US20080130637A1 - Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks - Google Patents

Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080130637A1
US20080130637A1 US11/570,323 US57032305A US2008130637A1 US 20080130637 A1 US20080130637 A1 US 20080130637A1 US 57032305 A US57032305 A US 57032305A US 2008130637 A1 US2008130637 A1 US 2008130637A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
proxy server
ggsn
gprs
user traffic
sgsn
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/570,323
Inventor
Nishi Kant
Atchuta Rallapalli
Original Assignee
Nishi Kant
Atchuta Rallapalli
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US62985504P priority Critical
Priority to US70522405P priority
Application filed by Nishi Kant, Atchuta Rallapalli filed Critical Nishi Kant
Priority to PCT/US2005/042239 priority patent/WO2006055939A2/en
Priority to US11/570,323 priority patent/US20080130637A1/en
Assigned to RUSTIC CANYON VENTURES SBIC, L.P. reassignment RUSTIC CANYON VENTURES SBIC, L.P. SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: AZAIRE NETWORKS, INC.
Publication of US20080130637A1 publication Critical patent/US20080130637A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W36/00Hand-off or reselection arrangements
    • H04W36/0005Control or signalling for completing the hand-off
    • H04W36/0011Control or signalling for completing the hand-off for data session or connection
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management
    • H04W76/10Connection setup
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/02Processing of mobility data, e.g. registration information at HLR [Home Location Register] or VLR [Visitor Location Register]; Transfer of mobility data, e.g. between HLR, VLR or external networks
    • H04W8/08Mobility data transfer
    • H04W8/087Mobility data transfer for preserving data network PoA address despite hand-offs
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/02Hierarchically pre-organised networks, e.g. paging networks, cellular networks, WLAN [Wireless Local Area Network] or WLL [Wireless Local Loop]
    • H04W84/04Large scale networks; Deep hierarchical networks
    • H04W84/042Public Land Mobile systems, e.g. cellular systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W36/00Hand-off or reselection arrangements
    • H04W36/02Buffering or recovering information during reselection ; Modification of the traffic flow during hand-off
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W36/00Hand-off or reselection arrangements
    • H04W36/12Reselecting a serving backbone network switching or routing node
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management
    • H04W76/10Connection setup
    • H04W76/12Setup of transport tunnels
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management
    • H04W76/20Manipulation of established connections
    • H04W76/22Manipulation of transport tunnels
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/02Processing of mobility data, e.g. registration information at HLR [Home Location Register] or VLR [Visitor Location Register]; Transfer of mobility data, e.g. between HLR, VLR or external networks
    • H04W8/08Mobility data transfer
    • H04W8/082Mobility data transfer for traffic bypassing of mobility servers, e.g. location registers, home PLMNs or home agents
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/26Network addressing or numbering for mobility support
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W80/00Wireless network protocols or protocol adaptations to wireless operation
    • H04W80/04Network layer protocols, e.g. mobile IP [Internet Protocol]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/02Terminal devices
    • H04W88/06Terminal devices adapted for operation in multiple networks or having at least two operational modes, e.g. multi-mode terminals

