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US20080099546A1 - Container and closure for a container - Google Patents

Container and closure for a container Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080099546A1
US20080099546A1 US11590201 US59020106A US2008099546A1 US 20080099546 A1 US20080099546 A1 US 20080099546A1 US 11590201 US11590201 US 11590201 US 59020106 A US59020106 A US 59020106A US 2008099546 A1 US2008099546 A1 US 2008099546A1
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US
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
closure
carton
inner
end
paperboard
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11590201
Inventor
Edward P. Cronin
George Solowiejko
Gordon E. VerWeyst
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
J L Clark Inc
Original Assignee
J L Clark Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons, trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/64Lids
    • B65D5/66Hinged lids
    • B65D5/6697Separate lids attached to the container body by a hinge element
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D43/00Lids or covers for rigid or semi-rigid containers
    • B65D43/14Non-removable lids or covers
    • B65D43/16Non-removable lids or covers hinged for upward or downward movement
    • B65D43/163Non-removable lids or covers hinged for upward or downward movement the container and the lid being made separately
    • B65D43/169Non-removable lids or covers hinged for upward or downward movement the container and the lid being made separately the lid, the hinge and the element connecting them to the container being made of one piece

Abstract

A container having a paperboard carton and a plastic closure is provided. The carton has a bottom and a sidewall extending upward toward an open end. A plurality of flaps extend from the sidewall at the open end. Each flap joins to the sidewall at a hinge and depends downwardly from the sidewall over an end portion of the sidewall. The closure has a base portion and inner and outers walls depending downward from the base portion. The base portion and inner and outer walls define a channel therebetween. The channel receives the flaps of the carton. At least one of the inner and outer walls defines a shoulder that engages the flaps to secure the carton to the closure.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    This invention generally relates to containers and more particularly to closable paperboard cartons.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Paperboard cartons of various sizes and shapes are used to store vast quantities of consumer products. Representative consumer products range from the milk to boxes for cake mixes or batters and other foodstuffs to laundry soaps to non-explosive munitions such as BB's and paintballs. The use of paperboard to form the cartons is highly cost effective in comparison to metal containers. Unfortunately, purely paperboard cartons such as the well known gabled top milk cartons do not re-close satisfactorily.
  • [0003]
    Attempts to add plastic closures to paperboard carton have been made. One attempt is illustrated in WO 03/013966 to Cope Allman Plastic Packaging Limited. This closure uses a plurality of ribs that grip the sides of the paperboard carton. However, to gain access to the internal cavity of the paperboard carton, the entire closure is removed from the carton. As such, the closure itself is designed to be removed from the paperboard carton. This design is believed to have drawbacks. For example, if a user tends to grab the container by the plastic closure rather than container) the closure and carton can separate causing the carton and its contents to fall to the ground and spill.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    One aspect of the invention is directed at a practical and inexpensive container having a paperboard carton and an re-closable closure that is not easily removed from the paperboard carton. The container includes a plastic closure that mounts to folded flaps of the open end of the paperboard carton. The connection between the folded over flaps and the closure can preferably be formed without any adhesives (adhesives may be used if desired for enhanced securement or the provision for a seal to prevent leakage). The plastic closure includes a channel that is sized and configured with an engagement shoulder (that may be continuous or discontinuous) that can securely engage the folded over flaps of the carton.
  • [0005]
    According to a more detailed embodiment, an improved container has a rectangular paperboard carton and a plastic closure mounted to the carton. The paperboard carton includes a rectangular bottom and four sidewalls extending upward from the bottom. The sidewalls and bottom define an open ended enclosure. Each sidewall includes a flap connected to the sidewall by a fold. Each flap includes a terminating free end running generally parallel to the fold. The folds generally define the open end of the carton. The plastic closure mounts to the free end of the carton. The closure includes a rectangular base and an inner skirt spaced apart from an outer skirt extending from the base. The base and inner and outer skirts combine to form a rectangular channel. The channel receives the free end of the carton. The rectangular base defines an opening to the interior cavity of the carton. At least one rib extends into the channel from one of the skirts toward the other skirt and engages the terminating edge of each flap. A movable door covers the opening and is integrally hinged to the rectangular base.
  • [0006]
    According to a further embodiment, a container including a carton formed at least in part from paperboard material and closure secured to the carton is provided. The carton has a bottom and a sidewall extending upward toward an open end. A plurality of flaps extends from the sidewall at the open end. Each flap joins to the sidewall at a hinge and depends downwardly from the sidewall over an end portion of the sidewall. The has a base portion and inner and outers walls depending downward from the base portion. The base portion and inner and outer walls define a channel therebetween. The channel receives the flaps of the carton. At least one of the inner and outer walls defines a shoulder that engages the flaps to secure the carton to the closure.
