US20080140452A1 - Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products - Google Patents

Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080140452A1
US20080140452A1 US11876922 US87692207A US2008140452A1 US 20080140452 A1 US20080140452 A1 US 20080140452A1 US 11876922 US11876922 US 11876922 US 87692207 A US87692207 A US 87692207A US 2008140452 A1 US2008140452 A1 US 2008140452A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
donors
recipients
method
registry
genotyped
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11876922
Inventor
Michael Seul
Robert James Danehy
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BioArray Solutions LLC
Original Assignee
BCT HOLDINGS LLC
BioArray Solutions LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/10Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology
    • G06F19/18Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology for functional genomics or proteomics, e.g. genotype-phenotype associations, linkage disequilibrium, population genetics, binding site identification, mutagenesis, genotyping or genome annotation, protein-protein interactions or protein-nucleic acid interactions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/10Office automation, e.g. computer aided management of electronic mail or groupware; Time management, e.g. calendars, reminders, meetings or time accounting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/22Social work
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/22Social work
    • G06Q50/24Patient record management
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H10/00ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data
    • G16H10/60ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data for patient-specific data, e.g. for electronic patient records
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H40/00ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/20ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities, e.g. managing hospital staff or surgery rooms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/10Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology
    • G06F19/24Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology for machine learning, data mining or biostatistics, e.g. pattern finding, knowledge discovery, rule extraction, correlation, clustering or classification
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/10Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology
    • G06F19/28Bioinformatics, i.e. methods or systems for genetic or protein-related data processing in computational molecular biology for programming tools or database systems, e.g. ontologies, heterogeneous data integration, data warehousing or computing architectures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/30Medical informatics, i.e. computer-based analysis or dissemination of patient or disease data
    • G06F19/34Computer-assisted medical diagnosis or treatment, e.g. computerised prescription or delivery of medication or diets, computerised local control of medical devices, medical expert systems or telemedicine
    • G06F19/3481Computer-assisted prescription or delivery of treatment by physical action, e.g. surgery or physical exercise
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A90/00Technologies having an indirect contribution to adaptation to climate change
    • Y02A90/10Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change.
    • Y02A90/20Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change. specially adapted for the handling or processing of medical or healthcare data, relating to climate change
    • Y02A90/22Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change. specially adapted for the handling or processing of medical or healthcare data, relating to climate change for administrative, organizational or management aspects influenced by climate change adaptation
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A90/00Technologies having an indirect contribution to adaptation to climate change
    • Y02A90/10Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change.
    • Y02A90/20Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change. specially adapted for the handling or processing of medical or healthcare data, relating to climate change
    • Y02A90/26Information and communication technologies [ICT] supporting adaptation to climate change. specially adapted for the handling or processing of medical or healthcare data, relating to climate change for diagnosis or treatment, for medical simulation or for handling medical devices

Abstract

Disclosed is a registry system, including member institutions, in which transfusion donors and recipients are registered following genotyping, which would typically take place in a member institution, or a member institution would have access to the genotyping information, if performed outside. The registry database can be accessed and searched by members seeking samples of particular type(s). Systems are disclosed for maintaining economic viability of genotyping in connection with transfusions, by maximizing the number of units placed with the minimal number of candidate donors typed. Genotyping of potential donors, and product supply, is matched to forecasted demand. Genotyping can also be limited to the more clinically relevant markers. The registry system can also be integrated with one format of assay which generates an image for analysis, whereby the imaged results can be analyzed and redacted by experts in a central location, and then transmitted back to the patient or their representative.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority to U.S. application Ser. No. 11/092,420, filed Mar. 29, 2005, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. Nos. 60/586,931 and 60/621,196. Priority to all these applications is hereby claimed.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The prevailing paradigm of organizing the supply of blood units available for transfusion relies on routine typing of transfusion antigens by hemagglutination. Typically, the major transfusion antigen groups, namely A, B, O and D, are typed at collection while a select set of minor group antigens such as RhCE, Kell and Kidd are typed only as needed For blood group antigens other than ABO and D, source material is diminishing, and the cost of FDA-approved commercial reagents is escalating. Many antibodies used for testing for minor blood group antigens (especially when searching for an absence of a high prevalence antigen) are not FDA-approved and are characterized to varying degrees by those who use them. In addition, some antibodies are limited in volume, weakly reactive, or not available. Collectively, the labor-intensive approach limits the number of donors one can test: thereby restricting the supply of antigen-negative RBC products for patients who have produced the corresponding alloantibody, and, more recently, restricting the supply of Rh and K matched RBCs for patients in the Stroke Prevention Trial (STOP) program, which was designed to prevent immunization of such patients.
  • Recipients exposed to foreign transfusion antigens generally will form antibodies directed against those antigens. Allo-immunized patients, a subpopulation comprising approximately 2% of transfused patients, and up to 38% of multiply transfused patients, require red blood cell products which do not contain the offending antigen. Such units typically must be found either in the limited available supply or must be found, in real time, by serological typing of such likely candidate units as may be available in inventory. The selection of candidate units for “stat” typing, performed in immunohematology laboratories, is guided largely by empirical factors. The delay introduced by the search for matching units can exacerbate emergency situations and generally will incur substantial cost to hospitals and/or insurance carriers by delaying in-hospital stay. More generally, allo-immunization to red blood cell antigens which are also displayed on other cells (see Table I) and recognized by certain pathogens such as malaria, can introduce unnecessary health risks whose elimination would improve the general health.
  • The procurement of matched blood to recipients who either display an uncommon antigen or lack a common antigen, is particularly problematic. While such incidences are considered “rare,” occurring at a rate of one in 1,000 recipients, the supply of matched units is very limited. Thus, existing national collections of special units, including the American Rare Donor Program (ARDP), register donors encountered in the immunohematology laboratories of its members: only 30,000 donors have been registered (see, e.g., the Red Cross Website). In comparison, the National Maarow Donor Program (NMDP), a national registry of prospective bone marrow donors who have been genotyped for polymorphisms in certain loci of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) gene complex, in the year 2000, comprised 2.7 million fully characterized and 4.1 million known donors to supply matching bone marrow transplants for only ˜2,400 transplantations per year. See the National Marrow Donor Program Website.
  • Distribution of the precious few special units available in the program also leaves substantial room for improvement. At present, relying primarily on telephone contacts, only 1,000 special units are placed per year, while up to 2% of the approximately 4-5 million recipients of blood transfusions per year, that is 100,000 recipients, would benefit from improved availability.
  • In view of this situation, a method of providing a large and diverse inventory of fully typed blood units, and a method of instant and efficient distribution of units in response to requests posted to a central registry would be desirable in order to improve the public health and to minimize the cost accruing in the health care system in the form of unnecessarily prolonged hospital stays, adverse transfusion reactions (see Hillyer et al., Blood Banking and Transfusion Medicine; published. by Churchill Livingston, Philadelphia Pa.) and other potential complications arising from allo-immunization.
  • However, absent substantial government or private funding for such an endeavor, a registry of “critical mass” must be created and operated in a commercially viable manner. The ARDP operation, representative of current practice, illustrates the difficulty: In order to identify a special donor, up to 1,000 donors may have been typed, and from a collection of 30,000 such special units, only 1,000 were placed. While special units fetch a higher price than do “vanilla” red blood cell products, the premium does not come close to covering the cost, in view of the substantial amount of excess typing required. Commercial viability, under these conditions, is doubtful.
  • SUMMARY
  • Described is the efficient organization and operation of a diverse registry of fully characterized blood units. Preferably, donors are characterized by DNA typing of the clinically most relevant genetic markers, including a set of mutations of Human Erythrocyte Antigens (HEA) including genetic variants of Rh, and additional antigens such as HLA and HPA. The registry, also referred to as a Transfusion Network, comprising certain application programs and databases preferably accessible via a web-browser interface, offers essentially instant access to linked inventories of typed units of donor blood (“actual” units) as well as access to genotyped donors who are available on-call (“callable” units), along with requisite information relating to donor status, inventories of actual units or information relating to callable units ran be held by subscribing member organizations, who also may participate in the operation and governance of the registry.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the registry network comprises an alliance of dominant regional and national donor centers (such as New York Blood Center and United Blood Services) which would set new standards in transfusion medicine. In another embodiment, regional donor centers and transfusion services are linked so as to create the critical mass of regional centers (both domestic and foreign) to decentralize the market by competing with the dominant national donor centers.
  • An “actively managed” registry—Existing registries such a the ARDP largely operate as passive repositories of donors encountered per chance during blood drives. Registries of bone marrow donors operated by the NMDP or comparable organizations around the world (REF), while in some cases actively funding bone marrow drives, operate in essentially the same manner of underwriting the large-scale typing of volunteer donors and collecting results. TO the extent that the population of donors and population of recipients are not balanced, this approach generally will be very inefficient from the point of view of maximizing the probability of a matching a recipient request.
  • To overcome this inefficiency and to ensure commercial viability, a preferred strategy is described herein for constructing and maintaining a registry of genotyped donors which maximizes the number of units placed with the minimal number of candidate donors typed. To this end, relevant parameters relating to managing supply and forecasting demand are identified, and methods are described to optimize these parameters so as to maximize revenue and minimize total cost. The registry performs real-time analysis of supply and demand balance and directs its subscribing members to balance their respective donor typing operations.
  • A transfusion network, operated as an active registry, permits near-instant selection of prospective donors matching a given recipient by way of implementation on a global network such as the world wide web, thereby also facilitating the efficient distribution of units in inventory, further supported by transaction management including order placement and delivery. The registry will generate revenue from subscription as well as transaction fees, offering a set of products and services as described herein. Thus, a commercially viable registry, the first such in transfusion medicine, is disclosed, to improve clinical outcomes while enhancing economic efficiency.
  • In one embodiment, large-scale, rapid and cost-effective DNA typing, also herein referred as genotyping, of prospective donors is performed to permit instant matching of registered donors to recipients of known phenotype or genotype in a manner improving the clinical outcome of transfusion while improving economic efficiencies. To the extent that genotyped donors are retained, the cost of typing is minimized, as discussed herein.
  • The registry server preferably executes a “genetic cross-matching, gXM” algorithm to identify actual and callable donors within the registry, A gXM algorithm relating to a selection of the clinically most relevant human erythrocyte antigen (HEA) mutations is described in a co-pending application (see Provisional Application No. 60/621,196, entitled “A Method of Genetic Cross-Matching of Transfusion Recipients to Registered Donors,” as well as applications to be filed claiming priority to it, all of which are incorporated by reference).
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 is an illustration of a transfusion registry network linking multiple donor centers offering blood-derived products to multiple hospitals requesting blood-derived products for transfusion to patients. Participating parties can perform donor genotyping, patient genotyping and patient antibody screening (using, e.g., BeadChip™ assay kits). The registry performs genetic cross-matching and can offer a variety of additional products and services.
  • FIGS. 2A to 2D is a graphical depiction of the central components and subsystems of a BeadChip™ format for multiplexed analysis of polymorphisms and profiling of antibodies enabling the large-scale genotyping of donors and patients, as well as detection and identification of antibodies circulating in patient serum.
  • FIG. 3 is a graphical depiction of a uniform interface for presentation of data to the registry, preferably by way of a web-enabled Automated Allele Analysis (AAA) program (as disclosed in U.S. application Ser. No. 10/909,638, incorporated by reference), and the connection of the registry to linked inventories
  • FIG. 4 is a graph showing the dependence of cost and revenue projections for a multiple donation scenario for various values of the repeat probability, RHO.
  • FIG. 5 is an illustration of the concept of optimal resolution (described in text).
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In order to maximize the economic efficiency of the transfusion registry, it will be preferable to adopt a strategy of minimizing the total number of donors typed for every recipient request fulfilled. The following exposition refers to a genotype to represent a combination of marker alleles, where, for each marker, the possible values of the allele are Normal (1), Homozygous (−1) or Heterozygous (0), and a specific genotype, representing a combination of alleles, thus has the form of a ternary string.
  • Estimating Demand Requests for Special Units—In order to maintain a registry of candidate donors such that the maximal number of requests from prospective recipients for special units can in fact be matched while the number of excess donors typed is kept to a minimum, it will be critical to construct an estimate of anticipated demand.
  • Denote by:
      • NR the number of requests anticipated (or received);
      • 8 the probability of receiving (logging) a request for a specific genotype;
      • : the probability of matching a request (to a pre-determined level of resolution)
        Available evidence indicates that the incidence of certain genotypes varies substantially between ethnic groups (see G. Hashmi et al., “A Flexible Array Format for Large-scale, Rapid Blood Group DNA Typing,” Transfusion, in press). Therefore, the probability of a request for blood from a donor of specific genotype received from a random sample of a heterogeneous pan-ethnic population in fact represents a weighted average of probabilities, 8s, for each of multiple constituent homogeneous subpopulations. The population-specific probabilities may be cast in the form:

