US20080169373A1 - Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing - Google Patents

Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080169373A1
US20080169373A1 US12008327 US832708A US2008169373A1 US 20080169373 A1 US20080169373 A1 US 20080169373A1 US 12008327 US12008327 US 12008327 US 832708 A US832708 A US 832708A US 2008169373 A1 US2008169373 A1 US 2008169373A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
supply roll
primary supply
roll
indicator material
splice
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12008327
Inventor
Robert E. Andrews
Alan Rabe
Jeff W. Fritz
Brian R. Krueger
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Joa Curt G Inc
Original Assignee
Joa Curt G Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H23/00Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs
    • B65H23/04Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally
    • B65H23/06Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally by retarding devices, e.g. acting on web-roll spindle
    • B65H23/063Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally by retarding devices, e.g. acting on web-roll spindle and controlling web tension
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H19/00Changing the web roll
    • B65H19/10Changing the web roll in unwinding mechanisms or in connection with unwinding operations
    • B65H19/18Attaching, e.g. pasting, the replacement web to the expiring web
    • B65H19/1805Flying splicing, i.e. the expiring web moving during splicing contact
    • B65H19/1826Flying splicing, i.e. the expiring web moving during splicing contact taking place at a distance from the replacement roll
    • B65H19/1836Flying splicing, i.e. the expiring web moving during splicing contact taking place at a distance from the replacement roll the replacement web being accelerated or running prior to splicing contact
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H23/00Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs
    • B65H23/04Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally
    • B65H23/18Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally by controlling or regulating the web-advancing mechanism, e.g. mechanism acting on the running web
    • B65H23/188Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally by controlling or regulating the web-advancing mechanism, e.g. mechanism acting on the running web in connection with running-web
    • B65H23/1882Registering, tensioning, smoothing or guiding webs longitudinally by controlling or regulating the web-advancing mechanism, e.g. mechanism acting on the running web in connection with running-web and controlling longitudinal register of web
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2301/00Handling processes for sheets or webs
    • B65H2301/40Type of handling process
    • B65H2301/41Winding, unwinding
    • B65H2301/415Unwinding
    • B65H2301/4152Finishing unwinding process
    • B65H2301/41522Detecting residual amount of web
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2801/00Application field
    • B65H2801/03Image reproduction devices
    • B65H2801/21Industrial-size printers, e.g. rotary printing press
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2801/00Application field
    • B65H2801/57Diaper manufacture

Abstract

An apparatus and methods are disclosed to reliably utilize material as close as possible to the end of the primary supply wheel so to minimize the roll waste. An indicator material, such as tape, is positioned on the primary and standby supply wheels at a distance from the end of the roll so that a reader, such as a machine vision system, can detect the presence or absence of the indicator material on the rolls. If the indicator material is present, the machine vision system will initiate a minimal waste splice logic. If the indicator material is absent, the machine vision system will initiate a standard splice logic.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/880,143 filed 12 Jan. 2007.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention disclosed herein relates to an apparatus and method for decreasing the amount of roll waste present in many web based operations, such as diaper manufacturing or printing.
  • Roll waste occurs when the material on an expiring roll, such as a paper roll, is not completely unwound prior to splicing a standby material roll into the system, leaving raw material remaining on the core of the expiring roll. In present methods using standard web splicing techniques, material in a radius of as much as ¼″ to ½″ of raw material remains on the core of the expiring roll, and this material is generally wasted. During the course of time, the roll waste can become quite considerable in terms of both cost and waste of natural resources.
  • During web processing operations, a web is fed from a primary supply wheel (the expiring roll) into the manufacturing process. As the material from the expiring roll is paid out, it is necessary to splice the leading edge of a web from a standby roll to the trailing edge of the material on the expiring roll in a manner that will not cause interruption of the web supply to a web consuming or utilizing device.
  • In modern splicing systems, a web accumulation dancer system may be employed, in which an accumulator accumulates a substantial length of a running web. By using an accumulator, the material being fed into the process can continue, yet the trailing end of the material can be stopped or slowed for a short interval so that it can be spliced to leading edge of the new supply roll. The leading portion of the expiring roll remains being paid out continuously to the web-utilizing device. The accumulator continues to feed the web utilization process while the expiring roll is stopped so the new material roll can be spliced to the end of the expiring roll.
  • In this manner, the device has a constant web supply being paid out from the accumulator, while the stopped web material in the accumulator can be spliced to the standby roll. Examples of web accumulators include that disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/110,616, which is commonly owned by the assignee of the present application, and incorporated herein by reference.
  • A zero speed splice unit is an air-operated clamping and cutting mechanism. The purpose of the splice unit is first to join an expiring material roll with the leading edge of a standby roll, then to cut the expiring roll from the process. The splice unit uses two clamp bars, one on each side. The clamp bar nearest to the expiring web advances to make the splice. A knife located in the center of the unit captures the expiring web on the drive side and cuts the web as it advances to the operator side. The clamp releases, and the knife returns.
  • An electrical sensor monitors the RPM of the active web spindle. A diameter is calculated for the expiring roll using the machine web speed and the RPM of the spindle. When the expiring roll diameter reaches a preset size, the machine control system initiates an automatic splice. The spindle motor stops the expiring roll and the accumulation is paid but.
  • The splice unit joins the expiring web with the standby web while the two webs are at rest. The machine continues to run during the splice because of web material stored in the accumulator. The splice knife then cuts the expiring material web before accelerating new material from the standby roll. The spindle motor accelerates the new material roll to the proper speed before the web is used up in the accumulator.
