US20080098546A1 - Hand-held cleaning tool assembly - Google Patents

Hand-held cleaning tool assembly Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080098546A1
US20080098546A1 US11/590,509 US59050906A US2008098546A1 US 20080098546 A1 US20080098546 A1 US 20080098546A1 US 59050906 A US59050906 A US 59050906A US 2008098546 A1 US2008098546 A1 US 2008098546A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
surface
cleaning tool
cleaning
wiping
portion
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Abandoned
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US11/590,509
Inventor
Bridget K. Warmka
Bobbi L. Pinnow
Arthur V. Lang
Perry S. Dotterman
Thomas G. Skulley
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3M Innovative Properties Co
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3M Innovative Properties Co
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Priority to US11/590,509 priority Critical patent/US20080098546A1/en
Assigned to 3M INNOVATIVE PROPERTIES COMPANY reassignment 3M INNOVATIVE PROPERTIES COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SKULLEY, THOMAS G., DOTTERMAN, PERRY S., LANG, ARTHUR V., PINNOW, BOBBI L., WARMKA, BRIDGET K.
Publication of US20080098546A1 publication Critical patent/US20080098546A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/16Cloths; Pads; Sponges
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L17/00Apparatus or implements used in manual washing or cleaning of crockery, table-ware, cooking-ware or the like
    • A47L17/04Pan or pot cleaning utensils
    • A47L17/08Pads; Balls of steel wool, wire, or plastic meshes

Abstract

The disclosed cleaning tool assembly for cleaning a hard kitchen surface includes a cleaning tool and a wiping substrate. The cleaning tool is a unitary cleaning tool having a base portion, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion. The base portion includes a planar, rigid working surface. The handle portion includes an upper convex surface that forms an upper portion of the cleaning tool whereby the upper convex surface engages with the palm of a hand. The neck portion is recessed from both the base portion and the handle portion. The neck portion engages with the fingers of a hand. The wiping substrate is removably attached to the working surface.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • The present invention relates to a hand-held cleaning tool assembly and a method of using the hand-held cleaning tool assembly to clean a surface. In particular, the present invention relates to a hand-held cleaning tool assembly, which includes a cleaning tool and a wiping substrate and a method of using such a tool for cleaning a kitchen surface.
  • For cleaning surfaces, including kitchen surfaces, it is common to use a cleaning solution in combination with a cleaning cloth or sponge. However, users often do not know if a particular cleaning solution can be safely used on the particular surface being cleaned. For example, surfaces such as stainless steel, granite, quartz, and ceramic cook-tops may require specialized products that do not stain, scratch, or otherwise damage these surfaces. In addition to knowing whether a particular chemical is safe for use with a particular surface, users often do not know how much of the chemical should be used or whether the type of cleaning cloth or scouring pad is safe on the surface.
  • Wiping substrates such as cleaning cloths, sponges, and foam pads are used to clean surfaces. One particular type of wiping substrate used to clean surfaces is a loaded wipe, which contains chemical loaded into the substrate. A user will remove a wipe from a package and with his or her hand apply the loaded wipe to the surface. This method of cleaning eliminates the need for the user to portion out the cleaner and determine if the cleaner and cleaning cloth are compatible. However, with this method of cleaning a user's hand must contact both the wipe and the cleaner. Additionally, because the user's hand is guiding the wipe along the surface being cleaned, the cleaning solution is unevenly distributed, resulting in streaks along the surface. Often, in order to eliminate the streaking, a second cleaner or wipe should be used.
  • There are cleaning systems that use wiping substrates in combination with a cleaning tool. In some of these systems, the wiping substrates are loaded with cleaner. However, these systems are typically for mops and floor cleaning applications. Often, these tools include a resilient backing with a large surface area both to dissipate the force applied to the tool and to prevent scratching and damage to the floor. As such, mops are not designed for scouring, where concentrated amount of force being applied to the surface being cleaned may help in removal of stains. Further, some mops used in combination with wiping substrates are specifically designed to have a curved or nonplanar backing profile to prevent so-called snowplowing of dirt and debris and to utilize more surface area of the wipe for picking up dirt and debris.
