US20080124482A1 - Method and apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes Download PDF

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US20080124482A1
US20080124482A1 US11/734,443 US73444307A US2008124482A1 US 20080124482 A1 US20080124482 A1 US 20080124482A1 US 73444307 A US73444307 A US 73444307A US 2008124482 A1 US2008124482 A1 US 2008124482A1
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carbon
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plasma
carbon nanotubes
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Olivier Smiljanic
Barry L. STANSFIELD
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Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS)
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Olivier Smiljanic
Stansfield Barry L
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Priority to US10/434,181 priority patent/US7591989B2/en
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Priority to US11/734,443 priority patent/US20080124482A1/en
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Assigned to INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE reassignment INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: LAROUCHE, FREDERIC, SMILJANIC, OLIVIER, STANSFIELD, BARRY L.
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B82NANOTECHNOLOGY
    • B82YSPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MEASUREMENT OR ANALYSIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF NANOSTRUCTURES
    • B82Y30/00Nanotechnology for materials or surface science, e.g. nanocomposites
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J19/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J19/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J19/087Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor employing electric or magnetic energy
    • B01J19/088Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor employing electric or magnetic energy giving rise to electric discharges
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B82NANOTECHNOLOGY
    • B82YSPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MEASUREMENT OR ANALYSIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF NANOSTRUCTURES
    • B82Y40/00Manufacture or treatment of nanostructures
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B32/00Carbon; Compounds thereof
    • C01B32/15Nano-sized carbon materials
    • C01B32/158Carbon nanotubes
    • C01B32/16Preparation
    • C01B32/162Preparation characterised by catalysts
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01FCHEMICAL FEATURES IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF CARBON FILAMENTS
    • D01F9/00Artificial filaments or the like of other substances; Manufacture thereof; Apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture of carbon filaments
    • D01F9/08Artificial filaments or the like of other substances; Manufacture thereof; Apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture of carbon filaments of inorganic material
    • D01F9/12Carbon filaments; Apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture thereof
    • D01F9/127Carbon filaments; Apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture thereof by thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases or vapours or other carbon-containing compounds in the form of gas or vapour, e.g. carbon monoxide, alcohols
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J2219/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J2219/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J2219/0871Heating or cooling of the reactor
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J2219/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J2219/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J2219/0873Materials to be treated
    • B01J2219/0875Gas
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J2219/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J2219/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J2219/0873Materials to be treated
    • B01J2219/0892Materials to be treated involving catalytically active material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01JCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROCESSES, e.g. CATALYSIS OR COLLOID CHEMISTRY; THEIR RELEVANT APPARATUS
    • B01J2219/00Chemical, physical or physico-chemical processes in general; Their relevant apparatus
    • B01J2219/08Processes employing the direct application of electric or wave energy, or particle radiation; Apparatus therefor
    • B01J2219/0894Processes carried out in the presence of a plasma
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01BNON-METALLIC ELEMENTS; COMPOUNDS THEREOF; METALLOIDS OR COMPOUNDS THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASS C01C
    • C01B2202/00Structure or properties of carbon nanotubes
    • C01B2202/02Single-walled nanotubes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S977/00Nanotechnology
    • Y10S977/84Manufacture, treatment, or detection of nanostructure
    • Y10S977/842Manufacture, treatment, or detection of nanostructure for carbon nanotubes or fullerenes
    • Y10S977/843Gas phase catalytic growth, i.e. chemical vapor deposition
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S977/00Nanotechnology
    • Y10S977/84Manufacture, treatment, or detection of nanostructure
    • Y10S977/842Manufacture, treatment, or detection of nanostructure for carbon nanotubes or fullerenes
    • Y10S977/844Growth by vaporization or dissociation of carbon source using a high-energy heat source, e.g. electric arc, laser, plasma, e-beam

Abstract

There is provided a method for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes comprising condensing a plasma comprising atoms or molecules of carbon and atoms of a metal suitable for catalyzing the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in an oven at a predetermined temperature so as to provide a temperature gradient, thereby forming single-wall carbon nanotubes; and collecting the so-formed single-wall carbon nanotubes by passing them through an electrostatic trap comprising a pair of electrodes generating an electrical current so as to deposit at least a portion of the single-wall carbon nanotubes on one of the electrodes.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to improvements in the field of carbon nanotube production. More particularly, the invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Carbon nanotubes are available either as multi-wall or single-wall nanotubes. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes have exceptional properties such as excellent electrical and thermal conductivities. They have applications in numerous fields such as storage of hydrogen (C. Liu, Y. Y. Fan, M. Liu, H. T. Cong, H. M. Cheng, M. S. Dresselhaus, Science 286 (1999), 1127; M. S. Dresselhaus, K. A Williams, P. C. Eklund, M R S Bull. (1999), 45) or other gases, adsorption heat pumps, materials reinforcement or nanoelectronics (M. Menon, D. Srivastava, Phy. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997), 4453). Single-wall carbon nanotubes, on the other hand, possess properties that are significantly superior to those of multi-wall nanotubes. However, single-wall carbon nanotubes are available only in small quantities since known methods of production do not produce more than few grams per day of these nanotubes. For any industrial application such as storage or material reinforcement, the amount of single-wall carbon nanotubes produced must be at least a few kilograms per day.