Abstract

A proxy server (208) provides an anchor point for access network changes in a wireless environment. One example embodiment uses the concept of proxy server in order to preserve a uniform connectivity to a gateway service node while roaming across different networks through a handover mechanism. In one embodiment, the client connects to a proxy server through one access network (204), and the proxy server manages and keeps track of the user session toward the gateway service node. The client then connects to any packet service network, including Internet, through the proxy. When the client moves from one network to another, it indicates the change to the proxy and proxy, using a handover mechanism, switches the access network while maintaining the user session toward the gateway service node. The handover mechanism involved is efficient, with minimal messaging overhead, and preserves the application layer IP address of the client. Therefore, the data connections do not suffer from interruptions due to roaming through different networks and the service is seamlessly continued.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority from provisional patent application 60/629,855 filed on Nov. 18, 2004, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • This application also claims priority from provisional patent application 60/705,224, filed on Aug. 3, 2005, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present inventions relate generally to wireless data movement and, more particularly, to how wireless devices maintain consistent network connections when more than one network is present.
  • 2. Background
  • Wireless networks have evolved from a simple point-to-point link to encompassing different coverage areas at varying data transfer rates. For example, a short ranged network (made up of connectivity devices such as Bluetooth capable devices) provides data rates in excess of 3 Mb/s covering a small room; a medium range network (such as Wi-Fi or 802.11) that provides data rates of 25 Mbps covering a several rooms; a large range network (such as The Global System for Mobile TeleCommunications (GSM)) with cells that provide several hundred kbits/s data rate covering a city; and the largest connectivity devices, satellite networks, provide data coverage for several countries. The multi-mode mobile terminal has capabilities to connect to different networks based on the policies of the user and the network, such as the particular sources that have been purchased or provided. Due to the overlapping of these networks a user can roam through multiple networks during a single session. In all roaming scenarios, the handover mechanism between these hybrid networks is a vital topic.
  • General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a data communication technology that is capable of transferring packet data and signaling in a cost-efficient manner over GSM radio networks while optimizing the use of radio and network resources. The voice traffic and the data packet share the same physical channel, but new logical GPRS radio channels are defined. Data transfer rates up to 171.2 Kbps are possible over GPRS thus enabling mobile data services, like Internet applications, over mobile devices. The data traffic is segregated and sent to a Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN) node from the BSC. The SGSN node connects to a Gateway GPRS Support Node (GGSN) for communication with external packet data networks. The next generation of this technology is UMTS that provides higher data transfer rates. Typically GPRS and UMTS networks operate over licensed frequencies and are owned by mobile operators. Several entities have created a partnership project called 3GPP that is responsible for defining services, architecture and protocols. These specifications cover wireless access network, core network nodes and interconnection protocols etc.
  • The Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is a wireless extension to Ethernet LAN technologies. The IEEE 802.11 committee has defined several of these standards and named them 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11a. In WLAN, each service access point (AP) covers a cell. In IEEE 802.11, each single cell is defined as a basic service set (BSS). Several BSSs can form an extended service set (ESS). IEEE 802.11 only defines the communication between the client (referred to also as the mobile terminal (MT) or mobile node (MN)) and access point (AP) (the physicals layer and data link layer). The client connects to the AP that has higher signal quality and communicates wirelessly to the AP. The data communication is similar to the wired Ethernet communication except for the physical layer and medium access.
  • 802.11x WLAN technologies, popularly known as the Wi-Fi, have become predominant in the limited mobility wireless data networks due to reasonably higher data transfer rates and affordability of the technology. In fact, 3GPP has come up with a specification (TS 23.234) on how to interwork WLAN with GPRS/UMTS networks. Both these wireless technologies are complimentary in several aspects. Therefore, many operators provide both services, with GPRS for global roaming and Wi-Fi for limited mobility areas popularly known as hotspots. There are several devices that support these dual technologies paving way for pervasive computing. The hotspots are WLAN islands scattered at key geographic locations. The mobile user would be roaming between GPRS coverage area and Wi-Fi coverage area very frequently thus requiring a fast and efficient handover procedure.
  • To achieve seamless mobility, the client should do fast handover from GPRS network to WLAN or vice versa without interruption. Several methodologies have been proposed for this roaming scenario. Two different methodologies that address this problem are described below.
  • Background: Mobile IP
  • Mobile IP (MIP) provides mobility at the network layer thus enabling roaming between different networks. The MIP is specified in Request for Comments (RFC) 3344 (for IPv4) and 3775 (for IPv6) by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) community. MIP defines two nodes, Home Agent (HA) and Foreign Agent (FA). The HA is the coordinating node on the home network of a user. The mobile node communicates to HA node directly, using normal IP routing, when connected to the home network. A Foreign Agent is a node in a MIP network that enables roamed IP users to register on the foreign network. The FA will communicate with the HA (Home Agent) to enable IP data to be transferred between the home IP network and the roamed IP user on the foreign network. Whenever the node is connected on a foreign network, it acquires a care-of-address (COA) and registers with the HA providing the COA. The data packets sent by a correspondent node (CN) destined to the mobile node are captured by HA in the home network and are tunneled to the COA. The packets are decapsulated either at FA or client. When the client roams to another network, it acquires new COA and registers with HA about its new location. Now all the data packets destined to this mobile node are tunneled to the new COA.
  • One common solution for GPRS and WLAN mobility using MIP is to provide home agent (HA) functionality at the Gateway GPRS Support Node (GGSN). The FA functionality can be at Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN) for the GPRS network and at the Wireless Gateway (WG) for the Wide Area Local Network (WLAN). Otherwise a co-located Care of Address (COA) can be used if the client supports MIP.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates this type of communication network. A GGSN 102 is connected to both a SGSN 104 and a WLAN Gateway 106. There is generally a constant connection between the GGSN, SGSN, and WLAN Gateway. A HA 112 is located north of GGSN, which, in this embodiment, means that the HA is connected directly to the GGSN which is connected to the client networks 104 and 106. Clients 108, 110 may connect to the GGSN through either the SGSN or through the WLAN Gateway. The GGSN provides connectivity to an IP network such as the Internet. When the client is connected through GPRS network, it acquires the remote IP address from the GGSN. This GGSN-assigned IP address works as the COA and the client registers this COA to the HA. When the client moves into WLAN area and connected to the WLAN, it acquires the IP address from either NAS or WLAN gateway. This IP address is different from the GGSN-assigned IP address and it serves as a new COA. The client registers this IP address to the HA. Since the client's home address remains the same and only the COA is changed, the mobility can be supported with the service continuity.
  • Though MIP provides mobility between these two networks the handover is not seamless because of the time delay from the point the client moves to a different network and the registration with the HA is completed. During this phase, HA sends all packets for client towards the old COA and these packets could be lost. This is a problem when roaming from WLAN to GPRS network since the WLAN connection is gone and any packets sent over this network will not reach the client. The other drawback of this solution is the triangle routing of the data packets (the packets from client to the correspondent node (CN) are directly routed while the packets from CN are sent to HA first and then tunneled to client) that is inherent in the MIP. Route optimization methods have been proposed to overcome this issue. Finally, there are 3GPP services that are valuable to operators and useful to end-users. Such services are accessible at the GGSN and Mobile IP layer makes this work complicated. In other words, since the anchor point is HA and all the packets should be decapsulated at HA, the service differentiation using APN (Access point name) at GGSN is not simple. GGSN also can perform some services, e.g. content-based billing, and this gets more complicated because of MIP tunneling. The MIP packet overhead in all the packets (both GPRS and WLAN) and message overhead for registration is one drawback, too.
  • Background: Inter-SGSN Like Handover Approach
  • The WLAN coverage cell is small compared to the cell of the GSM area. One method of integrating these two networks is by treating the WLAN as a smaller network within the GSM network. Several Access Points (AP) connecting to a WG represent a small coverage area. In “Method and System for Transparently and Securely Interconnecting a WLAN Radio Access Network into a GPRS/GSM Core Network.” it has been demonstrated how the WG could function in a manner similar to the SGSN and thereby providing an interconnection into GPRS core network. The roaming scenario is just like an Inter-SGSN Routing Update process described in the GPRS specification. When the client roams in to WLAN area, the client sends the Routing Area Update request to the WG. To retrieve all the MM and PDP contexts for the client, WG requests these contexts from previous serving SGSN. After the contexts are transferred to WG, SGSN starts forwarding all the packets to WG, if it receives any packets from GGSN. The WG now, based on the information of the existing GPRS PDP context, sends an Update PDP Context to the GGSN that will transfer the existing GPRS session to this network.
  • The GGSN sends a packet data protocol/mobility management context standby command to the old SGSN. The message is to ask the SGSN to hold the PDP/MM context till the client comes back to the UMTS or detaches. The packets are sent over the WLAN through WG to the GGSN and the IP address of the session still remains the same. When the client roams back to the GPRS network, a Routing Area (RA) update procedure is triggered that activates the old GPRS session. The handover delay in this process is lower than that of the Mobile IP method described earlier. Due to the tight integrated nature of this solution, the LAN based architecture on the WLAN needs several changes to accommodate this solution. Especially WG should support most of standard GPRS SGSN functionalities. Also, the client should be intelligent enough to obtain the GPRS session parameters and sends it to the WG. Since it is not an open architecture solution, this method is not preferred.
  • Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks
  • Handover between different wireless access networks (e.g., a GPRS access network and a WLAN access network) is facilitated by a proxy server (also referred to herein as a proxy server or proxy, which can optionally be combined with a global wireless gateway node) preferably adapted to communicate with other nodes of a network, such as nodes of a GPRS network and/or a WLAN. (Note that hereinafter, the term SGSN may be referred to a server GSN, and a GGSN can be referred to as a gateway GSN.)
  • In one example class of embodiments, when a multifunction (e.g., dual mode) client is operating as a GPRS client (i.e., it is using a GPRS access network), the DNS server is configured to resolve the selected APN to the proxy server's high-level address, so that all control traffic is sent to the proxy server, preferably prior to being sent to another node, such as a GGSN.
  • In embodiments wherein the user equipment or mobile node accesses the network via a GPRS access network, the user traffic may flow from an SGSN through the proxy server to a GGSN, or the user traffic can flow directly to the GGSN, without first passing through the proxy server, therefore reducing the number of hops for user data. When a handover to another type of access network occurs (e.g., to a WLAN access network) preferred embodiments implement one of at least two options: if only control traffic was anchored at the proxy server, then the proxy server can update the GGSN to switch the user traffic from SGSN to the proxy server. GGSN would typically reflect this in its accounting. Alternatively, if both control and user traffic were anchored at the proxy server, the proxy server can do a simple update to the GGSN for accounting purposes, since data and control flow are already established with the GGSN through proxy server.
  • In either case, on handover (e.g., from a GPRS to a WLAN access network) the client preferably establishes a tunnel to the proxy server as its wireless gateway. When the handover happens, the proxy server already has all the control information of the GPRS session, because the control traffic passes through the proxy server, preferably no matter what access network is used.
  • In embodiments wherein the user equipment uses a WLAN access network, it is preferred that both control and user traffic are routed through the proxy server, and the proxy server acts as a wireless gateway server.
  • Traffic on the “access side” of the proxy server can thus take different paths, depending on the access network used by the user equipment. Traffic on the other side of the proxy server (e.g., toward a GGSN or other node) is preferably unchanged when the user equipment changes access networks. This efficient means of handover between access networks is facilitated by preferred embodiments' use of the proxy server to receive control traffic for the session.
  • In preferred embodiments, the present innovations are implemented using an address mapping mechanism that is internal to the proxy server and another node, such as a DNS server (as part of a GPRS network). The DNS server, which normally points traffic to a GGSN, instead points to the proxy server. The proxy server includes an address mapping mechanism that points in turn to the GGSN. As stated above, either control traffic or both control and user traffic are proxied in this way, depending on the specific implementation.
  • Thus the present innovations provide, in preferred embodiments, efficient handover between two types of access networks, retaining at least part of the connection to a target or destination network.
  • The proxy server thus allows the change in route to be invisible to the GGSN. Consistent connections may therefore be maintained with the same application-layer address and optimized even when data is routed through varying networks.
  • The disclosed inventions, in various embodiments, provide at least the following advantages:
      • Each application's data connections are not perturbed by movement, since changes in the client's local IP address can be concealed from at least some processes and the same application layer IP address can be used across different access networks.
      • Complexities due to access changes are HIDDEN from applications.
      • The GGSN can still operate normally, and does not have to know what the proxy server is doing, therefore supporting the handover with no or minimum changes to the existing GGSN node itself
      • The client can still operate normally, and does not have to know about the proxy server, therefore supporting the handover with no or minimum changes to the existing client itself.
      • If the DNS server for a selected APN does not point to the proxy server, then conventional operation will occur, and the rest of the network is not impacted.
      • The handover mechanisms enabled by the proxy server and found in some embodiments of the inventions preserve the address of the client with minimal messaging overhead.
      • Consistent connections may therefore be maintained and optimized even when data is routed through varying networks.
      • A centralized proxy server can optionally maintain records for billing and usage purposes for all varying services (especially in the case where the proxy server is handling both data and control).
      • A centralized proxy server can optimize traffic flow over a wide range of networks.
      • A centralized proxy server can maintain a unique identifier while a client travels through different ISP's
    BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The disclosed inventions will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, which show important sample embodiments of the invention and which are incorporated in the specification hereof by reference, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 shows an example overview of mobile networks with two possible access networks.
  • FIG. 2 shows an example implementation consistent with a preferred embodiment.
  • FIG. 3 shows a call flow consistent with implementing a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • FIG. 4 shows a call flow consistent with implementing a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • FIG. 5 shows an overview of the process steps for implementing a system consistent with a preferred embodiment of the present innovations.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The numerous innovations of the present application will be described with particular reference to the presently preferred embodiment (by way of example, and not of limitation).
  • The present innovations can be implemented in a number of different contexts. For purposes of clarity, specific examples are used to describe preferred embodiments, namely GPRS access networks and WLAN access networks are used by user equipment in the context of a wireless network, such as a cellular telephone network. These examples are not intended to limit the potential application or scope of the present innovations. The scope of these innovations is described in the claims.
  • FIG. 2 shows an overview of an example implementation consistent with a preferred embodiment. In this example, a GPRS access network 204 is used by a user equipment 202 such as a cellular telephone. For example, a GPRS access network signal is detected by the user equipment, but a WLAN signal is not detected. Therefore, the user connects using the GPRS access network. The GPRS access network 204 sends both control traffic 216 and user traffic 214 to the SGSN 206. The SGSN performs several functions, including GPRS authentication, APN selection, and DNS resolution of the APN (which points to the proxy server 208 rather than directly to the GGSN 210), which preferably causes the proxy server 208 to appear as the GGSN. A DNS server 218 is connected to both the SGSN and the proxy server. In this preferred embodiment, the protocol used is RADIUS, but other protocols could be used in other embodiments.
  • At the proxy server 208, APN translation is performed using a mapping mechanism to resolve the GGSN 210. In this example, the proxy server 208 appears to the GGSN 210 as the SGSN 206. Upon creating the connection to GGSN, proxy server can specify the route for both control and user traffic. If the proxy server anchors all the control and user traffic, all the traffic is routed from SGSN through proxy server to GGSN. If the proxy server anchors the control traffic only, proxy server specifies the SGSN as the user traffic end point to GGSN, resulting in the control traffic flowing from SGSN through proxy server to GGSN while user traffic flowing from SGSN to GGSN directly. The proxy server in this example acts as an anchor point for the control traffic 216 while the user traffic is routed directly to GGSN 214.
  • When a user equipment 202 roams within range of another access network, such as a WLAN access network 212, a handover process begins. The proxy server 208 checks that a session already exists for that user and updates the PDP context for the new access network. The control and user traffic are handed off to the new access network 212 and the connection to the old access network 204 is removed. In preferred embodiments, both control traffic and user traffic are sent through the proxy server 208 prior to being sent to the GGSN 210 (or other appropriate node).
  • Thus, in one example implementation, a preferred embodiment call flow starts at a GPRS access network. The control traffic flows from the access network to a SGSN, then to the proxy server, then to a GGSN. The user traffic can either follow this path, or it can go directly from the SGSN to the GGSN.
  • When a user is using a WLAN access network, the control and data are preferably both anchored at the proxy server, and from there routed to the GGSN.