  • There is a need for a hand-held cleaning tool that does not require the user to determine the proper amount of cleaning solution for a particular cleaning application. Additionally, there is a need for a hand-held cleaning tool that does not require the user to determine the proper combination of cleaner and wipe for a particular cleaning application.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present invention relates to a hand-held cleaning tool assembly and a method of using the cleaning tool to clean a planar surface. The cleaning tool assembly for cleaning a hard kitchen surface includes a cleaning tool and a wiping substrate. The cleaning tool is a unitary cleaning tool having a base portion, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion. The base portion includes a planar, rigid working surface. The handle portion includes an upper convex surface that forms an upper portion of the cleaning tool whereby the upper convex surface engages with the palm of a hand. The neck portion is recessed from both the base portion and the handle portion. The neck portion engages with the fingers of a hand. The wiping substrate is removably attached to the working surface.
  • The method of cleaning a kitchen surface comprises providing a cleaning tool having a base portion with a planar, rigid working surface, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion, providing a wiping substrate over the planar, rigid working surface to form a rigid, planar wiping surface, applying the wiping surface to a planar kitchen surface to clean the kitchen surface, and removing the wiping substrate from the cleaning tool after applying the wiping surface to a planar kitchen surface.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a hand-held cleaning tool assembly.
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the hand-held cleaning tool assembly.
  • FIG. 3 is a right side view of the hand-held cleaning tool of FIGS. 1 and 2, a left side view is a mirror image of the right side view.
  • FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the hand-held cleaning tool of FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • While the above-identified drawings and figures set forth embodiments of the invention, other embodiments are also contemplated, as noted in the discussion. In all cases, this disclosure presents the invention by way of representation and not limitation. It should be understood that numerous other modifications and embodiments can be devised by those skilled in the art, which fall within the scope and spirit of this invention. The figures may not be drawn to scale.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a hand-held cleaning tool assembly 100 in the hand 500 of a user and in use over a surface 600. FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the hand-held cleaning tool assembly 100, which includes a hand-held cleaning tool 200, a wiping substrate 300, and an attachment mechanism 400 for holding the wiping substrate 300 to the cleaning tool 200. FIG. 3 is a right side view of the cleaning tool of FIGS. 1 and 2. A left side view, not shown, is a mirror image of the right side view. FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the cleaning tool of FIGS. 1 and 2. Common features throughout the figures are referenced with common reference numbers.
  • The hand-held cleaning tool assembly 100 includes a hand-held cleaning tool 200 and a wiping substrate 300. As shown by FIG. 1, a hand 500 is able to hold the cleaning tool 200 to clean a surface 600 with the wiping substrate 300. Surface 600 intended to be cleaned with the cleaning tool assembly 100 is generally planar, rigid surface. More particularly, surface 600 intended to be cleaned with the cleaning tool assembly 100 is a kitchen surface that may be essentially nonporous such as, but not limited to, stainless steel, stone, ceramic, cook-top surfaces, and engineered materials such as Formica®, Silestone®, and Corian®. Typical kitchen surfaces include countertops, appliances, and sinks.
  • I. Cleaning Tool
  • The cleaning tool 200 includes a base 210 and a handle 250 spaced from the base by a neck 230. The base 210 includes a working surface 212. Working surface 212 is located opposite the handle 250 and is generally adjacent the surface 600 to be cleaned. In this embodiment, the working surface 212 is rectangular and includes a leading edge 214, a trailing edge 216, a first side edge 218, and a second side edge 220. The rectangular shape allows for the working surface 212 to reach into corners. However, other shapes are possible including, but not limited to, triangular, circular, and arch shaped with a linear trailing edge.
  • The working surface 212 is generally rigid and substantially planar so that pressure applied to the cleaning tool 200 is transferred evenly across the working surface 212. Even distribution of pressure across the working surface 212 results in even pressure across the surface being cleaned 600, which typically is also planar. Even pressure across the surface being cleaned 600 prevents high pressure points, which may cause scratching of the surface 600 and streaking of the chemicals. In one embodiment, the area of the working surface 212 is from 50 to 200 cm2, and in one embodiment the area of the working surface 212 is from 80 to 110 cm2. The area of the working surface 212 is not so large that the pressure applied to the cleaning tool is dissipated over too large of an area to decrease the effectiveness of the scouring and cleaning ability of the cleaning tool 200.