  • 8s˜(N(Rs)/N(R))f(s)Σ(r)
  • where f(s) represents the frequency of occurrence of a certain allele, the ratio (N(Rs)/N(R)) represents the relative proportion of individuals in subpopulation s within the pan-ethnic population at large, and Σ(r) represents a function of excess risk associated with a specific subpopulation (relative to the population at large). The function Σ(r), which may assume positive or negative values, reflects actuarial probabilities which in turn reflect genetic risk, e.g., the higher than average incidence of sickle cell anemia in African-Americans, or higher than average incidence of kidney disease in certain native American Indian tribes, requiring multiple transfusions, and environmental risk, e.g., the lower probability of, e.g., the Amish to suffer trauma in automobile accidents.
  • The probability, :, of matching a specific request depends on the diversity of the registry and its linked inventories of actual and callable donors.
  • Managing Supply Selection of Donors from Stratified Populations—in accordance with the preferred strategy of registry operation, the supply of registered donors will be adjusted to balance the anticipated demand.
  • Denote by:
      • N the number of new donors tested;
      • , the fraction of special units encountered in a test population; 0≦, <1;
      • Φ the fraction of special units sold.
  • The probability, Φ, of selling any specific unit is determined, for given unit price, by the probability. :, of matching a request for such a unit. Provided that an acceptable price for a unit is agreed upon, then:

  • Φ=:
  • Preferably, the strategy for balancing the supply of registered donors will reflect the increased probability of finding an acceptable match for a prospective recipient of transfusion within a donor population of similar heritage. The similarity of genotype among individuals of similar heritage has been established for a variety of genetic markers such as those for certain inherited genetic disorders, including so-called Ashkenazi Jewish Diseases and Cystic Fibrosis (see the Jewish Virtual Library Website), as well as for the highly variable human leukocyte gene complex which encodes for the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) determining the compatibility of recipients and donors of solid organs and bone marrow through the National Marrow Donor Program website. For blood group genotypes, but one example is provided by the high incidence in individuals of South Chinese heritage of the Miltenberger mutation within the MNS blood group (see M. Reid, “The Blood Group Antigen FactsBook” (2003)) which is largely absent in individuals of Caucasian heritage.
  • As with demand estimation, the probability of encountering a specific genotype in a pan-ethnic and hence genetically heterogeneous donor population will reflect the existence of constituent homogeneous subpopulations displaying varying values of that probability:

  • ,=(N (1) /N)f (1)+(N (2) /N)f (2)+ . . . +(N (s) /N)f (s)
  • where, as before, f(1), f(2) . . . , f(s) denote allele frequencies. To balance the supply of registered donors to anticipated demand, it will be desirable to select, for each subpopulation, s, shared among donor and recipient populations, the number of registered donors in accordance with the condition:

  • (N (s) /N)=C(N (Rs) /N (R))Σ(r)
  • The constant, C, captures factors such as the anticipated number of units required per recipient. This condition dictates that the registry, rather then genotyping alt corners, would accept only a certain continent of donors from each subpopulation.
  • Factors determining Profitability—A key aspect of operating a transfusion registry network with an acceptable profit margin concerns the pricing for a test permitting the genotyping a donor sample for a designated number of genetic markers, preferably by invoking elongation-mediated Multiplexed analysis of polymorphisms (“eMAP”; as disclosed in U.S. application Ser. No. 10/271,602, incorporated by reference).
  • Denote by:
  • Nk the number of new donors tested in year k, where k=0, 1, 2, . . . , n;
  • Rk the number of repeat donors (from year k−1) in year k=1, 2 . . . n;
  • Δ the fraction of repeat donors; generally Rk<Nk, and thus Δ<1.
  • ΔS the fraction of repeat donors among special donors; ΔS<1.
  • , the fraction of special units encountered in a test population; 0≦, <1;
  • c the cost of typing one sample;
  • Φ the fraction of special units sold;
  • s the excess revenue (over the “vanilla” unit) of a special unit of product.
  • The cost of screening in year k is: Ck=cNk−g(Rk, Rk-1, . . . ), that is, in any year but the first (k=0), the total cost of typing Nk donor samples will be reduced by a certain portion reflecting the number of repeat donors from previous years. Various assumptions—manifesting themselves in specific forms of the function g(Rk, Rk-1, . . . )—are possible. To the cost of typing must be added the cost of operating the registry—including transaction costs.
  • The revenue in year k reflects the sale of special units accumulated in inventory, that is: Sk=h(Nk, Nk-1, . . . ). Various assumptions—manifesting themselves in specific forms of the function h(Nk, Nk-1, . . . )—are possible.
  • The profit in year k is given by Pk=Sk−Ck. Break-even, Pk=0, is attained at a certain k.
  • EXAMPLE 1 Single Repeat Donations
  • Assume that a certain constant total number of donors, say N0, is screened every year, and that a (constant) fraction of donors repeat, but repeat only once, namely in the year following their initial donation. Then Rk=ΔNk-1, and:
  • Yr0 Yr1 Yr2
    New donors N0 N1 = N0 − R1 N2 = N0 − R2
    Repeat donors R1 = ΔN0 R2 = ΔN1