  • In preferred embodiments, the proxy server acts as a GGSN when connecting to a SGSN. Similarly it acts as a SGSN when connecting to a GGSN. When the mobile connects over GPRS networks, SGSN connects to proxy server, acting as a GGSN. The proxy server maps the APN information to identify the actual GGSN from an APN mapping table. The proxy server proxies the connection request from SGSN to the actual GGSN. So, the PDP context is setup between the SGSN and the home GGSN via the proxy server. All the control and data flow of this PDP context flow through the proxy server. Since the GTP allows for separation of control and data traffic, one optimization is to proxy server only the control traffic and the data traffic path (or the GTP-U tunnel) is directly setup between SGSN and GGSN. For the WLAN connection, the proxy server acts as tunnel termination gateway, with an IPSec tunnel from the client to the proxy server. In this case, the proxy server acts as a SGSN and connects to the actual GGSN. The proxy server handles both control and user data in this case.
  • Handover Using Proxy Server
  • Following is a discussion of one example embodiment showing a handover between access networks using the innovative system including a proxy server. Since, in preferred embodiments, the sessions are setup through the proxy server to a common gateway node, GGSN, seamless handover can be achieved between different wireless access data networks. The sequence of the events when a mobile node roams, for example, between GPRS network and WLAN are:
      • 1. Client initiates the primary PDP context setup after it attaches to the GPRS network.
      • 2. SGSN performs the GTP tunnel setup by sending a create PDP context request to proxy server, since proxy server is configured as the GGSN node for the selected APN.
      • 3. Proxy server performs the APN mapping to identify the actual GGSN, which supports the requested service. The PDP context create request is proxied to this actual GGSN.
      • 4. The network, in this process, performs authorization and authentication as described in 3GPP specification TS 24.008. The PDP context is setup between SGSN and GGSN through the proxy server, acting in the control plane. An IP address is assigned to the client by the GGSN.
      • 5. The client can communicate with external network using the GGSN assigned PDP address. All the traffic flows between GGSN and client through SGSN.
      • 6. Upon entering into a WLAN coverage area a connection setup is initiated between the client and WLAN network.
      • 7. Proxy server performs authorization/authentication of the subscriber for WLAN access and initiates a PDP context switchover towards the actual GGSN.
      • 8. The existing PDP context GTP-U tunnel is switched over from SGSN to the proxy server. From that point onwards, all the traffic flows through the proxy server over the WLAN.
      • 9. When the mobile node leaves the WLAN coverage area, the GPRS session is updated on the attached SGSN. The SGSN create or updates the PDP context towards the proxy server.
      • 10. The proxy server updates the PDP context information on GGSN that transfers the GTP-U tunnel from proxy server to the SGSN. The traffic flows through SGSN from that point onwards.
    Seamless Roaming
  • The call flows in this case are as shown in FIG. 3. Each of the steps indicated in the diagram are explained below:
  • GPRS Connection Setup
      • 1. The mobile node attaches over the GSM air interface to initiate the GPRS session. The GPRS attach is made to the SGSN by providing the MN's Packet TMSI or IMSI, and the RAI. After having executed the GPRS attach, the MN is in READY state to activate the PDP contexts.
      • 2. The MN sends an Activate PDP context Request message to the SGSN with all required parameters viz., NSAPI, TI, PDP type, optional PDP address, optional APN, QoS requested and any PDP configuration options. SGSN performs the security functions to authorize and authenticate user by interacting with HLR, not shown in the figure. After these security functions are completed, there is a DNS resolution (shown in steps 2 a and 2 b in FIG. 3) where in the input is APN and the response from the DNS is the proxy server address.
      • 3. The SGSN performs the APN selection/GGSN resolution, and as a result, considering the proxy server as GGSN, sends a create PDP context request message to the proxy server, acting as a GGSN. The following minimum parameters are sent in the create request; PDP Type, APN, QoS Negotiated, TEID, NSAPI, MSISDN, Selection Mode, Charging Characteristics.
      • 4. Proxy server identifies the APN value in the request and maps to actual APN using an internal APN mapping table. This mapped APN is used for identifying the actual GGSN for this service. A second DNS resolution occurs (shown in steps 3 a and 3 b in FIG. 3) where the mapped APN is the input and the response from the DNS is the GGSN address. Proxy server then proxies the original PDP context create request to this GGSN. In the case of data path optimization, where the data tunnel is directly between SGSN and GGSN, proxy server explicitly specifies the value for SGSN node for data as the actual SGSN IP address. This case is explicitly shown in FIG. 4. In FIG. 4, there are two separate data tunnels shown through which user and control traffic may travel. The proxy server is able to accomplish data path optimization by separating the user and control traffic.
      • 5. GGSN validates the request and creates a new entry in its PDP context table and generates a charging Id. This allows GGSN to route PDP PDUs between the SGSN and the external packet data network. GGSN returns a create PDP context response with the approved values, including the dynamically assigned IP address.
      • 6. Proxy server verifies the response received from GGSN and proxies back to SGSN.
      • 7. The SGSN selects the Radio Priority and Packet flow Id based on the QoS negotiated. An activate PDP context accept message with the negotiated parameters (PDP Type, PDP Address, TI, QoS Negotiated, Radio Priority, Packet Flow Id and PDP configuration options) is sent to MN. The SGSN is now able to route PDP PDUs between the GGSN and MN.
    GPRS Data Flow
      • 8. The client uses the GGSN assigned PDP address as the IP address to communicate to other nodes. The traffic between the client and SGSN are transferred using standard GPRS mechanism. There are two GTP tunnels: GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN for both control and user traffic.
    Roaming Into WLAN Hotspot
  • The client is triggered either automatically (by detecting a preferred WLAN) or manually (explicitly initiation) to initiate a handover to WLAN. The process of setting up WLAN connection and handover of connection are as follows:
  • WLAN Connection Setup
      • 9. The client associates to a WLAN access point over the 802.11 radio. AP (or the hotspot gateway) can perform any authorization and security functions, including EAPOL, WPA, for additional security.
      • 10. Client sends a request to the proxy server to setup a secure connection by including the IMSI value and optional APN information. Proxy server performs the authentication of the client for WLAN access through standard procedures.
      • 11. Proxy server identifies that a GTP tunnel exists for this IMSI and APN, towards the GGSN. To perform the tunnel switchover, proxy server sends an update PDP context request with the context parameters, defined in 3GPP specification TS29.060.
      • 12. GGSN validates the update request and sends the update response to the proxy server. In this process any new QoS values can be negotiated due to change of access network.
      • 13. Proxy server sends a session setup response to the client, including the IP address that was assigned by the GGSN during GTP tunnel setup through GPRS. This becomes possible because the proxy server is acting as an anchor for GPRS and WLAN traffic.
      • 14. Now the client has flow paths to the same GGSN with different priority levels through different access network. There is no change in the IP address of the client since proxy server maintains the same IP address toward the client, thus no impact to the higher layer protocols. There is only one GTP tunnel between the proxy server and the GGSN and both control and user traffic are delivered in this GTP tunnel. The packets are sent over WLAN to proxy server, which tunnels them to the GGSN. GGSN de-capsulate the packets and routes to external network. Packets destined for the client arriving at the GGSN, are tunneled over the GTP tunnel to proxy server. The packet is de-capsulated at proxy server and forwarded to the client over the WLAN connection. The proxy server switches the traffic path between GPRS and WLAN. This way the entire traffic stream is handed over to the WLAN connection seamlessly.
    Roaming Out of WLAN Hotspot—Handback to GPRS
      • 15. When the MN roams out of the WLAN hotspot and the WLAN signal strength gets weaker below threshold level, client initiates the GPRS connection by doing the GPRS attach action as defined in step 1 above. Note that this step is optional if the mobile is already GPRS attached. In case mobile is GPRS attached and comes back to GPRS, then the mobile performs the routing area update procedure.
      • 16. Client sends a create GPRS session request to SGSN. This is similar to step 2above.
      • 17. The SGSN sends a create PDP context request to proxy server acting as a proxy server as in step 3 above.
      • 18. Proxy server verifies the request and checks for any existing PDP context (or GTP tunnel) for this IMSI. Since there is context associated with IMSI, proxy server sends an update PDP context request to the corresponding GGSN. The Proxy server IP address is used for both control and user plane tunnel end point.
      • 19. GGSN updates the PDP context information and sends the update PDP context response to the proxy server.
      • 20. Proxy server and sends the create PDP context response to SGSN.
      • 21. SGSN responds to the client with the message received from proxy server. This is same as step 7 above.
      • 22. The data from the client is now transferred over the GPRS connection to the same GGSN node, through the SGSN and proxy server. Since the session, as observed from any external node, didn't change, the session is seamlessly handed back to GPRS network. There are two GTP tunnels: GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN. It is again noted that user and control traffic can be separated, thereby following separate paths, or they can be transmitted along the same path.
  • A data flow illustration of one embodiment of this proxy server this is shown in FIG. 3. In this proxy-based handover without a separate data tunnel, the first step is to have the client connect to and create a PDP context with the proxy server for both control and user plane data. (Step 310). The next step is to have the proxy server establish the GTP tunnel to GGSN for both control and user plane data. With this procedure, all the data, both control and user traffic are transferred from SGSN to GGSN through proxy server. When the client enters to WLAN area, an undate PDP context request is made to the GGSN from proxy server where information regarding the WLAN area that the client has entered is transmitted (Step 330). Both control and user plane data path is handed over to proxy server from SGSN, and data flow is then made from the client through the proxy server to GGSN (Step 340). When the client leaves the WLAN area it attaches to the GPRS system again and updates the PDP context so that data flow will commence from the client through SGSN and proxy server to the GGSN.
  • Another data flow illustration of another embodiment of this proxy this is shown in FIG. 4. In this proxy-based handover with a separate data path, the first step is to have the client connect to and create a primary PDP context with the proxy server (Step 410). The next step is to have the proxy server to establish the GTP tunnel with GGSN (Step 420). The proxy server indicates to the GGSN that SGSN is the tunnel end point for user plane data and the proxy server itself is the tunnel end point for control plane data. The proxy server then indicates to the SGSN that GGSN is the tunnel end point for user plane data and the proxy server itself is the tunnel end point for control plane data (Step 430). After this procedure, there are separate routes for control and user plane data. The control traffic is routed in two GTP tunnels—GTP tunnel between SGSN and proxy server, and GTP tunnel between proxy server and GGSN. The user traffic is routed in one GTP tunnel between SGSN and GGSN. (step 430) When the client enters WLAN area, the client requests to create the WLAN session to the proxy server, where information regarding the WLAN area that the client has entered is transmitted (Step 440). Then the proxy server receives this request, it checks if there is a session for this user and this APN. If present, the proxy server sends the ‘update PDP context request’ to the GGSN. In this update PDP context request, the proxy server takes over the user plane data from SGSN, so that both control and user plane data is transferred through proxy server. An advantage of using this method is to proxy server only the control traffic through the proxy server when user is connected to GPRS. The data traffic will be directly tunneled between SGSN and GGSN, just like in a standard GPRS architecture, therefore reducing one hop for the user data. When the user is connected to WLAN, proxy server handles both control and user plane traffic. When the client leaves the WLAN area it must then attach to the GPRS system and update the PDP context so that user data flow will commence from the client through SGSN to GGSN, bypassing the proxy server. For the control traffic, the data will flow from the client through SGSN and proxy server to GGSN, making the proxy server the anchor point for control messages.
  • In one example embodiment, sessions are setup through proxy server to a common gateway node, GGSN, and seamless handover can be achieved between different wireless data networks. FIG. 5 illustrates one sequence of events that can be followed to implement this embodiment. These are not the only steps that may be used to implement the invention, but are illustrative of the different types of steps that are available.
  • First, a client initiates the primary PDP context setup after it attaches to the GPRS network (Step 510). Then, a SGSN performs the GTP tunnel setup by sending a create PDP context request to WG, since it is configured as the GGSN node for this mobile node (Step 520). The network, in this preferred embodiment, performs authorization and authentication as described in 3GPP specification TS 24.008. Next, a WG performs the APN mapping to identify the actual GGSN, which the user is subscribed to. The Create PDP context request is proxied to this actual GGSN (Step 530). The PDP context is setup between SGSN and GGSN through WG, acting in the control plane. An IP address is assigned to the client by the GGSN (Step 540). The client can then communicate with external network using the GGSN assigned PDP address. All the traffic flows between GGSN and client through proxy server (Step 550). In this example embodiment, the proxy server becomes the anchor point for the traffic and has all the information on the user session. Alternatively, for routing optimization, the proxy server can anchor the control traffic only. In this case, the user traffic is routed from SGSN to GGSN directly. The proxy server still has all the necessary information of the user session, though, because it is anchoring the control traffic. Upon entering into a WLAN coverage area, client detects the presence of WLAN and initiates the connection setup toward the proxy server, which acts as a WG over WLAN network by providing the authentication credentials, including IMSI (Step 560). The proxy server performs authorization/authentication of the subscriber for WLAN access and initiates a PDP context switchover towards the GGSN (Step 570). The existing GTP tunnel endpoint for both user and control traffic is updated as proxy server. From that point onwards, all the user and control traffic flows through the proxy server over the WLAN (Step 580) to GGSN. When the mobile node leaves the WLAN coverage area, the GPRS session is updated on the attached SGSN (Step 590). The SGSN creates or updates the PDP context towards the proxy server. The proxy server then updates the PDP context information on GGSN (Step 595). If the proxy server is anchoring both user and control traffic, there is no additional action required from the proxy server except notifying the GGSN on the change of access network, because it is already acting as the tunnel end point for both user and control traffic toward GGSN. If the proxy server is anchoring only the control traffic, it updates the GGSN to change the user traffic tunnel end point becomes the SGSN.
  • According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of: when a multifunction mobile client is in a GPRS session, routing GPRS control and user traffic to an SGSN; routing at least the GRPS control traffic to a GGSN through a proxy server transparently to the client; and routing the GPRS user traffic to a GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server.
  • According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of: when a multifunction mobile client accesses a GPRS network using an IP-based access technology: routing control traffic and user traffic to a proxy server; and transparently to the mobile client, routing the control traffic and user traffic from the proxy server to a GGSN.
  • According to a disclosed class of innovative embodiments, there is provided: A wireless network system, comprising: a proxy server adapted to support both GPRS traffic and a non-GPRS and IP-based traffic from a mobile client and to communicate with a GGSN through GPRS protocol; wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network: GPRS control traffic is sent to the GGSN through a proxy server, transparently to the mobile client; and GPRS user traffic is sent to the GGSN either through the proxy server or directly from an SGSN; and wherein when the mobile client uses a non-GPRS, IP-based access network: both control traffic and user traffic are sent to the proxy server; and transparently to the mobile client, both control traffic and user traffic are routed to the GGSN.
  • Modifications and Variations
  • As will be recognized by those skilled in the art, the innovative concepts described in the present application can be modified and varied over a tremendous range of applications, and accordingly the scope of patented subject matter is not limited by any of the specific exemplary teachings given.
  • For example, the present innovations can be implemented, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, using any number of network types to maintain consistent connectivity while moving into and out of a network coverage area.
  • Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is the EDGE network WiFiMAX technology to enable constant connectivity.
  • Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of a router or other device to act as the proxy server as a standalone unit away from the GGSN.
  • Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of integrated telecommunications system to act as the proxy server away from the GGSN.
  • Another example, that the present innovations can be implemented using, consistent and within the scope of the concepts disclosed herein, is use of a proxy server as a data distribution point where data is separated into two separate streams and the streams are optimized by the proxy server for specific connections.
  • Additional general background, which helps to show variations and implementations, may be found in the following publications, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference: 3G Mobile Networks, S. Kasera, N. Narang, McGraw-Hill, 2005.
  • Abbreviations:
  • The following is a list of abbreviations and meanings determined from the application. These abbreviations are intended only as a source of clarity and not intended to limit the scope of the application, nor are they intended to contradict ordinary meaning to those of skill in the art.
  • Abbreviation Words Represented By Abbreviations 3GPP 3rd Generation Partnership Project AP Access Point APN Access Point Name BSC The Base Station Controller BSS The Base Station Subsystem CN Correspondent Node COA Care of Address ESS Electronic Switching System FA Foreign Agent GGSN Gateway GPRS Support Node GPRS General Packet Radio Services GSM The Global System for Mobile Communications GSN GPRS Support Node GTP GPRS Tunneling Protocol HA Home Agent IMSI International Mobile Subscriber Identity IPv4 Version 4 of the Internet Protocol IPv6 Version 6 of the Internet Protocol LAN Local Area Network MIP Mobile IP MN Mobile Node MSISDN Mobile Station Integrated Services Digital Network MT Message Transfer NSAPI Network Service Access Point Identifier PDP Packet Data Protocol PDU Protocol Data Unit QoS Quality of Service. SGSN Serving GPRS Support Node TEID Terminal Equipment ID TFT The Traffic Flow Template TI Tunnel Identifier TOS Type of Service TS Technical Specification UMTS Universal Mobile Telecommunications System WGS Wireless Gateway Server Wi-Fi Wireless Fidelity WLAN Wireless Local Area Network
  • None of the description in the present application should be read as implying that any particular element, step, or function is an essential element which must be included in the claim scope: THE SCOPE OF PATENTED SUBJECT MATTER IS DEFINED ONLY BY THE ALLOWED CLAIMS. Moreover, none of these claims are intended to invoke paragraph six of 35 USC section 112 unless the exact words “means for” are followed by a participle.
  • The claims as filed are intended to be as comprehensive as possible, and NO subject matter is intentionally relinquished, dedicated, or abandoned.