  • Machine vision systems typically requires digital input/output devices and computer networks to control other manufacturing equipment, in this case the splicing unit.
  • A typical machine vision system will consist of several among the following components:
      • One or more digital or analog camera (black-and-white or colour) with suitable optics for acquiring images
      • Lighting
      • Camera interface for digitizing images (widely known as a “frame grabber”)
      • A processor (often a PC or embedded processor, such as a DSP)
      • Computer software to process images and detect relevant features.
      • A synchronizing sensor for part detection (often an optical or magnetic sensor) to trigger image acquisition and processing.
      • Input/Output hardware (e.g. digital I/O) or communication links (e.g. network connection or RS-232) to report results
      • Some form of actuators used to sort or reject defective parts.
  • The sync sensor determines when a part (often moving on a conveyor) is in position to be inspected. The sensor triggers the camera to take a picture of the part as it passes by the camera and often synchronizes a lighting pulse. The lighting used to illuminate the part is designed to highlight features of interest and obscure or minimize the appearance of features that are not of interest (such as shadows or reflections).
  • The camera's image can be captured by the framegrabber. A framegrabber is a digitizing device (within a smart camera or as a separate computer card) that converts the output of the camera to digital format (typically a two dimensional array of numbers, corresponding to the luminous intensity level of the corresponding point in the field of view, called pixel) and places the image in computer memory so that it may be processed by the machine vision software.
  • The software will typically take several steps to process an image. In this case, the image processing will result in either detection of the indicator material, or non-detection of the indicator material.
  • Commercial and open source machine vision software packages typically include a number of different image processing techniques such as the following:
      • Pixel counting: counts the number of light or dark pixels
      • Thresholding: converts an image with gray tones to simply black and white
      • Segmentation: used to locate and/or count parts
      • Blob discovery & manipulation: inspecting an image for discrete blobs of connected pixels (e.g. a black hole in a grey object) as image landmarks. These blobs frequently represent optical targets for machining, robotic capture, or manufacturing failure.
      • Recognition-by-components: extracting geons from visual input
      • Robust pattern recognition: location of an object that may be rotated, partially hidden by another object, or varying in size
      • Barcode reading: decoding of 1D and 2D codes designed to be read or scanned by machines
      • Optical character recognition: automated reading of text such as serial numbers
      • Gauging: measurement of object dimensions in inches or millimeters
      • Edge detection: finding object edges
      • Template matching: finding, matching, and/or counting specific patterns.
        In most cases, a machine vision system will use a sequential combination of these processing techniques to perform a complete inspection. A system that reads a barcode may also check a surface for scratches or tampering and measure the length and width of a machined component.
    SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • An apparatus and methods are disclosed to reliably utilize material as close as possible to the end of the primary supply wheel so to minimize the roll waste.
  • An indicator material, such as tape, is positioned on the primary and standby supply wheels at a distance from the end of the roll so that a reader, such as a machine vision system, can detect the presence or absence of the indicator material on the rolls. If the indicator material is present, the machine vision system will initiate a minimal waste splice logic. If the indicator material is absent, the machine vision system will initiate a standard splice logic.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective and schematic view of an apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll;
  • FIG. 2 is a logic flowchart for an apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll;
  • FIG. 3 is a side view of apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll including a splicer.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • Although the disclosure hereof is detailed and exact to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, the physical embodiments herein disclosed merely exemplify the invention which may be embodied in other specific structures. While the preferred embodiment has been described, the details may be changed without departing from the invention, which is defined by the claims.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1 is a perspective and schematic view of an apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll is disclosed. In this system, vision system 12 is supplied to detect the presence or absence of indicator material 16. As shown, it is preferred that indicator material 16 be positioned extending externally of the material roll 14, which is rotatably held in the system by spindle 18. The web 20 is paid out to a splicer as shown. In an alternate embodiment, the indicator material need not extend externally of the material roll 14, but instead could be either applied to the side or interior of the roll 14, either radially or longitudinally. The positioning of the indicator material 16, although preferred to extend externally from the roll 14, is based on preference of the material supplier of the roll 14, and detection of the indicator material 16 is adjusted by adjusting the field of vision of the vision system 12.
  • One preferred indicator material 16 is simply tape that extends out from the roll 14. However, any identifiable feature that either the material supplier or the user adds at a predetermined distance from the end of the roll suffices.
  • In an alternate embodiment, the indicator material 16 could be coded with information to tell the vision system 12 the exact distance to the end of the roll, if the indicator material 16 is not set at a predetermined distance.
  • The vision system 12 is coupled to a programmable logic controller, which controls the splicer through the logic provided in FIG. 2; either standard or minimal waste splice logic.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a logic flowchart for an apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll is shown. In this logic, if the vision system 12 detects the indicator material 16, minimal waste splice logic is employed. If the vision system 12 does not detect the indicator material 16, standard splice logic is employed.
  • In the standard splice logic, a user measures the diameter of the new supply roll and enters the diameter into the splice controller. An electrical sensor monitors the RPM of the web spindle carrying the new supply roll as the roll is paid out. A diameter is calculated for the expiring material roll using the machine web speed and the RPM of the spindle. When the roll diameter reaches a preset size, the machine control system initiates an automatic splice. The spindle motor stops the active roll. The splice unit joins the expiring web with the new web while the two webs are at rest. The machine continues to run during the splice because of web material stored in the accumulator. The splice knife then cuts the old material web before accelerating new material. The spindle motor accelerates the new material roll to the proper speed before the web is used up in the accumulator.
