US20080083915A1 - Security barrier - Google Patents

Security barrier Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080083915A1
US20080083915A1 US11/906,455 US90645507A US2008083915A1 US 20080083915 A1 US20080083915 A1 US 20080083915A1 US 90645507 A US90645507 A US 90645507A US 2008083915 A1 US2008083915 A1 US 2008083915A1
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Prior art keywords
fence
post
metal
barrier
panel
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US11/906,455
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Ken Trascher
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Ken Trascher
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Priority to US11/906,455 priority patent/US20080083915A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H17/00Fencing, e.g. fences, enclosures, corrals
    • E04H17/14Fences constructed of rigid elements, e.g. with posts, with additional wire fillings
    • E04H17/16Fences constructed of rigid elements, e.g. with posts, with additional wire fillings using prefabricated panel-like elements, e.g. wired frames
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H17/00Fencing, e.g. fences, enclosures, corrals
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H17/00Fencing, e.g. fences, enclosures, corrals
    • E04H17/003Anti-climbing devices, e.g. fixed or rotary spikes

Abstract

A security barrier includes interlocking metal panels attached to purlins and anchored posts forming a continuous barrier. The lower ends of the interlocking metal panels are anchored to a base foundation, and the upper end of the barrier may be topped with razor or concertina wire. The continuous surface of the security barrier provides a complete visual shield that is difficult to climb or dismantle.

Description

    1. PRIORITY CLAIM UNDER 35 U.S.C. § 119(e)
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/849,681, filed on Oct. 4, 2006.
  • 2. FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to a security barrier or fence, and more particularly to a security barrier having interlocking metal panels attached to modular frame members.
  • 3. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Fences and barriers are used in many settings. Some fences are used for aesthetic reasons, others for privacy, and still others for security. Fences vary a great deal in their designs, their methods of construction and installation, and their materials. This variation can range from old piled stone fences to high-tech modern fences with motion sensors and laser light beams for added security.
  • Security barriers or fences also vary a great deal. In high security settings, tall brick or concrete walls are sometimes used as barriers. These walls are opaque, difficult to climb, and very difficult to penetrate. Such high security walls may be topped with razor or concertina wire, a type of wire having sharp, cutting surfaces. Razor and concertina wire do not seriously impede the ability to penetrate a wall, but they do add to the time it takes a person to get through or over the wall. Cutting tools, thick gloves, and protective clothing are needed to safely work through razor or concertina wire.
  • Where maximum security is needed, it is hard to improve upon the brick or concrete wall. These barriers, however, are expensive and take a long time to construct. They are a reasonable solution to security issues in some places, but more often, it is simply impractical, from a cost perspective, time perspective, or both, to build a tall and thick brick or concrete security wall.
  • Because of these real-world issues, many security fences are constructed of chain link fencing material. Chain link fences are very common. Such fences are used on farms, at homes, at schools, and in some security settings. Military bases and other secure areas may be surrounded by high chain link fences. These chain link security fences are often topped with razor or concertina wire to deter potential intruders. In some settings a pair of high chain link fences, each topped with razor or concertina wire, are positioned in parallel, with a wide space between them. This arrangement can be combined with visual monitoring (e.g., using video cameras or guard towers) to detect intruders before they are able to penetrate both of the chain link security fences.
  • Chain link fencing is extremely versatile. It can be installed quickly, at relatively low-cost, in almost any setting. Installation can be performed by relatively low-skilled workers, and few special tools are needed. These advantages have helped make chain link fencing the solution of choice for many security fence applications.
  • There are, however, several key disadvantages of chain link security fences. Chain link fences are easy to see through, thus providing no visual shielding. Slats can be inserted into a section of chain link fencing, providing some visual shielding, but this is only a partial solution. It remains relatively easy to see through a slatted chain link fence. In addition, it is time consuming to insert slats into a long section of chain link fence, which can add to the cost, the time needed to install the fence, or both.
  • Chain link fences are easy to climb. The nearly square openings within the fencing material created when a section is pulled taut make perfect toe holds for an intruder. Placing razor or concertina wire at the top of a chain link fence makes climbing more risky, but these materials can be penetrated rather quickly, too.
  • It is also easy to tamper with chain link fences. All the would-be intruder needs is a pair of wire cutters, and with a few cuts, a large enough opening can be created to crawl through. If a number of intruders work together, a large section of a chain link fence can be quickly cut out, enabling a vehicle to be driven through.