  • Nowadays, the most popular methods for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes are laser ablation, electric arc and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The two first methods are based on the same principal: local evaporation of a graphite target enriched with a metal catalyst and subsequent condensation of the vapor to form nanotubes (A. A. Puretzky, D. B. Geohegan, S. J. Pennycook, Appl. Phys. A 70 (2000), 153). U.S. Pat. No. 6,183,714 discloses a method of making ropes of single-wall carbon nanotubes using a laser pulse to produce a vapor containing carbon and one or more Group VIII transition metals. U.S. Pat. No. 5,424,054 discloses a process for producing hollow carbon fibers having wall consisting essentially of a single layer of carbon atoms using an electric arc. The process involves contacting carbon vapor with cobalt vapor under specific conditions, and is thus limited to the use of cobalt vapor.
  • Although the above methods are relatively efficient for the transformation of carbon into nanotubes, they have inherent drawbacks. The vaporisation of graphite is not energetically advantageous since 717 kJ are required to evaporate one mole of carbon. Therefore, the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes via laser ablation and electric arc consumes a lot of energy for small quantities of nanotubes produced. Moreover, these processes are non-continuous since they must be stopped for renewing the source of carbon once the graphite has been consumed.
  • In the CVD method as well as in the other two methods described above, the metal catalyst plays a key role in the synthesis of the nanotubes. For example, in the CVD method, the carbon-containing gas is decomposed by the particles of metal catalyst on which the nanotubes form. The CVD method suffers from a major drawback since the encapsulation of the catalyst particles by carbon stops the growth of the nanotubes (R. E. Smalley et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. 296 (1998), 195). In addition, due to the non-selectivity of the method, nanotubes having two, three or multi-walls are obtained at the same time as the single-wall nanotubes.
  • A promising method for the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes involves the use of a plasma torch for decomposing a mixture of carbon-containing substance and a metal catalyst and then condensing the mixture to obtain single-wall carbon nanotubes. This method has been recently described by O, Smiljanic, B. L. Stansfield, J.-P. Dodelet, A. Serventi, S. Ddsilets, in Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002), 189 and showed encouraging results. Such a method, however, has an important drawback since a premature extinction of the plasma torch occurs due to a rapid formation of carbon deposit in the torch. This method is therefore non-continuous and requires removal of the carbon deposit. Thus, large quantities of single-wall carbon nanotubes cannot be produced.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is therefore an object of the present invention to overcome the above drawbacks and to provide a method and apparatus for the continuous production of single-wall carbon nanotubes in large quantities.
  • According to a first aspect of the invention, there is provided a method for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, comprising the steps of:
  • a) providing a plasma torch having a plasma tube with a plasma-discharging end;
  • b) feeding an inert gas through the plasma tube to form a primary plasma;
  • c) contacting a carbon-containing substance and a metal catalyst with the primary plasma at the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube, to form a secondary plasma containing atoms or molecules of carbon and atoms of metal catalyst; and
  • d) condensing the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes.
  • According to a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a method for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, comprising the steps of:
  • a) providing a plasma torch having a plasma tube with a plasma-discharging end;
  • b) feeding an inert gas and an inorganic metal catalyst through the plasma tube to form a primary plasma containing the atoms of metal catalyst;
  • c) contacting a carbon-containing substance with the primary plasma at the plasma-discharging end of said plasma tube, to form a secondary plasma containing atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst; and
  • d) condensing the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes.
  • According to a third aspect of the invention, there is provided an apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, which comprises:
  • a plasma torch having a plasma tube for receiving an inert gas so as to form a primary plasma, the plasma tube having a plasma-discharging end;
  • a feeder for directing a carbon-containing substance and a metal catalyst towards the primary plasma so that the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst contact the primary plasma at the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube, to thereby form a secondary plasma containing atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of the metal catalyst; and
  • a condenser for condensing the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of the metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes.