    where R2=ΔN1=Δ(N0−R1)=ΔN0−Δ2N0 and N2=N0−ΔN02N0=N0(1−Δ+Δ2).
    Generalizing, one finds the expression for Nk to be Nk=N0 (1−Δ+Δ2−Δ3+ . . . ); the alternating series reflects the fact that, as repeat donors stay away, a greater number of new donors must be screened in every even year. For n sufficiently large so that Δ2n<<1, this expression turns out to be Nk=N0/(1+Δ), independent of n; for example, with Δ=½, Δ2n=(½)2n= 1/256 for n=4.
  • Assume further that revenue in any given year reflects the sale of a certain fraction, Φ, of the total units, , N0, available that year, at an excess sales price, s, per sample, and that the population of repeat donors within the special population equals that within the general population. Then
  • Yr0 Yr1 Yr2
    S0 = Φ(,N0)s S1 = Φ(,N0)s S2 = Φ(,N0)s

    Then Pn=Sn−Cn=[,Φs−c/(1+Δ)]N0, independent of n. Under these assumptions, to attain break-even, Pn=0, or c/s=(1+Δ),Φ, the cost per unit screened must not exceed a certain fraction of the excess revenue in each year.
  • For example, with reported numbers of Δ=½ (see Schreiber, G. B. et al., “Targeting Repeat Blood Donors Can Increase Supply,” Transfusion 43: 591-97 (2003)),=0.001 (percentage of “rare” units in pan-ethnic population) and Φ=⅕, reflecting the placement of 1,000 “rare” units (from a stock of 30,000), with approximately 5,000 new rare units acquired per year (See the National Marrow Donor Program website), one obtains c/s= 3/2*0.001*⅕=0.0003. Since s will likely not exceed $1,000, the price per test will have to be negligibly small, not a scenario for a profitable large-scale screening operation. In fact, this is near the worst case scenario in which, along with the low abundance of special samples, and low percentage of placement, donors do not repeat (Δ=0).
  • It is anticipated that proper demand projection and inventory management, combined with providing instant access to such inventories by way of a transfusion registry network, as disclosed herein, will provide a basis to attain an operating regime of ,→0.1 and Φ→1 so that, even with Δ=½, c/s= 3/2*0.1*1=0.15.
  • EXAMPLE 2 Multiple Repeat Donations
  • In contrast to the previous Example 1, assume that of the total number of donors, say N0, screened in the first year, a (constant) fraction of donors, once recruited, repeat every year. Given that each donor is genotyped only once, this will have a cumulative effect on cost reduction.
  • To illustrate the effect, assume first that the same fraction of general donors and special donors repeat, that is: Δ=ΔS, and that this fraction is constant.
  • Yr0 Yr1 Yr2
    Cost
    C0 = cN0 C1 = c(N0 − R1) C2 = c(N0 − R2 − R1)
    = cN0(1 − Δ) = cN0(1 − Δ)2
    Revenue
    S0 = Φ(,N0)s S1 = Φ(,N0)s S2 = Φ(,N0)s