  • In the minimal waste splice logic, it is preferred that the indicator material 16 is set at a predetermined distance from the end of the roll, for instance 3 to 6 feet of material remaining. In this manner, early detection of the presence of the indicator material 16 will trigger the splice based on the known distance to the end of the roll. Then, by computing the time until the end of the roll is reached by using the RPM of the spindle, the machine control system can initiate the automatic splice routine based on time, and the time to initiate the splice can be calculated and activated to take place just prior to reaching the end of the roll.
  • One purpose of the indicator material is to allow the vision system 16 to recognize ahead of time what type of roll is in the expiring position, and also to calculate how much material remains on the roll 14, in order to calculate the time/distance left relationship, and to trigger the splice routine at just the right time to eliminate the possibility that the roll 14 will expire without being spliced to the new roll, which can lead to machine down time. In this manner, the splice triggered by the machine PLC will initiate at a time when the roll is almost, but not yet fully, expired. For instance, if the vision system recognizes that the roll contains indicator material 16, and the machine PLC is informed that the roll 14 will have exactly 3 feet left, and further is informed at what rate the material is being paid out, the machine PLC would then calculate the amount of time remaining until initiating a splice with nearly zero material remaining on the roll.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, a side view of apparatus for detecting an indicator material present on a supply roll including a splicer is shown.
  • As can be seen, two vision systems 12 may be employed such that each system is directed at an indicator material 16 on both the expiring roll 14 a and the new supply roll 14 b. It is noted that only one of the two visions systems 12 would be reading the expiring roll (14 a as shown in FIG. 3), and thus communicating with the machine PLC and splicer, at any given time. The other vision system 12 would not activate until the new supply roll (14 b as shown in the sequence in FIG. 3) became the expiring roll (14 b as shown in the sequence in FIG. 3). Only the vision system 12 watching the expiring roll need be involved in the splice logic selection process described with reference to FIG. 2.
  • Both the expiring roll 14 a and the new supply roll 14 b feed webs 20 into the splicer for splicing, which is controlled by the machine PLC coupled to the vision systems 12. The web 20 is paid out into the accumulator 22, which can be of any type used to facilitate constant supply of the web 20 to the process, while allowing zero speed splicing at the splicer unit.
  • It is only necessary for the indicator material 16 to be present on the expiring material roll 14 a in order to select the minimal waste splice logic, because the splice logic is initiated based on the marker-tape on the expiring roll. If the new roll that is spliced into the process is a standard roll, lacking indicator material 16, then the subsequent splice would be a standard splice based on the splice logic.
  • The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Furthermore, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described. While the preferred embodiment has been described, the details may be changed without departing from the invention, which is defined by the claims.

Claims (6)

  1. 1. A method for minimizing waste during web splicing, the method comprising:
    providing an indicator material on a primary supply roll, said indicator material placed at a distance from the end of said primary supply roll;
    providing a standby supply roll;
    providing an indicator material reader;
    detecting the presence or absence of the indicator material on said primary supply roll;
    initiating a minimal waste splice logic in the presence of said indicator material on said primary supply roll, said minimal waste splice logic thereby employed to splice said primary and standby supply rolls;
    initiating a standard waste splice logic in the absence of said indicator material on said primary supply roll, said standard waste splice logic thereby employed to splice said primary and standby supply rolls.
  2. 2. The method according to claim 1, said minimal waste splice logic comprising:
    ascertaining a distance of said primary supply roll remaining between said indicator material and the end of said primary supply roll;
    measuring the revolution speed of a spindle carrying said primary supply roll as said primary roll is expiring;
    calculating time remaining until the expiration of said primary supply roll would be reached;
    initiating a splice sequence through a web accumulator at a time immediately prior to said calculated time remaining until the expiration of said primary supply roll would be reached, thereby joining said expiring primary supply roll and said standby supply roll.
  3. 3. The method according to claim 1, said standard waste splice logic comprising:
    measuring an initial diameter of said primary supply roll;
    communicating said diameter to a splice controller;
    measuring the revolution speed of a spindle carrying said primary supply roll as it expires;
    calculating a remaining diameter on said expiring primary supply roll using a predetermined machine web speed and the measured revolution speed of a spindle;
    initiating a splice sequence through a web accumulator when said expiring primary supply roll remaining diameter reaches a preset point, thereby joining said expiring primary supply roll and said standby supply roll.
  4. 4. The method according to claim 1, said standby roll carrying an indicator material.
  5. 5. The method according to claim 1, wherein the indicator material is placed at a known distance from the end of said primary supply roll.
  6. 6. A method for minimizing waste during web splicing, the method comprising:
    providing an indicator material on a primary supply roll, said indicator material placed at a distance from the end of said primary supply roll;
    providing a standby supply roll;
    providing an indicator material reader;
    detecting the presence or absence of the indicator material on said primary supply roll;
    initiating a minimal waste splice logic in the presence of said indicator material on said primary supply roll, said minimal waste splice logic comprising:
    ascertaining a distance of said primary supply roll remaining between said indicator material and the end of said primary supply roll;
    measuring the revolution speed of a spindle carrying said primary supply roll as said primary roll is expiring;
    calculating time remaining until the expiration of said primary supply roll would be reached;
    initiating a splice sequence through a web accumulator at a time immediately prior to said calculated time remaining until the expiration of said primary supply roll would be reached, thereby joining said expiring primary supply roll and said standby supply roll;
    initiating a standard waste splice logic in the absence of said indicator material on said primary supply roll, said standard waste splice logic comprising:
    measuring an initial diameter of said primary supply roll;
    communicating said diameter to a splice controller;
    measuring the revolution speed of a spindle carrying said primary supply roll as it expires;
    calculating a remaining diameter on said expiring primary supply roll using a predetermined machine web speed and the measured revolution speed of a spindle;
    initiating a splice sequence through a web accumulator when said expiring primary supply roll remaining diameter reaches a preset point, thereby joining said expiring primary supply roll and said standby supply roll.