Claims (28)

1. A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of:
when a multifunction mobile client is in a GPRS session, routing GPRS control and user traffic to an SGSN;
routing at least the GRPS control traffic to a GGSN through a proxy server transparently to the client; and
routing the GPRS user traffic to a GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the route of the user traffic is determined at the proxy server and this information becomes available to the SGSN and the GGSN by the proxy server.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the route of the user traffic is specified by the tunnel end point provided by the proxy server, where if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN directly to GGSN bypassing the proxy server, and where if the proxy server is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN to the GGSN through the proxy server.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the routing of either GPRS control traffic or GPRS control and user traffic from the SGSN to the proxy server happens through an address resolution mechanism internal to an address resolution node, accessed by SGSN.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the routing of either GPRS control traffic or GPRS control and user traffic from the proxy to the GGSN happens through an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy and an address resolution node, accessible by a proxy.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the GPRS user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the user traffic tunnel end point to be either the proxy server or the SGSN.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein when the mobile client switches to a non-GPRS, IP-based access technology during a GPRS session, using the proxy server as a wireless gateway for the client while continuing to communicate at least some GPRS control and user traffic through the proxy server.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the IP-based access technology is a wireless local area network.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein the client's application layer IP address does not change when access networks are changed, wherein the proxy server maintains the control of the user session and keeps the IP address the same.
10. The method of claim 7, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity, by the proxy server maintaining the control of the user session toward the GGSN while switching the access networks.
11. A method of wireless communication, comprising the steps of:
when a multifunction mobile client accesses a GPRS network using an IP-based access technology:
routing control traffic and user traffic to a proxy server; and
transparently to the mobile client, routing the control traffic and user traffic from the proxy server to a GGSN.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising the steps of, when the mobile client switches to a GPRS access technology, routing control and user traffic from the mobile client to an SGSN; and
transparently to the mobile client, routing at least GPRS control traffic from the SGSN to the proxy server; and routing the GPRS user traffic to the GGSN, either directly from the SGSN or through the proxy server
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the route of the user traffic is determined at the proxy server and this information becomes available to the SGSN and the GGSN by the proxy server.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the GPRS user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the user traffic tunnel end point to be either the proxy server or the SGSN.
15. The method of claim 12, wherein the route of the user traffic is specified by the tunnel end point provided by the proxy server, where if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN directly to the GGSN bypassing the proxy server, and where if the proxy server is specified as the tunnel end point for user traffic, then the user traffic is routed from the SGSN to the GGSN through the proxy server, thereby separating the control and user traffic.
16. The method of claim 2, wherein the routing of traffic from the proxy to the GGSN happens using an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy server and an address resolution node, transparently to the mobile client.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein the client's application layer IP address does not change when access networks are changed by the proxy server maintaining the control of a user session upon handover and keeping the IP address the same.
18. The method of claim 12, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity by the proxy server maintaining control of a user session toward the GGSN and switching access networks upon handover.
19. A wireless network system, comprising:
a proxy server adapted to support both GPRS traffic and a non-GPRS and IP-based traffic from a mobile client and to communicate with a GGSN through GPRS protocol;
wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network:
GPRS control traffic is sent to the GGSN through a proxy server, transparently to the mobile client; and
GPRS user traffic is sent to the GGSN either through the proxy server or directly from an SGSN; and
wherein when the mobile client uses a non-GPRS, IP-based access network:
both control traffic and user traffic are sent to the proxy server; and
transparently to the mobile client, both control traffic and user traffic are routed to the GGSN.
20. The system of claim 19, wherein the routing to the proxy server is by use of an address resolution mechanism internal to an address resolution node and the routing from the proxy server to the GGSN is by use of an address mapping mechanism and an address resolution mechanism internal to the proxy and the address resolution node.
21 The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the routing of the user traffic is decided by proxy by use of specifying the tunnel end point of the user traffic.
22. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the user traffic is routed to the GGSN through the proxy server if the proxy server is specified as a tunnel end point of the user traffic; and the user traffic is routed directly to the GGSN if the SGSN is specified as the tunnel end point of the user traffic.
23. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client uses a GPRS access network, the user traffic route can be changed any time by updating the tunnel end point of the user traffic; where the tunnel end point of the user traffic can be either proxy or SGSN.
24. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client changes from a first access network of a first type to a second access network of a second type, the proxy server acts as an anchor point for at least the control traffic and maintains the route toward the GGSN and switches the control path between two access networks.
25. The system of claim 19, wherein when the mobile client changes from a first access network of a first type to a second access network of a second type, the user traffic is routed according to the type of the access network.
26. The system of claim 20, wherein the first access network type is a GPRS access network, and wherein the second access network type is a WLAN access network.
27. The system of claim 19, wherein the client's IP address does not change when access networks are changed by the proxy server acting as the anchor point and maintaining control of the user session and keeping the IP address the same upon access network change.
28. The system of claim 19, wherein access networks can be changed while maintaining service continuity by the proxy server acting as the anchor point and maintaining the control of the user session toward the GGSN and switching between the access networks.
US11/570,323 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks Abandoned US20080130637A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US62985504P true 2004-11-18 2004-11-18
US70522405P true 2005-08-03 2005-08-03
PCT/US2005/042239 WO2006055939A2 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining consistent network connections while moving through wireless networks
US11/570,323 US20080130637A1 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/570,323 US20080130637A1 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080130637A1 true US20080130637A1 (en) 2008-06-05