    Then Pn=Sn−Cn=[,Φs−c(1−Δ)n]N0. The contrast to the model of Example 1 is dramatic: the requisite cost of typing required to attain the same revenue, decreases geometrically with n, the slope of the decrease being set by Δ. Break-even corresponds to c/s=,Φ/(1−Δ)n, and profit grows rapidly thereafter.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates the evolution of projected cost and excess revenue for different values of the repeat probability, Δ. Precedents for relatively high repeat probabilities exist, especially in donors who are aware of their special status. It will be desirable to provide incentives to such donors, as described below.
  • Mutually Beneficial Interaction of Registry and Reagent Manufacturer—Provided that the large-scale genotyping of donors and patients is enabled by an efficient methodology, preferably invoking the eMAP-HEA design in conjunction with the BeadChip™ format (US Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/586,931, entitled “Encoded Probe Pairs for Molecular Blood Group Antigen Molecular Typing and Identification of New Alleles” and applications claiming priority thereto (incorporated by reference); G. Hashmi et al., “A Flexible Array Format for Large-scale, Rapid Blood Group DNA Typing,” Transfusion, in press; see also: FIG. 2), the cost of genotyping is reduced by the use of the multiplexed format of analysis and delivery of the assay in a parallel processing format, thereby permitting automation and uniform data management for a large menu of applications, including the typing of multiple antigen groups (FIG. 3).
  • In the initial stage, while building its initial donor reservoir, the registry, to the extent that it bears the cost of recruiting and genotyping donors, either directly, or indirectly, by way of subscribing member donor centers, will operate at a loss (FIG. 4). It will be beneficial for the registry to partner with a reagent manufacturer who would underwrite the operations in the initial stage, for example by providing kits at reduced or at no cost to the registry. To the extent that the registry is successful in retaining special donors and hence reduces its cost of typing, the market opportunity for the reagent manufacturer declines. To compensate the reagent manufacturer, the registry could, for example, grant the manufacturer participation in a jointly controlled entity along with a profit sharing arrangement.
  • EXAMPLE 3 Expanding Fire Registry
  • The scenario of Example 2 offers several modes of operation. For example, the registry might operate in a “non-profit” regime by setting the ratio cn/sn so as to ensure Pn=0. That is, the diagnostic reagent manufacturer, in return for obtaining a designated share of profits after break-even, can subsidize the initial ramp-up of the registry by accepting a lower price per test, corresponding to the condition Pn(cn/sn)=0.
  • Alternatively, the registry, having attained breakeven, may decide to expand operations by expanding the number of donors screened per year, for example, such that the number of new donors is set by the available profit. This provides a mechanism to compensate the participating reagent manufacturer for the declining sales of tests arising from the successful retention of repeat donors.
  • Recruiting and Retaining Special Donors—The single repeat and multiple repeat scenarios indicate the critical role of the effect of the repeat probability on the profitability of the registry.
  • As with the recruitment of HLA donors for national registries, genotyping of blood group antigens will permit the identification of prospective future donors—that is, donors who do not have to donate blood until called upon. For example, analysis of DNA extracted from buccal swabs would enable “self-collection” in targeted communities such as churches and synagogues, and simple submission processes, e.g. by mail, to a designated member laboratory (not necessarily a donor center), for DNA analysis. This aspect not only allows the extension of the universe of known special donors, but also would be invaluable in registry management, in order to match the volume of donor typing to projected demand within individual subpopulations.
  • To refine this model toward a “best case” scenario, retention efforts would be directed to special donors, not the general donor population. The total number of special donors in each designated subpopulation would be matched to demand projections, as described above. Special donors would be given incentive to repeat by granting them, and donating family members, authorized direct emergency access to the registry.
  • Clinical Benefit vs. Cost of Genotyping “Optimal” Panel Size—The clinical outcome of transfusion generally would improve with increasing resolution, that is, with the number of genetic markers included in the determination of patient and donor genotypes. The greatest benefit would derive from matching alleles encoding the clinically most significant blood group antigens (see M. Reid “The Blood Group Antigen FactsBook” (2003)), and the incremental benefit of matching additional alleles would decrease. Ignoring cost, a reasonable criterion for the determining the optimal resolution would be to select this point of diminishing incremental benefit.
  • However, significant economic considerations also apply. Thus, the higher the degree of resolution required for genetic cross-matching of a donor genotype to that of a patient, the higher the risk to the registry of not being able to place that unit, and the higher the cost of typing that unit. That is, c, the cost of genotyping, generally will increase with the number, m, of genetic markers included in the set, while the probability, , of matching a request and selling a specific unit will decrease. For example, denoting by fFirst, fSecond, fThird, . . . fLast the relative allele frequencies of markers included in cross-matching, in the order of decreasing clinical significance, :˜fFirst×fSecond×fThird, . . . ×f Last, thus :˜1/mx, where x denotes an exponent, while c˜c0+a*my, where c0 denotes a constant, namely the initial cost of genotyping the first marker, a denotes a constant related to the marginal cost of genotyping additional markers, and y denotes an exponent reflecting the rate of increase in cost: for example, using a single-marker method of genotyping such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or Allele-specific PCR, one would anticipate cost to increase linearly, y=1, while using the preferred embodiment of elongation-mediated multiplexed analysis of polymorphisms (eMAP), one would anticipate cost to increase in a sublinear form, y<1. In either case, from the cost-benefit point of view, there exists an “optimal” resolution. Unless the market would compensate the registry for the higher cost of matching a donor unit to high resolution, in which case clinical benefit will set the optimal resolution, m*, that value otherwise will be determined by the intersection of the two functions :=:(m) and c=c(m), as illustrated in FIG. 5.
  • Implementation of Registry—A co-pending application (U.S. application Ser. No. 10/909,638, incorporated by reference) discloses algorithms and implementations for automated allele analysis, and these methods are useful in connection with genetic cross-matching (gXM) generally, as disclosed in a further co-pending application (Provisional Application No. 60/621,196, noted above, incorporated by reference).
  • Using standard software engineering technologies such as MicroSoft.net (“dot-net”), these methods can be implemented in a manner permitting their use in an application-server modality using a standard web browser such as Microsoft Explorer™. Preferably, such an implementation, wAAA™, will invoke an SQL server and provide a uniform interface to Array Imaging Systems generating data for a variety of applications such as multiplex HEA, HLA and HPA analysis as well as patient and donor antibody identification. As disclosed in a Co-pending application (Ser. No. 10/714,203), data records will be uploaded—preferably using transaction protocols preserving donor and patient anonymity—to the wAAA application on a central server permitting review and redaction by, and delivery to authorized users.
  • Establishing an Efficient Market: Management of Real-time Transactions—Disclosed is a mode of operating a commercially viable registry in the form a real-time transaction network offering instant access to a diverse collection of characterized donors, that is, both actual donor-derived blood products in linked inventories, and callable candidate donors of desirable genotype. Such a registry will increase demand by extending its reach to a global base of potential customers by providing access to it products and services by way of a standard web browser and permitting applications, notably automated allele analysis, gXM and selection of candidate donors to be performed automatically, in real time. By offering instant transactions, under a variety of pricing arrangements including contracts, notably futures contracts, as well as real-time pricing, for example by way of bid-ask matching (currently available in the context of web-auctions as well as Electronic Communications Networks (ECNs) such as InstiNet (http://www.island.com), the registry will create an efficient market for the global procurement and distribution of matched donor units.
  • Collection of Samples, Assay Performance, Analysis of Assay Results, Patient Counseling and Reporting Results to Patients—Also disclosed herein is a model of implementing molecular diagnostics in a mode of “virtual centralization” which permits the steps of actually performing assays, preferably in a standard and universal format such as the Random Encoded Array Detection (READ™) format, and the steps of analyzing, interpreting and reporting assay results including communicating outcomes to the patient or referring physician, to be performed in different locations, such that experts or groups of experts have access, by way of a standard web browser to the wAAA environment to review data generated in a location different from their own physical location.
  • Virtual centralization of the data is accomplished by uploading of data relating to assay results, and interpretation/analysis thereof, to a server or other accessible database. It can then be accessed by or securely transmitted to authorized parties to perform additional interpretation or analysis, or to view or report the results. User identification can be secured at all stages of the process so as to preserve confidentiality, such that, for example, only the patient and perhaps his physician will be aware of the patient identity associated with particular results.
  • This model is particularly well-suited to the analysis and interpretation of results produced by genetic tests, including, results which can be processed for initial analysis by the web-based AAA program (discussed above) or where these results are in the form of images for which standard formats of network transmission now exist. Assay formats producing suitable images invoke, for example, spatially encoded “dot blot” or “reverse dot blot” formats, including “spotted” probe or protein arrays; arrays of oligonucleotide probes synthesized in-situ on a substrate, or probes (or proteins) associated with encoded beads: see U.S. Pat. No. 6,797,524; U.S. application Ser. No. 10/204,799, filed on Aug. 23, 2002 “Multianalyte Molecular Analysis Using Application-Specific Random Particle Arrays,” (incorporated by reference.
  • Networking allows the different parties involved in different steps of the process to perform their respective functions such as collecting samples, performing the assay, or analyzing the results, at the same location, or at different locations. Performing separate functions by different parties at different locations can provide a significant advantage in terms of cost and speed of analysis, as parties do not need to travel to a location to carry out their function. It also allows better control over the confidentiality of the results, as results do not need to be physically transported, by non-secure means, to different locations.
  • After sample collection, or self-collection by the patient (e.g., by using a buccal swab), an assay on a patient sample can be performed at a first location. The initial assay results, which may be encoded (see U.S. Pat. No. 6,797,524; US Application Ser. No. 10/204,799, filed on Aug. 23, 2002 “Multianalyte Molecular Analysis Using Application-Specific Random Particle Arrays,” both being incorporated herein by reference) or in the form of an assay image (see “Analysis, Secure Access to and Transmission of Array Images,” Ser. No. 10/714,203, filed Nov. 14, 2003, incorporated herein by reference), can be uploaded to a server or transmitted to an analysis site (which may be the site which sold the assay kit to the remote location). The identity of the patient can be associated with the sample, using, e.g., methods set forth in the co-pending application “Genetic Analysis and Authentication,” Ser. No. 10/238,439 (incorporated herein by reference). The analysis site decodes or interprets or performs a preliminary analysis of the results (and/or the assay image), and may also obtain assistance in interpretation from experts or consultants, who may either be on-site or may transmit an image from the assay, or who have access to the server with such images or results. The analyzed results can then be accessed by, or transmitted to, the patient's physician, or the patient, or the laboratory where the assay was conducted, which in turn provides them to the patient's physician and/or the patient. It is possible to keep the patient identity separated from the results at all stages, so that only the physician and the patient, or even only the patient, can correlate results with a particular patient. This secures the confidentiality of assay information, as is desirable in the case of genetic information, given the growing concern over maintaining confidentiality of individual's genetic data.
  • In this manner, the “front-end” of laboratory practice is standardized, preferably by adoption of a BeadChip™ format of performing multiplexed nucleic acid and protein analysis while the “back end”, generally requiring specialized expertise, is moved to a network, preferably by implementation of an application service which provides network protocols to transmit assay results, perform analysis, authorize access to databases for review and result certification, and manage communication between multiple participants in the process.
  • It should be understood that the terms and expressions herein are exemplary only, and not limiting, and that the invention is defined only in the claims which follow, and includes all equivalents of the claimed subject matter.

Claims (17)

  1. 1. A method for operating a registry offering access to genotyped prospective transfusion donors, for matching to a transfusion recipient of given genotype or phenotype, in a manner increasing the probability of having an acceptable donor for any recipient querying the registry, over said probability where donors are not stratified and typed as set forth below, while reducing the total number of prospective donors to be genotyped over the number required to be genotyped where donors are not stratified and typed as set forth below, comprising:
    stratifying prospective donors and recipients into subpopulations; and
    for each subpopulation, genotyping sufficient numbers of donors of different genotypes or phenotypes to fulfill anticipated demand from recipients of particular genotypes or phenotypes.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein blood units are collected from donors of different genotypes or phenotypes to fulfill anticipated demand for blood units from recipients of particular genotypes or phenotypes.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein the registry includes several member institutions, and the inventories of the member institutions include genotyped blood units and genotyped donors who agreed to be available to donate.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1 wherein following genotyping of the number of donors anticipated to be required to match a preset fraction of the anticipated demand from recipients, additional donors are not genotyped.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 wherein genetic markers likely to be present in a subpopulation and indicative of a clinically significant adverse event, if mismatched between donor and recipients, are genotyped.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1 further including providing incentives to retain donors having particular genotypes.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6 wherein said incentives include extending authorization to said donors having particular genotypes for preferential access, as against other recipients, to the registry in the event said donors require transfusion.
  8. 8. A method for reducing clinically significant adverse clinical events in transfusion recipients to less than the number said events encountered if not using the method herein, comprising ranking the genetic markers which are related to clinically significant events in order of their clinical significance, matching donors and recipients for only those markers which are associated with a clinical significance greater than a threshold value, and providing donors with transfusions from matched recipients.
  9. 9. The method of claim 8 wherein donors and recipients are not genotyped for other markers.
  10. 10. A method for reducing clinically significant adverse clinical events in transfusion recipients to less than the number of said events encountered if not using the method herein, comprising:
    stratifying prospective donors and recipients into subpopulations;
    determining, in each subpopulation, genetic markers which are associated with clinically significant adverse events;
    matching donors and recipients for those markers which have a clinical significance greater than a threshold; and
    providing donors with transfusions from matched recipients.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10 wherein donors and recipients are not genotyped for markers with a significance below the threshold.
  12. 12-13. (canceled)
  13. 14. The method of claim 10 wherein the genetic markers include RhCE, Kidd, Kell, Duffy, Dombrock, MNS, and combinations of markers of RhCE, Kidd, Kell, Duffy, Dombrock and MNS.
  14. 15-16. (canceled)
  15. 17. A method of centralization of molecular diagnostics within a network of member institutions, comprising:
    providing to each member institution an assay delivery system capable of uploading assay data to a central server in a standardized format;
    providing, through or on said central server, automated analysis and interpretation of uploaded data to generate preliminary assay results;
    providing, through or on said central server, access to and expert review of said preliminary assay results, whereby, following said review, final assay results are generated, which are suitable for release to patients or their representatives.
  16. 18. The method of claim 17 wherein the communication of preliminary and final assay results maintains patient anonymity.
  17. 19. A method of increasing the fraction of repeat donations above that experienced when not using the following method by incentivizing selected genotyped donors, wherein said incentives include extending authorization to said donors having particular genotypes for preferential access, as against other recipients, to the registry in the event said donors require transfusion, and providing transfusions to said genotyped donors requiring transfusion.
US11876922 2004-07-09 2007-10-23 Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products Abandoned US20080140452A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US58693104 true 2004-07-09 2004-07-09
US62119604 true 2004-10-22 2004-10-22
US11092420 US7363170B2 (en) 2004-07-09 2005-03-29 Transfusion registry network providing real-time interaction between users and providers of genetically characterized blood products
US11876922 US20080140452A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2007-10-23 Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11876922 US20080140452A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2007-10-23 Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products
US14281190 US20140257858A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2014-05-19 Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products
US15673675 US20170372015A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2017-08-10 Transfusion Registry Network Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11092420 Continuation US7363170B2 (en) 2004-07-09 2005-03-29 Transfusion registry network providing real-time interaction between users and providers of genetically characterized blood products