US12008327 2007-01-12 2008-01-10 Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing Abandoned US20080169373A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US88014307 true 2007-01-12 2007-01-12
US12008327 US20080169373A1 (en) 2007-01-12 2008-01-10 Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12008327 US20080169373A1 (en) 2007-01-12 2008-01-10 Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080169373A1 true true US20080169373A1 (en) 2008-07-17

Family

ID=39356658

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12008327 Abandoned US20080169373A1 (en) 2007-01-12 2008-01-10 Apparatus and methods for minimizing waste during web splicing

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20080169373A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1944258A3 (en)
CA (1) CA2617875A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110240789A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Winder registration and inspection system

Citations (98)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US135145A (en) * 1873-01-21 Improvement in paper-bag machines
US293353A (en) * 1884-02-12 puryis
US312257A (en) * 1885-02-17 hewes
US643821A (en) * 1898-03-29 1900-02-20 Union Paper Bag Machine Co Machine for folding sides of satchel-bottomed bags.
US2345937A (en) * 1940-08-01 1944-04-04 Joa Curt G Inc Feed for woodworking machines
US2466240A (en) * 1949-04-05
US2540844A (en) * 1947-11-28 1951-02-06 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Web folding machine
US2591359A (en) * 1950-06-14 1952-04-01 Curt G Joa Cellulose pad machine
US2702406A (en) * 1950-12-13 1955-02-22 Energized Materials Corp Apparatus for stretching sheet material
US2730144A (en) * 1953-11-04 1956-01-10 Curt G Joa Automatic hopper feed for a wood working machine
US2780253A (en) * 1950-06-02 1957-02-05 Curt G Joa Self-centering feed rolls for a dowel machine or the like
US2785609A (en) * 1953-07-03 1957-03-19 Milprint Inc Art of producing lip-type bags
US2875724A (en) * 1955-10-07 1959-03-03 Curt G Joa Apparatus for selective pattern impregnation or coating
US3016207A (en) * 1958-12-15 1962-01-09 Potter Instrument Co Inc Vacuum loop tape handler
US3016582A (en) * 1957-02-14 1962-01-16 Falls Paper & Power Company Batt or mat forming apparatus
US3017795A (en) * 1957-06-06 1962-01-23 Falls Paper & Power Company Method and apparatus for forming individual wrapped pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3020687A (en) * 1958-09-15 1962-02-13 Falls Paper & Power Company Method and apparatus for forming individual wrapped pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3021135A (en) * 1959-08-10 1962-02-13 Curt G Joa Method and apparatus for cutting and folding paper or cloth webs
US3024957A (en) * 1959-01-05 1962-03-13 Cons Electrodynamics Corp Tape apparatus
US3087689A (en) * 1959-06-10 1963-04-30 Heim Richard Thread tensioning means for textile machines
US3122293A (en) * 1961-01-03 1964-02-25 Curt G Joa Apparatus for forming individual pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3230955A (en) * 1963-03-28 1966-01-25 Joa Curt G Inc Sanitary napkin
US3301114A (en) * 1964-11-25 1967-01-31 Curt G Joa Mat cutting machine with reciprocating belt feeder
US3363847A (en) * 1964-11-12 1968-01-16 Curt G. Joa Waste disposer
US3502322A (en) * 1966-08-17 1970-03-24 Broadbent & Sons Ltd Thomas Folding of sheet material
US3575170A (en) * 1969-02-14 1971-04-20 Plastronics Inc Breather assembly for a sealed container
US3635462A (en) * 1970-08-21 1972-01-18 Curt G Joa Pad-folding machine
US3656741A (en) * 1970-04-03 1972-04-18 Thomas F Macke Folding apparatus
US3728191A (en) * 1971-03-19 1973-04-17 Kimberly Clark Co Waistband tape application for disposable diapers
US3796360A (en) * 1972-09-27 1974-03-12 Alexeff Snyder Ets Combination storage festoon and compensator
US4003298A (en) * 1975-02-10 1977-01-18 Gloucester Engineering Co. Inc. Apparatus for driving moving webs in bag making machines
US4009814A (en) * 1975-09-08 1977-03-01 Scott Paper Company Web accumulator
US4009815A (en) * 1976-04-02 1977-03-01 Gte Sylvania Incorporated Apparatus for maintaining vertically moving strip at established tension
US4081301A (en) * 1975-10-30 1978-03-28 The Procter & Gamble Company Method and apparatus for continuously attaching discrete, stretched elastic strands to predetermined isolated portions of disposable abosrbent products
US4141509A (en) * 1978-01-06 1979-02-27 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Bale loader for fluff generator
US4141193A (en) * 1977-07-12 1979-02-27 Joa Curt G Horizontal diaper grouper
US4142626A (en) * 1977-06-08 1979-03-06 Paper Converting Machine Company Accumulator for wound paper logs
US4316756A (en) * 1980-08-15 1982-02-23 Gff, Inc. Method for bonding a pocket blank to a garment portion
US4374576A (en) * 1981-02-02 1983-02-22 Compensating Tension Controls, Inc. Semi-automatic roll winding machine
US4492608A (en) * 1983-01-06 1985-01-08 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Elastic band applicator and sheet folder
US4501098A (en) * 1982-07-19 1985-02-26 Heritage Homes, Inc. Hybrid home construction technique
US4508528A (en) * 1982-12-29 1985-04-02 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Pad-cross folder
US4634482A (en) * 1985-06-20 1987-01-06 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method for securing elastic strands to disposable absorbent articles
US4641381A (en) * 1985-01-10 1987-02-10 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable underpants, such as infant's training pants and the like
US4642150A (en) * 1984-12-05 1987-02-10 Winkler+Duennebier Maschinenfabrik+Eisengiesserei Gmbh & Co. Kg. Method and apparatus for securing elastic tapes to a material web