  • An alternative to chain link security fencing is needed. The alternative should provide the cost and quick installation benefits of chain link fencing, while avoiding the disadvantages set forth above. There is a need for a security fence that is hard to climb, that provides an effective visual shield, that is difficult to tamper with or cut through, and that can be installed quickly at a reasonable cost. The present invention meets these needs.
  • Security barriers and fences are often needed in remote locations, particularly as military installations are being located in places far from traditional supply facilities. When a new military or industrial facility is located in a remote area of Nigeria or Afghanistan, for example, there is often a need to quickly build a security barrier or fence around the perimeter of the compound. In these situations, it is highly desirable to be able to build a barrier or fence using materials already on site. This reduces the need to transport additional materials, and can allow installation of the security fence and key other structures at the site simultaneously, thus allowing the site to become operational as quickly as possible. The present invention fills this need, too.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is a security barrier constructed in a manner somewhat similar to that used in the construction of metal buildings. The barrier has pickets made of metal panels that interlock to one another, forming a continuous surface. The barrier is completely opaque and can be painted (on site or using pre-painted steel for the pickets) to further enhance security. For example, in a desert area, the barrier can be painted the color of sand. In this example, the exterior of the barrier is a continuous wall of sand-colored, interlocking metal panels that tend to blend into the surrounding environment.
  • The barrier is constructed using two primary structural components. Each component can be made on site using specialized machines and large spools of steel sheet material. The frame members are formed using a machine that creates uniform “C” shaped frame pieces. These pieces are used to form posts, purlins, and vertical rails. Frame pieces are screwed together to form a strong and solid frame for the barrier.
  • Once the frame is built, the interlocking metal panels are attached to the frame. The interlocking nature of the panels make construction fast and easy. General standing seam techniques or snap-on siding techniques are used for installing the vertical picket panels to the frame.
  • The lower ends of the picket panels are secured to a horizontal base foundation. The foundation is positioned partially below ground level, and includes a base anchor that runs parallel to and just below the bottom edge of the picket panels. A hook or other anchoring means is used to attach each picket panel to the base anchor. A second layer of concrete is then poured to cover the anchoring means and the lower ends of the picket panels.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a cut-away front view of the security barrier.
  • FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional side view of a post used with the barrier.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a “C” shaped frame member used with the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a pair of “C” shaped frame members interconnected to form a box shaped frame member.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a portion of a particular panel design.
  • FIG. 5A is a cross-sectional view of the panel shown in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 6 is perspective view of a portion of a different panel design.
  • FIG. 6A is a cross-sectional view of the panel shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional side view of the barrier.
  • FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional front view of the lower area of the security barrier.
  • FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional side view of the lower area of the security barrier.
  • FIG. 10 is a front view of a modular frame section of the security barrier.
  • FIG. 11 is an expanded view of a portion of a modular frame section of the security barrier.
  • FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional side view of an embodiment of the barrier with features to enhance the barrier's strength.
  • FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional top view of a post from the embodiment shown in FIG. 12.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The following description refers to the figures identified above. A portion of a security barrier 10 is shown in FIG. 1, in cut-away form. This presentation allows for an explanation of several features of the present invention. The security barrier 10 uses posts 12 that are secured to a post foundation 14. In FIG. 1, the post foundation 14 is shown as an excavated hole 15 in the ground filled with concrete 17. An appropriate post base reinforcement 16 may be used to enhance the anchoring of the post 12.
  • Purlins 40 run horizontally between the posts 12, as shown in the cut-away portion of FIG. 1. Interlocking metal panels 42 are attached to the purlins 40 to form the primary barrier of the security barrier 10. An entry deterrent material, such as concertina or razor wire 36 is shown as part of an upper attachment to the security barrier 10 in FIG. 1. Other types of entry deterrent materials might include electric wires, laser or other light beams to detect entry, or other physical deterrents such as broken glass or barbed wire. The lower ends of the panels 42 are anchored to a horizontal base foundation 50, which makes it difficult for an intruder to tamper with the security barrier 10. Further details of these features is provided below.
  • Turning to FIG. 2, a side view of a post 12 is shown. The post foundation 14 is presented in more detail in this drawing. A grid made of standard rebar forms the post base reinforcement 16. The lower end of the post 12, with the post base reinforcement 16 attached, is positioned in an excavated hole 15. The post 12 is carefully positioned to the proper height and is aligned to be true in the vertical direction. The hole 15 is then filled with concrete 17, anchoring the post 12 in place.
