as accuracy falls below a set threshold, alarm system 402 notifies the user. Notification can be provided using various methods, including an audio alarm, a visual alarm, a combination of the two, and an automated message sent to a user's cell phone or computer. This gives the user instant notification for sensor failure, which minimizes the time required to fix or install a new sensor 108. As a result, the time that system 400 is not functioning properly can be greatly reduced. Note that when alarm system 402 is triggered, a signal is sent to transmitter 106 and/or receiver 104 to shut down gas to appliance 102 and any other connected appliances. These appliances remain shut down until sensor 108 is replaced or repaired.
  • [0034]
    There may be situations where the faulty sensor cannot be readily fixed or replaced, but that appliances connected to system 400 still need to be operable. In this situation, bypass system 404 enables the user to manually bypass appliance shut down and start or maintain the flow of gas to appliance 102. In one embodiment, the bypass is only in effect for a specified period of time, such as 36 hours. Other periods of time may be set by the user, depending on system needs and uses. The user may continually restart the bypass system, but must do so no later than the specified period of time. This allows the system to continue functioning, but also requires the user to monitor the system as well. Consequently, a level of safety is maintained due to the necessity for user intervention. When sensor 108 is repaired or replaced, system 400 begins normal operation again. Note that alarm system 402 and/or bypass system 404 may be used in conjunction with exhaust system 302.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 5 is a flow chart 500 illustrating steps for operating the systems of FIG. 3 and 4 according to one embodiment. In step 502, a determination is made as to whether the air sensor is faulty. Faulty can mean that the sensor has failed or that its accuracy has dropped below a minimum threshold. If the air sensor is functioning properly, the air quality is sensed at step 200. Steps 200 to 208 are the same as in FIG. 2 and thus their description will not be repeated. However, if as determined in step 502 that the air sensor is faulty, a turn off signal is sent (step 204) and the appliance is turned off (step 208). Next, or simultaneously, an alarm is activated in step 504. Alarm activation may include a visual alarm, an audio alarm, a combination of the two, and/or a call sent to the user, such as via a cell phone or computer.
  • [0036]
    In step 506, the user determines whether the appliances are to remain operational. If not, appliances remain shut off until a functional sensor is in place. However, if the appliances are to remain operational, a bypass is activated to resume or maintain gas flow to the appliance in step 508. Step 510 determines whether the appliances have been operational more than a specified period of time after the bypass was activated. If so, the appliances are turned off at step 208. However, if the specified period of time has not passed, the user may activate the bypass again in step 508 to continue operation of the appliances. Once the air sensor has been repaired or replaced, normal operation resumes at step 200 with air quality sensing or detection.
  • [0037]
    So, the above enables the air sensor to be continually monitored for proper operation and for the appliances to be turned off in the event of air sensor failure. However, the appliances can remain operational by a user bypass, although the bypass is only for a specified period of time, which can be continually reset by the user for uninterrupted operation.
  • [0038]
    In step 512, after unsafe air is detected, an exhaust system is activated, which can be in response to the turn-off signal in step 204, to a separate signal from sensor 108, or to the appliance being turned off. The exhaust system is deactivated when the air quality is detected to be safe or when the user deactivates the system. Note that step 512 can be performed in parallel with or before step 208 and does not need to sequentially follow step 208. The exhaust system may remain activated until safe air is detected or when the user manually turns off the exhaust system.
  • [0039]
    The above features provide a system that is safer than conventional systems, while still allowing the user the flexibility to maintain operation of the appliances if desired.
  • [0040]
    Having thus described embodiments of the present invention, persons skilled in the art will recognize that changes may be made in form and detail without departing from the scope of the invention.

Claims (21)