US4642839A (en) * 1984-06-09 1987-02-17 Eduard Kusters Device for the reciprocating linear drive of a part
US4650530A (en) * 1986-03-10 1987-03-17 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Apparatus and method for folding, bonding and severing a web
US4726874A (en) * 1987-03-31 1988-02-23 Weyerhaeuser Company Waist elastic applicator for diaper or similar article
US4726876A (en) * 1985-10-18 1988-02-23 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Apparatus for repositioning discrete articles
US4795510A (en) * 1987-09-11 1989-01-03 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Process for applying reinforcing material to a diaper cover material
US4801345A (en) * 1980-09-15 1989-01-31 Boussac Saint Freres B.S.F. Process for manufacturing disposable diapers and diaper briefs, and disposable diapers and diaper briefs obtained by application of this process
US4802570A (en) * 1987-09-14 1989-02-07 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Stacker with a yoke-type stripping device
US4892536A (en) * 1988-09-02 1990-01-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article having elastic strands
US4904440A (en) * 1986-05-28 1990-02-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus for and methods of airlaying fibrous webs having discrete particles therein
US4908175A (en) * 1986-05-28 1990-03-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus for and methods of forming airlaid fibrous webs having a multiplicity of components
US4987940A (en) * 1988-08-19 1991-01-29 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Cross web layer application device
US4994010A (en) * 1988-09-03 1991-02-19 Winkler & Dunnebier Maschinenfabrik Und Eisengiesserei Kg Method and apparatus for the attachment of clasps to letter envelopes
US5000806A (en) * 1988-04-19 1991-03-19 Paper Converting Machine Company Method and apparatus for applying an elastic strand to a disposable diaper
US5080741A (en) * 1989-09-13 1992-01-14 Uni-Charm Corporation Method for manufacturing disposable garments
US5094658A (en) * 1991-03-05 1992-03-10 F.L. Smithe Machine Company, Inc. Vacuum side-folder section for envelope blank folding apparatus
US5096532A (en) * 1990-01-10 1992-03-17 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Ultrasonic rotary horn
US5108017A (en) * 1990-09-06 1992-04-28 Union Special Corporation Sleeve flip over device
US5176244A (en) * 1991-09-16 1993-01-05 Curt G. Joa, Inc. High speed variable count mechanical stacker
US5190234A (en) * 1988-12-06 1993-03-02 Butler Automatic, Inc. Web handling method and apparatus with pre-acceleration of web feed rolls
US5407513A (en) * 1993-10-14 1995-04-18 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus and process for cyclically accelerating and decelerating a strip of material
US5602747A (en) * 1995-01-31 1997-02-11 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Controlling web tension by actively controlling velocity of dancer roll
US5624428A (en) * 1995-11-29 1997-04-29 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Absorbent article having a pantlike pull down feature
US5624420A (en) * 1993-06-25 1997-04-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable training pants having a non-perforated tear line through elastic
US5707470A (en) * 1995-01-31 1998-01-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Rotary ultrasonic apparatus and methods
US5711832A (en) * 1995-05-31 1998-01-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process for making a training pant having a separate waist elastic system
US5725518A (en) * 1993-08-11 1998-03-10 Tailored Technologies, Inc. Reusable diaper having gusseted pad insert
US5858012A (en) * 1996-11-06 1999-01-12 Uni-Charm Corporation Pull-on disposable diaper
US5865393A (en) * 1995-07-14 1999-02-02 Mannesmann Aktiengesellschaft Vertical strip storage device
US5868727A (en) * 1995-06-15 1999-02-09 Johnson & Johnson Inc. Sanitary absorbent article with an adhesive positioning system covered by release strips linked to one another and method and apparatus for packaging the absorbent article
US5876027A (en) * 1995-06-15 1999-03-02 Canon Aptex Inc. Sheet bundle folding apparatus
US5879500A (en) * 1996-06-21 1999-03-09 Herrin; Robert M. Disposable undergarment forming apparatus and method of forming same
US6036805A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-03-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of making an asborbent article with prefastened side panels
US6050517A (en) * 1998-09-22 2000-04-18 Curt G. Joa Counterbalanced web accumulator
US6183576B1 (en) * 1999-05-27 2001-02-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Multiple path bonding
US6210386B1 (en) * 1997-04-30 2001-04-03 Uni-Charm Corporation Disposable pull-on undergarment with roll-up arrangement for its disposal
US6358350B1 (en) * 1995-05-31 2002-03-19 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process for making a training pant having a unitary waist elastic system
US6369291B1 (en) * 1998-05-29 2002-04-09 Toyo Eizai Kabushiki Kaisha Disposable underpants and method of continuously producing the same
US6375769B1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2002-04-23 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of applying curved leg elastics using pucks with curved surfaces
US20020046802A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2002-04-25 Ikuo Tachibana Method for manufacturing disposable worn article
US20030000620A1 (en) * 1989-11-28 2003-01-02 Herrin Robert M. Disposable garments, and method and apparatus for making
US6521320B2 (en) * 2000-03-29 2003-02-18 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Pants type diaper and method for producting same