  • [0007]
    According to a different inventive aspect, an improved closure for a rectangular paperboard carton is provided. The closure is mountable to a paperboard carton having an open free end defined by folded over flaps of the rectangular sidewall of the carton. The flaps terminate in an end face that runs parallel to the folds. The closure includes a rectangular base that includes a dispensing opening. Inner and outer skirts extend from a bottom side of the rectangular base. The inner and outer skirts and rectangular base combine to form a rectangular channel adapted to receive and engage the open free end of the carton. A shoulder formed in one of the inner and outer skirts is configured to engage the end face of the folded over flaps. A lid door hingedly connects to the rectangular base by a living hinge. The lid door includes a top panel sized to cover the opening when the lid door is in a closed position. Lid door inner and outer walls extend from and generally transverse to the top panel. The lid door inner wall inserts into and mates with the opening. The outer wall terminates in a free end that abuts with a top side of the rectangular base in the closed position.
  • [0008]
    Other aspects, objectives and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0009]
    The accompanying drawings incorporated in and forming a part of the specification illustrate several aspects of the present invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention. In the drawings:
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 is a top perspective illustration of an embodiment of a container having a paperboard carton and plastic closure with the plastic closure in an open position;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2 is a top perspective illustration of the container of FIG. 1 having the plastic closure in a closed position;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 3 is an exploded illustration of the container of FIG. 1;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 4 is a frontal illustration of the container of FIG. 1;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional illustration of the container about lines 5-5 of FIG. 4;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 6 is an enlarge partial cross-sectional illustration of the container of FIG. 5; and
  • [0016]
    FIG. 7 is bottom illustration of the plastic closure of FIG. 1;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 8 is a further enlarged partial cross-sectional illustration of the container of FIG. 6; and
  • [0018]
    FIG. 9 is a further embodiment of a container having a plastic closure and a paperboard carton, wherein the plastic closure includes a handle.
  • [0019]
    While the invention will be described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, there is no intent to limit it to those embodiments. On the contrary, the intent is to cover all alternatives, modifications and equivalents as included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0020]
    Referring now to the figures, FIG. 1 illustrates a container 8 that generally includes a carton 10 in conjunction with a closure 12. The container 8 forms an interior cavity 16 for housing numerous types of products, for example: powdered goods such as flour or sugar, liquid goods such as milk or juice, or a plurality of solid goods such as paintballs or bb's. This list of products is merely illustrative and is in no way exhaustive or limiting.
  • [0021]
    The closure 12 mounts to an open end of the carton 10 and functions to provide a closable opening to the interior cavity 16 of the container 8. In an open position, the interior cavity 16 is exposed such that the products (not shown) within the container 8 can be dispensed or otherwise extracted from the container 8. The cavity 16 is exposed through an aperture passing through a closure body 18 of the closure 12. The closure body 18 secures the closure 12 to the carton 10.
  • [0022]
    In a closed position, as illustrated in FIG. 2, a closure lid 20 covers and closes the aperture through the closure body 18 to prevent any stored items from spilling or leaking from the container 8, or to otherwise prevent access to the material stored within the container 8. The closure body 18 and closure lid 20 may combine and contact to form a seal that prevents moisture from entering or exiting the container 8. Whether a seal is necessary will depend upon the desired application and planned container contents. While the illustrated embodiment includes a single large closure lid 20, the closure 12 could include multiple closure lids and the closure lid(s) could have different sizes, shapes or locations.
  • [0023]
    With reference to FIG. 3, the carton 10 is generally rectangular in shape, and preferably, square as shown. Four sidewalls 24-27 extend upward from a square bottom 28 in generally perpendicular relation. The sidewalls 24-27 and bottom 28 combine to form the carton 10, which provides an open ended enclosure with an interior cavity 16.
  • [0024]
    The carton 10 is preferably formed from paperboard. The paperboard may be laminated or coated with such coatings as wax or plastic film to increase the moisture resistance of the material. The coating can be on one side or both sides of the paperboard. It is preferable, but not required, to form the carton 10 from a single unitary one-piece blank of paperboard. The paperboard generally has an outer surface and an inner surface. The thickness T1 (see FIG. 8) of the paperboard extending generally perpendicularly between the inner and outer surface is generally constant. Different paperboard thicknesses are usuable with the embodiment depending upon strength and container size requirements, and is typically in the range of between 0.01 inches and 0.05 inches and preferably between about 0.02 inches and 0.03 inches of thickness for most paperboard materials used in cartons. Typical cartons 8 sizes are pint, quart and gallon sized cartons 10. As such, three different standard sized closures 12 for pint, quart and gallon are standard size containers are embodiments of the closure 12.