  • According to a fourth aspect of the invention, there is provided an apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, which comprises:
  • a plasma torch having a plasma tube for receiving an inert gas and an inorganic metal catalyst so as to form a primary plasma containing atoms of the metal catalyst, the plasma tube having a plasma-discharging end;
  • a feeder for directing a carbon-containing substance towards the primary plasma so that the carbon-containing substance contacts the primary plasma at the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube, to thereby form a secondary plasma containing atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of the metal catalyst; and
  • a condenser for condensing the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of the metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes.
  • Applicant has found quite surprisingly that by feeding the carbon-containing substance separately from the inert gas used to generate the primary plasma so that the carbon-containing substance contacts the primary plasma at the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube to form the aforesaid secondary plasma, there is no undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. Thus, no premature extinction of the plasma torch.
  • The term “carbon-containing substance” as used herein refers to a substance which contains carbon atoms. Preferably, such a substance does not contain nitrogen atoms. The carbon-containing substance can be a solid, a liquid or a gas.
  • The expression “organometallic complex” as used herein refers to a compound in which there is a bonding interaction (ionic or covalent, localized or delocalized) between one or more carbon atoms of an organic group or molecule with a main group, transition, lanthanide, or actinide metal atom or atoms.
  • The expression “rapid condensation” as used herein refers to a condensation which occurs at a rate of at least 105 K/second.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In the method according to the first aspect of the invention, step (c) can be carried out by separately directing the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst towards the primary plasma. The carbon-containing substance can be in admixture with a carrier gas. Preferably, the carbon-containing substance is in liquid or gaseous phase and the carbon-containing substance in liquid or gaseous phase flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma. The carbon-containing substance in liquid or gaseous phase is preferably in admixture with a carrier gas. It is also possible to use a carbon-containing substance in solid phase, in admixture with a carrier gas; such a mixture preferably flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma. The metal catalyst can also be in admixture with a carrier gas. When use is made of a metal catalyst in liquid or gaseous phase, such a metal catalyst preferably flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma. The metal catalyst in liquid or gaseous phase is preferably in admixture with a carrier gas. It is also possible to use a metal catalyst in solid phase, in admixture with a carrier gas; such a mixture preferably flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma.
  • Step (c) of the method according to the first aspect of the invention can also be carried out by directing a mixture of the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst towards the primary plasma. The latter mixture can be in admixture with a carrier gas. Preferably, the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst are in liquid or gaseous phase and the latter two flow along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma. The carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst in liquid or gaseous phase are preferably in admixture with a carrier gas. It is also possible to use the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst in solid phase, in admixture with a carrier gas; such a mixture preferably flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma.
  • The metal catalyst used in the method according to the first aspect of the invention is preferably an organometallic complex. It is also possible to use, as a metal catalyst, an inorganic metal complex or an inorganic metal catalyst comprising at least one metal in metallic form. Examples of suitable metal catalyst include those comprising at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Y, La, Ce, Mn, Li, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Lu and Gd. The metal is preferably iron.
  • The metal catalyst can also comprise cobalt and at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Fe, Y, Pt, Mo, Cu, Pb and Bi. Alternatively, the metal catalyst can comprise nickel and at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Y, Lu, Pt, B, Ce, Mg, Cu and Ti.
  • Ferrocene, iron (II) phthalocyanine, iron in metallic form, iron pentacarbonyl and mixtures thereof can be used as suitable metal catalyst. Ferrocene is preferred.
  • In the method according to the first aspect of the invention, it is possible to use the inert gas in admixture with an inorganic metal catalyst which may be the same or different than the one used in step (c).
  • In the method according to the second aspect of the invention, step (c) can be carried out by directing the carbon-containing substance towards the primary plasma. The carbon-containing substance can be in admixture with a carrier gas. Preferably, the carbon-containing substance is in liquid or gaseous phase and the carbon-containing substance in liquid or gaseous phase flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma. The carbon-containing substance in liquid or gaseous phase is preferably in admixture with a carrier gas. It is also possible to use a carbon-containing substance in solid phase, in admixture with a carrier gas; such a mixture preferably flows along a helical path prior to contacting the primary plasma.