  • The handle 250 includes an upper convex surface 252 that creates an upper portion 254 of the cleaning tool 200. The upper convex surface 252 generally slopes from the leading edge 214 to the upper portion 254 of the cleaning tool 200. The upper convex surface 252 is intended to conform to the palm 501 of a user's hand, as shown in FIG. 1. Achieving a conforming fit of the upper convex surface 252 of the handle 250 with the user's hand 500 allows for effective application of the force applied by the user's hand 500 to be transferred to the cleaning tool 200 and the surface 600 to be cleaned.
  • The cleaning tool 200 is a hand-held tool intended to fit in a user's hand 500. The cleaning tool 200 has a low profile, which is a height measured from the working surface 212 to the upper portion 254. Typically, the height of the cleaning tool 200 from the working surface 212 to the upper portion 254 ranges from 4 cm to 15 cm and in one embodiment ranges from 5 cm to 8 cm.
  • Optionally, the handle 250 may include a finger resting surface 256 and gripping ridges 258. The finger resting surface 256 shown in this embodiment is a planar surface (as shown in FIG. 2) or may be a concave surface where a user's index finger 504 and middle finger 506 (see FIG. 1) may rest. The finger resting surface 256 allows for a conforming fit of the cleaning tool 200 with the user's hand 500 to effectively transfer the force applied by the user to the cleaning tool 200.
  • Gripping ridges 258 may be included on the surface of the upper convex surface 252. The gripping ridges 258 are a series of raised ridges that extend laterally across the upper convex surface 252 that help to prevent slipping of the user's palm 501 when force is applied by the hand 500 to the cleaning tool 200. If included, there may be one or a plurality of gripping ridges 258. Further, the gripping ridges may be constructed from an anti-slip material or a “soft-touch” material to further prevent slipping of the user's palm 501.
  • The handle 250 may include a brush or scraper (not shown). The brush may be projecting bristles from a portion of the handle 250, or other portion of the cleaning tool 200. The scraper may be a rigid, linear edge that allows a user to apply significant scouring to a surface. The scraper may be molded into the handle 250, or other portion of the cleaning tool 200. Alternatively, the brush or scraper may be separate from the cleaning tool 200 but retained in a compartment in the handle 250.
  • The handle 250 may include reservoir that holds a liquid such as water or a cleaning solution. Located on the cleaning tool may be a delivery mechanism that the user actuates with his or her fingers or thumb to spray the liquid on to the surface 600 to be cleaned. Such a mechanism may be desirable if the wiping substrate 300 does not include cleaner or is dry loaded and must be moistened to be activated.
  • The neck 230 is a narrowing region between the base 210 and the upper convex surface 252 of the handle 250 that is a place for some of the user's fingers to rest (see FIG. 1). In this embodiment, the neck 230 includes is a first concave side surface 234, a second concave side surface 236 (not shown), and a rear concave surface 238. As shown by FIG. 1, a user's thumb 502 rests against the first concave side surface 234 and a user's ring finger 508 and small finger (not visible) rest against the second concave side surface 236. The rear concave surface 238 completes the neck 230 and allows for the working surface 212 to be positioned under an area where the entire cleaning tool 200 may not otherwise fit, such as behind the pull bar of an oven door. The first and second concave side surfaces 234, 236 allow for a conforming fit of the cleaning tool 200 with the user's hand 500 and fingers to effectively transfer the force applied by the user to the entire working surface 212 of the cleaning tool 200.
  • II. Wiping Substrate
  • The cleaning tool 200 is used in combination with a wiping substrate 300 for cleaning the surface 600. The wiping substrate 300 includes working surface 310 and an attachment surface 320. The attachment surface 320 of the wiping substrate 300 is placed over the working surface 212 of the cleaning tool. Then, the working surface 310 is exposed to the surface 600 to be cleaned. Generally, the wiping substrate 300 will be of a uniform construction such that the attachment surface 320 and working surface 310 are of the same composition. However, in some embodiments, the attachment surface 320 and working surface 310 may be of different compositions.