  • [0025]
    Generally, a plurality of folds 30-33 interconnect adjacent ones of sidewalls 24-27. However, adjacent sidewalls 27 and 26 are interconnected by connection flap 34, which is connected to sidewall 26 at fold 33. The connection flap 34 overlaps and is secured to sidewall 27 thereby interconnecting adjacent sidewalls 27 and 26 when the carton 10 is in an assembled condition. Typically, the connection flap 34 is adhesively bonded to the interior surface of sidewall 27. One suitable adhesive is hot melt. The connection flap 34 may have the bottom and top ends tapered to prevent interference with other folded portions of the carton 10. Other designs or configurations for forming the bottom 28 and sidewalls 24-27 may be used as well. Furthermore, the individual sides of the carton are identified as individual sidewalls, however, the combination of all four sidewalls 24-27 may be referred to as a single sidewall as well (e.g. the four individual sidewalls are connected to provide a containment sidewall).
  • [0026]
    End folds 42 interconnect top flaps 38 to individual sidewalls 24-27. The end folds 42 generally form the open free end of the carton 10. The end folds 42 extend generally parallel to the bottom 28 of the carton 10. Terminating ends 48 of the top flaps 38 run generally parallel to the end folds 42.
  • [0027]
    The end folds 42 may be creased to form hinges that permit the top flaps 38 to pivot relative to their respective sidewalls 24-27. This creased condition can help reduce the bending moment inherent in the paperboard material at the end folds 42. The crease can be formed by various methods to include scoring, folding the material about a line to weaken the cellulose material along the line, indenting a line with a tool such as during the stamping operations in which the die cut paperboard blank is made, or other conventional process. In either event, the crease provides a reliable hinge point about which the top flaps 38 can pivot. Due to the nature of paperboard material and the “memory” of the fibers contained in the cellulose, however, each top flap 38 naturally wants to rotate away from the sidewall and widen to its relaxed state that would be wider than the corresponding gap of the mouth of the channel 64 into which the top flap 38 is to be installed (a horizontal distance measure from the inner surface of the outer skirt 60 to the innermost surface of the shoulder provided by the mounting rib 70). Prior to installation, (e.g. as shown in FIG. 3), the top flaps 38 are folded over into a relaxed state to an angle between about 95 degrees and 175 degrees relative to the sidewall (or vertical), and more preferably about 130 degrees and 150 degrees relative to the sidewalls 42 to which the top flaps 38 are attached to facilitate easier assembly.
  • [0028]
    Also, it can be seen that the top of the creased end folds 42 form a nose, which is about double (to slightly more than) the thickness T1 of the paperboard material. The remainder of the flaps 38 taper outward therefrom in the relaxed position. This nose can readily be guided into the channel 64 and is substantially self locating due to the fact that the top flap 38 tapers outwardly therefrom.
  • [0029]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the top flaps 38 are folded inward and into cavity 16. However, alternative embodiments have the top flaps 38 folded outward and exterior of the cavity 16. With the top flaps 38 extending into the cavity 16, the top flaps 38 extend downward over an end portion of the side walls 24-27. The opposed free ends of the top flaps 38 that extend between the end folds 42 and terminating ends 48 may be tapered to facilitate folding the top flaps 38 inward by preventing adjacent free ends of adjacent top flaps 38 from interfering with one another during assembly. Alternatively, rather than being tapered, the top flaps 38 can be trimmed such that the top flaps 38 are slightly shorter in distance than the width of the sidewalls 24-27 to which each top flap 38 is attached. As illustrated, the top flaps 38 are generally planar. Again, these trimming operations can be performed during the die cutting operation of the paperboard blank.
  • [0030]
    With reference to the illustrations of FIGS. 5-7, the closure 12 mounts to the open end of the carton 10. The closure 12 can be formed using injection molding plastic methods as well as from plastic materials such as polypropylene or ABS plastic. The closure 12 generally includes the closure body 18 and the closure lid 20. The closure body 18 mounts the closure 12 to the carton 10. The closure body 18 further includes the aperture that provides access to the interior cavity 16 of the container 8.