  • The inorganic metal catalyst used in the method according to the second aspect of the invention can be an inorganic metal complex or at least one metal in metallic form. Preferably, the inorganic metal catalyst comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ru, Co, Ph, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Y, La, Ce, Mn, Li, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Lu and Gd. The metal is preferably iron. The inorganic metal catalyst can also comprise cobalt and at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Fe, Y, Pt, Mo, Cu, Pb and Bi. Alternatively, the inorganic metal catalyst can comprise nickel and at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Y, Lu, Pt, B, Ce, Mg, Cu and Ti.
  • The carbon-containing substance used in the method according to the first or the second aspect of the invention can be a carbon-containing gas, a carbon-containing liquid or a carbon-containing solid. It is also possible to use a mixture of a carbon-containing gas and a carbon-containing liquid, a mixture of a carbon-containing gas and a carbon-containing solid, a mixture of a carbon-containing liquid and a carbon-containing solid or a mixture of a carbon-containing gas, a carbon-containing liquid and a carbon-containing solid. Preferably, the carbon-containing gas is a C1-C4 hydrocarbon such as methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, propene, cyclopropane, allene, propyne, butane, 2-methylpropane, 1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene, cyclobutane, methylcyclopropane, 1-butyne, 2-butyne, cyclobutene, 1,2-butadiene, 1,3-butadiene or 1-buten-3-yne or a mixture thereof. When commercial acetylene is used, care should be taken to filter such a gas in order to remove impurities. The carbon-containing liquid is preferably a C5-C10 hydrocarbon. Alternatively, the carbon-containing liquid can be selected from the group consisting of pentane, hexane, cyclohexane, heptane, benzene, toluene, xylene or styrene or mixtures thereof. The carbon-containing solid can be graphite, carbon black, norbornylene, naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, or polystyrene or mixtures thereof. Graphite is preferred. More preferably, the graphite is in the form of a nano-powder.
  • The inert gas used in the method according to the first or second aspect of the invention can be helium, argon or a mixture thereof. Argon is preferred. A further inert gas can be injected in the plasma torch and directed towards the primary and secondary plasmas. A cooling inert gas is preferably injected downstream of the secondary plasma; the cooling inert gas can be helium, argon or a mixture thereof. The cooling inert gas assists in providing a temperature gradient. The aforementioned carrier gas can be helium, argon, hydrogen or hydrogen sulfide or a mixture thereof. Argon is preferably used as carrier gas.
  • According to a preferred embodiment, the metal catalyst and the carbon-containing substance are used in an atomic ratio metal atoms/carbon atoms of about 0.01 to about 0.06. More preferably, the atomic ratio metal atoms/carbon atoms is about 0.02.
  • Step (d) of the method according to the first or second aspect of the invention is preferably carried out to provide a temperature gradient permitting rapid condensation of the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. Preferably, the temperature gradient is provided by directing the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst through an oven disposed downstream of the plasma tube in spaced relation thereto, the oven being heated at a predetermined temperature. The predetermined temperature can be comprised between 500 and 1800° C. and preferably between 800 and 950° C. A temperature of about 900° C. is preferred. Such a temperature of about 900° C. is also particularly preferred when the metal catalyst comprises iron. The single-wall carbon nanotubes produced can be collected in a trap such as an electrostatic trap.
  • In the apparatus according to the third aspect of the invention, the feeder preferably comprise a first conduit for directing the carbon-containing substance towards the primary plasma and a second conduit for directing the metal catalyst towards the primary plasma. Preferably, the first and second conduits each have a discharge end disposed adjacent the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. Alternatively, the feeder can comprise a single conduit for directing a mixture of the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst towards the primary plasma. In such a case, the single conduit preferably has a discharge end disposed adjacent the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the single conduit is disposed inside the plasma tube and extends substantially coaxially thereof.
  • In the apparatus according to the fourth aspect of the invention, the feeder preferably comprises a single conduit for directing the carbon-containing substance towards the primary plasma. Preferably, the conduit has a discharge end disposed adjacent the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the conduit is disposed inside the plasma tube and extends substantially coaxially thereof.
  • In the apparatus according to the third or fourth aspect of the invention, the condenser preferably comprise an oven disposed downstream of the plasma tube in spaced relation thereto, and a heat source for heating the oven to provide a temperature gradient permitting rapid condensation of the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. Preferably, a heat-resistant tubular member having a plasma-receiving end extends through the oven with the plasma-receiving end disposed upstream of the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. An injector is provided for injecting a cooling inert gas into the tubular member, downstream of the secondary plasma; the cooling inert gas assists in providing the temperature gradient. The heat-resistant tubular member can be made of quartz or boron nitride. The apparatus can be provided with a trap for collecting single-wall carbon nanotubes produced. Preferably, the trap is an electrostatic trap. The apparatus can also be provided with a cooling system disposed about the plasma tube and extends substantially coaxially thereof. Preferably, the apparatus comprises a Faraday shield made of a conductive material for preventing emission of electromagnetic radiations outside of the apparatus.