1. An air quality sensor and interrupting system, comprising:
an air quality sensor configured to measure the quality of air proximate to a gas appliance and generate a signal when unsafe air is detected;
a gas shut off device configured to turn off at least one portion of the gas appliance in response to the signal sent from the air quality sensor; and
an exhaust configured to remove the unsafe air when unsafe air is detected.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the exhaust is a vacuum device.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein the exhaust is a blowing device.
4. The system of claim 1, further comprising a bypass configured to allow a user to keep the gas appliance turned on if the air quality sensor fails.
5. The system of claim 4, wherein the bypass only allows the gas appliance to be turned on for a set period of time without additional user input.
6. The system of claim 1, further comprising an alarm to notify the user when the air quality sensor fails.
7. The system of claim 6, wherein the alarm is an audio alarm, a visual alarm, or an audio and visual alarm.
8. An air quality sensor and interrupting system, comprising:
an air quality sensor configured to measure the quality of air proximate to a gas appliance and generate a signal when unsafe air is detected;
a gas shut off device configured to turn off at least one portion of the gas appliance in response to the signal sent from the air quality sensor; and
an alarm coupled to the sensor, wherein the alarm notifies a user when the sensor fails.
9. The system of claim 8, further comprising a bypass configured to allow the user to keep the gas appliance turned on if the air quality sensor fails.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the bypass only allows the gas appliance to be turned on for a set period of time without additional user input.
11. An air quality sensor and interrupting system, comprising:
an air quality sensor configured to measure the quality of air proximate to a gas appliance and generate a signal when unsafe air is detected;
a gas shut off device configured to turn off at least one portion of the gas appliance in response to the signal sent from the air quality sensor; and
a bypass configured to allow a user to keep the gas appliance turned on if the air quality sensor fails.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein the bypass only allows the gas appliance to be turned on for a set period of time without additional user input.
13. A method for operating a gas appliance, comprising:
sensing an air quality of air proximate to the gas appliance;
determining whether the air quality is unsafe;
turning off at least a portion of the gas appliance if the air quality is unsafe; and
removing the unsafe air.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the removing comprises vacuuming.
15. The method of claim 13, wherein the removing comprises blowing.
16. The method of claim 13, further comprising notifying a user when the sensing fails.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein the notifying is with an audio alarm, a visual alarm, or an audio and visual alarm.
18. A method for operating a gas appliance, comprising:
sensing an air quality of air proximate to the gas appliance;
determining whether the air quality is unsafe;
turning off at least a portion of the gas appliance if the air quality is unsafe;
notifying a user if the sensing fails; and
turning off at least a portion of the gas appliance if the sensing fails.
19. The method of claim 18, further comprising allowing the user to bypass turning off the gas appliance when the sensing fails to keep the appliance turned on.
20. The method of claim 19, wherein the appliance is turned on only for a limited amount of time when the bypass is used.
21. The method of claim 18, further comprising removing unsafe air when the air quality is determined unsafe.
US12126215 2005-04-15 2008-05-23 Air quality sensor/interruptor Abandoned US20080220384A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US67195205 true 2005-04-15 2005-04-15
US11404313 US20060234175A1 (en) 2005-04-15 2006-04-14 Air quality sensor/interruptor
US12126215 US20080220384A1 (en) 2005-04-15 2008-05-23 Air quality sensor/interruptor

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12126215 US20080220384A1 (en) 2005-04-15 2008-05-23 Air quality sensor/interruptor
PCT/US2009/044124 WO2010002504A1 (en) 2008-05-23 2009-05-15 Air quality sensor/interruptor

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080220384A1 true true US20080220384A1 (en) 2008-09-11

Family

ID=41466272

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12126215 Abandoned US20080220384A1 (en) 2005-04-15 2008-05-23 Air quality sensor/interruptor

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20080220384A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2010002504A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110271914A1 (en) * 2009-01-24 2011-11-10 Callum Scott Stewart Richardson Flue-Gas Analysis Safety Apparatus
US20120118044A1 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-05-17 Scientec Lab Center Co., Ltd. Method and system for managing a pollution-prevention facility
US20140175184A1 (en) * 2009-08-20 2014-06-26 Enerco Group, Inc. Portable catalytic heater
CN105701985A (en) * 2016-01-18 2016-06-22 南阳师范学院 Combustion gas leakage alarm control system

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2916689B1 (en) * 2012-11-07 2016-07-20 Leonardo S.r.L. Perfected hanging bracket for the wall assembly of a wall-cupboard