  • The wiping substrate 300 may be a cleaning cloth, a sponge, a foam or other similar type of wiping substrate for cleaning. Wiping substrates 300 that are cleaning cloths may be a knitted or woven fabric or may be constructed from a nonwoven web. The wiping substrate 300 may be disposable or reusable and may be dry, dry loaded, or wet loaded. Use of the cleaning tool 200 with a wiping substrate 300 loaded with cleaner eliminates the current methods of cleaning a surface 600 where the user's hand directly touches the cleaner saturated cloth. Also, use of the rigid, planar working surface 212 of the cleaning tool 200 with the loaded wipe 300 allows for even unloading of the cleaner over the surface 600.
  • In one embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 is a generally flexible sheet of material typically less than 0.25 inches (6.35 mm) thick. The wiping substrate 300 shown in the embodiments of FIGS. 1-4 is a nonwoven lofty web of fibers. The fibers may be made from one or more of a variety of thermoplastic polymers that are known to form fibers. Suitable thermoplastic polymers can be selected from polyolefins (such as polyethylenes, polypropylenes, and polybutylenes), polyamides (suds as nylon 6, nylon 6/6, and nylon 10), polyesters (such as polyethylene terephthalate), copolymers containing acrylic monomers, and blends and copolymers thereof. Semi-synthetic fibers (such as acetate fibers), natural fibers (such as cotton), regenerated fibers (such as rayon), and other non-thermoplastic fibers can also be blended with the thermoplastic fibers. The nonwoven web of the wiping substrate 300 can be prepared by any suitable melt forming or mechanical forming operation. For example, the nonwoven webs may be carded, spunbonded, spunlaced, melt blown, air laid, creped, or made by other processes as are known in the art. The nonwoven web can be consolidated by any known technique such as for example hydroentanglement, thermal bonding (e.g. calendar or through air) chemical bonding, needlepunching/needletacking, use of binder fibers, etc. The fibers typically have a denier from about 1 to about 50. The basis weight of the nonwoven wiping substrate is typically from about 10 to about 500 grams per square meter in one embodiment, from 50 to about 350 grams per square meter in another embodiment, and from 100 to 300 grams per square meter in another embodiment.
  • The specific construction of the wiping substrate 300 is designed for the particular cleaning application and cleaner. In one embodiment, a wiping substrate 300 is specifically designed for use with a particular cleaner for cleaning a kitchen surface and more specifically a ceramic cook-top. In this embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 is a needlepunched nonwoven web of fibers. In this embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 is a single use, disposable product. In one embodiment, the nonwoven fabric has a viscose rayon fiber, a polyester fiber, and a polypropylene fiber. In one embodiment the viscose rayon fiber content is a minimum of 15 weight % and the polypropylene is a minimum of 25 weight % of the content of the wipe 300. The viscose rayon may be from 1.5 to 3 denier, the polyester may be from 1.5 to 50 denier, and the polypropylene may be from 1.6 to 6 denier.
  • The wiping substrate 300 as shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4 is rectangular to match the rectangular size and shape of the working surface 212. The wiping substrate 300 should at least match the size and shape of the working surface 212 to cover the entire working surface 212. It is understood that the wiping substrate 300 could be larger than the working surface 212 and in such an embodiment, may be of a different shape than the working surface 212.
  • a. Wiping Substrate and Cleaner for a Kitchen Surface
  • One suitable wiping substrate 300 for cleaning a kitchen surface and particularly a ceramic cook-top is a nonwoven fabric available from Texel of Quebec, Canada. The nonwoven fabric has a composition of 50 weight % polypropylene (unfinished), 25 weight % viscose rayon, 25 weight % polyester having a basis weight of 230 grams per square meter. Unfinished means finish-free or very low finish, describing the polypropylene olefin fiber as being devoid of any surface enhancements or processing lubricants that could affect the hydrophobicity or hydrophylicity of the fiber. The unfinished polypropylene fiber makes the web more oil-absorbing. The viscose rayon is 1.5 denier, the polyester is 15 denier, and the polypropylene is 3 denier.