  • Where the apparatus according to the third or fourth aspect of the invention has the aforementioned conduit disposed inside the plasma tube and extending substantially coaxially thereof, the apparatus preferably includes another heat-resistant tubular member disposed about the plasma tube and extending substantially coaxially thereof, and an injector for injecting a further inert gas between the plasma tube and the tubular member to prevent undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end of the plasma tube. The latter heat-resistant tubular member can also be made of quartz or boron nitride.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Further features and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following description of preferred embodiments as illustrated by way of examples in the appended drawings wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic, sectional elevation view of an apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, according to a first preferred embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic, sectional elevation view of an apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, according to a second preferred embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic, sectional elevation view of an apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, according to a third preferred embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic, sectional elevation view of an injecting device according to a fourth preferred embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) picture of a crude sample of single-wall carbon nanotubes;
  • FIG. 6 is another SEM picture of the sample shown in FIG. 5;
  • FIG. 7 is a TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) picture of the sample shown in FIG. 5;
  • FIG. 8 is another TEM picture of the sample shown in FIG. 5;
  • FIG. 9 is the graph of a Raman spectroscopy measurement performed on the sample shown in FIG. 5 using a 514 nm laser; and
  • FIG. 10 is the graph of another Raman spectroscopy measurement performed on the sample shown in FIG. 5 using a 782 nm laser.
  • DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown an apparatus 10 for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, which comprises a plasma torch 12 having a plasma tube 14 with a plasma-discharging end 16, and an oven 18 disposed downstream of the plasma tube 14 in spaced relation thereto. The plasma tube 14 is adapted to receive an inert gas for activation by electromagnetic radiation generated from a source (not shown) so as to form a primary plasma 20. The electromagnetic radiations are propagated on the plasma tube 14 so as to maintain the primary plasma 20. The primary plasma 20 comprises ionized atoms of the inert gas. A feed conduit 22 having a discharge end 24 is arranged inside the plasma tube 14 and extends substantially coaxially thereof. The discharge end 24 of the feed conduit 22 is disposed adjacent the plasma discharging end 16 of the plasma tube 14. The feed conduit 22 serves to direct a carbon-containing substance, such as a carbon-containing gas, and a metal catalyst towards the primary plasma 20 so that the carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst contact the primary plasma 20 at the plasma-discharging end 16 of the plasma tube 14, whereby to form a secondary plasma 26 containing atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. The carbon-containing gas is preferably ethylene or methane.
  • The oven 18 serves to condense the atoms or molecules of carbon and atoms of metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes 28. A heat source 30 is provided for heating the oven 18 to generate a temperature gradient permitting rapid condensation of the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. A heat-resistant tubular member 32 having a plasma-receiving end 34 extends through the oven 18, the plasma-receiving end 34 being disposed upstream of the plasma-discharging end 16 of the plasma tube 14. An electrostatic trap 35 comprising a filter 36 and a rod 37 is extending downstream of oven 18. The deposit of single-wall carbon nanotubes 28 occurs on the heat-resistant member 32 upstream and downstream of the oven 18, as well as inside of the trap 35. The filter 36 traps some of the fine particles (not shown) generated during the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes 28 and reduces the emission of fine particles outside of the apparatus. The electrostatic trap 35 permits a more efficient recovery of the single-wall nanotubes produced by the apparatus 10. The apparatus further includes a gas injector 38 for injecting a cooling inert gas into the tubular member 32, downstream of the secondary plasma 26. The cooling inert gas assists in providing the temperature gradient. Another heat-resistant tubular member 40 is disposed about the plasma tube 14 and extends substantially coaxially thereof, the tubular member 40 being fixed to the tubular member 32 and supporting same. Another gas injector 42 is provided for injecting a further inert gas between the plasma tube 14 and the tubular member 40 to prevent undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end 16 of the plasma tube 14. The plasma tube 14 is also provided with a cooling system (not shown), which preferably uses water. The apparatus 10 further comprises a Faraday shield (not shown) made of a conductive material, preferably aluminium.