US6523595B1 (en) * 1999-09-03 2003-02-25 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of and apparatus for separating discrete elements from pre-perforated web for placement on product web moving at different speed
US6524423B1 (en) * 2000-03-07 2003-02-25 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of transferring a discrete portion of a first web onto a second web
US20030052148A1 (en) * 1998-07-03 2003-03-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Controlling web tension, and accumulating lengths of web, using a festoon
US20030066585A1 (en) * 2001-10-10 2003-04-10 Mccabe John A. Web velocity modulator
US6547909B1 (en) * 1998-07-20 2003-04-15 C. G. Bretting Mfg. Co., Inc. Flying web splice apparatus and method
US6551228B1 (en) * 1997-10-23 2003-04-22 Heidelberger Druckmaschinen Ag High speed quarterfolder
US20040016500A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2004-01-29 Ikuo Tachibana Method for manufacturing disposable worn article
US6837840B2 (en) * 2001-01-30 2005-01-04 Nisca Corporation Sheet processing apparatus and image forming apparatus equipped with the same
US20050000628A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2005-01-06 Sca Hygiene Products Ab. Method for applying elastic members on a pant-shaped absorbent article
US6840616B2 (en) * 2001-03-29 2005-01-11 Scott Summers Air folder adjuster apparatus and method
US20050023881A1 (en) * 2003-07-29 2005-02-03 Frederick Larry D. Geosteering detectors for boring-type continuous miners
US7195684B2 (en) * 2002-11-01 2007-03-27 Zuiko Corporation Apparatus and method for producing article

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2939646A (en) * 1957-01-14 1960-06-07 Meredith Publishing Company Splicing control device
US3822838A (en) * 1972-03-20 1974-07-09 Butler Automatic Inc Web handling apparatus
GB2123801B (en) * 1982-07-17 1986-06-25 Hurley Moate Eng Improvments in or relating to splicing webs
WO2004022466A1 (en) * 2002-09-04 2004-03-18 Lowrey John D Jr Method and apparatus for reducing newsprint waste during printing process
US20050230449A1 (en) 2004-04-20 2005-10-20 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Apparatus and method of increasing web storage in a dancer

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US135145A (en) * 1873-01-21 Improvement in paper-bag machines
US293353A (en) * 1884-02-12 puryis
US312257A (en) * 1885-02-17 hewes
US2466240A (en) * 1949-04-05
US643821A (en) * 1898-03-29 1900-02-20 Union Paper Bag Machine Co Machine for folding sides of satchel-bottomed bags.
US2345937A (en) * 1940-08-01 1944-04-04 Joa Curt G Inc Feed for woodworking machines
US2540844A (en) * 1947-11-28 1951-02-06 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co Web folding machine
US2780253A (en) * 1950-06-02 1957-02-05 Curt G Joa Self-centering feed rolls for a dowel machine or the like
US2591359A (en) * 1950-06-14 1952-04-01 Curt G Joa Cellulose pad machine
US2702406A (en) * 1950-12-13 1955-02-22 Energized Materials Corp Apparatus for stretching sheet material
US2785609A (en) * 1953-07-03 1957-03-19 Milprint Inc Art of producing lip-type bags
US2730144A (en) * 1953-11-04 1956-01-10 Curt G Joa Automatic hopper feed for a wood working machine
US2875724A (en) * 1955-10-07 1959-03-03 Curt G Joa Apparatus for selective pattern impregnation or coating
US3086253A (en) * 1957-02-14 1963-04-23 Falls Paper & Power Company Method and apparatus for producing fibrous batts
US3016582A (en) * 1957-02-14 1962-01-16 Falls Paper & Power Company Batt or mat forming apparatus
US3017795A (en) * 1957-06-06 1962-01-23 Falls Paper & Power Company Method and apparatus for forming individual wrapped pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3020687A (en) * 1958-09-15 1962-02-13 Falls Paper & Power Company Method and apparatus for forming individual wrapped pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3016207A (en) * 1958-12-15 1962-01-09 Potter Instrument Co Inc Vacuum loop tape handler
US3024957A (en) * 1959-01-05 1962-03-13 Cons Electrodynamics Corp Tape apparatus
US3087689A (en) * 1959-06-10 1963-04-30 Heim Richard Thread tensioning means for textile machines
US3021135A (en) * 1959-08-10 1962-02-13 Curt G Joa Method and apparatus for cutting and folding paper or cloth webs
US3122293A (en) * 1961-01-03 1964-02-25 Curt G Joa Apparatus for forming individual pads from otherwise continuous batt strips
US3230955A (en) * 1963-03-28 1966-01-25 Joa Curt G Inc Sanitary napkin
US3363847A (en) * 1964-11-12 1968-01-16 Curt G. Joa Waste disposer
US3301114A (en) * 1964-11-25 1967-01-31 Curt G Joa Mat cutting machine with reciprocating belt feeder
US3502322A (en) * 1966-08-17 1970-03-24 Broadbent & Sons Ltd Thomas Folding of sheet material
US3575170A (en) * 1969-02-14 1971-04-20 Plastronics Inc Breather assembly for a sealed container
US3656741A (en) * 1970-04-03 1972-04-18 Thomas F Macke Folding apparatus
US3635462A (en) * 1970-08-21 1972-01-18 Curt G Joa Pad-folding machine
US3728191A (en) * 1971-03-19 1973-04-17 Kimberly Clark Co Waistband tape application for disposable diapers
US3796360A (en) * 1972-09-27 1974-03-12 Alexeff Snyder Ets Combination storage festoon and compensator
US4003298A (en) * 1975-02-10 1977-01-18 Gloucester Engineering Co. Inc. Apparatus for driving moving webs in bag making machines
US4009814A (en) * 1975-09-08 1977-03-01 Scott Paper Company Web accumulator
US4081301A (en) * 1975-10-30 1978-03-28 The Procter & Gamble Company Method and apparatus for continuously attaching discrete, stretched elastic strands to predetermined isolated portions of disposable abosrbent products
US4009815A (en) * 1976-04-02 1977-03-01 Gte Sylvania Incorporated Apparatus for maintaining vertically moving strip at established tension