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14281190 Continuation US20140257858A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2014-05-19 Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080140452A1 true true US20080140452A1 (en) 2008-06-12

Family

ID=35541831

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11092420 Active 2026-05-23 US7363170B2 (en) 2004-07-09 2005-03-29 Transfusion registry network providing real-time interaction between users and providers of genetically characterized blood products
US11876922 Abandoned US20080140452A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2007-10-23 Transfusion registry network for genetically characterized blood products
US14281190 Abandoned US20140257858A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2014-05-19 Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products
US15673675 Pending US20170372015A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2017-08-10 Transfusion Registry Network Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11092420 Active 2026-05-23 US7363170B2 (en) 2004-07-09 2005-03-29 Transfusion registry network providing real-time interaction between users and providers of genetically characterized blood products

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14281190 Abandoned US20140257858A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2014-05-19 Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products
US15673675 Pending US20170372015A1 (en) 2004-07-09 2017-08-10 Transfusion Registry Network Providing Real-time Interaction Between Users and Providers of Genetically Characterized Blood Products

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (4) US7363170B2 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8429740B2 (en) 2010-04-26 2013-04-23 Microsoft Corporation Search result presentation

Families Citing this family (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2007075573A3 (en) * 2005-12-16 2008-05-02 41St Parameter Inc Methods and apparatus for securely displaying digital images
US8938671B2 (en) * 2005-12-16 2015-01-20 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Methods and apparatus for securely displaying digital images
US8151327B2 (en) 2006-03-31 2012-04-03 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Systems and methods for detection of session tampering and fraud prevention
WO2010018575A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Famillion Ltd. Method and system for matching between a tissue donor and a tissue recipient
US8543339B2 (en) * 2008-12-05 2013-09-24 23Andme, Inc. Gamete donor selection based on genetic calculations
US9112850B1 (en) 2009-03-25 2015-08-18 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Systems and methods of sharing information through a tag-based consortium
WO2012054646A3 (en) 2010-10-19 2012-06-14 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Variable risk engine
US9633201B1 (en) 2012-03-01 2017-04-25 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Methods and systems for fraud containment
US9521551B2 (en) 2012-03-22 2016-12-13 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Methods and systems for persistent cross-application mobile device identification
WO2014078569A1 (en) 2012-11-14 2014-05-22 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Systems and methods of global identification
KR20150092585A (en) * 2014-02-05 2015-08-13 한국전자통신연구원 DNA data compression Method and Apparatus based on binary image
US10091312B1 (en) 2014-10-14 2018-10-02 The 41St Parameter, Inc. Data structures for intelligently resolving deterministic and probabilistic device identifiers to device profiles and/or groups