  • The inert gas flows through the plasma tube 14 along a helical path represented by the arrow 44. Similarly, the carbon-containing gas and the metal catalyst, optionally in admixture with a carrier gas, flow through the feed conduit 22 along a helical path represented by the arrow 46. The metal catalyst which is fed through the conduit 22 can be either an organometallic complex such as ferrocene, or an inorganic metal catalyst such as iron in metallic form. Instead of feeding the metal catalyst through the conduit 22, it is possible to feed only the carbon-containing gas through the conduit 22 and to feed the metal catalyst in admixture with the inert gas through the plasma tube 14. In such a case, the metal catalyst must be an inorganic metal catalyst to prevent undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end 16 of the plasma tube 14. It is also possible to feed the inert gas and an inorganic metal catalyst through the plasma tube 14 and to feed the carbon-containing gas in admixture with an organometallic complex or an inorganic metal catalyst through the conduit 22.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates another apparatus 48 for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes, which comprises a plasma torch 50 having a plasma tube 52 with a plasma-discharging end 54, and an oven 56 disposed downstream of the plasma tube 52 in spaced relation thereto. The plasma tube 52 is adapted to receive an inert gas for activation by electromagnetic radiation generated from a source (not shown) so as to form a primary plasma 58. A feed conduit 60 having a discharge end 62 disposed adjacent the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52 is provided for directing a carbon-containing substance, such as a carbon-containing gas, and a metal catalyst towards the primary plasma 58. The carbon-containing substance and the metal catalyst discharged from the feed conduit 60 contact the primary plasma 58 at the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52, thereby forming a secondary plasma 64 containing atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. The carbon-containing gas is preferably ethylene or methane. Although only one feed conduit 60 is shown in FIG. 2, it is possible to have a plurality of such conduits disposed symmetrically about the plasma tube 52. The plasma tube 52 is also provided with a cooling system (not shown), which preferably uses water. The apparatus 48 further comprises a Faraday shield (not shown) made of a conductive material, preferably aluminium.
  • The oven 56 serves to condense the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst to form single-wall carbon nanotubes 66. A heat source 68 is provided for heating the oven 56 to generate a temperature gradient permitting rapid condensation of the atoms or molecules of carbon and the atoms of metal catalyst. A heat-resistant tubular member 70 having a plasma-receiving end 72 extends through the oven 56, the plasma-receiving end 72 being disposed upstream of the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52. The apparatus further includes a gas injector 74 for injecting a cooling inert gas into the tubular member 70, downstream of the secondary plasma 64. The cooling inert gas assists in providing the temperature gradient. The deposit of single-wall carbon nanotubes 66 occurs on the heat-resistant tubular member 70 upstream and downstream of the oven 56.
  • The inert gas flows through the plasma tube 52 along a helical path represented by the arrow 76. Similarly, the carbon-containing gas and the metal catalyst, optionally in admixture with a carrier gas, flow through the conduit 60 along a helical path represented by the arrow 78. The metal catalyst which is fed through the conduit 60 can be either an organometallic complex such as ferrocene, or an inorganic metal catalyst such as iron. Instead of feeding the metal catalyst through the conduit 60, it is possible to feed only the carbon-containing gas through the conduit 60 and to feed the metal catalyst in admixture with the inert gas through the plasma tube 52. In such a case, the metal catalyst must be an inorganic metal catalyst to prevent undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52. It is also possible to feed the inert gas and an inorganic metal catalyst through the plasma tube 52 and to feed the carbon-containing gas in admixture with an organometallic complex or an inorganic metal catalyst through the conduit 60. Optionally, the apparatus 48 can be provided with the electrostatic trap 35 illustrated in FIG. 1.