  • The security barrier 10 of the present invention provides numerous benefits, including opacity. The interlocking metal panels 42, as seen in FIG. 1, provide a complete visual shield. By securing the lower ends of the panels to the horizontal base foundation 50, and making the security barrier 10 sufficiently tall, it is impossible for a typical intruder to see under, through, or over the barrier 10. The continuous vertical shield created by the barrier 10 has a very large surface area, and is, therefore, vulnerable to large wind forces.
  • To increase the wind loading capabilities of the security barrier 10, the posts 12 can be partially filled with concrete or some other anchoring material. This configuration is easy to accomplish with the present invention, though it may not be needed in all situations. If, for example, a relatively short barrier (e.g., a two-meter tall barrier) is needed, the wind loading may not require any additional anchoring.
  • To enhance the wind resistance of barrier 10, the lower end of the post 12 is formed using two “C” shaped frame pieces. The invention can use a variety of different types of framing members, but in a preferred embodiment, the frame members are formed in a “C” shape. A cross section of a “C” shaped frame member 22 is shown in FIG. 3. The short sides of the member 22 are of slightly different lengths, which allows two members to be combined to form a box shape, as seen in FIG. 4. The member 22 shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 have lips 23 that facilitate the assembly of a closed box-shaped post section 24, as shown in FIG. 4. The two “C” shaped members can be connected using screws 26, thus forming a rigid and strong box-shaped frame member.
  • As an alternative to the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the “C” shaped members may be made without the lips 23. The short sides of the member 22 may be of the same length, and two such members may be joined to form a box-shaped post section by wrapping a band, strap, or other type of securing device around the circumference of the two “C” shaped members to be joined. This configuration is shown in FIG. 13, and is discussed in more detail below. Other variations on these designs are also possible, resulting is different size box-shaped posts with varying amounts of overlapping frame material. The arrangement shown in FIG. 4 provides a smaller post cross-section and a greater amount of overlapping frame material.
  • The post 12 shown in FIG. 2 is of two-part construction. A full-length “C” shaped member 25 is used to create the entire length of the post 12. A second, shorter “C” shaped member 27 is created and combined with the lower end of the longer member 25. This creates a post 12 having a lower boxed section 18, and an upper open section 20. The lower boxed section 18 is stronger than the upper open section 20, and enhances the wind resistance of the barrier 10.
  • To further increase the wind load capability of the barrier 10, the lower boxed section 18 may be filled with concrete 30 or some other anchoring material. A length of rebar 32 or other reinforcing material may be placed inside the lower boxed section 18 before the concrete fill 30 is added. In a preferred embodiment, a three meter tall barrier is created such that the bottom section of the post 12 is made of the boxed design and filled with rebar strengthened concrete. The upper open section 20 of the post 12 in this preferred embodiment is approximately two meters in length. A suitable length of the post 12 is positioned below ground level in this preferred embodiment (i.e., in the excavated post foundation hole 15), resulting in a total length of approximately 3.5-4.0 meters for the post 12. Further enhancements may be used—such as making the entire post in the box design and filling the entire post with a reinforcing concrete/rebar combination—to improve the strength of the fence, and hence its resistance to wind loading or ramming. Such enhancements are discussed below, in connection with FIGS. 12 and 13.
  • The purlins seen in FIG. 1, and explained in more detail below, are made of the same “C” shaped frame members 22. All the frame pieces may be made using a single machine. In a most preferred embodiment, a SteelFrameMaster™ metal forming machine is used to produce the frame pieces at the job site. The SteelFrameMaster™ machine is manufactured by Metal Forming Technologies, a New Zealand company. More information concerning the SteelFrameMaster™ machine is available at www.steelframemaster.com.
  • The SteelFrameMaster™ machine converts raw sheet steel into accurately formed steel frame pieces. The raw steel is obtained in large coils or spools, typically 200 mm in width. A large powered decoiler is used to feed the raw sheet steel into the SteelFrameMaster™ machine. Metal Forming Technologies provides a line of decoilers that work well with the SteelFrameMaster™ machine, and use of such a decoiler is preferred.
  • The SteelFrameMaster™ machine can be shipped in a standard container (e.g., a 10′ container), and a decoiler loaded with a large supply of raw steel can be shipped in a second container of the same type. The containers can be positioned next to each other such that steel frame members are created without having to move the machines out of the containers. This arrangement allows for rapid construction of frame members, and it keeps the two machines protected from the elements. By closing and securing the shipping containers when the machines are not in use, this arrangement also reduces the risk of job site theft or vandalism.