Family

ID=36407860

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/234,072 Active 2030-05-22 US8238326B2 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-09-23 Maintaining consistent network connections while moving through wireless networks
US11/570,323 Abandoned US20080130637A1 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining Consistent Network Connections While Moving Through Wireless Networks
US11/282,956 Abandoned US20060153124A1 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining consistent network connections using a secondary PDP context

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/234,072 Active 2030-05-22 US8238326B2 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-09-23 Maintaining consistent network connections while moving through wireless networks

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/282,956 Abandoned US20060153124A1 (en) 2004-11-18 2005-11-18 Maintaining consistent network connections using a secondary PDP context

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (3) US8238326B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1834446A4 (en)
JP (1) JP2008521366A (en)
KR (1) KR20070104521A (en)
AU (1) AU2005306294A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2588974A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2440017A (en)
WO (2) WO2006055939A2 (en)

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060187926A1 (en) * 2005-02-23 2006-08-24 Kddi Corporation Communications session switching method and system
US20060209768A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2006-09-21 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Service in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US20060291484A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Naqvi Shamim A Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US20060291487A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Aylus Networks, Inc. IMS networks with AVS sessions with multiple access networks
US20060291412A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Naqvi Shamim A Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US20060291448A1 (en) * 2005-06-23 2006-12-28 Nokia Corporation Fixed access point for a terminal device
US20070232301A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Fujitsu Limited Roaming in wireless networks
US20070297378A1 (en) * 2006-06-21 2007-12-27 Nokia Corporation Selection Of Access Interface
US20080019387A1 (en) * 2006-07-24 2008-01-24 Samsung Electronics Co.; Ltd Bridge-based radio access station backbone network system and signal processing method therefor
US20080049695A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2008-02-28 Nec Corporation Wireless Local Area Network system
US20080137686A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-06-12 Starent Networks Corporation Systems, methods, media, and means for hiding network topology
US20080165725A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-07-10 Nokia Corporation Removing GTP-U path management in UGAN
US20080205379A1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-08-28 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US20080219218A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2008-09-11 Gunnar Rydnell Gtp for Integration of Multiple Access
US20080261593A1 (en) * 2007-04-17 2008-10-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for IMS user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20080259887A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-10-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network
US20080274744A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-11-06 Naqvi Shamim A Systems and Methods for Using a Recipient Handset as a Remote Screen
US20080291905A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-11-27 Kiran Chakravadhanula Systems and Methods for Real-Time Cellular-to-Internet Video Transfer
US20080305768A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2008-12-11 Tomas Nylander Validating User Identity by Cooperation Between Core Network and Access Controller
US20080317010A1 (en) * 2007-06-22 2008-12-25 Aylus Networks, Inc. System and method for signaling optimization in ims services by using a service delivery platform
US20090238099A1 (en) * 2008-03-24 2009-09-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Dynamic home network assignment
US20100039978A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Starent Networks, Corp Multimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
US20100125902A1 (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-05-20 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Seamless data networking
US20100208659A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2010-08-19 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Local break out in case of wimax roaming
WO2010132700A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2010-11-18 Nortel Networks Limited Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
US20110044198A1 (en) * 2008-04-21 2011-02-24 Teleonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (publ) QCI Mapping at Roaming and Handover
US20120203926A1 (en) * 2010-08-16 2012-08-09 Michael Camp IP Network Service Redirector Device and Method
US20130086142A1 (en) * 2011-09-30 2013-04-04 K. Georg Hampel System and Method for Mobility and Multi-Homing Content Retrieval Applications
US20130091196A1 (en) * 2011-10-10 2013-04-11 Fred L. Templin Method and apparatus for client-directed inbound traffic engineering over tunnel virtual network links
USRE44412E1 (en) 2005-06-24 2013-08-06 Aylus Networks, Inc. Digital home networks having a control point located on a wide area network
US20140126532A1 (en) * 2012-11-05 2014-05-08 Stoke, Inc. Seamless mobility from 3g network to wifi network
US20160174107A1 (en) * 2014-12-12 2016-06-16 Satish Kanugovi Wifi boost with lte ip anchor
US9806905B2 (en) 2014-12-14 2017-10-31 Alcatel Lucent WiFi boost with uplink offload to LTE with independent IP addresses