  • The apparatus 48′ illustrated in FIG. 3 is similar to the apparatus 48 shown in FIG. 2, with the exception that an additional feed conduit 60′ is provided, the feed conduits 60 and 60′ being arranged on either side of the plasma tube 52. The conduit 60′ has a discharge end 62′ disposed adjacent the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52 and serves the same purpose as the feed conduit 60. The carbon-containing gas and the metal catalyst, optionally in admixture with a carrier gas, flow through the conduit 60′ along a helical path represented by the arrow 78′. Although two feed conduits 60 and 60′ are shown in FIG. 3, it is possible to have a plurality of such conduits disposed symmetrically about the plasma tube 52. Instead of feeding the metal catalyst through the conduits 60 and 60′, it is possible to feed only the carbon-containing gas through the conduits 60 and 60′ and to feed the metal catalyst in admixture with the inert gas through the plasma tube 52. In such a case, the metal catalyst must be an inorganic metal catalyst to prevent undesirable formation of carbon deposit adjacent the plasma-discharging end 54 of the plasma tube 52. It is also possible to feed the inert gas and an inorganic metal catalyst through the plasma tube 52 and to feed the carbon-containing gas in admixture with an organometallic complex or an inorganic metal catalyst through the conduits 60 and 60′. The plasma tube 52 is also provided with a cooling system (not shown), which preferably uses water. The apparatus 48′ further comprises a Faraday shield (not shown) made of a conductive material, preferably aluminium. Optionally, the apparatus 48′ can be provided with the electrostatic trap 35 illustrated in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an injecting device 80 comprising a reservoir 82 adapted to receive an oil 84, and a reservoir 86 having filters 88. The reservoir 86 is forming a chamber 89 for receiving a metal catalyst 90, preferably ferrocene. The reservoir 86 has an inlet 92 and an outlet 94, which are in fluid flow communication with conduits 96 having an inlet 98 and an outlet 100.
  • The chamber 89 of the reservoir 86 is provided with a metal catalyst 90 and the catalyst 90 is heated by the hot oil 84 so as to evaporate the metal catalyst 90. A mixture of a carbon-containing gas and a carrier gas (not shown) or a carbon-containing gas is injected at the inlet 98 so as to flow into conduits 96 thereby passing through the reservoir 86 and carrying the evaporated metal catalyst 90 at the outlet 100, which is connected to the apparatus 10, 48 or 48′. The filters 88 prevent solid particles of the metal catalyst 90 from being carried out into said conduits 96.
  • The following non-limiting example further illustrates the invention.
  • EXAMPLE
  • The production or synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been performed by using a plasma torch as illustrated in FIG. 1. The following experiment has been carried out by the inventors by providing the plasma torch with a cooling system and a Faraday shield. The cooling system prevents the plasma torch from over-heating and being damaged. The Faraday shield comprising a conductive material, preferably aluminium, prevents the electromagnetic radiations from escaping from said apparatus, thereby protecting users of the plasma torch. All the parameters related to the plasma torch are controlled by a computer using the LABVIEW® software. The parameters can also be manually controlled. The inert gas used for generating the primary plasma was argon, the metal catalyst was ferrocene, the carbon-containing gas was ethylene and the cooling gas was helium. Helium was also injected toward the plasma discharging end so as to prevent carbon deposit. The injecting device illustrated in FIG. 4 was used for injecting the ferrocene. Ferrocene was heated to 100° C. and the conduits were heated to 250° C. so as to prevent condensation of ferrocene in the conduit disposed downstream of the reservoir containing the latter metal catalyst. The argon flow varied from 1000 to 3000 sccm (standard cubic centimeters per minute). The helium flows were both stabilized at about 3250 sccm, and the ethylene flow varied between 50 and 100 sccm. The temperature of the oven was kept at 900° C. and measured with a pyrometer. The power of the source generating the electromagnetic radiations (microwaves) was 1000 W and the reflected power was about 200 W. The rod of the electrostatic trap was maintained at a tension of −1000 V. The heat-resistant tubular members were made of quartz. The plasma tube was made of brass. The feed conduit, on the other hand, was made of stainless steel. The metal catalyst (ferrocene) and the carbon-containing substance (ethylene) were used in an atomic ratio metal atoms/carbon atoms of 0.02. The software controlled the flow of the carrier gas, argon, so as to maintain the atomic ratio at such a value. The experiment was carried out at atmospheric pressure under inert conditions (helium and argon).
  • The synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes was performed for a period of 20 minutes using the above-mentioned experimental conditions. During this period of time, 500 mg of the desired single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced. The purity of the nanotubes thus obtained was about 20%.
  • The crude sample obtained in the above example was characterized by SEM; the results are illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6. As it is apparent from FIGS. 5 and 6, single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced. The sample was also characterized by TEM; the results are illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8. These two figures show that the growth of the single-wall nanotubes is initiated by metal catalyst particles of about 5 nm (indicated by the arrows). The rope-like structure shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 is very common for single-wall nanotubes. The purity of the sample was estimated by comparing the surface occupied by the single-wall carbon nanotubes with the amorphous carbon residues in FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • In order to determine the diameter of the single-wall nanotubes produced according to the above example, two Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed. In the first experiment, a 514 nm laser was used (FIG. 9) whereas, in the second experiment, a 782 nm laser was used (FIG. 10). In FIG. 9, the peaks at 149.10, 171.90, 184.22, 217.75 and 284.79 cm−1 correspond to single-wall carbon nanotubes having diameters of 1.50, 1.30, 1.22, 1.03 and 0.80 nm, respectively.