Citations (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3909816A (en) * 1974-04-29 1975-09-30 Lloyd L Teeters Flame and carbon monoxide sensor and alarm circuit
US4139339A (en) * 1977-02-17 1979-02-13 Combustion Unlimited Incorporated Flare gas stack with purge control
US4171944A (en) * 1977-09-01 1979-10-23 Jack B. Hirschmann Combined smoke detection and furnace shut off device
US4202301A (en) * 1977-08-31 1980-05-13 Engelhard Minerals & Chemicals Corporation Oxygen sensor control system
US4204833A (en) * 1978-02-06 1980-05-27 Scotty Vent Dampers Safety control for furnace burner
US4213180A (en) * 1978-06-22 1980-07-15 The Bendix Corporation Closed loop sensor condition detector
US4267458A (en) * 1972-04-26 1981-05-12 Westinghouse Electric Corp. System and method for starting, synchronizing and operating a steam turbine with digital computer control
US4330261A (en) * 1979-09-17 1982-05-18 Atlantic Richfield Company Heater damper controller
USRE30936E (en) * 1978-02-06 1982-05-18 Scotty Vent Dampers, Inc. Safety control for furnace burner
US4340885A (en) * 1979-09-24 1982-07-20 Super Shops, Inc. Gas detector
US4381075A (en) * 1981-12-17 1983-04-26 Thermonic Corp. Microprocessor based controller for heating system
US4401425A (en) * 1980-11-18 1983-08-30 Carrier Corporation Safety switch for a combustion system
US4815014A (en) * 1987-02-27 1989-03-21 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Machine assisted execution of process operating procedures
US4893113A (en) * 1988-01-29 1990-01-09 Park Sea C Gas alarm and detoxification heating systems
US4930488A (en) * 1988-08-18 1990-06-05 Gas Research Institute Processor-controlled gas appliances and microprocessor-actuated valves for use therein
US4986468A (en) * 1989-08-29 1991-01-22 A.O. Smith Corporation Test circuit for system monitoring apparatus
US5039006A (en) * 1989-08-16 1991-08-13 Habegger Millard A Home heating system draft controller
US5069154A (en) * 1989-07-26 1991-12-03 Carter John A Marine safety system for positive-pressure engines
US5189392A (en) * 1991-06-24 1993-02-23 Kass Carl E Heating system shut-off system using detector and existing safety switch or fuel valve
US5239980A (en) * 1992-05-19 1993-08-31 Hilt Fay E J Forced air furnace control system and method of operation
US5276434A (en) * 1992-04-03 1994-01-04 Brooks Elgin C Carbon monoxide concentration indicator and alarm
US5333703A (en) * 1993-01-07 1994-08-02 The Thames Group Ltd. Carbon monoxide sensor and control for motor vehicles
US5384697A (en) * 1990-01-30 1995-01-24 Johnson Service Company Networked facilities management system with balanced differential analog control outputs
US5412297A (en) * 1994-06-27 1995-05-02 Stanley Home Automation Monitored radio frequency door edge sensor
US5419358A (en) * 1993-08-02 1995-05-30 Francis Myrtil Gas monitoring system for a boiler
US5477913A (en) * 1993-04-22 1995-12-26 Homer, Inc. System for controlling a heating/air conditioning unit
US5503550A (en) * 1993-07-30 1996-04-02 Depalma; Thomas M. Gas log fireplace system
US5576739A (en) * 1992-06-18 1996-11-19 Phy-Con. Inc. Carbon monoxide safety system
US5793296A (en) * 1996-04-30 1998-08-11 Lewkowicz; Mike Apparatus for carbon monoxide detection and automatic shutoff of a heating system
US5797358A (en) * 1996-07-08 1998-08-25 Aos Holding Company Control system for a water heater
US5831851A (en) * 1995-03-21 1998-11-03 Seagate Technology, Inc. Apparatus and method for controlling high throughput sputtering
US5838243A (en) * 1997-04-10 1998-11-17 Gallo; Eugene Combination carbon monoxide sensor and combustion heating device shut-off system
US6130412A (en) * 1999-01-14 2000-10-10 Ssm Technologies Method and apparatus for remotely controlling devices in response to a detected environmental condition
US6145502A (en) * 1999-03-02 2000-11-14 Heat-N-Glo Fireplace Products, Inc. Dual mode of operation fireplaces for operation in vented or unvented mode
US6339379B1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2002-01-15 Michael A. Argus Carbon monoxide detector
US6503141B2 (en) * 1997-08-20 2003-01-07 Julio Shtanko Carbon monoxide venting system
US20040045543A1 (en) * 2001-05-16 2004-03-11 Charles. Perryman Safety module for fuel-burning appliance, and appliance using such a module
US6722876B2 (en) * 2000-04-11 2004-04-20 The Water Heater Industry Joint Research And Development Consortium Flammable vapor control system
US20040124989A1 (en) * 2002-03-20 2004-07-01 Bachinski Thomas J. Detection and air evacuation system
US6989757B2 (en) * 2001-06-29 2006-01-24 Electronic Control Systems, Llc Proactive carbon monoxide monitoring, alarm and protection system
US7033165B1 (en) * 2002-02-21 2006-04-25 Brown Delton R Gas furnace controller
US7176805B2 (en) * 2004-01-08 2007-02-13 Maple Chase Company System for controlling ignition sources when flammable gas is sensed
US7327246B2 (en) * 2005-01-24 2008-02-05 Wolfgang Schoor Safety shut-off system
US7579956B2 (en) * 2004-01-08 2009-08-25 Robertshaw Controls Company System and method for controlling ignition sources and ventilating systems during high carbon monoxide conditions
US7581946B2 (en) * 2005-11-02 2009-09-01 Emerson Electric Co. Ignition control with integral carbon monoxide sensor
US7806682B2 (en) * 2006-02-20 2010-10-05 Honeywell International Inc. Low contamination rate flame detection arrangement