Citations (96)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3790492A (en) * 1971-03-11 1974-02-05 Atomic Energy Commission Method for production of uniform microspheres
US4003713A (en) * 1975-08-14 1977-01-18 Bowser Everett N Multiple test tube evaporator
US4075013A (en) * 1976-09-13 1978-02-21 Ward Anthony T Electrophotochemical preparation of selenium photoconductive members
US4140937A (en) * 1975-07-22 1979-02-20 Aron Vecht Direct current electroluminescent devices
US4143203A (en) * 1976-03-19 1979-03-06 Amicon Corporation Particulate support material
US4258001A (en) * 1978-12-27 1981-03-24 Eastman Kodak Company Element, structure and method for the analysis or transport of liquids
US4497208A (en) * 1983-06-23 1985-02-05 Matec, Inc. Measurement of electro-kinetic properties of a solution
US4499052A (en) * 1982-08-30 1985-02-12 Becton, Dickinson And Company Apparatus for distinguishing multiple subpopulations of cells
US4575407A (en) * 1962-12-03 1986-03-11 Diller Isaac M Product and process for the activation of an electrolytic cell
US4647544A (en) * 1984-06-25 1987-03-03 Nicoli David F Immunoassay using optical interference detection
US4654267A (en) * 1982-04-23 1987-03-31 Sintef Magnetic polymer particles and process for the preparation thereof
US4717655A (en) * 1982-08-30 1988-01-05 Becton, Dickinson And Company Method and apparatus for distinguishing multiple subpopulations of cells
US4795698A (en) * 1985-10-04 1989-01-03 Immunicon Corporation Magnetic-polymer particles
US4806776A (en) * 1980-03-10 1989-02-21 Kley Victor B Electrical illumination and detecting apparatus
US4806313A (en) * 1985-04-12 1989-02-21 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Rapid assay processor
US4891324A (en) * 1987-01-07 1990-01-02 Syntex (U.S.A.) Inc. Particle with luminescer for assays
US4994373A (en) * 1983-01-27 1991-02-19 Enzo Biochem, Inc. Method and structures employing chemically-labelled polynucleotide probes
US4996265A (en) * 1988-01-29 1991-02-26 Mita Industrial Co., Ltd. Process for preparation of monodisperse polymer particles having increased particle size
US5091206A (en) * 1987-10-26 1992-02-25 Baxter Diagnostics Inc. Process for producing magnetically responsive polymer particles and application thereof
US5185066A (en) * 1988-08-11 1993-02-09 Helena Laboratories Corporation Immunofixation electrophoresis control system
US5187096A (en) * 1991-08-08 1993-02-16 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Cell substrate electrical impedance sensor with multiple electrode array
US5281370A (en) * 1990-08-22 1994-01-25 University Of Pittsburgh Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher Education Method of making solid crystalline narrow band radiation filter
US5288577A (en) * 1991-02-27 1994-02-22 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Dry-type developer
US5382801A (en) * 1992-04-15 1995-01-17 Agency Of Industrial Science And Technology Method for producing minute particles and apparatus therefor
US5382512A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-01-17 Chiron Corporation Assay device with captured particle reagent
US5389549A (en) * 1987-05-29 1995-02-14 Toa Medical Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for classifying leukocytes and a reagent used therefor
US5480723A (en) * 1985-04-08 1996-01-02 Optical Sensors Incorporated Surface-bound fluorescent polymers and related methods of synthesis and use
US5488567A (en) * 1992-07-23 1996-01-30 Acrogen, Inc. Digital analyte detection system
US5593838A (en) * 1994-11-10 1997-01-14 David Sarnoff Research Center, Inc. Partitioned microelectronic device array
US5593839A (en) * 1994-05-24 1997-01-14 Affymetrix, Inc. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks
US5602042A (en) * 1994-04-14 1997-02-11 Cytyc Corporation Method and apparatus for magnetically separating biological particles from a mixture
US5604097A (en) * 1994-10-13 1997-02-18 Spectragen, Inc. Methods for sorting polynucleotides using oligonucleotide tags
US5604099A (en) * 1986-03-13 1997-02-18 Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. Process for detecting specific nucleotide variations and genetic polymorphisms present in nucleic acids
US5714340A (en) * 1992-12-22 1998-02-03 Johnson & Johnson Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. Immunoassay elements having a receptor zone
US5714521A (en) * 1994-04-07 1998-02-03 Yeda Research And Development Company Ltd. Ion exchange membranes
US5716852A (en) * 1996-03-29 1998-02-10 University Of Washington Microfabricated diffusion-based chemical sensor
US5856092A (en) * 1989-02-13 1999-01-05 Geneco Pty Ltd Detection of a nucleic acid sequence or a change therein
US5855753A (en) * 1996-11-26 1999-01-05 The Trustees Of Princeton University Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures
US5866331A (en) * 1995-10-20 1999-02-02 University Of Massachusetts Single molecule detection by in situ hybridization
US5874219A (en) * 1995-06-07 1999-02-23 Affymetrix, Inc. Methods for concurrently processing multiple biological chip assays
US6014451A (en) * 1997-10-17 2000-01-11 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Remote imaging system for plant diagnosis
US6013531A (en) * 1987-10-26 2000-01-11 Dade International Inc. Method to use fluorescent magnetic polymer particles as markers in an immunoassay
US6015666A (en) * 1994-06-23 2000-01-18 Bayer Aktiengesellschaft Rapid DNA test for detecting quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pathogens in clinical material
US6015664A (en) * 1995-11-03 2000-01-18 Mcw Research Foundation Multiplex PCR assay using unequal primer concentrations to detect HPIV 1,2,3 and RSV A,B and influenza virus A, B
US6017696A (en) * 1993-11-01 2000-01-25 Nanogen, Inc. Methods for electronic stringency control for molecular biological analysis and diagnostics
US6018350A (en) * 1996-10-29 2000-01-25 Real 3D, Inc. Illumination and shadow simulation in a computer graphics/imaging system
US6023590A (en) * 1996-05-24 2000-02-08 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Image recording device
US6023540A (en) * 1997-03-14 2000-02-08 Trustees Of Tufts College Fiber optic sensor with encoded microspheres
US6025905A (en) * 1996-12-31 2000-02-15 Cognex Corporation System for obtaining a uniform illumination reflectance image during periodic structured illumination
US6027945A (en) * 1997-01-21 2000-02-22 Promega Corporation Methods of isolating biological target materials using silica magnetic particles
US6027889A (en) * 1996-05-29 2000-02-22 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Detection of nucleic acid sequence differences using coupled ligase detection and polymerase chain reactions
US6167910B1 (en) * 1998-01-20 2001-01-02 Caliper Technologies Corp. Multi-layer microfluidic devices
US6172218B1 (en) * 1994-10-13 2001-01-09 Lynx Therapeutics, Inc. Oligonucleotide tags for sorting and identification
US6180226B1 (en) * 1996-08-01 2001-01-30 Loctite (R&D) Limited Method of forming a monolayer of particles, and products formed thereby
US6183970B1 (en) * 1998-08-27 2001-02-06 Hitachi, Ltd. Polynucleotide probe chip and polynucleotide detection method
US6187540B1 (en) * 1998-11-09 2001-02-13 Identigene, Inc. Method of newborn identification and tracking
US6193866B1 (en) * 1996-03-27 2001-02-27 Curagen Corporation Separation of charged particles by a spatially and temporally varying electric field
US6193951B1 (en) * 1997-04-30 2001-02-27 Point Biomedical Corporation Microparticles useful as ultrasonic contrast agents
US20020006634A1 (en) * 1999-05-11 2002-01-17 Han In Suk Methods and compositions for use of catalase in hydrogels and biosensors
US6342355B1 (en) * 1997-11-26 2002-01-29 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health & Human Services Probe-based analysis of heterozygous mutations using two-color labelling
US20020015952A1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2002-02-07 Anderson Norman G. Microarrays and their manufacture by slicing
US6349144B1 (en) * 1998-02-07 2002-02-19 Biodiscovery, Inc. Automated DNA array segmentation and analysis
US20020022276A1 (en) * 1999-03-15 2002-02-21 Yuxiang Zhou Individually addressable micro-electromagnetic unit array chips
US20020046054A1 (en) * 2000-08-28 2002-04-18 Morand Patrick G. Use of blood and plasma donor samples and data in the drug discovery process
US20030004594A1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2003-01-02 Liu Vincent Bardina Flexible manufacturing system
US20030003272A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2003-01-02 Bruno Laguitton Polyanion/polycation multilayer film for DNA immobilization
US6503680B1 (en) * 2001-08-29 2003-01-07 Xerox Corporation Latex processes
US20030006143A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2003-01-09 Sukanta Banerjee Directed assembly of functional heterostructures
US6506564B1 (en) * 1996-07-29 2003-01-14 Nanosphere, Inc. Nanoparticles having oligonucleotides attached thereto and uses therefor
US20030012699A1 (en) * 1998-11-18 2003-01-16 Thomas Moore Simultaneous handling of magnetic beads in a two-dimensional arrangement
US20030012693A1 (en) * 2000-08-24 2003-01-16 Imego Ab Systems and methods for localizing and analyzing samples on a bio-sensor chip
US6509158B1 (en) * 1988-09-15 2003-01-21 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Image processing and analysis of individual nucleic acid molecules
US20030022370A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2003-01-30 Rocco Casagrande Magnetic immobilization of cells
US20030022393A1 (en) * 1996-04-25 2003-01-30 Michael Seul Array cytometry
US6514714B1 (en) * 1997-05-30 2003-02-04 One Lambda Method for immunobead flow cytometric detection of anti-HLA panel reactive antibody
US6515649B1 (en) * 1995-07-20 2003-02-04 E Ink Corporation Suspended particle displays and materials for making the same
US6514688B2 (en) * 1995-07-31 2003-02-04 Chemagen Biopolymer-Technologie Aktiengesellschaft Separating, detecting or quantifying biological materials using magnetic cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol particles
US6514771B1 (en) * 1996-04-25 2003-02-04 Bioarray Solutions Light-controlled electrokinetic assembly of particles near surfaces
US20030031351A1 (en) * 2000-02-11 2003-02-13 Yim Peter J. Vessel delineation in magnetic resonance angiographic images
US6521747B2 (en) * 2000-08-28 2003-02-18 Genaissance Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Haplotypes of the AGTR1 gene
US20030038812A1 (en) * 2000-10-24 2003-02-27 Affymetrix, Inc. A Corporation Organized Under The Laws Of Delaware Computer software system, method, and product for scanned image alignment
US20030040129A1 (en) * 2001-08-20 2003-02-27 Shah Haresh P. Binding assays using magnetically immobilized arrays
US20040002073A1 (en) * 2001-10-15 2004-01-01 Li Alice Xiang Multiplexed analysis of polymorphic loci by concurrent interrogation and enzyme-mediated detection
US20040009614A1 (en) * 2000-05-12 2004-01-15 Ahn Chong H Magnetic bead-based arrays
US20040014073A1 (en) * 2000-08-08 2004-01-22 Dieter Trau Capsules encapsulating solid particles of signal-generating organic substances and their use in vitro bioassays for detection of target molecules in a sample
US6692914B1 (en) * 1999-07-02 2004-02-17 Symyx Technologies, Inc. Polymer brushes for immobilizing molecules to a surface or substrate, where the polymers have water-soluble or water-dispersible segments and probes bonded thereto
US6838289B2 (en) * 2001-11-14 2005-01-04 Beckman Coulter, Inc. Analyte detection system
US6844156B2 (en) * 1999-10-19 2005-01-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Veterans Affairs Methods for identifying a preferred liver transplant donor
US6993156B1 (en) * 2000-02-18 2006-01-31 Microsoft Corporation System and method for statistically comparing and matching plural sets of digital data
US20060024732A1 (en) * 2001-01-26 2006-02-02 Mingxian Huang Microdevices having a preferential axis of magnetization and uses thereof
US20060035240A1 (en) * 2003-10-28 2006-02-16 Michael Seul Optimization of gene expression analysis using immobilized capture probes
US7157228B2 (en) * 2002-09-09 2007-01-02 Bioarray Solutions Ltd. Genetic analysis and authentication
US20070031877A1 (en) * 1998-08-28 2007-02-08 Febit Biotech Gmbh Support for analyte determination methods and method for producing the support
US7320864B2 (en) * 2002-08-22 2008-01-22 Bioarray Solutions Ltd. Methods of using molecular constructs for detection of biochemical reactions
US20080020374A1 (en) * 2004-02-20 2008-01-24 Greene Mark I Reagents, Kits and Methods for Immunodetection of Epitopes on Molecules
US7335153B2 (en) * 2001-12-28 2008-02-26 Bio Array Solutions Ltd. Arrays of microparticles and methods of preparation thereof