  • In FIG. 10, the peaks at 127.91, 141.20, 147.59, 163.02, 181.64, 200.26, 211.96, 222.60, 230.05 and 263.57 cm−1 correspond to single-wall carbon nanotubes having diameters of 1.75, 1.60, 1.52, 1.37, 1.23, 1.12, 1.06, 1.00, 0.97 and 0.85 nm, respectively.
  • The above data indicate that in the method according to the example, as opposed to the methods comprising vaporization of graphite, a plurality of single-wall nanotube chiralities was obtained.
  • It should be noted that by using the method and apparatus of the invention, the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes can be performed for a period of several hours since the deposit of carbon at the plasma-discharging end, leading to the premature extinction of the plasma torch, is avoided.
  • While the invention has been described with particular reference to the illustrated embodiment, it will be understood that numerous modifications thereto will appear to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the above description and accompanying drawings should be taken as illustrative of the invention and not in a limiting sense.

Claims (21)

1-36. (canceled)
37: A method for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes comprising,
condensing a plasma comprising atoms or molecules of carbon and atoms of a metal suitable for catalyzing the formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in an oven at a predetermined temperature so as to provide a temperature gradient, thereby forming single-wall carbon nanotubes; and
collecting the so-formed single-wall carbon nanotubes by passing them through an electrostatic trap comprising a pair of electrodes generating an electrical current so as to deposit at least a portion of said single-wall carbon nanotubes on one of said electrodes.
38: The method of claim 37, wherein said metal is chosen from Fe, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Y, La, Ce, Mn, Li, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Lu and Gd.
39: The method of claim 37, wherein said metal is Fe.
40: The method of claim 37, wherein said predetermined temperature is comprised between 500 and 1800° C.
41: The method of claim 40, wherein said metal is Fe.
42: The method of claim 37, wherein said predetermined temperature is comprised between 800 and 950° C.
43: The method of claim 42, wherein said metal is Fe.
44: In a method for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes with a plasma torch comprising feeding said plasma torch with an inert gas, a carbon-containing substance and a metal catalyst, the improvement wherein the single-wall carbon nanotubes are collected by means of an electrostatic trap disposed downstream of said plasma torch.
45: The method of claim 44, wherein said electrostatic trap comprises a pair of electrodes generating an electrical current and at least a portion of said single-wall carbon nanotubes are deposited on one of said electrodes.
46: The method of claim 45, wherein said single-wall carbon nanotubes are passed through an oven defining a temperature gradient before being deposited.
47: The method of claim 45, wherein said carbon-containing substance is a carbon-containing solid or a carbon-containing gas.
48: The method of claim 45, wherein said carbon-containing substance is a carbon-containing gas chosen from C1-C4 hydrocarbons.
49: The method of claim 48, wherein said metal is Fe.
50: A method for collecting single-wall carbon nanotubes comprising contacting the single-wall carbon nanotubes with an electrostatic trap comprising a pair of electrodes generating an electrical current so as to deposit at least a portion of said single-wall carbon nanotubes on one of said electrodes.
51: The method of claim 50, wherein said single-wall carbon nanotubes are generated by means of a plasma torch and wherein said electrostatic trap is disposed sufficiently downstream of said plasma torch so as to permit to the single-wall carbon nanotubes to be condensed according to a temperature gradient before being deposited.
52: The method of claim 51, wherein said single-wall carbon nanotubes are produced by:
feeding an inert gas through a plasma torch to form an inert gas plasma;
injecting a carbon-containing substance and a metal catalyst in said inert gas plasma downstream of said inert gas feed, in order to form a plasma comprising atoms or molecules of carbon and atoms of said metal; and
condensing said atoms or molecules of carbon and said atoms of said metal to form single-wall carbon nanotubes.
53: The method of claim 52, wherein said carbon-containing substance is a carbon-containing solid or a carbon-containing gas.
54: The method of claim 52, wherein said carbon-containing substance is a carbon-containing gas chosen from C1-C4 hydrocarbons.
55: The method of claim 54, wherein said metal is Fe.
56: The method of claim 55, wherein said inert gas is argon.
US11/734,443 2002-05-09 2007-04-12 Method and apparatus for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes Abandoned US20080124482A1 (en)

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