US4142626A (en) * 1977-06-08 1979-03-06 Paper Converting Machine Company Accumulator for wound paper logs
US4141193A (en) * 1977-07-12 1979-02-27 Joa Curt G Horizontal diaper grouper
US4141509A (en) * 1978-01-06 1979-02-27 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Bale loader for fluff generator
US4316756A (en) * 1980-08-15 1982-02-23 Gff, Inc. Method for bonding a pocket blank to a garment portion
US4801345A (en) * 1980-09-15 1989-01-31 Boussac Saint Freres B.S.F. Process for manufacturing disposable diapers and diaper briefs, and disposable diapers and diaper briefs obtained by application of this process
US4374576A (en) * 1981-02-02 1983-02-22 Compensating Tension Controls, Inc. Semi-automatic roll winding machine
US4501098A (en) * 1982-07-19 1985-02-26 Heritage Homes, Inc. Hybrid home construction technique
US4508528A (en) * 1982-12-29 1985-04-02 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Pad-cross folder
US4492608A (en) * 1983-01-06 1985-01-08 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Elastic band applicator and sheet folder
US4642839A (en) * 1984-06-09 1987-02-17 Eduard Kusters Device for the reciprocating linear drive of a part
US4642150A (en) * 1984-12-05 1987-02-10 Winkler+Duennebier Maschinenfabrik+Eisengiesserei Gmbh & Co. Kg. Method and apparatus for securing elastic tapes to a material web
US4641381A (en) * 1985-01-10 1987-02-10 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable underpants, such as infant's training pants and the like
US4634482A (en) * 1985-06-20 1987-01-06 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Method for securing elastic strands to disposable absorbent articles
US4726876A (en) * 1985-10-18 1988-02-23 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Apparatus for repositioning discrete articles
US4650530A (en) * 1986-03-10 1987-03-17 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Apparatus and method for folding, bonding and severing a web
US4908175A (en) * 1986-05-28 1990-03-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus for and methods of forming airlaid fibrous webs having a multiplicity of components
US4904440A (en) * 1986-05-28 1990-02-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus for and methods of airlaying fibrous webs having discrete particles therein
US4726874A (en) * 1987-03-31 1988-02-23 Weyerhaeuser Company Waist elastic applicator for diaper or similar article
US4795510A (en) * 1987-09-11 1989-01-03 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Process for applying reinforcing material to a diaper cover material
US4802570A (en) * 1987-09-14 1989-02-07 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Stacker with a yoke-type stripping device
US5000806A (en) * 1988-04-19 1991-03-19 Paper Converting Machine Company Method and apparatus for applying an elastic strand to a disposable diaper
US4987940A (en) * 1988-08-19 1991-01-29 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Cross web layer application device
US4892536A (en) * 1988-09-02 1990-01-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article having elastic strands
US4994010A (en) * 1988-09-03 1991-02-19 Winkler & Dunnebier Maschinenfabrik Und Eisengiesserei Kg Method and apparatus for the attachment of clasps to letter envelopes
US5190234A (en) * 1988-12-06 1993-03-02 Butler Automatic, Inc. Web handling method and apparatus with pre-acceleration of web feed rolls
US5080741A (en) * 1989-09-13 1992-01-14 Uni-Charm Corporation Method for manufacturing disposable garments
US20030000620A1 (en) * 1989-11-28 2003-01-02 Herrin Robert M. Disposable garments, and method and apparatus for making
US5096532A (en) * 1990-01-10 1992-03-17 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Ultrasonic rotary horn
US5108017A (en) * 1990-09-06 1992-04-28 Union Special Corporation Sleeve flip over device
US5094658A (en) * 1991-03-05 1992-03-10 F.L. Smithe Machine Company, Inc. Vacuum side-folder section for envelope blank folding apparatus
US5176244A (en) * 1991-09-16 1993-01-05 Curt G. Joa, Inc. High speed variable count mechanical stacker
US5624420A (en) * 1993-06-25 1997-04-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable training pants having a non-perforated tear line through elastic
US5725518A (en) * 1993-08-11 1998-03-10 Tailored Technologies, Inc. Reusable diaper having gusseted pad insert
US5407513A (en) * 1993-10-14 1995-04-18 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus and process for cyclically accelerating and decelerating a strip of material
US5602747A (en) * 1995-01-31 1997-02-11 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Controlling web tension by actively controlling velocity of dancer roll
US5707470A (en) * 1995-01-31 1998-01-13 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Rotary ultrasonic apparatus and methods
US5711832A (en) * 1995-05-31 1998-01-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process for making a training pant having a separate waist elastic system
US6358350B1 (en) * 1995-05-31 2002-03-19 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process for making a training pant having a unitary waist elastic system
US5876027A (en) * 1995-06-15 1999-03-02 Canon Aptex Inc. Sheet bundle folding apparatus
US5868727A (en) * 1995-06-15 1999-02-09 Johnson & Johnson Inc. Sanitary absorbent article with an adhesive positioning system covered by release strips linked to one another and method and apparatus for packaging the absorbent article
US5865393A (en) * 1995-07-14 1999-02-02 Mannesmann Aktiengesellschaft Vertical strip storage device
US5624428A (en) * 1995-11-29 1997-04-29 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Absorbent article having a pantlike pull down feature