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE19633997C1 (en) * 1996-08-23 1998-03-26 Univ Stuttgart Picture transferor object remote examination device
US7613573B2 (en) * 2004-07-09 2009-11-03 Bio Pricing of the identification service by a registry which identifies prospective donors having particular bloodtypes to a requisitioner

Patent Citations (100)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4575407A (en) * 1962-12-03 1986-03-11 Diller Isaac M Product and process for the activation of an electrolytic cell
US3790492A (en) * 1971-03-11 1974-02-05 Atomic Energy Commission Method for production of uniform microspheres
US4140937A (en) * 1975-07-22 1979-02-20 Aron Vecht Direct current electroluminescent devices
US4003713A (en) * 1975-08-14 1977-01-18 Bowser Everett N Multiple test tube evaporator
US4143203A (en) * 1976-03-19 1979-03-06 Amicon Corporation Particulate support material
US4075013A (en) * 1976-09-13 1978-02-21 Ward Anthony T Electrophotochemical preparation of selenium photoconductive members
US4258001A (en) * 1978-12-27 1981-03-24 Eastman Kodak Company Element, structure and method for the analysis or transport of liquids
US4806776A (en) * 1980-03-10 1989-02-21 Kley Victor B Electrical illumination and detecting apparatus
US4654267A (en) * 1982-04-23 1987-03-31 Sintef Magnetic polymer particles and process for the preparation thereof
US4499052A (en) * 1982-08-30 1985-02-12 Becton, Dickinson And Company Apparatus for distinguishing multiple subpopulations of cells
US4717655A (en) * 1982-08-30 1988-01-05 Becton, Dickinson And Company Method and apparatus for distinguishing multiple subpopulations of cells
US4994373A (en) * 1983-01-27 1991-02-19 Enzo Biochem, Inc. Method and structures employing chemically-labelled polynucleotide probes
US4497208A (en) * 1983-06-23 1985-02-05 Matec, Inc. Measurement of electro-kinetic properties of a solution
US4647544A (en) * 1984-06-25 1987-03-03 Nicoli David F Immunoassay using optical interference detection
US5480723A (en) * 1985-04-08 1996-01-02 Optical Sensors Incorporated Surface-bound fluorescent polymers and related methods of synthesis and use
US4806313A (en) * 1985-04-12 1989-02-21 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Rapid assay processor
US5866099A (en) * 1985-10-04 1999-02-02 Nycomed Imaging As Magnetic-polymer particles
US4795698A (en) * 1985-10-04 1989-01-03 Immunicon Corporation Magnetic-polymer particles
US5604099A (en) * 1986-03-13 1997-02-18 Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. Process for detecting specific nucleotide variations and genetic polymorphisms present in nucleic acids
US4891324A (en) * 1987-01-07 1990-01-02 Syntex (U.S.A.) Inc. Particle with luminescer for assays
US5389549A (en) * 1987-05-29 1995-02-14 Toa Medical Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for classifying leukocytes and a reagent used therefor
US5283079A (en) * 1987-10-26 1994-02-01 Baxter Diagnostics Inc. Process to make magnetically responsive fluorescent polymer particles
US5091206A (en) * 1987-10-26 1992-02-25 Baxter Diagnostics Inc. Process for producing magnetically responsive polymer particles and application thereof
US6013531A (en) * 1987-10-26 2000-01-11 Dade International Inc. Method to use fluorescent magnetic polymer particles as markers in an immunoassay
US4996265A (en) * 1988-01-29 1991-02-26 Mita Industrial Co., Ltd. Process for preparation of monodisperse polymer particles having increased particle size
US5185066A (en) * 1988-08-11 1993-02-09 Helena Laboratories Corporation Immunofixation electrophoresis control system
US6509158B1 (en) * 1988-09-15 2003-01-21 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Image processing and analysis of individual nucleic acid molecules
US5856092A (en) * 1989-02-13 1999-01-05 Geneco Pty Ltd Detection of a nucleic acid sequence or a change therein
US5281370A (en) * 1990-08-22 1994-01-25 University Of Pittsburgh Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher Education Method of making solid crystalline narrow band radiation filter
US5288577A (en) * 1991-02-27 1994-02-22 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Dry-type developer
US5187096A (en) * 1991-08-08 1993-02-16 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Cell substrate electrical impedance sensor with multiple electrode array
US5382801A (en) * 1992-04-15 1995-01-17 Agency Of Industrial Science And Technology Method for producing minute particles and apparatus therefor
US5488567A (en) * 1992-07-23 1996-01-30 Acrogen, Inc. Digital analyte detection system
US5714340A (en) * 1992-12-22 1998-02-03 Johnson & Johnson Clinical Diagnostics, Inc. Immunoassay elements having a receptor zone
US5382512A (en) * 1993-08-23 1995-01-17 Chiron Corporation Assay device with captured particle reagent
US6017696A (en) * 1993-11-01 2000-01-25 Nanogen, Inc. Methods for electronic stringency control for molecular biological analysis and diagnostics
US5714521A (en) * 1994-04-07 1998-02-03 Yeda Research And Development Company Ltd. Ion exchange membranes
US5602042A (en) * 1994-04-14 1997-02-11 Cytyc Corporation Method and apparatus for magnetically separating biological particles from a mixture
US5593839A (en) * 1994-05-24 1997-01-14 Affymetrix, Inc. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks
US6015666A (en) * 1994-06-23 2000-01-18 Bayer Aktiengesellschaft Rapid DNA test for detecting quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pathogens in clinical material
US6172218B1 (en) * 1994-10-13 2001-01-09 Lynx Therapeutics, Inc. Oligonucleotide tags for sorting and identification
US5604097A (en) * 1994-10-13 1997-02-18 Spectragen, Inc. Methods for sorting polynucleotides using oligonucleotide tags
US5858804A (en) * 1994-11-10 1999-01-12 Sarnoff Corporation Immunological assay conducted in a microlaboratory array
US5593838A (en) * 1994-11-10 1997-01-14 David Sarnoff Research Center, Inc. Partitioned microelectronic device array
US5874219A (en) * 1995-06-07 1999-02-23 Affymetrix, Inc. Methods for concurrently processing multiple biological chip assays
US6515649B1 (en) * 1995-07-20 2003-02-04 E Ink Corporation Suspended particle displays and materials for making the same
US6514688B2 (en) * 1995-07-31 2003-02-04 Chemagen Biopolymer-Technologie Aktiengesellschaft Separating, detecting or quantifying biological materials using magnetic cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol particles
US5866331A (en) * 1995-10-20 1999-02-02 University Of Massachusetts Single molecule detection by in situ hybridization
US6015664A (en) * 1995-11-03 2000-01-18 Mcw Research Foundation Multiplex PCR assay using unequal primer concentrations to detect HPIV 1,2,3 and RSV A,B and influenza virus A, B
US6193866B1 (en) * 1996-03-27 2001-02-27 Curagen Corporation Separation of charged particles by a spatially and temporally varying electric field
US5716852A (en) * 1996-03-29 1998-02-10 University Of Washington Microfabricated diffusion-based chemical sensor
US6514771B1 (en) * 1996-04-25 2003-02-04 Bioarray Solutions Light-controlled electrokinetic assembly of particles near surfaces
US6991941B1 (en) * 1996-04-25 2006-01-31 Bioarray Solutions Ltd. Light-controlled electrokinetic assembly of particles near surfaces
US20030022393A1 (en) * 1996-04-25 2003-01-30 Michael Seul Array cytometry
US6023590A (en) * 1996-05-24 2000-02-08 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Image recording device
US6027889A (en) * 1996-05-29 2000-02-22 Cornell Research Foundation, Inc. Detection of nucleic acid sequence differences using coupled ligase detection and polymerase chain reactions
US6506564B1 (en) * 1996-07-29 2003-01-14 Nanosphere, Inc. Nanoparticles having oligonucleotides attached thereto and uses therefor
US6180226B1 (en) * 1996-08-01 2001-01-30 Loctite (R&D) Limited Method of forming a monolayer of particles, and products formed thereby
US6018350A (en) * 1996-10-29 2000-01-25 Real 3D, Inc. Illumination and shadow simulation in a computer graphics/imaging system
US5855753A (en) * 1996-11-26 1999-01-05 The Trustees Of Princeton University Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures
US6025905A (en) * 1996-12-31 2000-02-15 Cognex Corporation System for obtaining a uniform illumination reflectance image during periodic structured illumination
US6027945A (en) * 1997-01-21 2000-02-22 Promega Corporation Methods of isolating biological target materials using silica magnetic particles
US6023540A (en) * 1997-03-14 2000-02-08 Trustees Of Tufts College Fiber optic sensor with encoded microspheres
US6193951B1 (en) * 1997-04-30 2001-02-27 Point Biomedical Corporation Microparticles useful as ultrasonic contrast agents
US6514714B1 (en) * 1997-05-30 2003-02-04 One Lambda Method for immunobead flow cytometric detection of anti-HLA panel reactive antibody
US6014451A (en) * 1997-10-17 2000-01-11 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Remote imaging system for plant diagnosis
US6342355B1 (en) * 1997-11-26 2002-01-29 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health & Human Services Probe-based analysis of heterozygous mutations using two-color labelling
US6167910B1 (en) * 1998-01-20 2001-01-02 Caliper Technologies Corp. Multi-layer microfluidic devices
US6349144B1 (en) * 1998-02-07 2002-02-19 Biodiscovery, Inc. Automated DNA array segmentation and analysis
US6183970B1 (en) * 1998-08-27 2001-02-06 Hitachi, Ltd. Polynucleotide probe chip and polynucleotide detection method
US20070031877A1 (en) * 1998-08-28 2007-02-08 Febit Biotech Gmbh Support for analyte determination methods and method for producing the support
US6187540B1 (en) * 1998-11-09 2001-02-13 Identigene, Inc. Method of newborn identification and tracking
US20030012699A1 (en) * 1998-11-18 2003-01-16 Thomas Moore Simultaneous handling of magnetic beads in a two-dimensional arrangement
US20020022276A1 (en) * 1999-03-15 2002-02-21 Yuxiang Zhou Individually addressable micro-electromagnetic unit array chips
US20020006634A1 (en) * 1999-05-11 2002-01-17 Han In Suk Methods and compositions for use of catalase in hydrogels and biosensors
US6692914B1 (en) * 1999-07-02 2004-02-17 Symyx Technologies, Inc. Polymer brushes for immobilizing molecules to a surface or substrate, where the polymers have water-soluble or water-dispersible segments and probes bonded thereto
US20020015952A1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2002-02-07 Anderson Norman G. Microarrays and their manufacture by slicing
US6844156B2 (en) * 1999-10-19 2005-01-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Veterans Affairs Methods for identifying a preferred liver transplant donor
US20030004594A1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2003-01-02 Liu Vincent Bardina Flexible manufacturing system
US20030031351A1 (en) * 2000-02-11 2003-02-13 Yim Peter J. Vessel delineation in magnetic resonance angiographic images
US6993156B1 (en) * 2000-02-18 2006-01-31 Microsoft Corporation System and method for statistically comparing and matching plural sets of digital data
US20040009614A1 (en) * 2000-05-12 2004-01-15 Ahn Chong H Magnetic bead-based arrays
US20040014073A1 (en) * 2000-08-08 2004-01-22 Dieter Trau Capsules encapsulating solid particles of signal-generating organic substances and their use in vitro bioassays for detection of target molecules in a sample
US20030012693A1 (en) * 2000-08-24 2003-01-16 Imego Ab Systems and methods for localizing and analyzing samples on a bio-sensor chip
US6521747B2 (en) * 2000-08-28 2003-02-18 Genaissance Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Haplotypes of the AGTR1 gene
US20020046054A1 (en) * 2000-08-28 2002-04-18 Morand Patrick G. Use of blood and plasma donor samples and data in the drug discovery process
US20030038812A1 (en) * 2000-10-24 2003-02-27 Affymetrix, Inc. A Corporation Organized Under The Laws Of Delaware Computer software system, method, and product for scanned image alignment
US20060024732A1 (en) * 2001-01-26 2006-02-02 Mingxian Huang Microdevices having a preferential axis of magnetization and uses thereof
US20030006143A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2003-01-09 Sukanta Banerjee Directed assembly of functional heterostructures
US20030003272A1 (en) * 2001-06-21 2003-01-02 Bruno Laguitton Polyanion/polycation multilayer film for DNA immobilization
US20030022370A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2003-01-30 Rocco Casagrande Magnetic immobilization of cells
US20030040129A1 (en) * 2001-08-20 2003-02-27 Shah Haresh P. Binding assays using magnetically immobilized arrays
US6503680B1 (en) * 2001-08-29 2003-01-07 Xerox Corporation Latex processes
US20040002073A1 (en) * 2001-10-15 2004-01-01 Li Alice Xiang Multiplexed analysis of polymorphic loci by concurrent interrogation and enzyme-mediated detection
US6838289B2 (en) * 2001-11-14 2005-01-04 Beckman Coulter, Inc. Analyte detection system
US7335153B2 (en) * 2001-12-28 2008-02-26 Bio Array Solutions Ltd. Arrays of microparticles and methods of preparation thereof
US7320864B2 (en) * 2002-08-22 2008-01-22 Bioarray Solutions Ltd. Methods of using molecular constructs for detection of biochemical reactions
US7157228B2 (en) * 2002-09-09 2007-01-02 Bioarray Solutions Ltd. Genetic analysis and authentication
US20060035240A1 (en) * 2003-10-28 2006-02-16 Michael Seul Optimization of gene expression analysis using immobilized capture probes
US20080020374A1 (en) * 2004-02-20 2008-01-24 Greene Mark I Reagents, Kits and Methods for Immunodetection of Epitopes on Molecules