  • The interlocking metal panels 42 can be of a variety of designs. Many different panel designs are available, and some machines can create panels of different designs. FIGS. 5, 5A, 6, and 6A provides examples of two designs that may be used for the panels 42. The panels 42 have a flat panel section 44 and a pair of interlocking panel edges 46. The design shown in FIGS. 5 and 5A has lipped interlocking edges 46. The lip 46 shown on the right edge of the panel 42 in FIG. 5A is configured to snap into a lip 46 like the one shown on the left edge of the panel 42. Once two panels are connected in this manner, the seam may be crimped, producing a secure surface consisting of numerous panels interconnected in this manner. FIGS. 6 and 6A show a different interlocking edge 46 design, but the construction process and end result is essentially the same using this, or some other, panel design. The two panel designs shown in these figures are presented for illustration purposes only, as a person skilled in the art would realize that almost any standard panel design would work.
  • The interlocking metal panels 42 may be created on the job site using a metal panel forming machine. In a preferred embodiment, an SSP MultiPro™ machine made by New Tech Machinery of Denver, Colo. is used to create the interlocking metal panels 42 at the job site. More information on the SSP MultiPro™ machine is available at www.newtechmachinery.com. There are a number of other suppliers of interlocking metal panel forming machines. The SSP MultiPro™ has produced satisfactory results, and it is expected that other machines of this general type would also work well with the present invention.
  • The SSP MultiPro™ and other similar machines can create a number of panel designs. A clipless design, such as that shown in FIGS. 6 and 6A is preferred because installation is typically faster than with panels that require use of clips. In particular, the panel shape designated FF100 by New Tech Machinery is a preferred design.
  • The SSP MultiPro™ machine may be shipped in a single container (e.g., a 10′ container), and includes a supply of coiled sheet metal. The metal used by the interlocking metal panels 42 may be pre-painted with a highly durable exterior paint. Numerous coils of pre-painted supply metal can be shipped to the site in the same container as the SSP MultiPro™ machine.
  • The frame components (i.e., posts 12 and purlins 40) and the interlocking metal panels 42 are preferably made of galvanized steel. This material effectively eliminates corrosion, insect (e.g., termites), and other environmental concerns. Galvanized steel is readily available on the global market and can be shipped to virtually any remote location.
  • The security barrier 10 of the present invention is of particular interest in remote military bases or other remote governmental installations. Such projects have been constructed in Afghanistan and Iraq in recent years. In such a situation, it is common to need a perimeter security barrier and numerous basic buildings, as well. The barrier 10 of the present invention can be constructed from the very same materials needed to build metal-sided buildings of the type often constructed on military and government installations.
  • The frame forming machine and its raw steel supply can be shipped in two containers, and the metal panel forming machine in a third container. Additional supply of steel may be needed, and can be provided in additional containers. During operations, however, only the two containers housing the frame forming machine and its steel supply, and the single container housing the metal panel forming machine and its supply are needed. From these three discrete units come all the structural components needed to build the security barrier 10, and the structural components needed to build metal-sided buildings. The multi-tasking nature of this arrangement is highly advantageous, particularly where the installation is remote.
  • The present invention also offers the advantage of being premanufacturable. Given the specifications for a particular project, the materials can be fabricated in advance. Such fabrication could be performed, for example, at a safe and secure site away from the actual construction location. When all the materials are ready, the unassembled barrier would be shipped to the location, where it could be installed quickly. The only materials needed for installation other than those fabricated in advance are powered screw drivers and concrete.
  • There are significant advantages to this method of fabrication and assembly. It has become somewhat common in recent years for expansions of existing installations in remote, and potentially hostile, areas. For example, a secure installation may exist in a particular remote location, but that installation may not be adequate for all the governmental or military needs. One or more additional installations in the region might be needed. A number of satellite installations or outposts might be desirable around a single, central installation.