US5879500A (en) * 1996-06-21 1999-03-09 Herrin; Robert M. Disposable undergarment forming apparatus and method of forming same
US5858012A (en) * 1996-11-06 1999-01-12 Uni-Charm Corporation Pull-on disposable diaper
US6210386B1 (en) * 1997-04-30 2001-04-03 Uni-Charm Corporation Disposable pull-on undergarment with roll-up arrangement for its disposal
US6551228B1 (en) * 1997-10-23 2003-04-22 Heidelberger Druckmaschinen Ag High speed quarterfolder
US6369291B1 (en) * 1998-05-29 2002-04-09 Toyo Eizai Kabushiki Kaisha Disposable underpants and method of continuously producing the same
US6036805A (en) * 1998-06-19 2000-03-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of making an asborbent article with prefastened side panels
US20030052148A1 (en) * 1998-07-03 2003-03-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Controlling web tension, and accumulating lengths of web, using a festoon
US6547909B1 (en) * 1998-07-20 2003-04-15 C. G. Bretting Mfg. Co., Inc. Flying web splice apparatus and method
US6050517A (en) * 1998-09-22 2000-04-18 Curt G. Joa Counterbalanced web accumulator
US6183576B1 (en) * 1999-05-27 2001-02-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Multiple path bonding
US6523595B1 (en) * 1999-09-03 2003-02-25 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of and apparatus for separating discrete elements from pre-perforated web for placement on product web moving at different speed
US6524423B1 (en) * 2000-03-07 2003-02-25 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of transferring a discrete portion of a first web onto a second web
US6521320B2 (en) * 2000-03-29 2003-02-18 Curt G. Joa, Inc. Pants type diaper and method for producting same
US20040016500A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2004-01-29 Ikuo Tachibana Method for manufacturing disposable worn article
US20020046802A1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2002-04-25 Ikuo Tachibana Method for manufacturing disposable worn article
US6375769B1 (en) * 2000-08-15 2002-04-23 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of applying curved leg elastics using pucks with curved surfaces
US6837840B2 (en) * 2001-01-30 2005-01-04 Nisca Corporation Sheet processing apparatus and image forming apparatus equipped with the same
US6840616B2 (en) * 2001-03-29 2005-01-11 Scott Summers Air folder adjuster apparatus and method
US20030066585A1 (en) * 2001-10-10 2003-04-10 Mccabe John A. Web velocity modulator
US7195684B2 (en) * 2002-11-01 2007-03-27 Zuiko Corporation Apparatus and method for producing article
US20050000628A1 (en) * 2003-03-07 2005-01-06 Sca Hygiene Products Ab. Method for applying elastic members on a pant-shaped absorbent article
US20050023881A1 (en) * 2003-07-29 2005-02-03 Frederick Larry D. Geosteering detectors for boring-type continuous miners

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110240789A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2011-10-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Winder registration and inspection system
US8714472B2 (en) * 2010-03-30 2014-05-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Winder registration and inspection system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP1944258A3 (en) 2009-08-19 application
CA2617875A1 (en) 2008-07-12 application
EP1944258A2 (en) 2008-07-16 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5085510A (en) Pharmaceutical tablet vision inspection system
US7039485B2 (en) Systems and methods enabling automated return to and/or repair of defects with a material placement machine
US7193696B2 (en) Systems and methods for using light to indicate defect locations on a composite structure
US7889907B2 (en) Apparatus and methods for inspecting tape lamination
US20050232475A1 (en) Apparatus and method for the automated marking of defects on webs of material
JPH11138654A (en) Tire shape deciding apparatus and method for selecting tire
US4891530A (en) Testing or inspecting apparatus and method for detecting differently shaped surfaces of objects
US6580813B1 (en) Method and apparatus for detecting residual yarn on spinning cop tubes
CN101576508A (en) Device and method for automatically detecting chip appearance defects
CN102226739A (en) Apparatus and method for detecting tapered roller bearing rolling element upside-down mounting and missing mounting
CN2638920Y (en) Image detection device for processed article
US6144033A (en) Mark inspecting system
CN201434842Y (en) Automatic chip appearance defect detection system
JP2007155455A (en) Surface inspection device and surface inspection method
CN201421436Y (en) Surface spot and size detection device of product
JP2002331383A (en) Monitoring device for cutting
US4895029A (en) Method of and apparatus for detecting defects of elastic-member joint portion
CN1712888A (en) Reconstruction system and method for sheet three-dimensional surface of flexible body
CN101059451A (en) On-line flaw real-time detection system of printing machine based on machine vision
US20090088889A1 (en) Accurate Tracking Of Web Features Through Converting Processes
US4953710A (en) Automated apparatus for inspecting columnar bodies by eddy current method
JP2003262593A (en) Apparatus and method for detection of defect
JP2006292678A (en) Defect marking apparatus, sheet material, and manufacturing method thereof
JP2002148198A (en) Defect marking apparatus for sheet-like product
JP2003312895A (en) Double feed detector

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CURT G. JOA, INC., WISCONSIN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ANDREWS, ROBERT E.;RABE, ALAN;FRITZ, JEFF W.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020675/0288;SIGNING DATES FROM 20080226 TO 20080229