Families Citing this family (106)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2280780T3 (en) 2002-09-24 2007-09-16 Orange Sa Method for a channel of selection of a channel to transfer data packages.
ES2269974T3 (en) * 2003-01-09 2007-04-01 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Procedure and network of mobile radio telecommunications for the transmission of data in packages.
JP4472537B2 (en) * 2005-01-21 2010-06-02 パナソニック株式会社 Packet control apparatus, authentication server, and wireless communication system
US20060221986A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-05 Micael Berg An Arrangement, a Functional Means and a Method in a Network Supporting Communication of Packet Data
CA2603321C (en) * 2005-04-14 2014-08-12 Lg Electronics Inc. A method of reconfiguring an internet protocol address in handover between heterogeneous networks
US20060265504A1 (en) * 2005-05-18 2006-11-23 Azaire Networks Inc. Universal convergence border gateway
US7817622B2 (en) * 2005-05-19 2010-10-19 Nokia Corporation Unlicensed mobile access optimization
US20070002868A1 (en) * 2005-06-29 2007-01-04 Haibo Qian Location based quality of service (QoS) control
CA2616417C (en) * 2005-08-22 2016-02-09 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) A method and arrangement for establishing a communication session for multimedia
KR101268579B1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2013-05-28 한국전자통신연구원 An Apparatus and a Method for Service Continuity between UMTS network and WLAN
KR101268578B1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2013-05-28 한국전자통신연구원 An Apparatus and a Method for Service Continuity between UMTS network and WLAN network
WO2007049936A1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2007-05-03 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. System and method for handover between interworking wlan and eutran access systems
KR20070050256A (en) * 2005-11-10 2007-05-15 엘지노텔 주식회사 Apparatus and method for processing packet terminated call using mobile ip in the next-generation radio packet service network
EP2099160A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2009-09-09 BenQ Corporation Method for client-server-based communication over several interfaces and client supporting this method
CN101352004B (en) * 2005-12-30 2012-10-10 艾利森电话股份有限公司 Redirection of B-grade PDP data stream to A-grade PDP before establishing B-grade PDP context
US8218530B2 (en) * 2006-01-05 2012-07-10 Qualcomm Incorporated Seamless handoff between access networks with saved session information
US20070197227A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2007-08-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. System and method for enabling combinational services in wireless networks by using a service delivery platform
US20070195801A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2007-08-23 Nokia Corporation Context-based processing of data flows
FI20060240A0 (en) * 2006-03-13 2006-03-13 Nokia Corp Procedure for transmitting information during a handover in a communication system
EP1841142A1 (en) 2006-03-27 2007-10-03 Matsushita Electric Industries Co. Ltd. Sleep-state and service initiation for mobile terminal
US20090059848A1 (en) * 2006-07-14 2009-03-05 Amit Khetawat Method and System for Supporting Large Number of Data Paths in an Integrated Communication System
FR2904914B1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2008-09-26 Alcatel Sa Interworking management method for transferring service sessions from a wireless local network to a mobile network, and corresponding sgsn nodes
FR2904913B1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2008-09-26 Alcatel Sa Interworking management method for transferring multiple service sessions between a mobile network and a wireless local network, and corresponding equipment
EP1887740A1 (en) * 2006-08-11 2008-02-13 Nokia Siemens Networks Gmbh & Co. Kg Determination of the initiator for a configuration or an establishment of an access network connection
CN101128043B (en) 2006-08-15 2011-02-02 华为技术有限公司 Data processing method for switching between systems or change
CN104244219B (en) * 2006-08-16 2018-04-20 艾利森电话股份有限公司 GGSN for a tunnel solution is acted on behalf of
EP2052563B1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2013-10-16 Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson (publ) Ggsn proxy for one tunnel solution
WO2008047231A2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2008-04-24 Alcatel Lucent Mobility between uma access and gprs/umts access
US7920522B2 (en) * 2006-09-29 2011-04-05 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for system interoperability in wireless communications
US8155078B2 (en) 2006-10-20 2012-04-10 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems and methods for using internet mobility protocols with non internet mobility protocols
CN101170808B (en) * 2006-10-25 2011-03-30 华为技术有限公司 Switching method and system for heterogenous access systems
EP1919226B1 (en) * 2006-11-06 2013-01-02 Vodafone Holding GmbH Method for communicating activation information for primary PDP contexts, method for activating primary PDP contexts, as well a telecommunications network and a mobile electronic terminal
US7853691B2 (en) * 2006-11-29 2010-12-14 Broadcom Corporation Method and system for securing a network utilizing IPsec and MACsec protocols
EP2100473B1 (en) * 2006-12-05 2019-10-16 Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson (publ) Methods for controlling access domain switching, network nodes, user terminal and computer program product therefor
US8441949B2 (en) * 2006-12-14 2013-05-14 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) Methods, apparatuses and computer program products for routing a call from a circuit switched domain to a unified service domain
WO2008079063A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-03 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) SERVlCE BASED HANDOVER COMBINED WITH MS AND NETWORK INITIATED SECONDARY PDP CONTEXT ACTIVATION
CN101212810B (en) 2006-12-27 2012-04-25 华为技术有限公司 Customer premise equipment switching method in radio network
US7764963B2 (en) * 2007-04-11 2010-07-27 Cisco Technology, Inc. GW coupled SIP proxy
FR2916926B1 (en) * 2007-05-28 2009-10-09 Alcatel Lucent Sas Methods of managing interworking between a visible 3gpp network having 3gpp and wlan access networks and a home 3gpp network for a mobile station through and sgsn node and ttg gateway corresponding
US8488519B2 (en) * 2007-06-22 2013-07-16 Cisco Technology, Inc. Load-balanced NSAPI allocation for iWLAN
CN101365230B (en) 2007-08-07 2010-08-11 华为技术有限公司 Customer separating method, system and apparatus when heterogeneous network switching/changing
US8233401B2 (en) * 2007-08-13 2012-07-31 Cisco Technology, Inc. Using an IP registration to automate SIP registration
CN101384081B (en) 2007-09-07 2013-06-05 华为技术有限公司 Method and apparatus for transmitting service anchor positioning information
GB2453752A (en) * 2007-10-17 2009-04-22 Ericsson Telefon Ab L M Proxy mobile IP communications network
CN101442417B (en) * 2007-11-21 2011-11-16 华为技术有限公司 Method, apparatus and system for implementing pre-payment in network
US8321525B2 (en) * 2007-11-27 2012-11-27 Loyalblocks Ltd. Method, device and system for creating a virtual local social network
US8730842B2 (en) 2007-11-29 2014-05-20 Jasper Wireless, Inc. Connectivity management and diagnostics for cellular data devices
KR101409945B1 (en) * 2007-12-04 2014-06-20 주식회사 케이티 SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR SUPPORTING MOBILITY TO PROVIDE PERSONALIZED SERVICE BASED ON IPv6 BETWEEN DIFFERENT WIRELESS NETWORKS
US8462728B2 (en) * 2007-12-24 2013-06-11 Apple Inc. Method and wireless system for achieving local anchoring of a mobile node
US20090180429A1 (en) * 2008-01-10 2009-07-16 Qwest Communications International Inc. Broadband Unlicensed Spread Spectrum
FI20080032A0 (en) * 2008-01-16 2008-01-16 Joikusoft Oy Ltd Smartphone as a WLAN access point
US8611210B2 (en) * 2008-02-26 2013-12-17 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Method and apparatus for reliable broadcast/multicast service
US8599765B2 (en) * 2008-03-21 2013-12-03 Blackberry Limited Evolved packet system quality of service enforcement deactivation handling to prevent unexpected user equipment detach
CN101547483B (en) * 2008-03-28 2011-04-20 华为技术有限公司 Method for switching cross-network tunnel and inter-network inter-working equipment
US7970931B2 (en) * 2008-06-26 2011-06-28 Microsoft Corporation Policy-based routing in a multi-homed computer
WO2010039907A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-08 Spidercloud Wireless Handoff procedures and intra-network data routing for femtocell networks
US8750863B2 (en) * 2009-02-13 2014-06-10 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. Selection of roaming gateway
US9036541B2 (en) 2009-02-17 2015-05-19 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. Location-based IMS server selection
DE102009033250A1 (en) * 2009-07-14 2011-04-14 Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen Method for transmitting active communication link between mobile terminal and end point, involves executing authentication of mobile terminal opposite to access network and configuration of communication link through access network
US9100983B2 (en) * 2009-11-27 2015-08-04 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Telecommunications method, protocol and apparatus for improved quality of service handling
EP2405678A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2012-01-11 British Telecommunications public limited company System and method for roaming WLAN authentication
US9807602B2 (en) 2010-04-07 2017-10-31 Qualcomm Incorporated Apparatus and method for connection establishment in a communications network
US8885536B2 (en) * 2010-04-13 2014-11-11 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for managing local internet protocol offload
US8774128B2 (en) * 2010-04-19 2014-07-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for detachment from a wireless communication network
US9445215B2 (en) * 2010-04-21 2016-09-13 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) MTC device bandwidth reduction
US8538405B2 (en) 2010-04-29 2013-09-17 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. Communication protocol preferences
US8923309B2 (en) 2010-04-29 2014-12-30 T-Mobile Usa, Inc. Managing access gateways
US8825874B2 (en) * 2010-06-14 2014-09-02 Alcatel Lucent Extending revalidation-time of diameter sessions
KR101707543B1 (en) * 2010-06-24 2017-02-16 주식회사 케이티 Method for handover according to services based on PMIP and system thereof
CN101909058B (en) * 2010-07-30 2013-01-16 天维讯达无线电设备检测(北京)有限责任公司 Platform authentication strategy management method and system suitable for credible connecting architecture
US8812050B1 (en) * 2011-05-05 2014-08-19 Time Warner Cable Enterprises Llc Handoff management in a multi-layer wireless network
CN102340891B (en) * 2011-10-12 2018-10-26 南京中兴新软件有限责任公司 Multi-mode terminal service switching method and device
CN102573010B (en) * 2012-01-06 2019-01-04 上海中兴软件有限责任公司 Data transmission method and device based on Multi net voting
CN102448136B (en) * 2012-01-10 2018-09-28 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Multi-mode terminal service switching method and device
US9774894B2 (en) * 2012-03-13 2017-09-26 Cisco Technology, Inc. Coordinating video delivery with radio frequency conditions
EP2829154A1 (en) * 2012-03-20 2015-01-28 Femto Access Ltd. Dual-protocol femtocell-less communications
DK2658333T3 (en) * 2012-04-26 2015-12-14 Belgacom Internat Carrier Services APN Correction System and Procedure in GTP Messages for GPRS Data Services Provided by a Mobile Operator Using a Sponsor Network
US9426718B2 (en) 2012-05-16 2016-08-23 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems and methods for data exchange over common communication links
US9125123B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-01 All Purpose Networks LLC Efficient delivery of real-time asynchronous services over a wireless network
US9031511B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-05-12 All Purpose Networks LLC Operational constraints in LTE FDD systems using RF agile beam forming techniques
US9179352B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-11-03 All Purpose Networks LLC Efficient delivery of real-time synchronous services over a wireless network
US9219541B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-12-22 All Purpose Networks LLC Baseband data transmission and reception in an LTE wireless base station employing periodically scanning RF beam forming techniques
US9084143B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-07-14 All Purpose Networks LLC Network migration queuing service in a wireless network
US9882950B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2018-01-30 All Purpose Networks LLC Methods and systems of an all purpose broadband network
US9179354B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-11-03 All Purpose Networks LLC Efficient delivery of real-time synchronous services over a wireless network
US9084155B2 (en) * 2012-06-13 2015-07-14 All Purpose Networks LLC Optimized broadband wireless network performance through base station application server
US9137675B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-15 All Purpose Networks LLC Operational constraints in LTE TDD systems using RF agile beam forming techniques
US9503927B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2016-11-22 All Purpose Networks LLC Multiple-use wireless network
US9179392B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-11-03 All Purpose Networks LLC Efficient delivery of real-time asynchronous services over a wireless network
US9094803B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-07-28 All Purpose Networks LLC Wireless network based sensor data collection, processing, storage, and distribution
US9144082B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-22 All Purpose Networks LLC Locating and tracking user equipment in the RF beam areas of an LTE wireless system employing agile beam forming techniques
US9107094B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-08-11 All Purpose Networks LLC Methods and systems of an all purpose broadband network
US9131385B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-08 All Purpose Networks LLC Wireless network based sensor data collection, processing, storage, and distribution
US9125064B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-01 All Purpose Networks LLC Efficient reduction of inter-cell interference using RF agile beam forming techniques
US9144075B2 (en) 2012-06-13 2015-09-22 All Purpose Networks LLC Baseband data transmission and reception in an LTE wireless base station employing periodically scanning RF beam forming techniques
US8565689B1 (en) 2012-06-13 2013-10-22 All Purpose Networks LLC Optimized broadband wireless network performance through base station application server
US10194414B2 (en) * 2013-01-07 2019-01-29 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Information centric networking based service centric networking
US9071959B2 (en) 2013-02-21 2015-06-30 International Business Machines Corporation Service awareness and seamless switchover between client based WiFi access and mobile data network access
US9398505B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-07-19 Google Inc. Reducing stream interruptions during network handover
US9241292B2 (en) 2013-09-25 2016-01-19 Google Inc. Seamless application connectivity
US9143512B2 (en) 2013-10-04 2015-09-22 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Communication devices, computer readable storage devices, and methods for secure multi-path communication
WO2015061698A1 (en) 2013-10-25 2015-04-30 Benu Networks, Inc. System and method for configuring a universal device to provide desired network hardware functionality
US10382981B2 (en) 2014-02-25 2019-08-13 Roblox Corporation Cellular network protocol optimizations
US10098174B2 (en) * 2014-02-25 2018-10-09 Chetan Ahuja Maintaining continuous sessions in cellular data networks
FR3021836A1 (en) * 2014-05-28 2015-12-04 Orange Method for informing an entity of an ip network of the access network type used by a terminal
US10326615B2 (en) * 2015-04-10 2019-06-18 Avago Technologies International Sales Pte. Limited Cellular-wireless local area network (WLAN) interworking