  • The present invention can be used in this type of situation by assembling all the fabrication materials at the central, secure installation. Fabrication operations would be safe, and by making all the needed components in advance, the time required for installation (i.e., the time workers must operate in the less-secure environment) is greatly reduced. A cost-effective security barrier can be installed quickly and relatively safely using the methods and apparatus of the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 shows a cross section of the barrier 10, viewed from the side. A post 12 can be seen, but the cross section is presented such that the post foundation 14 and related post details are not shown. The purlins 40 are shown attached to the post 12, and an interlocking metal panel 42 is shown attached to the purlins 40. At the base area of the barrier 10, a cross section of the horizontal base foundation 50 is shown. This foundation is created in steps or sections, with a lower section created first and an upper section created after the lower section has been completed. To begin the method of constructing the horizontal base foundation 50, a sufficient area is excavated along the line of the intended barrier, prior to installing the interlocking metal panels 42. A base anchor 54 is positioned within the excavated area and is covered with a first concrete pour 52. A panel edge connector 56 extends upward from the base anchor 54, such that the connector 56 remains above the level of the first concrete pour 52. This completes the lower section of the horizontal base foundation 50.
  • The interlocking metal panels 42 are then attached to the purlins 40 and the base of each panel 42 is connected to a panel edge connector 56. This secures each panel 42 to the base anchor 54. A second concrete pour 58 is then made to cover the lower edges of the panels 42 to a point above where the panel edge connectors 56 and panels 42 are joined. This second concrete pour 58 produces a secure lower perimeter for the security barrier 10, and completes the creation of the upper section of the horizontal base foundation 50. The upper section of the foundation 50 includes the second concrete pour 58 and the upper parts of the panel edge connectors 56. This upper section fully encases the lower edges of the panels 42 within the horizontal base foundation 50.
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 provide more detail of a preferred embodiment of the lower barrier area. A front view cross section is presented in FIG. 8. The horizontal base foundation 50 is shown positioned partly below and partly above ground level. A long bar is used as the base anchor 54, though many other materials also could be used. A long section of “L” shaped angle iron would work well. The base anchor 54 is preferably a long piece of a material that will bond well to the concrete. It is possible, however, to use smaller, individual base anchors at the lower end of each panel edge connector 56. For example, a short piece of rebar could be welded to the end of each panel edge connector 56, forming an upside down “T” shape when viewed from the front or back. Any type of base anchor is adequate if it secures the panel edge connectors 56 securely within the first concrete pour 52. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 8, the panel edge connectors 56 are hooks attached to the base anchor 54. The upper hooked end of the connectors 56 remains above the top level of the first concrete pour 52.
  • The lower edges of the panels 42 are connected to the panel edge connectors 56. This securely attaches the panels 42 to the horizontal base foundation 50. To further enhance the strength and security of the barrier 10, a second concrete pour 58 is made to fully cover the panel edge connectors 56 and the lower ends of the panels 42. No open space is left along the lower edge of the security barrier 10 when this process is completed.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates how each interlocking metal panel 42 is connected to the horizontal base foundation 50. The panel edge connector 56 is attached to the base anchor 54, which is secured within the first concrete pour 52. The hooked section of the edge connector 56 is positioned through a hole made in the center of the lower edge of the panel 42. The second concrete pour 58 is then made to fully cover the entire base anchoring portion of the barrier.
  • Anchoring the metal panels 42 to a horizontal base foundation 50 provides important advantages, but may not be necessary in all situations. This configuration provides additional security and may enhance the wind resistance of the barrier. It does, however, add to the time needed for installation and creates additional cost over a barrier without such anchoring. In some situations, there may be a need for rapid installation combined with a lower security threat, and such circumstances may well justify construction of a security barrier in accordance with the present invention without the base anchoring described in the preceding paragraphs.
  • The framing for the security barrier 10 may be constructed in a modular fashion, as shown in FIG. 10. A modular section is formed by attaching purlins 40 to vertical rails 62. These pieces may be assembled on the ground or some other stable surface. FIG. 11 presents an expanded view of one corner of such a modular section. Frame screws 64 are used to attach the purlins to the vertical rails 62. In the embodiment shown, four purlins 40 are used, but the number will vary depending upon the height and other requirements for the barrier.
  • Once a modular frame section is complete, it may be attached to the posts 12. The vertical rails 62 are attached to the posts 12, preferably using frame screws 64. The modular design reduces the need for precisely matching the height of the posts 12 to the height of the upper purlin 40. As long as the post 12 is sufficiently strong and reaches near the top of the modular frame section, it is acceptable for the frame section to extend above the top of the post 12, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11.