  • [0031]
    For mounting the closure 12 to the carton 10, the closure body 18 includes an inner skirt 58 and an outer skirt 60 that extend from a top plate 62. The inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 are generally continuous and rectangular with the outer skirt 60 circumscribing the inner skirt 58 in generally spaced parallel relation (see FIG. 7). However, the individual skirts could be discontinuous and formed from a plurality of discrete segments that together are aligned or otherwise arranged to collectively provide the inner and outer skirts. The closure 12 can be made substantially any rectangular size, but is preferably between about 1 inch square and 6 inches square to provide container 8 volumes of between about 1 pint to about 1 gallon (1 quart size is therebetween). However, larger or smaller size containers 8 are possible.
  • [0032]
    The inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 extend in generally parallel relation. In the illustrated embodiment, the inner skirt 58 extends away from (downward in the illustrated embodiment) the top plate 62 farther than the outer skirt 60. The inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 are generally spaced apart from one another such that the inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 and top plate 62 combine to form a mounting channel 64. The mounting channel 64 is configured to receive the open end of the carton 10. Again, the mounting channel 64 could be either continuous as shown or discontinuous and broken into segments by intervening filler regions (for example, the corners of the closure 12 could be filled solid).
  • [0033]
    To facilitate installation of the closure body 18 to the carton 10, the skirts 58 and 60 include tapered ends 68 and 69, respectively, that taper inward toward mounting channel 64. The tapered ends 68 and 69 guide the folded free ends of sidewalls 24-27 into the mounting channel 64 during installation. As shown, tapered end 68 of the inner skirt 58 is located below the mounting rib 70. In contrast, the upper tapered end 69 is coincident with or slightly above the mounting rib 70. The significance of this is that there is a larger opening into the channel 64 that is provided so that the paperboard material can resiliently slide past the mounting rib 70 and into the channel 64 during initial assembly of the closure 12 and carton 10.
  • [0034]
    The closure body 18 further includes a mounting shoulder that, as illustrated, is provided by mounting rib 70 that extends outward from the inner skirt 58 and into the mounting channel 64. The shoulder is formed below a relief, and as such may alternatively be formed by a relief structure in the skirt wall rather than a projecting structure such as a sidewall groove or other cut out or relief region. As illustrated in FIG. 7, a plurality of segments extending generally the length of each side of the inner skirt 58 form the mounting rib 70. The mounting rib also can be either continuous as shown or discontinuous and broken into segments by intervening gap regions. The mounting rib 70 partially defines a mouth region at the entrance opening of the mounting channel 64 which defines a narrower width as opposed to a relief width located deeper into the mounting channel 64.
  • [0035]
    The engagement between the closure body 18 and top flaps 38 will be more fully described with primary reference to FIG. 6 and a single sidewall of the container 10. However, the following explanation is applicable to all four vertical sides of the container 8. As illustrated, mounting rib 70 engages the free end 48 of top flap 38 (e.g. the die cut edge of the flap which extends transversely between side surfaces of the top flap 38). This engagement secures the closure 12 to the carton 10 by resisting any axial tensile forces that are applied to the closure body 18 or closure lid 20 that would tend to remove the closure 12 from the carton 10.
  • [0036]
    The mounting rib 70 extends a distance T4 of between about 0.02 and about 0.03 inches from the outer surface 96 of the inner skirt 58. This distance can provide substantial engagement between top flap 38 and the mounting rib 70 for current standardized wall thicknesses, while still facilitating plastic mode release of the closure 12 from a mold without necessarily requiring a mold split during manufacturing. To assist resilient mold release, the top facing surface 97 of the mounting rib extends at an angle of between about 40 degrees and 50 degrees relative to the inner skirt 58, and is more preferably about 45 degrees. The bottom surface of the mounting rib 70 may extend at an angle of about 60 degrees relative to the inner skirt 58. These angles facilitate better removal of the closure 12 from a mold during manufacture as well as to facilitate more reliably engaging the terminating end 48 of the top flaps 38.
  • [0037]
    The spacing between the inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 can be correlated for proper reception and engagement between the closure body 18 and the carton 10. The closure 12 and carton 10 are configured such that large containers 8 holding heavy products can be lifted by the plastic closure 12 and the closure will not disengage the carton 10. The plastic closure 12 is substantially permanently secured to the carton 10 without adhesive through the provision and geometry of the channel 64. By substantially permanent, it is meant without a special tool and pulling the carton 10 away from the closure 12, destruction or breakage (including, but not necessarily severing) of the cellulose fiber in the paperboard material or non-reslient deformation or breakage, the closure 12 would be needed to facilitate release. The removal force required can be substantially predetermined based upon sizing and configuration of the carton 10 and paperboard used to form the carton 10. Typical sizing for the closures is between about 1 inch and 6 inch square closures for containers 8 having volumes ranging between about 1 pint and about 1 gallon. However, the closure 12 can be sized larger or smaller.