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020150091A1 (en) * 2001-04-17 2002-10-17 Jussi Lopponen Packet mode speech communication
US20040139201A1 (en) * 2002-06-19 2004-07-15 Mobility Network Systems, Inc. Method and system for transparently and securely interconnecting a WLAN radio access network into a GPRS/GSM core network
US20050007984A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2005-01-13 Interdigital Technology Corporation Method and architecture for accessing an internet protocol multimedia subsystem (IMS) over a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US20050025164A1 (en) * 2003-07-16 2005-02-03 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Seamless hand-off of mobile node to a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US6891842B2 (en) * 2001-09-21 2005-05-10 Nokia Corporation System and method for enabling mobile edge services
US20050102410A1 (en) * 2003-10-24 2005-05-12 Nokia Corporation Communication system
US7151931B2 (en) * 2002-06-19 2006-12-19 Industrial Technology Research Institute Method and system enabling roaming between different wireless networks
US7218618B2 (en) * 2002-07-19 2007-05-15 Nokia Corporation Method of providing mobile IP functionality for a non mobile IP capable mobile node and switching device for acting as a mobile IP proxy
US7239632B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2007-07-03 Tatara Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for converging local area and wide area wireless data networks
US7394795B2 (en) * 2002-03-26 2008-07-01 Interdigital Technology Corporation RLAN wireless telecommunication system with RAN IP gateway and methods
US7483411B2 (en) * 2001-06-04 2009-01-27 Nec Corporation Apparatus for public access mobility LAN and method of operation thereof
US7489696B2 (en) * 2001-04-23 2009-02-10 Nokia Corporation Method and system for implementing a signalling connection in a distributed radio access network
US7526289B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2009-04-28 Nokia Corporation Radio resource control method in mobile communication system, mobile communication system and network element

Family Cites Families (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FI106509B (en) * 1997-09-26 2001-02-15 Nokia Networks Oy Lawful interception in a telecommunication network
US6973054B2 (en) * 2001-01-05 2005-12-06 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ) Communication management in mobile networks having split control planes and user planes
US20020136226A1 (en) * 2001-03-26 2002-09-26 Bluesocket, Inc. Methods and systems for enabling seamless roaming of mobile devices among wireless networks
US7039027B2 (en) * 2000-12-28 2006-05-02 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Automatic and seamless vertical roaming between wireless local area network (WLAN) and wireless wide area network (WWAN) while maintaining an active voice or streaming data connection: systems, methods and program products
US6834044B2 (en) * 2001-02-15 2004-12-21 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Multi-path data streaming in a wireless packet data network
WO2002093811A2 (en) * 2001-05-16 2002-11-21 Adjungo Networks Ltd. Access to plmn networks for non-plmn devices
US7389412B2 (en) * 2001-08-10 2008-06-17 Interactive Technology Limited Of Hk System and method for secure network roaming
EP1430631A4 (en) * 2001-08-23 2009-01-21 Bamboo Mediacasting Ltd Multicast transmission in packet based cellular networks
US20030114158A1 (en) * 2001-12-18 2003-06-19 Lauri Soderbacka Intersystem handover of a mobile terminal
GB2383495A (en) * 2001-12-20 2003-06-25 Hewlett Packard Co Data processing devices which communicate via short range telecommunication signals with other compatible devices
US6791958B2 (en) * 2002-02-06 2004-09-14 Motorola, Inc. Method of routing control information and bearer traffic between a wireless communications device and infrastructure equipment
BR0305028A (en) * 2002-06-06 2004-11-09 Thomson Licensing Sa WLAN as a logical support node (SGSN) for interoperation between the WLAN and a mobile communication system
CN100388816C (en) * 2002-06-06 2008-05-14 汤姆森特许公司 Wlan as a logical support node for hybrid coupling in an interworking between wlan and a mobile communications system
US6768726B2 (en) * 2002-08-06 2004-07-27 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for effecting a seamless handoff between IP connections
FI20030967A (en) * 2003-06-27 2004-12-28 Nokia Corp Connection Settings dialog
GB0315278D0 (en) * 2003-06-30 2003-08-06 Nokia Corp A method for optimising handover between communication networks
CN100592696C (en) * 2003-09-30 2010-02-24 三星电子株式会社 System and method for coupling between mobile communication system and wireless local area network
US7738871B2 (en) * 2004-11-05 2010-06-15 Interdigital Technology Corporation Wireless communication method and system for implementing media independent handover between technologically diversified access networks

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020150091A1 (en) * 2001-04-17 2002-10-17 Jussi Lopponen Packet mode speech communication
US7489696B2 (en) * 2001-04-23 2009-02-10 Nokia Corporation Method and system for implementing a signalling connection in a distributed radio access network
US7483411B2 (en) * 2001-06-04 2009-01-27 Nec Corporation Apparatus for public access mobility LAN and method of operation thereof
US7239632B2 (en) * 2001-06-18 2007-07-03 Tatara Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for converging local area and wide area wireless data networks
US6891842B2 (en) * 2001-09-21 2005-05-10 Nokia Corporation System and method for enabling mobile edge services
US7394795B2 (en) * 2002-03-26 2008-07-01 Interdigital Technology Corporation RLAN wireless telecommunication system with RAN IP gateway and methods
US20040139201A1 (en) * 2002-06-19 2004-07-15 Mobility Network Systems, Inc. Method and system for transparently and securely interconnecting a WLAN radio access network into a GPRS/GSM core network
US7151931B2 (en) * 2002-06-19 2006-12-19 Industrial Technology Research Institute Method and system enabling roaming between different wireless networks
US7218618B2 (en) * 2002-07-19 2007-05-15 Nokia Corporation Method of providing mobile IP functionality for a non mobile IP capable mobile node and switching device for acting as a mobile IP proxy
US7526289B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2009-04-28 Nokia Corporation Radio resource control method in mobile communication system, mobile communication system and network element
US20050007984A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2005-01-13 Interdigital Technology Corporation Method and architecture for accessing an internet protocol multimedia subsystem (IMS) over a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US20050025164A1 (en) * 2003-07-16 2005-02-03 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Seamless hand-off of mobile node to a wireless local area network (WLAN)
US20050102410A1 (en) * 2003-10-24 2005-05-12 Nokia Corporation Communication system