  • FIGS. 12 and 13 show a number of possible enhancements to increase the strength of the fence. Such enhancements may be desirable when a fence is expected to face a larger wind load, possibly due to high wind conditions in the geographic area in which the fence is installed, or because a taller fence is needed. A taller fence increases the surface area exposed to the wind, and can greatly increase the total wind force experienced by the fence. A stronger fence also would be more resistant to ramming for forces other than wind, including human directed and/or generated forces.
  • Turning to FIG. 12, a side view of a security fence 10 is shown. The fence 10 has posts 12 that are secured to a post foundation 14, in a manner previously disclosed. The post foundation 14 may be deeper and larger in order to increase the strength, but is otherwise of generally standard design. Purlins 40 are attached to the posts 12, and metal panels 42 are attached to the purlins 40. These aspects of the design described above are not altered.
  • The post 12 and its support are modified in the embodiment shown in FIG. 12. A diagonal support brace 70 provides additional strength to the fence 12. This brace is secured with a brace foundation 72, also shown in FIG. 12. The brace foundation 72 may include anchoring the brace 70 in an excavated hole in the ground using concrete or other appropriate material. Alternatively, the brace foundation 72 may be a separate foundation anchored into the ground and then connected to one end of the brace 70. In another embodiment, the brace 70 is positioned diagonally, with one end connected to a post 12 and the other end secured to the ground.
  • The brace 70 may be a single “C” shaped member made using the same equipment used to make the members used for the posts and purlins. Alternatively, the brace 70, could be made by combining two “C” shaped members to form a box-shaped brace. The use of a single “C” shaped member is preferred because it results in easier installation and provides adequate additional strength to the fence.
  • The brace 70 may be attached to the post 12 using any conventional joining device. A bolt may be used, positioned in a hole drilled through the post 12 and brace 70. Alternatively, a mounting bracket may be secured to the post 12 and the brace 70 then secured to the same bracket. The details of how the brace 70 is attached to the post 12 are not shown in FIG. 12 because any number of attachment designs that are well-known in the art may be used, including the specific examples provided herein.
  • The post 12 shown in FIG. 12 is constructed in a somewhat different manner than the post 12 described with prior embodiments. These differences are also illustrated in FIG. 13, which shows a top-view of a cross section of the post 12. The post 12 is an enclosed box-shape design, with the entire length of the post 12 being enclosed. The “C” shape frame members 22 used to construct the post 12 shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 have only three sides, and no lips 23 (the lips 23 are shown in FIGS. 3 and 4). The two “C” shape members 22 are positioned to form a box shape and then a strap 74 is positioned around the members. Screws 76 are used to secure the strap 74 to the frame members 22, thus forming the box-shaped post 12. This creates a post 12 with a larger cross-section than that shown in FIG. 4.
  • The post 12 shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 is reinforced with a mix of concrete 78 and rebar 80. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, two pieces of rebar 80 are welded together and placed inside the box-shaped post 12. The entire length of the post 12 is then filled with concrete 78. The larger cross-section of the post 12 shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 allows for easier filling of the post with concrete and produces a stronger post. The double rebar 80 used also enhances the strength of the post 12. The enhancements shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 may be used individually or together to increase the strength and wind-loading capacity of the fence 10. In addition, the reinforced post 12 may be enclosed and reinforced for less than its full length. For example, the post 12 might be fully enclosed and reinforced up to the point at which the brace 70 is attached to the post 12. Many possible variations may be made using the design features disclosed.
  • In a preferred embodiment for a taller fence or a high wind-load application or both, the fence 10 uses posts 12 that are anchored more deeply compared to the more standard application shown in prior figures. In addition, the posts 12 would be reinforced along their entire lengths, with reinforcing concrete 78 and rebar 80 reaching from the foundation area near ground level all the way to the top of the post 12. Diagonal support braces 70 would be used to provide additional support, with such braces 70 being attached to a substantial percentage of the posts 12. If maximum strength is desired, a diagonal support brace 70 could be used with every post 12. This one-to-one ratio would not be needed in many situations, however, and using diagonal support braces 70 with every second, third, or fourth post 12 would still provide a stronger and more load-resistant fence.
  • The present invention provides a continuous visual screen, making it impossible for one outside the screen to know where the posts 12 are located, or where anything inside the barrier is located. This feature of the invention allows for use of invisible gates. A gate may be built into the barrier at a selected location, and when closed, the gate would appear, from the exterior, to be just another part of the barrier. Using invisible gates of this type would further increase the security provided by the present invention.