  • This wiping substrate 300 described is suitable for cleaning a kitchen surface. The wiping substrate 300 can be loaded with a cleaner for cleaning a kitchen surface and more particularly for cleaning a cook-top surface. In one embodiment, the cleaner includes a soft abrasive particle. Suitable soft abrasives include, without limitation, inorganic materials such as flint, silica, pumice, and calcium carbonate as well as organic polymeric materials such as polyester, polyvinylchloride, methacrylate, methylmethacrylate, polycarbonate, and polystyrene as well as combinations of any of the foregoing materials If the cleaner includes a soft abrasive particle, the user will typically follow the scouring with an additional wiping step.
  • One suitable cleaner for use with the wiping substrate 300 for cleaning a cook-top is 3M Scotch-Brite® Vitro, a cleaner containing soft abrasive particles of calcium carbonate. 3M Scotch-Brite® Vitro includes 65% water, 25% calcium carbonate, with the remainder being surfactant, thickener, perfume, and isopropylalcohol. Other commercially available cleaners, especially for ceramic cook-tops, may be used.
  • To make the loaded wiping substrate 300 described above, the dry wipe 300 is loaded with the cleaner following formation of the nonwoven web. In one embodiment, the wipe 300 has a 200 to 500 weight % loading of the cleaner. In another embodiment, the wipe has a 300 weight % loading of the cleaner. In the embodiment, where a cleaner includes a soft abrasive particle, the wiping substrate has a 300 weight % loading of the cleaner and a subsequent 200 weight % loading of water is added to the web to achieve a desired level of wetness. This method is preferred to diluting the cleaner and then loading to the web in a single step.
  • b. Wiping Substrate and Cleaner for a Stainless Steel Surface
  • In one embodiment, a wiping substrate 300 is specifically designed for use with a particular cleaner for cleaning a stainless steel surface. In this embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 is a needlepunched nonwoven fabric. In one embodiment, the nonwoven fabric has a viscose rayon fiber, a polyester fiber, and a polypropylene fiber. In one embodiment the viscose rayon fiber content is a minimum of 15 weight % and the polypropylene is a minimum of 25 weight % of the content of the wiping substrate 300. The viscose rayon may be from 1.5 to 3 denier, the polyester may be from 1.5 to 15 denier, and the polypropylene may be from 1.6 to 6 denier.
  • One suitable wiping substrate 300 for cleaning a stainless steel surface is a nonwoven fabric available from Texel of Quebec, Canada. The nonwoven fabric has a composition of 50 weight % polypropylene (unfinished), 25 weight % viscose rayon, 25 weight % polyester having a basis weight of 130 grams per square meter. Unfinished means finish-free or very low finish, describing the polypropylene olefin fiber as being devoid of any surface enhancements or processing lubricants that could affect the hydrophobicity or hydrophylicity of the fiber. The unfinished polypropylene fiber makes the web more oil-absorbing giving self-buffing properties and eliminates or minimizes the need for follow-up wiping with a paper towel. The viscose rayon is 1.5 denier, the polyester is 3 denier, and the polypropylene is 3 denier.
  • This wiping substrate 300 described is suitable for cleaning a stainless steel surface. The wiping substrate 300 can be loaded with a stainless steel cleaner for cleaning and polishing a stainless steel surface. In one embodiment, the cleaner is an aqueous emulsion of white mineral oil. One example is the 3M Liquid Stainless Steel Cleaner & Polish. An example of a stainless steel cleaner is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,330,422. Other commercially available stainless steel cleaners may be used.
  • The make the wiping substrate 300 described, the dry wiping substrate 300 is loaded with the stainless steel cleaner following formation of the nonwoven web. In one embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 has a 200 to 500 weight % loading of the stainless steel cleaner. In another embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 has a 400 weight % loading of the cleaner.
  • III. Attachment Mechanism
  • An attachment mechanism 400 is included for securing the wiping substrate 300 to the cleaning tool 200. In this embodiment, the attachment mechanism 400 is a plurality of hook projections 410. The hook projection 410 may be separate from or integral with the cleaning tool 200. As shown in this embodiment, the hook projections 410 extend from the cleaning tool 200 in a uniform distribution (see FIG. 4). A uniform distribution of the hook projections 410 across the entire working surface 212, for the embodiment where the hook projections 410 are located on the working surface 212, maintains the planar working surface for attachment of the wipe 300, which gives even unloading of the cleaner. As stated above, a nonplanar working surface may create concentrated points where the forces being exerted on the cleaning tool 200 are transferred resulting in scratching of the surface or streaking of the chemical on the surface caused by uneven unloading of the cleaners within the wipe.
  • The hook projections 410 attach to the attachment surface 320 of the wiping substrate 300. In the embodiment where the wiping substrate 300 is a lofty nonwoven web, a separate loop is likely not necessary. In other embodiments, the attachment surface 320 of the wiping substrate 300 may include a separate loop or mating material that locks with the hook projections 410.
  • Other mechanisms are contemplated for securing the wiping substrate 300 to the cleaning tool 200. For example, the hook projections may extend from other surfaces of the cleaning tool 200 so that the wipe 300 wraps up and around the cleaning tool 200. Also, hook projections are not essential. The attachment mechanism may include mechanical fasteners or adhesive.
  • IV. Use of the Cleaning Tool Assembly
  • To use the cleaning tool assembly 100, a user will attach the wiping substrate 300 to the attachment mechanism 400 of the cleaning tool 200. In this embodiment, the wiping substrate 300 is placed over the working surface 212, which includes hooks 410 that secure the wiping substrate 300 to the working surface 212. Then, the user will position his or her hand 500 over the cleaning tool 200. The user's palm 501 is adjacent the upper convex surface 252 of the handle, thumb 502 is adjacent the first concave side surface 234, index finger 504 and middle finger 506 are adjacent the finger resting surface 256, if included, and ring finger 508 and small finger are adjacent the second concave side surface 238. It is understood that the positioning of the fingers and thumb over the cleaning tool 200 may take other forms so long as the user feels ergonomically comfortable and secure in holding the cleaning tool 200.
  • If the wiping substrate 300 is dry or dry loaded, the wiping substrate 300 will be activated by application of water or a cleaner. If the cleaner is loaded in the wiping substrate 300, then the user can begin cleaning. The wiping substrate 300 will clean the surface 600 while the wiping substrate 300 may provide, in some embodiments, scouring, pick-up, or absorption capabilities. When the user is finished cleaning the surface 600, the cleaning tool 200 and wipe 300 are removed from the surface 600. If the wipe 300 is disposable, the wipe 300 is discarded. If the wipe 300 is nondisposable, the wipe 300 can be cleaned and stored for future use.
  • Although specific embodiments of this invention have been shown and described herein, it is understood that these embodiments are merely illustrative of the many possible specific arrangements that can be devised in application of the principles of the invention. Numerous and varied other arrangements can be devised in accordance with these principles by those of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Thus, the scope of the present invention should not be limited to the structures described in this application, but only by the structures described by the language of the claims and the equivalents of those structures.

Claims (28)

1. A cleaning tool assembly for cleaning a hard kitchen surface comprising:
a unitary cleaning tool having a base portion, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion, wherein the base portion includes a planar, rigid working surface, the handle portion includes an upper convex surface that forms an upper portion Of the cleaning tool the neck portion is recessed from both the base portion and the handle; and
a wiping substrate removably attached to the working surface.
2. The cleaning tool assembly of claim 1, wherein the wiping substrate is a nonwoven web of fibers.
3. The cleaning tool of claim 2, wherein, the wiping substrate includes at least 15% viscose rayon, at least 25% unfinished polypropylene, and polyester.
4. The cleaning tool of claim 3, wherein the wiping substrate includes 50% unfinished polypropylene, 25% viscose rayon, and 25% polyester.
5. The cleaning tool of claim 3, wherein the polypropylene includes a denier of from 1 to 6, the viscose rayon includes a denier of from 1.5 to 3, and the polyester includes a denier of from 1.5 to 50.
6. The cleaning tool assembly claim 1, wherein the wiping substrate is a sponge or foam.
7. (canceled)
8. The cleaning tool assembly of claim, wherein the wiping substrate is loaded with cleaning chemical.
9. The cleaning tool assembly of claim 1, further comprising an attachment mechanism on the base for securing the wiping substrate to the working surface.
10. The cleaning tool assembly of claim 9, wherein, the attachment mechanism includes a plurality is of hook projections extending uniformly from the working surface.