Patent Citations (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4267458A (en) * 1972-04-26 1981-05-12 Westinghouse Electric Corp. System and method for starting, synchronizing and operating a steam turbine with digital computer control
US3909816A (en) * 1974-04-29 1975-09-30 Lloyd L Teeters Flame and carbon monoxide sensor and alarm circuit
US4139339A (en) * 1977-02-17 1979-02-13 Combustion Unlimited Incorporated Flare gas stack with purge control
US4202301A (en) * 1977-08-31 1980-05-13 Engelhard Minerals & Chemicals Corporation Oxygen sensor control system
US4171944A (en) * 1977-09-01 1979-10-23 Jack B. Hirschmann Combined smoke detection and furnace shut off device
US4204833A (en) * 1978-02-06 1980-05-27 Scotty Vent Dampers Safety control for furnace burner
USRE30936E (en) * 1978-02-06 1982-05-18 Scotty Vent Dampers, Inc. Safety control for furnace burner
US4213180A (en) * 1978-06-22 1980-07-15 The Bendix Corporation Closed loop sensor condition detector
US4330261A (en) * 1979-09-17 1982-05-18 Atlantic Richfield Company Heater damper controller
US4340885A (en) * 1979-09-24 1982-07-20 Super Shops, Inc. Gas detector
US4401425A (en) * 1980-11-18 1983-08-30 Carrier Corporation Safety switch for a combustion system
US4381075A (en) * 1981-12-17 1983-04-26 Thermonic Corp. Microprocessor based controller for heating system
US4815014A (en) * 1987-02-27 1989-03-21 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Machine assisted execution of process operating procedures
US4893113A (en) * 1988-01-29 1990-01-09 Park Sea C Gas alarm and detoxification heating systems
US4930488A (en) * 1988-08-18 1990-06-05 Gas Research Institute Processor-controlled gas appliances and microprocessor-actuated valves for use therein
US5069154A (en) * 1989-07-26 1991-12-03 Carter John A Marine safety system for positive-pressure engines
US5039006A (en) * 1989-08-16 1991-08-13 Habegger Millard A Home heating system draft controller
US4986468A (en) * 1989-08-29 1991-01-22 A.O. Smith Corporation Test circuit for system monitoring apparatus
US5444851A (en) * 1990-01-30 1995-08-22 Johnson Service Company Method of accessing configured nodes in a facilities management system with a non-configured device
US5384697A (en) * 1990-01-30 1995-01-24 Johnson Service Company Networked facilities management system with balanced differential analog control outputs
US5189392A (en) * 1991-06-24 1993-02-23 Kass Carl E Heating system shut-off system using detector and existing safety switch or fuel valve
US5276434A (en) * 1992-04-03 1994-01-04 Brooks Elgin C Carbon monoxide concentration indicator and alarm
US5239980A (en) * 1992-05-19 1993-08-31 Hilt Fay E J Forced air furnace control system and method of operation
US5576739A (en) * 1992-06-18 1996-11-19 Phy-Con. Inc. Carbon monoxide safety system
US5333703A (en) * 1993-01-07 1994-08-02 The Thames Group Ltd. Carbon monoxide sensor and control for motor vehicles
US5477913A (en) * 1993-04-22 1995-12-26 Homer, Inc. System for controlling a heating/air conditioning unit
US5540273A (en) * 1993-04-22 1996-07-30 Homer, Inc. Method for controlling a heating unit
US5575274A (en) * 1993-07-30 1996-11-19 Depalma; Thomas M. Gas log fireplace system
US5503550A (en) * 1993-07-30 1996-04-02 Depalma; Thomas M. Gas log fireplace system
US5419358A (en) * 1993-08-02 1995-05-30 Francis Myrtil Gas monitoring system for a boiler
US5412297A (en) * 1994-06-27 1995-05-02 Stanley Home Automation Monitored radio frequency door edge sensor
US5831851A (en) * 1995-03-21 1998-11-03 Seagate Technology, Inc. Apparatus and method for controlling high throughput sputtering
US5793296A (en) * 1996-04-30 1998-08-11 Lewkowicz; Mike Apparatus for carbon monoxide detection and automatic shutoff of a heating system
US5797358A (en) * 1996-07-08 1998-08-25 Aos Holding Company Control system for a water heater
US5838243A (en) * 1997-04-10 1998-11-17 Gallo; Eugene Combination carbon monoxide sensor and combustion heating device shut-off system
US6743091B2 (en) * 1997-08-20 2004-06-01 William J. Meneely, Jr. Carbon monoxide venting system
US6503141B2 (en) * 1997-08-20 2003-01-07 Julio Shtanko Carbon monoxide venting system
US6130412A (en) * 1999-01-14 2000-10-10 Ssm Technologies Method and apparatus for remotely controlling devices in response to a detected environmental condition
US6145502A (en) * 1999-03-02 2000-11-14 Heat-N-Glo Fireplace Products, Inc. Dual mode of operation fireplaces for operation in vented or unvented mode
US6722876B2 (en) * 2000-04-11 2004-04-20 The Water Heater Industry Joint Research And Development Consortium Flammable vapor control system
US6339379B1 (en) * 2000-06-02 2002-01-15 Michael A. Argus Carbon monoxide detector
US20040045543A1 (en) * 2001-05-16 2004-03-11 Charles. Perryman Safety module for fuel-burning appliance, and appliance using such a module
US7021925B2 (en) * 2001-05-16 2006-04-04 Invensys Controls Limited Safety module for fuel-burning appliance, and appliance using such a module
US6989757B2 (en) * 2001-06-29 2006-01-24 Electronic Control Systems, Llc Proactive carbon monoxide monitoring, alarm and protection system
US7033165B1 (en) * 2002-02-21 2006-04-25 Brown Delton R Gas furnace controller
US20040124989A1 (en) * 2002-03-20 2004-07-01 Bachinski Thomas J. Detection and air evacuation system
US7176805B2 (en) * 2004-01-08 2007-02-13 Maple Chase Company System for controlling ignition sources when flammable gas is sensed
US7579956B2 (en) * 2004-01-08 2009-08-25 Robertshaw Controls Company System and method for controlling ignition sources and ventilating systems during high carbon monoxide conditions
US7327246B2 (en) * 2005-01-24 2008-02-05 Wolfgang Schoor Safety shut-off system
US7581946B2 (en) * 2005-11-02 2009-09-01 Emerson Electric Co. Ignition control with integral carbon monoxide sensor
US7806682B2 (en) * 2006-02-20 2010-10-05 Honeywell International Inc. Low contamination rate flame detection arrangement

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110271914A1 (en) * 2009-01-24 2011-11-10 Callum Scott Stewart Richardson Flue-Gas Analysis Safety Apparatus
US20120118044A1 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-05-17 Scientec Lab Center Co., Ltd. Method and system for managing a pollution-prevention facility
US20140175184A1 (en) * 2009-08-20 2014-06-26 Enerco Group, Inc. Portable catalytic heater
US9222682B2 (en) * 2009-08-20 2015-12-29 Enerco Group, Inc. Portable catalytic heater
CN105701985A (en) * 2016-01-18 2016-06-22 南阳师范学院 Combustion gas leakage alarm control system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2010002504A1 (en) 2010-01-07 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6155160A (en) Propane detector system
US5941699A (en) Shutoff system for gas fired appliances
US6102793A (en) Ventilation system
US6130412A (en) Method and apparatus for remotely controlling devices in response to a detected environmental condition
US6225907B1 (en) Environmental control system incipient failure indicator apparatus
US6164958A (en) Safety system for gas range
US6353395B1 (en) Interconnectable detector with local alarm indicator
US5165883A (en) Apparatus and method for safe operation of kerosene heaters
US6989757B2 (en) Proactive carbon monoxide monitoring, alarm and protection system
US5531214A (en) Gas vent and burner monitoring system
US4088986A (en) Smoke, fire and gas alarm with remote sensing, back-up emergency power, and system self monitoring
US6552647B1 (en) Building environment monitor and control system
US20170092115A1 (en) Smart-home multi-functional device with guided installation
US20100315224A1 (en) Self-testing notification appliance
US6392536B1 (en) Multi-sensor detector
US8016205B2 (en) Thermostat with replaceable carbon monoxide sensor module
US7528711B2 (en) Portable monitoring unit
US7642924B2 (en) Alarm with CO and smoke sensors
US7336168B2 (en) System and method for variable threshold sensor
US5239980A (en) Forced air furnace control system and method of operation
US5419358A (en) Gas monitoring system for a boiler
US5793296A (en) Apparatus for carbon monoxide detection and automatic shutoff of a heating system
US7623028B2 (en) System and method for high-sensitivity sensor
US6484951B1 (en) Thermostat with carbon monoxide warning feature
US20090273470A1 (en) Environmental monitoring and control system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RH PETERSON COMPANY, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BRIDGWATER, JON;YAN, MARTIN;REEL/FRAME:020991/0882

Effective date: 20080522