  • Small peep-holes may be installed in the barrier without these items being visible to a person more than several feet away from the barrier. Video monitoring equipment could also be used to monitor for activity outside the barrier.
  • The preceding description is intended to provide one skilled in the art with an understanding of the invention. It should not be read as limiting the particular features or specifications of any barrier built in accordance with the invention. For example, barriers ranging from less than one-meter high up to five meters or more in height may be built in accordance with the invention. Motion sensors, light beams, and other security enhancements could be adapted for use on the barrier.

Claims (21)

1. A metal security fence comprising,
a. anchored vertical posts;
b. horizontal purlins connected to the anchored vertical posts;
c. interlocking vertical metal panels connected to the horizontal purlins and to each other, such that an exterior surface of the fence is generally smooth and tamper proof; and,
d. a horizontal base foundation connected to a lower end of each interlocking vertical metal panel.
2. The fence of claim 1, wherein the horizontal base foundation further comprises a lower section and an upper section, the upper section encasing the lower edges of the interlocking vertical metal panels within the horizontal base foundation.
3. The fence of claim 2, wherein the lower section of the horizontal base foundation further comprises a base anchor, a first concrete pour, and a panel edge connector.
4. The fence of claim 1, wherein the anchored vertical posts further comprise an upper section and a lower section, the lower section comprising two or more “C” shaped members combined to form a box-shaped section of the post.
5. The fence of claim 4, wherein the lower section of the post is filled with reinforcing material.
6. The fence of claim 5, wherein the reinforcing material is concrete.
7. The fence of claim 5, wherein the reinforcing material is concrete and rebar.
8. The fence of claim 1, wherein the anchored vertical posts further comprise two or more “C” shaped members combined to form a box-shaped post.
9. The fence of claim 1, further comprising an upper attachment having an entry deterrent material.
10. The fence of claim 1, further comprising diagonal support braces having a first end and a second end, the first end of a support brace being connected to an anchored vertical post and the second end secured to the ground.
11. The fence of claim 1, wherein the purlins and metal panels are connected together to form a fence panel module, and the module, once formed, is connected to the posts.
12. The fence of claim 1, wherein the metal panels are painted a color selected to camouflage the resulting fence.
13. A method of constructing a metal security fence comprising the steps of:
a. anchoring vertical posts in post foundations;
b. connecting horizontal purlins to the vertical posts;
c. connecting a series of metal panels to the horizontal purlins and to each other to create an exterior fence surface that is generally smooth and tamper proof;
d. creating a horizontal base foundation; and,
e. anchoring a lower edge of each metal panel to the horizontal base foundation.
14. The method of claim 13, further comprising the step of forming “C” shaped members using a first metal forming machine, and wherein the posts and purlins are made from the “C” shaped members.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein some of the “C” shaped members are connected to each other to form box-shaped post sections, said box-shaped sections ranging in length from approximately ¼ of the length of a post up to the full length of the post.
16. The method of claim 15, further comprising the step of filling the box-shaped section of the posts with reinforcing material.
17. The method of claim 14, further comprising forming interlocking metal panels using a second metal forming machine.
18. The method of claim 17, wherein the first and second metal forming machines and a sufficient supply of raw materials are provided at a job site, and the posts, purlins, and interlocking metal panels are formed as needed and installed at the job site in a cost-efficient and timely manner.
19. The method of claim 13, further comprising the installation of one or more diagonal support braces by securing one end of the braces to the ground and the other end to an anchored vertical post.
20. The method of claim 13, wherein the horizontal base foundation is created by the following steps:
a. excavating a trench in the ground along a line located where the fence is to be constructed;
b. placing a base anchor in the trench, said anchor having one or more panel edge connectors; and,
c. filling part or all of the trench with a first concrete pour such that the first concrete pour covers the base anchor and a lower portion of the one or more panel edge connectors such that an upper portion of the connectors remains exposed above the first concrete pour.
21. The method of claim 20, wherein the lower edge of each metal panel is anchored to the horizontal base foundation by the following steps:
a. securing the lower ends of the metal panels to the upper portion of the panel edge connectors; and,
b. encasing the lower ends of the metal panels and the upper portions of the panel edge connectors in a second concrete pour that is formed on top of the first concrete pour.
US11/906,455 2006-10-04 2007-10-01 Security barrier Abandoned US20080083915A1 (en)

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GB2442587B (en) 2008-10-08
GB0719205D0 (en) 2007-11-07

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