  • [0038]
    When an attempt is made to pull the closure 12 away from the carton 10 (or lift the carton including its contents by the closure) the terminating ends 48 of the top flaps 38 engage the upward facing shoulder provided by the mounting rib 70. Because this engagement occurs at an offset location relative to the pivot point provided by the hinge provided by the paperboard fold 42, it locks the closure 12 even tighter to the paperboard material. Specifically, this engagement places the top flaps 38 in compression which pivots and drives the flap ends about the hinge and fold 42 further away from paperboard sidewall 24 making it wider and therefore harder to withdrawal.
  • [0039]
    The spacing between the inner and outer skirts 58 and 60 is sized to limit the rotational movement of the top flap 38, via end fold 42. Particularly, the spacing is such that the when the closure 12 is mounted to the carton 10, the top flap 38 may be folded at an angle of between about 140 degrees and 180 degrees relative to sidewall 24, and more preferably between 160 degrees and 175 degrees. As such, when the closure 12 is mounted to the carton 10, the flaps 38 are typically pressed and/or rotated toward the sidewalls 42 by the inner skirt 58. With reference to FIG. 8, the width T2 of the portion of the mounting channel 64 between the end plate 62 and the mounting rib 70 from inner surface 95 of the outer skirt 60 to the outer surface 96 of the inner skirt 58 is between about 2½ and 4 times the thickness T1 of the paperboard material, and more preferably between about 3¼ and 3¾ times the thickness T1 of the paperboard. Furthermore, the width T3 of the mounting channel at the mouth of the mounting channel 64 between the mounting rib 70 and the outer skirt 60 is between about 2 times and 3¾ times the thickness T1 of the paperboard so that the open end of the carton 10 can be inserted into the mounting channel 64 but yet still a strong engagement is still maintained.
  • [0040]
    With these general guidelines above, the closure 12 can be configured for different thicknesses of paperboard carton material in a range of between about 0.01 and about 0.05 inches, as discussed previously. As for other typical dimensions, the width W1 of the top flaps 38 from the fold 42 to the terminating end 48 may be determined with respect to the depth of channel 64.
  • [0041]
    Further, before the closure 12 is mounted to the carton 10, the outer surface 98 of the sidewall 24 substantially aligns with inner surfaces 95 of the outer skirt 60. In other words the outer dimensions or periphery of the paperboard carton 10 from outer surface 98 of opposed sidewalls is substantially equal and thereby roughly matches the distance between inner surfaces of opposed sides of outer skirt 60. This configuration allows the paperboard to be inserted into the mounting channel 64 substantially without flexure or bending of the sidewalls 24-27 (other than corrections to material deviations facilitated by taper 69). In this embodiment, the flaps 38 under go flexure during assembly rather than the sidewalls 24-27 of the carton 10.
  • [0042]
    It will be recognized by one of ordinary skill in the art that the mounting rib 70 can extend either outward from the inner skirt 58, as illustrated, or inward from the outer skirt 60. The positioning of the mounting rib 70 is conditioned on the fold direction of the top flap 38 of the carton 10. If the top flap 38 folds into the interior cavity 16 of the carton 10, then the mounting rib 70 will extend outward from the inner skirt 58. However, if the top flap 38 folds outward and external of the interior cavity 16, then the mounting rib 70 will extend inward from the outer skirt 60.
  • [0043]
    Further, the mounting rib 70 can be formed from a single continuous rib to form a continuous rectangular profile. Alternatively, the mounting rib 70 can be discontinuous (such as illustrated in FIG. 7). The mounting rib 70 may be formed from a plurality of nibs, bumps, protrusions, or segments. Additionally, the mounting shoulder could be formed as a recess or recesses, which receive the free end of the flaps, formed in one of the skirts.
  • [0044]
    In situations where the container 8 is to be used for holding smaller particulate such as flour or sugar or for holding liquids, the closure 12 can be adhesively secured to the end portion of the sidewalls 24-27 to provide a seal between the carton 10 and the closure 12. The adhesive also provides added securement between the carton 10 and the closure 12. Typically, any adhesive would be applied to the carton 10 and then the closure 12 would be pressed onto the open end of the carton 10.
  • [0045]
    As illustrated, the closure body 18 includes an inner support flange 78 that extends inward from the inner skirt 58 and terminates at terminating end 80. The inner support flange 78 extends generally perpendicular to the inner skirt 58. The inner support flange 78 adds structural support to the closure body 1 8 to prevent flexure or twisting. Flexure or twisting can facilitate or promote disengagement of the closure body 18 from the free end of the carton 10. This added support provided by the support flange 78 is beneficial when a consumer grabs the container 8 by the closure 12 rather than the carton 10, by preventing degradation of the closures 12 securement to the carton 10 and preventing the closure from inadvertently being removed from the carton 10 due to the direct loading on the closure 12.
  • [0046]
    Support ribs 82 extend perpendicularly to both the support flange 78 and the inner skirt 58. The support ribs 82 further prevent flexure of both the support flange 78 and the inner skirt 58 thereby adding additional rigidity to the closure body 18. The support ribs 82 are illustrated as triangular shaped wedges. However, the support ribs 82 are not limited to wedges and may take other shapes such as rectangles or arcuate shaped supports.
  • [0047]
    The support flange 78 and inner skirt 58 generally circumscribe the aperture defining the opening that passes through the closure body 18. To close the container 8, the closure 12 includes the closure lid 20. The closure lid 20 connects to the closure body 18 by hinge 86. Hinge 86 is preferably a living hinge integrally formed with and between the closure body 18 and closure lid 20.
  • [0048]
    The closure lid 20 generally includes a top panel 83, a closure skirt 84, and a clasp 88. The closure skirt 84 extends from the top panel 83 and is generally rectangular in shape. The closure skirt 84 is received into the aperture passing through the closure body 18 in the closed position (See FIG. 6). The interaction between the closure skirt 84 and the closure body 18 prevents any material stored within the container 8 from escaping the closure assembly. The closure skirt 84 may create a radial seal with the inner surface of the inner skirt 58 or may create an axial seal between the free end of the closure skirt 84 and the top surface of the support flange 78.
  • [0049]
    Additionally, a plastic seal can be secured to the support flange 78 and provide an initial seal for the closure prior to the initial opening of the carton 8. The incorporation of such a plastic seal can provide tamper evidence. Additionally, tamper evident security can be added to the exterior of the closure 12 to indicate if a container 8 has been initially opened. Such an external tamper evident feature could include a shrink wrapped or adhesively adhered tape secured around the closure 12.
  • [0050]
    The closure lid 20 includes a peripheral skirt 89 that is spaced apart from and circumscribes the closure skirt 84. The peripheral skirt 89 abuts the top surface of the top plate 62 in the closed position and can provide an additional seal between the closure lid 20 and the closure body 18. The living hinge 86 connecting the closure lid 20 to the closure body 18 extends from and is connected to the peripheral skirt 89.
  • [0051]
    With reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, a clasp 88 interacts with a catch 90 to maintain the closure lid 20 in a closed position. The clasp 88 includes an aperture that receives a catch 90 of the closure body 18. Living hinge 92 integrally connects the clasp 88 to the peripheral skirt 89. As illustrated in FIG. 5, the catch 90 extends outward from the outer skirt 60 and engages the clasp 88. However, the clasp 88 could take on other forms such as being a nib that is releasably received in a recess of the closure body.
  • [0052]
    As illustrated in FIG. 9, a further embodiment provides a container 108 having a paperboard carton and a plastic closure 112. The closure 112 is substantially similar to the closure 12 discussed previously, accept for the fact that the closure 112 includes a handle 111. The handle 111 is preferably plastic and connects on opposed sides of the closure 112. The handle 111 connects to connectors 113 formed in the closure 112. The connectors 113 may include a hole into which a corresponding nib of the handle 111 snaps or inserts. As such, a nib would be positioned at both ends of the handle 111. Alternatively, the connectors 113 could include other structure such as a slot in which a corresponding nib or catch on opposed ends of the handle 111 is inserted. The handle 111 facilitates lifting and carrying the container 108. The handle 111 may be pivotally connected to the closure 112 at the connector so that the handle 111 is not secured in a fixed position. Alternatively, the handle 111 may be integrally formed with the closure 112 or may be adhesively, thermally, ultrasonically or otherwise bonded to the closure 112.
  • [0053]
    All references, including publications, patent applications, and patents cited herein are hereby incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each reference were individually and specifically indicated to be incorporated by reference and were set forth in its entirety herein.