11. The cleaning tool assembly of claim 1, wherein the neck portion includes a first concave side surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface and a second concave side surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface, opposite the first concave side surface.
12. The cleaning tool of claim 11, wherein the neck portion further includes a rear concave surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface, and positioned between the first concave side surface and the second concave side surface.
13. The cleaning tool of claim 1, wherein the handle further includes a planar finger resting surface.
14. (canceled)
15. (canceled)
16. The cleaning tool of claim 1, wherein the wiping substrate is loaded with a cleaner containing a soft abrasive particle.
17. The cleaning tool of claim 1, wherein the wiping substrate is loaded with an aqueous emulsion of mineral oil.
18. A method of cleaning a kitchen surface comprising:
providing a cleaning tool having a base portion with a planar, rigid working surface, a handle portion, and a neck portion connection the base portion to the handle portion;
providing a wiping substrate over the planar, rigid working surface to form a rigid, planar wiping surface;
applying the wiping surface to the planar kitchen surface to clean the kitchen surface;
removing the wiping substrate from the cleaning tool after applying the wiping surface to the planar kitchen surface.
19. The method of cleaning a kitchen surface of claim 18, wherein the kitchen surface includes a ceramic cook-top and the wiping substrate is a nonwoven web of fibers that includes 50% unfinished 3 polypropylene, 25% 1.5 denier viscose rayon, and 25% 15 denier polyester.
20. The method of cleaning a kitchen surface of claim 19, wherein the wiping substrate is loaded with a cleaner containing a soft abrasive.
21. The method of cleaning a kitchen surface of claim 18, wherein the kitchen surface includes a stainless steel surface and the wiping substrate is a nonwoven web of fibers that includes 50% unfinished 3 denier polypropylene, 25% 1.5 denier viscose rayon, and 25% 3 denier polyester.
22. The method of cleaning a kitchen surface of claim 21, wherein the wiping substrate is loaded with an aqueous emulsion of mineral oil.
23. The method of cleaning a kitchen surface of claim 18, further comprising:
engaging a palm of a hand with the handle portion of the cleaning tool; and
engaging fingers of a hand with the neck portion of the cleaning tool.
24. A method of cleaning a planar cook-top surface comprising:
providing a cleaning tool having a base portion with a planar working surface, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion;
providing a wiping substrate loaded with a cleaner and soft abrasive particle attached to the planar working surface to form a planar wiping surface;
applying the wiping surface to the cook-top surface to clean the cook-top surface;
removing the wiping substrate from the cleaning tool after applying the wiping surface to the cook-top surface.
25. A method of cleaning a stainless steel surface comprising:
providing a cleaning tool having a base portion, a handle portion, and a neck portion connecting the base portion to the handle portion;
providing a wiping substrate leaded with aqueous emulsion of mineral oil attached to the working surface to form a wiping surface;
applying the wiping surface to the stainless steel surface to clean the kitchen surface;
removing the wiping substrate from the cleaning tool after applying the wiping surface to a planar kitchen surface.
26. A cleaning tool for cleaning a surface comprising:
a unitary cleaning tool having base portion, a handle portion, and a neck portion connection the base portion to the handle portion;
wherein the base portion includes a planar, rigid working surface including hook projections extending uniformly from the entire working surface;
wherein the handle portion includes an upper convex surface that forms an upper portion of the cleaning tool; and
wherein the neck portion is recessed from both the base portion and the handle portion.
27. The cleaning tool of claim 26, further comprising a cleaning wipe attached to the hook projections on the working surface.
28. The cleaning tool of claim 26, wherein the neck portion further comprises:
a first concave side surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface;
a second concave side surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface, opposite the first concave side surface; and
a rear concave surface, extending generally concavely from the upper portion of the cleaning tool to the working surface, and positioned between the first concave side surface and the second concave side surface.
US11/590,509 2006-10-31 2006-10-31 Hand-held cleaning tool assembly Abandoned US20080098546A1 (en)

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US20090038092A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Kennedy Brook S Hand held sponge implement
US20120148996A1 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-06-14 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method for facilitating the identification of suitable object-wiping material and dispenser therefor
US20120167323A1 (en) * 2010-12-31 2012-07-05 Goody Products, Inc. Water Removing Hair Brush
US8268770B2 (en) 2010-12-03 2012-09-18 The Clorox Company Fibrous substrate with a solid hypohalite precipitate formed therein and process of making
US8430724B2 (en) * 2011-08-19 2013-04-30 Total Import Solutions, Inc. Surface cleaning system and method
WO2013133855A1 (en) * 2012-03-07 2013-09-12 Baarsch Byron Keith Scraper attachment for sponges
US8684619B2 (en) 2010-10-26 2014-04-01 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning device having plural and customizable cleaning surfaces
US20150105003A1 (en) * 2013-10-10 2015-04-16 Timothy D. Miller Media-bearing polisher and restorer
USD739106S1 (en) 2013-09-23 2015-09-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning pad
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USD758740S1 (en) 2012-12-28 2016-06-14 Goody Products, Inc. Water removing hair brush
US9408521B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2016-08-09 3M Innovative Properties Company Continuously curving cleaning element
USD763580S1 (en) 2012-12-28 2016-08-16 Goody Products, Inc. Water removing hair brush
USD770800S1 (en) 2015-06-26 2016-11-08 The Clorox Company Dispenser
US20170172380A1 (en) * 2015-12-21 2017-06-22 Casabella Holdings, L.L.C. Dispensing pad cleaner
US10064535B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-09-04 The Clorox Company All-in-one scrubbing tool with hook for substrate attachment
US10071399B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-09-11 The Clorox Company Article for scrubbing and cleaning hard surfaces and a method for use thereof
US10136789B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-11-27 The Clorox Company All-in-one squeezable scrubbing tool

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090038092A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Kennedy Brook S Hand held sponge implement
US20120148996A1 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-06-14 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method for facilitating the identification of suitable object-wiping material and dispenser therefor
US8684619B2 (en) 2010-10-26 2014-04-01 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning device having plural and customizable cleaning surfaces
US8834055B2 (en) 2010-10-26 2014-09-16 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning device having plural and customizable cleaning surfaces
US8309508B2 (en) 2010-12-03 2012-11-13 The Clorox Company Fibrous substrate with a solid hypohalite precipitate formed therein
US8268770B2 (en) 2010-12-03 2012-09-18 The Clorox Company Fibrous substrate with a solid hypohalite precipitate formed therein and process of making
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USD785949S1 (en) 2011-12-30 2017-05-09 Goody Products, Inc. Water removing hair brush
WO2013133855A1 (en) * 2012-03-07 2013-09-12 Baarsch Byron Keith Scraper attachment for sponges
EP2866974A4 (en) * 2012-06-27 2016-05-25 3M Innovative Properties Co Abrasive article
US9408521B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2016-08-09 3M Innovative Properties Company Continuously curving cleaning element
USD758740S1 (en) 2012-12-28 2016-06-14 Goody Products, Inc. Water removing hair brush
USD763580S1 (en) 2012-12-28 2016-08-16 Goody Products, Inc. Water removing hair brush
USD765329S1 (en) 2013-09-23 2016-08-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning pad
USD739106S1 (en) 2013-09-23 2015-09-15 The Procter & Gamble Company Cleaning pad
US9908218B2 (en) * 2013-10-10 2018-03-06 Timothy D. Miller Media-bearing polisher and restorer
US10118276B1 (en) * 2013-10-10 2018-11-06 Timothy D. Miller Media-bearing polisher and restorer
US20150105003A1 (en) * 2013-10-10 2015-04-16 Timothy D. Miller Media-bearing polisher and restorer
US10136789B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-11-27 The Clorox Company All-in-one squeezable scrubbing tool
US10071399B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-09-11 The Clorox Company Article for scrubbing and cleaning hard surfaces and a method for use thereof
US10064535B2 (en) 2014-10-06 2018-09-04 The Clorox Company All-in-one scrubbing tool with hook for substrate attachment
USD770800S1 (en) 2015-06-26 2016-11-08 The Clorox Company Dispenser
US9883785B2 (en) * 2015-12-21 2018-02-06 Casabella Holdings L.L.C. Dispensing pad cleaner
US20170172380A1 (en) * 2015-12-21 2017-06-22 Casabella Holdings, L.L.C. Dispensing pad cleaner

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