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Mori, et al., "Computer program to predict Iikelihood of finding an HLA-matched donor: Methodology, validation, and application." Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 2, pp 134 - 144 (1996). *

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8429740B2 (en) 2010-04-26 2013-04-23 Microsoft Corporation Search result presentation
US8973128B2 (en) 2010-04-26 2015-03-03 Microsoft Corporation Search result presentation

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20170372015A1 (en) 2017-12-28 application
US20060008859A1 (en) 2006-01-12 application
US7363170B2 (en) 2008-04-22 grant
US20140257858A1 (en) 2014-09-11 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Guevara et al. Utilization and cost of health care services for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Hill et al. Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias increase costs of comorbidities in managed Medicare
van de Poll-Franse et al. The Patient Reported Outcomes Following Initial treatment and Long term Evaluation of Survivorship registry: scope, rationale and design of an infrastructure for the study of physical and psychosocial outcomes in cancer survivorship cohorts
Atlas et al. Patient–physician connectedness and quality of primary care
Wichmann et al. KORA-gen-resource for population genetics, controls and a broad spectrum of disease phenotypes
Benesch et al. Inaccuracy of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) in identifying the diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease
Schold et al. Which renal transplant candidates should accept marginal kidneys in exchange for a shorter waiting time on dialysis?
Weycker et al. Long-term mortality and medical care charges in patients with severe sepsis
Ireys et al. Expenditures for care of children with chronic illnesses enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid program, fiscal year 1993
Ollier et al. UK Biobank: from concept to reality
Sander Genomic medicine and the future of health care
US7788040B2 (en) System for managing healthcare data including genomic and other patient specific information
US20030074142A1 (en) Coincidence detection programmed media and system
Finkelstein Do factors other than need determine utilization of physicians' services in Ontario?
US20010051880A1 (en) System and method for connecting a healthcare business to a plurality of laboratories
Roman et al. Adoption and implementation of new technologies in substance abuse treatment
Gade et al. Impact of an inpatient palliative care team: a randomized controlled trial
Simmons et al. Performance of the UK prospective diabetes study risk engine and the Framingham risk equations in estimating cardiovascular disease in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort
US6730023B1 (en) Animal genetic and health profile database management
Leitsalu et al. Cohort profile: Estonian biobank of the Estonian Genome center, University of Tartu
Krawczak et al. PopGen: population-based recruitment of patients and controls for the analysis of complex genotype-phenotype relationships
Peterson et al. Outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery in 24 461 patients aged 80 years or older
US20040143403A1 (en) Status determination
Lubomirov et al. Association of pharmacogenetic markers with premature discontinuation of first-line anti-HIV therapy: an observational cohort study
AlHamdan et al. Premarital screening for thalassemia and sickle cell disease in Saudi Arabia

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BCT HOLDINGS LLC, NEW JERSEY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BIOARRAY SOLUTIONS, LTD.;REEL/FRAME:020640/0899

Effective date: 20080225

AS Assignment

Owner name: BIOARRAY SOLUTIONS LTD., NEW JERSEY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BCT HOLDINGS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:021230/0446

Effective date: 20080611

AS Assignment

Owner name: BIOARRAY SOLUTIONS LTD., NEW JERSEY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BCT HOLDINGS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:021266/0829

Effective date: 20080611

AS Assignment

Owner name: CITIBANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT, DELAWARE

Free format text: PATENT SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:IMMUCOR, INC.;BIOARRAY SOLUTIONS LTD.;REEL/FRAME:026778/0640

Effective date: 20110819