  • [0054]
    The use of the terms “a” and “an” and “the” and similar referents in the context of describing the invention (especially in the context of the following claims) is to be construed to cover both the singular and the plural, unless otherwise indicated herein or clearly contradicted by context. The terms “comprising,” “having,” “including,” and “containing” are to be construed as open-ended terms (i.e., meaning “including, but not limited to,”) unless otherwise noted. Recitation of ranges of values herein are merely intended to serve as a shorthand method of referring individually to each separate value falling within the range, unless otherwise indicated herein, and each separate value is incorporated into the specification as if it were individually recited herein. All methods described herein can be preformed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., “such as”) provided herein, is intended merely to better illuminate the invention and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the invention unless otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element as essential to the practice of the invention.
  • [0055]
    Preferred embodiments of this invention are described herein, including the best mode known to the inventors for carrying out the invention. Variations of those preferred embodiments may become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon reading the foregoing description. The inventors expect skilled artisans to employ such variations as appropriate, and the inventors intend for the invention to be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein. Accordingly, this invention includes all modifications and equivalents of the subject matter recited in the claims appended hereto as permitted by applicable law. Moreover, any combination of the above-described elements in all possible variations thereof is encompassed by the invention unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A container comprising:
    a rectangular paperboard carton including a rectangular bottom and four sidewalls extending generally upward from the bottom, the sidewalls and bottom defining an open ended enclosure, each sidewall terminating in a fold connecting a flap to the sidewall, each flap having a terminating free end extending in generally parallel relationship to the fold, the folds generally defining an open end of the carton;
    a plastic closure mounted to the free end of the carton, the closure having a generally rectangular base and an-inner skirt spaced apart from an outer skirt, the inner and outer skirts depending downward from the base, the base and inner and outer skirts combining to form a rectangular channel therebetween, the channel receiving the free end of the carton, the rectangular base defining an opening therethrough;
    at least one rib extending into the channel from one of the skirts toward the other skirt engaging the terminating edge of each flap; and
    a movable door covering the opening integrally hinged to the rectangular base at a living hinge, the movable door engageable with the rectangular base to maintain the door in a closed position.
  2. 2. The container of claim 1, wherein each fold connecting a flap to a sidewall is creased to form an integral hinge between the flap and the sidewall, and wherein the flaps are substantially planar and each flap has opposed ends that extend between the fold and the terminating free end, the opposed ends being tapered or trimmed such that the length of the terminating end is shorter in length than the width of the sidewall to which the flap is secured, and
    wherein the paperboard carton is formed from a unitary one-peace blank of paperboard.
  3. 3. The container of claim 1, wherein the connection between the carton and the closure is free of adhesive.
  4. 4. The container of claim 1, further including a support flange extending inward from the inner skirt and spaced apart from the rectangular base, the movable door includes an engagement flange, the engagement flange receivable in the opening, a terminating end of the engagement flange abutting the support rib when the movable door is in a closed position.
  5. 5. A container, comprising:
    a carton formed at least in part from paperboard material, the carton having a bottom and a sidewall extending upward toward an open end;
    a plurality of flaps extending from the sidewall at the open end, each flap depending downwardly from the sidewall over an end portion of the sidewall; and
    a closure secured to the carton at the open end, the closure having a base portion and inner and outers walls depending downward therefrom to define a channel therebetween, the channel receiving the flaps, at least one of the inner and outer walls defining a shoulder, the shoulder engaging the flaps to secure the carton to the closure.
  6. 6. The container of claim 5, wherein each of the flaps have opposing first and second side surfaces and a terminating end face extending between the first and second side surfaces, wherein the flaps engage the shoulder along the end face.
  7. 7. The container of claim 6, wherein each flap is joined to the sidewall at a hinge, the hinge being formed by a folded crease formed into the paperboard material, and wherein the flaps are substantially planar.
  8. 8. The container of claim 5, wherein the paperboard material defines first and second surfaces with a substantially constant paperboard thickness extending transversely therebetween throughout the end portion and the flaps, wherein the channel has a width of between 2.5 and 4 times of the paperboard thickness above the shoulder.
  9. 9. The container of claim 5, wherein the inner and outer walls, the channel and the shoulder are a continuous and free of interruptions in extension around a periphery of the closure.
  10. 10. The container of claim 5, wherein at least one of the inner and outer walls, the channel and the shoulder are discontinuous and broken into different discrete segments around a periphery of the closure.
  11. 11. The container of claim 5, wherein the closure defines a dispensing opening formed therethrough, further including a lid adapted to open and close the dispensing opening.
  12. 12. The container of claim 5, wherein the closure is non-removably secured to the carton without any adhesive.
  13. 13. The container of claim 5, wherein the closure is further adhesively bonded to the carton, the adhesive providing a seal between the closure to the carton to prevent leakage therebetween.
  14. 14. The container of claim 7, wherein the shoulder is a rib formed on the inner wall, and wherein each flap is folded inwardly from the sidewall to form the hinge.
  15. 15. The container of claim 7, wherein the shoulder is a rib formed on the outer wall, and wherein each flap is folded outwardly from the sidewall to form the hinge.
  16. 16. A closure for a rectangular paperboard carton having an open free end defined by folded over flaps of the rectangular sidewall of the carton, the flaps terminating in an end face that runs parallel to the folds, the closure comprising:
    a rectangular base having a dispensing opening passing therethrough;
    inner and outer skirts extending from and extending transverse to a bottom side of the rectangular base, the inner and outer skirts and rectangular base combining to form a rectangular channel adapted to receive and engage an open free end of the carton;
    a shoulder formed in one of the inner and outer skirts, the shoulder configured to engage the end face of the folded over flaps;
    a lid door hingedly connected to the rectangular base by a living hinge and having a top panel sized to cover the opening when the lid door is in a closed position; and
    lid door inner and outer walls extending from and generally transverse to the top panel, the lid door inner wall sized to insert into and mate with the opening, the outer wall terminating in a free end that abuts with a top side of the rectangular base in the closed position.
  17. 17. The closure of claim 16, wherein one of the rectangular base and the lid door includes a clasp and the other of the rectangular base and lid door including a catch for selectively engaging the clasp to secure the lid door in a closed position.
  18. 18. The closure of claim 16, further comprising an inner support flange that extends inward from an inner surface of the inner skirt, a terminating end of the lid door inner wall abutting the support flange when the lid door is in a closed condition.
  19. 19. The closure of claim 16, wherein the lid door and rectangular base form a seal therebetween when the lid door is in a closed condition.
US11590201 2006-10-27 2006-10-27 Container and closure for a container Abandoned US20080099546A1 (en)

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US11590201 US20080099546A1 (en) 2006-10-27 2006-10-27 Container and closure for a container
CA 2576844 CA2576844A1 (en) 2006-10-27 2007-02-02 Container and closure for a container

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Cited By (7)

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JP2009035331A (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-02-19 Huhtamaki Consumer Packaging Inc Hinged lid structure and container
US20100193391A1 (en) * 2006-07-13 2010-08-05 Sig Technology Ag Cardboard/plastic composite packaging having a pull-off cover, and a method and device for the production thereof
GB2479862A (en) * 2010-04-20 2011-11-02 Gordano Support Group Ltd Container with strengthening frame around the opening thereof
USD662412S1 (en) 2011-04-01 2012-06-26 The Quaker Oats Company Carton blank
US20130214035A1 (en) * 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Chih-Wei Huang Reusable Paper Pan
US9630741B2 (en) 2014-09-29 2017-04-25 Sonoco Development, Inc. Recloseable paperboard carton with thermoformed closure
US9776773B1 (en) * 2016-11-30 2017-10-03 Cheng Yu Enterprises Co., Ltd. Fastener container

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US20100193391A1 (en) * 2006-07-13 2010-08-05 Sig Technology Ag Cardboard/plastic composite packaging having a pull-off cover, and a method and device for the production thereof
JP2009035331A (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-02-19 Huhtamaki Consumer Packaging Inc Hinged lid structure and container
GB2479862A (en) * 2010-04-20 2011-11-02 Gordano Support Group Ltd Container with strengthening frame around the opening thereof
USD662412S1 (en) 2011-04-01 2012-06-26 The Quaker Oats Company Carton blank
US20130214035A1 (en) * 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Chih-Wei Huang Reusable Paper Pan
US9630741B2 (en) 2014-09-29 2017-04-25 Sonoco Development, Inc. Recloseable paperboard carton with thermoformed closure
US9776773B1 (en) * 2016-11-30 2017-10-03 Cheng Yu Enterprises Co., Ltd. Fastener container

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Owner name: J.L. CLARK, INC., ILLINOIS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CRONIN, EDWARD P.;SOLOWIEJKO, GEORGE;VERWEYST, GORDON E.;REEL/FRAME:018587/0442;SIGNING DATES FROM 20061102 TO 20061109