US20080113574A1 - Wound care product made from bulked filament tow - Google Patents

Wound care product made from bulked filament tow Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080113574A1
US20080113574A1 US11/559,507 US55950706A US2008113574A1 US 20080113574 A1 US20080113574 A1 US 20080113574A1 US 55950706 A US55950706 A US 55950706A US 2008113574 A1 US2008113574 A1 US 2008113574A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
care product
wound care
filaments
manufacture
article
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Abandoned
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US11/559,507
Inventor
Rene B. Neron
Raymond M. Robertson
Jitendrakumar N. Suthar
Gary E. Dehart
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Deutsche Bank AG New York Branch
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Deutsche Bank AG New York Branch
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Priority to US11/559,507 priority Critical patent/US20080113574A1/en
Assigned to CELANESE ACETATE LLC reassignment CELANESE ACETATE LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ROBERTSON, RAYMOND M., DEHART, GARY E., NERON, RENE B., SUTHAR, Jitendrakumar N.
Assigned to DEUTSCHE BANK AG, NEW YORK BRANCH, AS COLLATERAL AGENT reassignment DEUTSCHE BANK AG, NEW YORK BRANCH, AS COLLATERAL AGENT ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CELANESE ACETATE LLC
Publication of US20080113574A1 publication Critical patent/US20080113574A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/00004Non-adhesive dressings
    • A61F13/00021Non-adhesive dressings characterized by the structure of the dressing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/02Adhesive plasters or dressings
    • A61F13/0203Adhesive plasters or dressings having a fluid handling member
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02JFINISHING OR DRESSING OF FILAMENTS, YARNS, THREADS, CORDS, ROPES OR THE LIKE
    • D02J1/00Modifying the structure or properties resulting from a particular structure; Modifying, retaining, or restoring the physical form or cross-sectional shape, e.g. by use of dies or squeeze rollers
    • D02J1/18Separating or spreading
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/14Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic yarns or filaments produced by welding
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F2013/00361Plasters
    • A61F2013/00727Plasters means for wound humidity control
    • A61F2013/00748Plasters means for wound humidity control with hydrocolloids or superabsorbers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition

Abstract

A wound care product is a nonwoven fabric made of filaments bulked from a tow and fixed into a 3-dimensional structure.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • A wound care product is made from a bulked filament tow.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The use of nonwoven materials as wound dressings is disclosed in, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,704,113; 4,741,941; 6,448,462; and 6,500,539, each of which are discussed in greater detail below.
  • In general, materials used as wound dressings need, among other things, the ability to remove fluid from the wound site (a transport phenomenon), to hold the removed fluid (an absorption phenomenon), and not to adhere (stick) to the wound.
  • Nonwoven fabric is a term of art that refers to a manufactured sheet, batting, webbing, or fabric that is held together by various methods. Those methods include, for example, fusion of fibers (e.g., thermal, ultrasonic, pressure, and the like), bonding of fibers (e.g., resins, solvents, adhesives, and the like), and mechanical entangling (e.g., needle-punching, entangling, and the like). The term is sometimes used broadly to cover other structures such as those held together by interlacing of yarns (stitch bonding) or those made from perforated or porous films. The term excludes woven, knitted, and tufted structures, paper, and felts made by wet milling processes. In its most common usage, the term includes fibrous structures made by such processes as dry, wet, or air laying (with or without one of the methods of holding the fibers together mentioned above), needle-punching, spunbond or meltblown processes, and hydroentangling (spunlacing). In the dry, wet, air laying, and hydroentangling (spunlacing) processes, staple fibers are used in the manufacture of the nonwoven fabric. In the spunbond and meltblown processes, molten polymer is extruded onto a moving belt; the fibers of these types of nonwovens may be filaments.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,704,113 discloses a staple fiber, hydroentangled nonwoven used as a hospital dressing.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,741,941 discloses a meltblown or spunbonded nonwoven that can used as a hospital wipe.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,448,462 discloses a spunbonded nonwoven used as a bandage material.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,500,539 discloses a spunlaced (hydroentangled) nonwoven as a wound dressing.
  • While each of the foregoing has provided an advancement in the art of wound care, there is a need for better wound care products.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A wound care product is a nonwoven fabric made of filaments bulked from a tow and fixed into a 3-dimensional structure.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings a form that is presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.
  • FIG. 1 is a photograph showing a flat tow (right hand side) and a bulked tow (left hand side).
  • FIG. 2 is a photograph illustrating two embodiments of the present invention (right hand side and center) along with a flat tow (left hand side).
  • FIG. 3 is schematic illustration of the process for making the instant invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a graph illustrating the effect of a plasticizer on the shape retention of a nonwoven fabric after wetting.
  • FIG. 5 is a graph illustrating the effect of a plasticizer on the shape retention of a nonwoven fabric after wetting.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Wound care product, as used herein, refers to post operative absorbent dressings (or pads), wound pads for cushioning, Gamgee dressings, sponges (including ultra small examples often known as ‘pledgets’) for use externally or internally, bandages, patient underpads, gauzes for skin preparation/debridement, gauzes including narrow or ‘ribbon gauze,’ and laporotomy sponges for internal operating room (OR) uses. This material may also be used as a component or in its entirety in a wound dressing, a component or in its entirety in a bandage, a component or in its entirety in an eye dressing, a component or in its entirety in a nursing pad, a component or in its entirety in absorbent materials used in autopsy, a component or in its entirety in dental dressings, a component or in its entirety in veterinary dressings, or one of the other listed applications. This material may also be used as wadding for the packaging of medicine in bottles or jars.
  • Nonwoven fabric as used herein refers to randomly oriented filaments produced from a bulked tow, and excludes nonwoven fabrics made by dry, wet, or air laying processes, needle-punching, spunbond or meltblown processes, and hydroentangling (spunlacing).
  • Filament refers to continuous fiber, i.e., a fiber of infinite length when compared to its cross-sectional diameter.
  • Tow refers to a bundle of filaments without definite twist.
  • Bulked (or bulking) refers to a processing step whereby an flat tow is caused to swell, grow, expand, and/or increase in thickness, for example, perpendicular to both the machine direction (MD) and the cross machine direction (CD) of the tow. Bulking may be accomplished by use of an air jet.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a tow A of filaments and a nonwoven B made from a bulked tow. Tow A is generally a flat structure with the filaments generally aligned with one another. The nonwoven B is bulked and has 3-dimensional structure with the filaments primarily oriented along the MD, with additional folding and deregistering of the filaments within the structure creating the additional bulk.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown two embodiments B and C of the present invention of a nonwoven made from a bulked filament tow and having a fixed 3-dimensional structure. There is also shown a flat tow A. Each sample, A, B, & C, weighs 4.3 grams. Embodiments B & C demonstrate the bulk that can be achieved with the instant process.
  • The filaments may be made of any material that can be formed into filaments. Such materials may include melt spinnable polymers and solution spinnable polymers. Such material includes, but are not limited to: acrylics, cellulosics (e.g., regenerated celluloses (rayons), and cellulose esters), polyamide (e.g., nylons), polyesters (e.g., PET and PBT), polyolefins (e.g., PE, PB, PMP, PP), and mixtures thereof. In one embodiment, the filaments are made of cellulose acetate.
  • The filaments may have any size. The denier of an individual filament may range from 1-15 dpf (denier per filament). In one embodiment, the denier may range from 2-10 dpf. In another embodiment, the denier may range from 3-8 dpf.
  • The filaments may have any cross-sectional shapes. Such shapes include, but are not limited to: round, ‘y,’ ‘x,’ crenulated, dog bone, or combinations thereof.
  • The tow may include any number of filaments. The number of filaments may range in number from 2,500 to 25,000.
  • The tow may have any total denier. The total denier of the tow may be in the range of 2,500 to 125,000. In one embodiment, the total denier of the tow may range from 15,000 to 75,000. In another embodiment, the total denier of the tow may range from 20,000 to 40,000.
  • The tow may be crimped. Crimps may be in the range of 5-80 crimps per inch (2-32 crimps per cm). In one embodiment, the crimps may range from 25-35 crimps per inch (10-14 crimps per cm).
  • The tow may include a finish or may be finished. When a surface finish is applied, the finish may comprise about 0.3-5.0 wt % of the tow. In one embodiment, the finish comprises about 0.5-2.0 wt % of the tow.
  • The nonwoven fabric may have any physical dimension or any cross-sectional shape. In one embodiment, the nonwoven fabric may have the following physical dimensions: basis weight of 50-300 g/m2; a width of 50-300 mm; and a thickness of 2 mm-5 cm. The cross-sectional shapes may include, for example, rectangular, square, round, or oval. In one embodiment, the cross-sectional shape may be rectangular.
  • The nonwoven fabric preferably has a fixed, 3-dimensional structure to facilitate, at least, transport of fluid away from the wound, absorbency capacity, and shape retention. The nonwoven fabric may be fixed by any means. The nonwoven fabric may be fixed by use of, for example: a binder (an adhesive-type material that cements the filaments to one another at filament contact points); a plasticizer (a material that softens the polymer of the filaments and allows the filaments to coalesce at filament contact points); and/or external energy source to form point bonds (such energy sources include, for example, thermal, pressure, and/or ultrasonic bonding techniques, which may or may not be facilitated by the use of bicomponent fibers incorporated into the nonwoven fabric).
  • The choice of the fixing technique may be dependent upon the polymer of the filament. For example, if the filament is a cellulose ester, e.g., cellulose acetate, a plasticizer may be used. Such plasticizers may be, for example, triacetin, triethylene glycol diacetate, glycol monoethyl ether acetate, and combinations thereof. In one embodiment, the plasticizer may be added to the nonwoven fabric in the range of 2-15 wt % of the nonwoven fabric. In another embodiment, the plasticizer may be added to the nonwoven in the range of 7-20 wt % of the nonwoven fabric.
  • The nonwoven fabric may also include the following, alone or in combination:
  • Radio-opaque detector mechanisms, such as threads or beads, that allows detection when used within the patient.
  • Radio frequency (RF) tags which could then be detected by an external counting or tracking system and that eliminate the need for manually counting surgical disposables before and after surgery.
  • Bar coding systems, such as tapes, which could then be detected by an external counting or tracking system, eliminating the need for manually counting surgical disposables before and after surgery.
  • Antimicrobial agents intended to slow or kill the growth of microbes and potentially reduce the occurrence of infection. Such agents are conventional and may include, but are not limited to, drugs, chemicals or the like. These agents may be added during filament spinning or with the agent used to fix the structure of the nonwoven fabric or added to the surface of the filaments in any known manner. Antimicrobial agents include, but are not limited to, antibacterial agents, antiviral agents, antifungal agents, and/or antiparisitic agents. Such agents may include, but are not limited to, silver ions, Chitosan, copper ions, and/or chlorinated phenoxy compounds.
  • The non-adherence properties of the nonwoven fabric may be improved by any known manner. For example, absorbent cellulose derivatives may be used. One absorbent cellulose derivative material is hydroxypropyl cellulose. This material may be added to the surface of the nonwoven fabric that is intended to be in contact with the wound surface. Alternatively, calcium alginate (derived from seaweed) may also be used. This material may be added in sheet or web form to a side of the nonwoven fabric that is intended for contact with the wound and readily dissolves when contacted by a saline solution prior to removal of the dressing from the wound. Calcium alginate is commercially available from Specialty Fibers and Materials, Ltd. In another embodiment, siloxanes may be added to the nonwoven fabric in any conventional manner.
  • Flexible absorbent binder (FAB) may be added to increase the absorbent capacity of the nonwoven fabric. FAB may be applied to the nonwoven fabric in any conventional manner. One such material is described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,964,803, incorporated herein by reference.
  • The nonwoven fabric does not include any superabsorbent particles (SAP) that are commonly used in the manufacture of personal hygiene products/garments.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, the manufacture of the instant wound dressing shall be described. The process 10 for making the wound care product generally comprises the steps of: bulking 50 the tow, and fixing 40 the 3-dimensional structure of the bulked tow. In the embodiment shown, bulking 50 the tow further includes spreading 20 the tow and deregistering 30 the tow.
  • Tow 14 may be pulled from a bale 12. The tow (or tow band) 14 may be spread 20 (i.e., increasing its width from the compressed state in the bale) by use of one or more banding jets 16, 18. During travel, the tow 14 may be guided by one or more guides 17. Additionally, multiple tows may be combined by feeding several tow bands together. In this way, the nonwoven may include differing fibers. Differing fibers may include, but is not limited to, fibers of differing sizes, fibers made of differing materials, fibers having differing additives or surface coatings, fibers of differing chemical, medical, and physical properties, and combinations thereof. With this flexibility, nonwovens with varying functions may be produced. In one specific example of the foregoing, calcium alginate fibers (which, for example, have beneficial gelling properties desired for contact with a wound surface) may be readily combined with other fibers (e.g., those mentioned above) to form a wound care product.
  • The spread tow is then deregistered 30 in deregistering apparatus that may consist of at least two pairs of driven rollers 32, 34. These driven rollers turn at different speeds. In one embodiment, rollers 34 turning faster than rollers 32. In one embodiment (not shown in the figure), one roller of each pair is grooved or threaded and the mate is smooth faced. Additionally, a pair of pretension rollers 36 may be used to facilitate deregistration of the filaments of the tow band.
  • Fixing the 3-dimensional structure of the bulked tow may be accomplished before, during, or after the tow is bulked.
  • In one embodiment, a plasticizer is added 40 to the deregistered tow prior to bulking to facilitate fixing of the 3-dimensional structure of the nonwoven fabric. The plasticizer may be added in any conventional manner. Application of the plasticizer may be by brushing, spraying, pads, wicks, or other types of plasticizer applicators. Further, the plasticizer may be applied to one or more sides of the tow/bulked tow. Optionally, when the plasticizer method of fixing is used, setting of the fixing may be sped up, i.e., reducing the set time. Speeding up the set may be accomplished in any conventional manner. One such manner may be by the injection of live steam into the bulked tow. The injection of steam may be further aided by a pair of nip rollers which additionally serve to control the thickness and density of the nonwoven fabric. Alternatively, a pair of heated godet rollers may be used to set the fix. These heated godet rollers contact the bulked tow and not only help set the 3-dimensional structure of the tow, but also control the thickness and density of the nonwoven fabric.
  • In another embodiment, fixing of the 3-dimensional structure may be accomplished after the tow is bulked. In this latter embodiment, the binder and/or the use of the external energy source are applied, in any conventional manner, after the tow has been bulked.
  • The deregistered tow is bulked 50 in any conventional manner. In one embodiment, the tow is bulked with an air jet 52. Such air jets 52 are known. See, for example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,331,976 and 6,253,431, incorporated herein by reference. After bulking and before fixing, it may be necessary to carry the bulked tow because the bulked tow has little to no machine direction (MD) strength. For example, the bulked tow may be carried on: a discrete material (e.g., a tissue) or moving belt or a rotating drum (which may or may not be vacuum assisted). The tissue may be subsequently discarded or the tissue may be incorporated into a subsequent product based upon the nonwoven fabric. Additionally, the tissue may sandwich the bulked tow. By sandwiching the tow, the bulked tow would have the same characteristic on both sides. Tissue, as used here, includes, but is not limited to: tissue, woven fabric, knitted fabric, other nonwoven, same nonwoven, film or the like.
  • Optionally, a speed controller 54 may be used to control/regulate the basis weight of the nonwoven. Alternately, the basis weight of the nonwoven may be controlled by an additional pair of driven rollers (e.g., nip rollers) located immediately after the air jet.
  • After the bulked tow is fixed, it is ready for subsequent processing 60. Subsequent processing may include, but is not limited to: wind-up; addition of other material or components; sterilization; cutting to shape; packaging; subsequent bonding (e.g., external energy source or adhesives); calendaring; and combinations thereof. The instant nonwoven fabric may also be joined to one or more other substrates. Such substrates include, but are not limited to, films, meshes, nonwovens, or fabrics (woven or knitted). Non-limiting examples of the forgoing include; barrier films to reduce or prevent strikethrough of exudates from the dressing; scrims to provide additional strength to the nonwoven in the machine direction, cross machine direction, or both; and materials that provide additional tactile or aesthetic benefits to the final product.
  • Additional operating parameters of the foregoing process may be obtained from the relevant portions of U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,253,431; 6,543,106; 7,059,027; and U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/672,036; 10/672,109; 10/672,519; 10/672,673; 10/672,674, all filed Sep. 26, 2003, and each of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • The instant invention also includes a nonwoven as described above, but for uses other than wound care products.
  • EXAMPLES
  • The foregoing invention may be further illustrated with regard to the following non-limiting examples.
  • In the FIGS. 4 and 5, the shape retention properties of the subject nonwoven are illustrated. The X-axis illustrates the wt % of plasticizer per the total nonwoven weight and the y-axis illustrates the % of the original dimension. Both samples were made according to the foregoing process with 110 mm air jet disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,253,431, a basis weigh of 80 g/m2, a line speed of 50 m/minute, and a bulking ratio of 1.5 (Bulking ratio refers to the linear speed of the tow across the second pair of rollers (in FIG. 3, roller pair 34) relative to the linear speed of the tow across the first pair of rollers (32), and expressed as a ratio). The sample illustrated in FIG. 4 was made of cellulose acetate (2.5 dpf, 30,000 total denier) and triacetin was used as plasticizer. The sample illustrated in FIG. 5 was made of cellulose acetate (7.3 dpf, 33,000 total denier) and triacetin was used as plasticizer. The test was performed by placing a 10 cm×41 cm sample in de-ionized water for 20 minutes, hanging the wetted sample vertically for 2 minutes and allowed to drip, the sample was then allowed to air dry, and the resulting dimensions were recorded. The shape retention values were calculated according to the following formula:

  • Shape retention(%)=[(original-post wetting)/original]*100.
  • The present invention may be embodied in other forms without departing from the spirit and the essential attributes thereof, and, accordingly, reference should be made to the appended claims, rather than to the foregoing specification, as indicated the scope of the invention.

Claims (33)

1. A wound care product comprising;
a nonwoven fabric made of filaments bulked from a tow and being fixed into a 3-dimensional structure, wherein said nonwoven fabric excludes nonwoven fabrics made by spunbond processes.
2. The wound care product of claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric having a basis weight in the range of 50-300 g/m2.
3. The wound care product of claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric having a thickness in the range of 2 mm-5 cm.
4. The wound care product of claim 1 wherein said filaments being a thermoplastic material.
5. The wound care product of claim 4 wherein said thermoplastic material being acrylics, cellulosics, polyamides, polyolefins, polyesters, co-polymers thereof, and mixtures thereof.
6. The wound care product of claim 5 wherein said thermoplastic material being cellulose acetate.
7. The wound care product of claim 1 wherein said filaments comprising two or more differing filaments.
8. The wound care product of claim 1 further comprising a binder.
9. The wound care product of claim 8 wherein said binder comprising 4-20% by weight of said fabric.
10. The wound care product of claim 8 wherein said binder being selected from the group consisting of glycerol derivatives, cyclohexanone, benzl alcohol, and combinations thereof.
11. The wound care product of claim 10 wherein glycerol derivatives include glyceryl triacetate (triacetin), triethylglycerol diacetate, and glycol monoethyl ether acetate.
12. The wound care product of claim 1 further comprising point bonds.
13. The wound care product of claim 12 wherein said point bonds being selected from the group of thermal bonds, ultrasonic bonds, pressure bonds, and combinations thereof.
14. The wound care product of claim 1 wherein said fabric not including any superabsorbent particles incorporated therein.
15. A method of making a wound care product comprising the steps of:
bulking a filament tow into a nonwoven fabric, and fixing the filaments into a 3-dimensional structure.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein said nonwoven fabric having a basis weight in the range of 50-300 g/m2.
17. The method of claim 15 wherein bulking further comprising opening the tow with an air jet.
18. The method of claim 15 wherein fixing the filaments further comprising applying a binder to the nonwoven.
19. The method of claim 15 wherein fixing the filaments further comprising bonding the filaments of the nonwoven with an external energy source.
20. An article of manufacture comprising;
a nonwoven fabric made of filaments bulked from a tow and being fixed into a 3-dimensional structure, wherein said nonwoven fabric excludes nonwoven fabrics made by spunbond processes.
21. The article of manufacture of claim 20 wherein said nonwoven fabric having a basis weight in the range of 50-300 g/m2.
22. The article of manufacture of claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric having a thickness in the range of 2 mm-5 cm.
23. The article of manufacture of claim 1 wherein said filaments being a thermoplastic material.
24. The article of manufacture of claim 23 wherein said thermoplastic material being acrylics, cellulosics, polyamides, polyolefins, polyesters, co-polymers thereof, and mixtures thereof.
25. The article of manufacture of claim 24 wherein said thermoplastic material being cellulose acetate.
26. The article of manufacture of claim 20 wherein said filaments comprising two or more differing filaments.
27. The article of manufacture of claim 20 further comprising a binder.
28. The article of manufacture of claim 27 wherein said binder comprising 4-20% by weight of said fabric.
29. The article of manufacture of claim 27 wherein said binder being selected from the group consisting of glycerol derivatives, cyclohexanone, benzl alcohol, and combinations thereof.
30. The article of manufacture of claim 29 wherein glycerol derivatives include glyceryl triacetate (triacetin), triethyiglycerol diacetate, and glycol monoethyl ether acetate.
31. The article of manufacture of claim 20 further comprising point bonds.
32. The article of manufacture of claim 31 wherein said point bonds being selected from the group of thermal bonds, ultrasonic bonds, pressure bonds, and combinations thereof.
33. The article of manufacture of claim 20 wherein said fabric not including any superabsorbent particles incorporated therein.
US11/559,507 2006-11-14 2006-11-14 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow Abandoned US20080113574A1 (en)

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US11/559,507 US20080113574A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-11-14 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow

Applications Claiming Priority (13)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/559,507 US20080113574A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-11-14 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
PCT/US2006/061770 WO2008060306A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
JP2009536215A JP2010508961A (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound healing product made from bulking filament tow
KR1020097009879A KR20090064600A (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
CN 200680056387 CN101541273A (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
CN 201410052016 CN103784257A (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
MX2009005149A MX2009005149A (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow.
KR1020127027779A KR101315639B1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
EP20060846525 EP2081527B1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
EP20140160425 EP2767266A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-12-08 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
US12/507,834 US20090287131A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2009-07-23 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
US13/672,739 US20130066250A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2012-11-09 Wound care product made from bulked filament tow
JP2013242848A JP2014111118A (en) 2006-11-14 2013-11-25 Wound healing product made from bulked filament tow

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US20150351976A1 (en) * 2014-06-06 2015-12-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Carded staple fiber nonwovens

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WO2013074584A1 (en) * 2011-11-16 2013-05-23 Celanese Acetate Llc Nonwoven materials from polymer melt filaments and apparatuses and methods thereof
WO2013074591A1 (en) * 2011-11-16 2013-05-23 Celanese Acetate Llc Nonwoven materials from continuous tow bands and apparatuses and methods thereof
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KR101315639B1 (en) 2013-10-08
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US20090287131A1 (en) 2009-11-19
EP2081527A1 (en) 2009-07-29
MX2009005149A (en) 2009-05-25
JP2010508961A (en) 2010-03-25
EP2767266A1 (en) 2014-08-20
WO2008060306A1 (en) 2008-05-22
KR20090064600A (en) 2009-06-19
CN103784257A (en) 2014-05-14
KR20120134145A (en) 2012-12-11
EP2081527B1 (en) 2014-03-19
JP2014111118A (en) 2014-06-19

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