Cited By (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9055563B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2015-06-09 Wi-Fi One, Llc Service in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US20060209768A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2006-09-21 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Service in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US7610038B2 (en) * 2003-01-14 2009-10-27 Panasonic Corporation Service in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US8081971B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2011-12-20 Panasonic Corporation Service in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US20100002668A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2010-01-07 Panasonic Corporation Service in wlan inter-working, address management system, and method
US9560521B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2017-01-31 Wi-Fi One, Llc Service in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US9986426B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2018-05-29 Wi-Fi One, Llc Service in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US8374580B2 (en) 2003-01-14 2013-02-12 Panasonic Corporation Service in WLAN inter-working, address management system, and method
US20060187926A1 (en) * 2005-02-23 2006-08-24 Kddi Corporation Communications session switching method and system
US7733824B2 (en) * 2005-06-23 2010-06-08 Nokia Corporation Fixed access point for a terminal device
US20060291448A1 (en) * 2005-06-23 2006-12-28 Nokia Corporation Fixed access point for a terminal device
USRE44412E1 (en) 2005-06-24 2013-08-06 Aylus Networks, Inc. Digital home networks having a control point located on a wide area network
US20110151871A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-06-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. Ims networks with avs sessions with multiple access networks
US8483373B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2013-07-09 Aylus Networks, Inc. Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US10477605B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2019-11-12 Aylus Networks, Inc. Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US10194479B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2019-01-29 Aylus Networks, Inc. Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US7864936B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2011-01-04 Aylus Networks, Inc. Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US8553866B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2013-10-08 Aylus Networks, Inc. System and method to provide dynamic call models for users in a network
US10085291B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2018-09-25 Aylus Networks, Inc. Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US20060291412A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Naqvi Shamim A Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US20060291487A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Aylus Networks, Inc. IMS networks with AVS sessions with multiple access networks
US9468033B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2016-10-11 Aylus Networks, Inc. Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US20060291484A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Naqvi Shamim A Method of avoiding or minimizing cost of stateful connections between application servers and S-CSCF nodes in an IMS network with multiple domains
US9999084B2 (en) 2005-06-24 2018-06-12 Aylus Networks, Inc. Associated device discovery in IMS networks
US20110164563A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-07-07 Aylus Networks, Inc. Method of Avoiding or Minimizing Cost of Stateful Connections Between Application Servers and S-CSCF Nodes in an IMS Network with Multiple Domains
US20080219218A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2008-09-11 Gunnar Rydnell Gtp for Integration of Multiple Access
US8315227B2 (en) * 2005-09-27 2012-11-20 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) GTP for integration of multiple access
US20080305768A1 (en) * 2005-12-23 2008-12-11 Tomas Nylander Validating User Identity by Cooperation Between Core Network and Access Controller
US9113331B2 (en) * 2005-12-23 2015-08-18 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Validating user identity by cooperation between core network and access controller
US20070232301A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Fujitsu Limited Roaming in wireless networks
US20080049695A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2008-02-28 Nec Corporation Wireless Local Area Network system
US7817611B2 (en) * 2006-04-05 2010-10-19 Nec Corporation Wireless local area network system
US9148766B2 (en) 2006-05-16 2015-09-29 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for real-time cellular-to-internet video transfer
US20080274744A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-11-06 Naqvi Shamim A Systems and Methods for Using a Recipient Handset as a Remote Screen
US8611334B2 (en) 2006-05-16 2013-12-17 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network
US20080291905A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-11-27 Kiran Chakravadhanula Systems and Methods for Real-Time Cellular-to-Internet Video Transfer
US9026117B2 (en) 2006-05-16 2015-05-05 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for real-time cellular-to-internet video transfer
US8730945B2 (en) 2006-05-16 2014-05-20 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for using a recipient handset as a remote screen
US20080259887A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2008-10-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for presenting multimedia objects in conjunction with voice calls from a circuit-switched network
US8620307B2 (en) * 2006-06-21 2013-12-31 Nokia Corporation Selection of access interface
US20070297378A1 (en) * 2006-06-21 2007-12-27 Nokia Corporation Selection Of Access Interface
US8149784B2 (en) * 2006-07-24 2012-04-03 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Bridge-based radio access station backbone network system and signal processing method therefor
US20080019387A1 (en) * 2006-07-24 2008-01-24 Samsung Electronics Co.; Ltd Bridge-based radio access station backbone network system and signal processing method therefor
US8018955B2 (en) * 2006-12-07 2011-09-13 Starent Networks Llc Providing dynamic changes to packet flows
US8929360B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2015-01-06 Cisco Technology, Inc. Systems, methods, media, and means for hiding network topology
US10103991B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2018-10-16 Cisco Technology, Inc. Scalability of providing packet flow management
US8213913B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2012-07-03 Cisco Technology, Inc. Providing location based services for mobile devices
US8724463B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2014-05-13 Cisco Technology, Inc. Scalability of providing packet flow management
US8250634B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2012-08-21 Cisco Technology, Inc. Systems, methods, media, and means for user level authentication
US8300629B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2012-10-30 Cisco Technology, Inc. Device and method for providing interaction management for communication networks
US20080168540A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-07-10 Kaitki Agarwal Systems, Methods, Media, and Means for User Level Authentication
US20080137671A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-06-12 Kaitki Agarwal Scalability of providing packet flow management
US20080137541A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-06-12 Kaitki Agarwal Providing dynamic changes to packet flows
US20080137686A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-06-12 Starent Networks Corporation Systems, methods, media, and means for hiding network topology
US8014750B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2011-09-06 Starent Networks Llc Reducing call setup delays from non-call related signaling
US8483685B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2013-07-09 Cisco Technology, Inc. Providing location based services for mobile devices
US20080137646A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2008-06-12 Kaitki Agarwal Providing interaction Management for Communication networks
US9219680B2 (en) 2006-12-07 2015-12-22 Cisco Technology, Inc. Scalability of providing packet flow management
US8730906B2 (en) * 2007-01-08 2014-05-20 Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L. Apparatus and method for removing path management
US20080165725A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2008-07-10 Nokia Corporation Removing GTP-U path management in UGAN
US8989149B2 (en) 2007-01-08 2015-03-24 Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L. Apparatus and method for removing path management
US20150195739A1 (en) * 2007-01-08 2015-07-09 Core Wireless Licensing S.A.R.L. Apparatus and method for removing path management
US20080205379A1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-08-28 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US9160570B2 (en) 2007-02-22 2015-10-13 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and method for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US8432899B2 (en) 2007-02-22 2013-04-30 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for enabling IP signaling in wireless networks
US7856226B2 (en) 2007-04-17 2010-12-21 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for IMS user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20080261593A1 (en) * 2007-04-17 2008-10-23 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for IMS user sessions with dynamic service selection
US8433303B2 (en) 2007-04-17 2013-04-30 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20110092206A1 (en) * 2007-04-17 2011-04-21 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for ims user sessions with dynamic service selection
US8170534B2 (en) 2007-04-17 2012-05-01 Aylus Networks, Inc. Systems and methods for user sessions with dynamic service selection
US20080317010A1 (en) * 2007-06-22 2008-12-25 Aylus Networks, Inc. System and method for signaling optimization in ims services by using a service delivery platform
US20100208659A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2010-08-19 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Local break out in case of wimax roaming
US8416791B2 (en) * 2007-09-18 2013-04-09 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Local break out in case of WiMAX roaming
US8503460B2 (en) * 2008-03-24 2013-08-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Dynamic home network assignment
US20090238099A1 (en) * 2008-03-24 2009-09-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Dynamic home network assignment
US8638753B2 (en) * 2008-04-21 2014-01-28 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) QCI mapping at roaming and handover
US20110044198A1 (en) * 2008-04-21 2011-02-24 Teleonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (publ) QCI Mapping at Roaming and Handover
US8837382B2 (en) * 2008-08-11 2014-09-16 Cisco Technology, Inc. Multimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
US20100039978A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Starent Networks, Corp Multimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
WO2010019573A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Starent Networks, Corp Multimedia broadcast and multicast service enhancements
US8359644B2 (en) 2008-11-17 2013-01-22 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Seamless data networking
US20100125902A1 (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-05-20 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Seamless data networking
US8763109B2 (en) 2008-11-17 2014-06-24 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Seamless data networking
KR101389590B1 (en) 2009-05-13 2014-04-29 애플 인크. Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
CN104994598A (en) * 2009-05-13 2015-10-21 苹果公司 Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
CN102484823A (en) * 2009-05-13 2012-05-30 北方电讯网络有限公司 Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
US9253815B2 (en) 2009-05-13 2016-02-02 Apple Inc. Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
CN104994597A (en) * 2009-05-13 2015-10-21 苹果公司 Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
WO2010132700A1 (en) * 2009-05-13 2010-11-18 Nortel Networks Limited Session suspend and resume using a transient binding option messaging
US20120203926A1 (en) * 2010-08-16 2012-08-09 Michael Camp IP Network Service Redirector Device and Method
US8769111B2 (en) * 2010-08-16 2014-07-01 Numerex Corp. IP network service redirector device and method
US20130086142A1 (en) * 2011-09-30 2013-04-04 K. Georg Hampel System and Method for Mobility and Multi-Homing Content Retrieval Applications
US9215283B2 (en) * 2011-09-30 2015-12-15 Alcatel Lucent System and method for mobility and multi-homing content retrieval applications
US8645564B2 (en) * 2011-10-10 2014-02-04 The Boeing Company Method and apparatus for client-directed inbound traffic engineering over tunnel virtual network links
US20130091196A1 (en) * 2011-10-10 2013-04-11 Fred L. Templin Method and apparatus for client-directed inbound traffic engineering over tunnel virtual network links
US20140126532A1 (en) * 2012-11-05 2014-05-08 Stoke, Inc. Seamless mobility from 3g network to wifi network
US20160174107A1 (en) * 2014-12-12 2016-06-16 Satish Kanugovi Wifi boost with lte ip anchor
US10219310B2 (en) * 2014-12-12 2019-02-26 Alcatel Lucent WiFi boost with LTE IP anchor
US9806905B2 (en) 2014-12-14 2017-10-31 Alcatel Lucent WiFi boost with uplink offload to LTE with independent IP addresses

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US8238326B2 (en) 2012-08-07
CA2588974A1 (en) 2006-05-26
WO2006055933A2 (en) 2006-05-26
EP1834446A2 (en) 2007-09-19
WO2006055939A2 (en) 2006-05-26
US20060153124A1 (en) 2006-07-13
KR20070104521A (en) 2007-10-26
GB2440017A (en) 2008-01-16
EP1834446A4 (en) 2008-05-21
GB0711720D0 (en) 2007-07-25
WO2006055933A3 (en) 2006-12-07
US20060104262A1 (en) 2006-05-18
AU2005306294A1 (en) 2006-05-26
WO2006055939A3 (en) 2006-10-26
JP2008521366A (en) 2008-06-19

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
KR101076415B1 (en) An apparatus and method for transferrig PDP context information for a terminal in the case of intersystem handover
EP1968256B1 (en) WLAN to UMTS handover with network requested PDP context activation
CN101511081B (en) Address transition and message correlation between networks nodes
EP2172045B1 (en) Signaling in a wireless communication system
JP5475655B2 (en) Method and apparatus for resource management in handover operation
US7437154B2 (en) Heterogeneous mobile radio system
EP2111066B1 (en) Access context management for macro-level mobility management registration in an access network
US6711147B1 (en) Merged packet service and mobile internet protocol
CN1131648C (en) Macro transferability management method in access system and access system
EP2147541B1 (en) System and method for providing local ip breakout services employing access point names
EP1404143B1 (en) Handover of a wireless terminal
CA2585931C (en) Wireless communication method and system for implementing media independent handover between technologically diversified access networks
US7356015B2 (en) Data handoff method between wireless local area network and wireless wide area network
EP1192820B1 (en) Selection of mobility agent in access network
CN101156488B (en) Radio communication system and radio communication method
JP2008514061A (en) Fast context establishment for interworking in heterogeneous networks
US8130718B2 (en) Method and system for interworking of cellular networks and wireless local area networks
Ferrus et al. Interworking in heterogeneous wireless networks: Comprehensive framework and future trends
US7885248B2 (en) System and method for traffic localization
DE60121626T2 (en) Access system for an access network
JP5524863B2 (en) Optimization of handover from non-3GPP network to 3GPP network
US20120202491A1 (en) Telecommunications networks
JP2010050977A (en) Mobile terminal
JP5438209B2 (en) Route optimization of data path between communication nodes using route optimization agent
CN101855922B (en) Local breakout service continuation in handover process

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RUSTIC CANYON VENTURES SBIC, L.P., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AZAIRE NETWORKS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019541/0825

Effective date: 20070710

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION