US20080070658A1 - Method of tracking gaming system - Google Patents

Method of tracking gaming system Download PDF

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US20080070658A1
US20080070658A1 US11822595 US82259507A US2008070658A1 US 20080070658 A1 US20080070658 A1 US 20080070658A1 US 11822595 US11822595 US 11822595 US 82259507 A US82259507 A US 82259507A US 2008070658 A1 US2008070658 A1 US 2008070658A1
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player
gaming
card
information
cards
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US11822595
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Marc Labgold
Lacy Kolo
Brian Kolo
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Labgold Marc R
Lacy Kolo
Brian Kolo
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/3232Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/3232Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed
    • G07F17/3237Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the operator is informed about the players, e.g. profiling, responsible gaming, strategy/behavior of players, location of players
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3293Card games, e.g. poker, canasta, black jack

Abstract

The invention disclosed herein relates to methods, systems, programs and devices for monitoring a specific player's pattern of playing a game. These methods, systems, programs and devices include tracking an individual person's playing cards and/or poker chips using of a detectable tracking device implanted within or upon the playing cards and chips. The information detected from the playing cards and/or chips is then linked to a specific player via the player's use of his comp card. In some embodiments, the methods, systems, programs and devices can also be used to foil forms of cheating such as collusion. Detectors that detect the tracking device may be placed anywhere in the gaming facilities, including but not limited to, under, upon, above, within, adjacent to the gambling table, casino floor, casino entrances and exits, and any other locations within the gaming facilities. Indeed, the tracking device can even be added to employees as clothing, jewelry, etc. This method also relates to methods, systems, programs and devices for preventing collusion between the dealer and game player

Description

  • This application claims priority to U.S. Ser. No. 60/818,955, filed Jul. 7, 2006, currently pending and 60/818,654, filed Jul. 7, 2006, currently pending, both of which are incorporated by reference in their entirety.
  • In the casino business, there is a lack of control over the movement of the playing cards and casino chips. In addition to employing surveillance professionals, such as pit bosses and security guards to watch player conduct, movement of the cards and chips, dealer conduct, payouts, and the like, casinos increasingly rely upon cameras and computer surveillance to determine play activity throughout the casino. There are, however, still a overwhelming need to increase fraud/theft detection capability. In particular, there exists a need to detect and otherwise monitor cheating in games by use of very well known slight-of-hand tricks to switch, remove or add cards or chips. Accordingly, there is a need to find a solution that allows reliable surveillance and tracking of playing cards and chips during game play. The present invention provides a novel means and method for such fraud/theft detection, deterrence, monitoring and response.
  • Currently there are reported means and methods that purport to allow one to track casino chips within a casino gaming environment. Gaming chips with electronic circuits have been disclosed, including U.S. Pat Nos. 3,766,452; 5,166,502; 5,361,885; and 5,406,264.
  • For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,651,548 discloses gaming chips with electronic circuits that are scanned by antennas in gaming chip placement areas. The chips transmit information such as individual identification numbers, which identify the particular chip and the value of the chip. The system includes an electronic system for receiving and storing the information from the antennas so that the location of the gaming chips can be tracked.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,166,502 discloses a fabrication process and the resulting gaming chip which utilizes an implanted electronic circuit encoded with identification information, which may include, but is not limited to, casino designation, chip value, serial number, and date of issue. The chip contains a programmable 32-bit transponder. In use, the transponder is electrically simulated by a reading device that causes the transponder to transmit the information stored in it. The encoded information, which is read, may then be processed by a computer or similar device. A computer program matches the encoded information with information stored in its database and then decodes and outputs the information in a legible manner for immediate or later review.
  • It has also been contemplated that detectors at the gaming table be used as a means of detecting the identification number and amount of gaming chips by such means as magnetic markers, light-conductive materials, and electronic circuits, see, e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,651,548; 5,166,502; 3,766,452; and 5,406,264.
  • There has existed a long-felt need for tracking and/or monitoring playing cards, however, the attempts of others have failed to provide a solution. While others have tried to track the movement of the playing cards, also known as poker cards, such methods have not proven effective.
  • For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,403,908 to Stardust et al., discloses what is characterized as an automated method and apparatus for sequencing and/or inspecting decks of playing cards. The disclosed method utilizes pattern recognition technology or other image comparison technology to compare one or more images of a card as it passes through an apparatus with memory containing known good images of a complete deck of playing cards. The cards can be read as the card is passed from the shoe to the player. Others have also contemplated optically reading of playing cards. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,582,301; 6,039,650; and 5,722,893 to Hill et al. describes a shoe with a card scanner, which optically scans a playing card as the card moves out of shoe. The card suit and value is then recognized by a neural-network algorithm.
  • Others have also attempted to track cards by use of card shoes that optically recognize the cards as they are drawn from the shoe. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,941,769 and 6,460,848 disclose a card shoe with an optical device that deflects and transmits a reflected image of the card value imprint from the drawn playing card to a CCD image converter.
  • However, detecting the number and suit of a card by optical markings has a number of significant drawbacks. For example, the markings tend to degrade during use due to excessive handling and/or spills or stains, and thus become difficult or impossible to read. Optical markings are also difficult to read in the uncontrolled visual environment common in casinos. For example, optical systems rely on line-of-sight, which may be purposefully blocked or simply blocked in the uncontrolled visual environment of a gaming table, such as by a drink or other object placed on the gaming table. Further, players and other casino customers wear a large variety of colors in their clothing, which clutters the visual background, and makes the optical marking difficult or impossible to read. Such methods are also prone to interference by materials that may intentionally or inadvertently come into contact with the cards themelves such as lipstick, oils, food, ashes, or other similar substances.
  • Still others have attempted to combine detection of playing cards optically and gambling chips by some means. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,605,334; 6,093,103 and 6,117,012 to McCrea et al., disclose a game table system for monitoring each hand in a progressive live card game. The system comprises a shoe that optically detects the value and suit of each card, a game bet sensor to detect the presence or absence of a bet, a card sensor located at each player position to detect the presence or absence of a playing card, and a game control. The game control receives information on the presence or absence of a bet or playing card to ensure a bet is placed before the playing card is dealt.
  • Further, U.S. Pat. No. 5,941,769 to Order et al. describes a gaming table for professional use in table games of chance with playing cards and gaming chips. The gaming table includes a card shoe that optically detects the value of the drawn cards, photodiodes arranged under the table cloth to register light passing through each area where the gaming chips and playing cards are placed; a mechanism for detecting what each bet comprises, and a computer program to evaluate and store all data transmitted from the functional devices to the computer.
  • No prior disclosed method has addressed the real and significant risks faced by the gaming industry. Throughout the gaming industry, there still exists a lack of control over the movement of the playing cards, also known as poker cards. In addition to employing people such as pit bosses and security guards to watch the movement of the playing cards across the table, casinos are relying more and more on cameras and computer surveillance to determine where playing cards at all times. However, there are still blind spots in surveillance due to, for example, camera angles and movement of persons. Therefore, there still exists considerable cheating in card games by use of very well known slight of hand tricks to switch cards, remove cards or add cards. Moreover, the greatest risk of loss remains fraudulent conduct involving casino employee collusion (dealer collusion with one or more gambling patrons). No known method exists that effectively addresses this serious risk of loss.
  • In addition, currently, casinos employ a player identification card, also known as a “comp card” to track a player's wins and losses. The comp card was initiated in the 1980's to dissuade players from hopping from one casino to another. Typically, the casino will reward a loyal gambler with benefits such as free meals, rooms or shows. While the casino may use the player identification card to track the player's wins and losses, the casinos do not have a reliable method of tracking the player's playing card and casio chip There has existed a long-felt need for tracking and/or monitoring playing cards, however, the attempts of others have failed to provide a solution. While others have tried to track the movement of the playing cards, also known as poker cards, such methods have not proven effective. Further, even if casinos had a method of reliable surveillance and tracking of bids and playing cards, also known as poker cards, there are other ways for a cheating player to fool the gambling host. For instance, the cheating player may switch tables often, making it difficult to detect patterns in how the gambler plays.
  • The present invention solves the previously mentioned problems by not only tracking playing cards and bids of a specific player, or gambler, but also saving the specific gambler's play information over a period of time. This allows for the gaming host to analyze patterns in a gambler's play.
  • There therefore exists a long-felt need for a practical and effective solution that allows reliable surveillance and tracking of playing cards during game play without requiring an optical device with a line of sight to the suit and number of the playing card.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention disclosed herein relates to methods, systems, programs and devices for preventing collusion between the dealer and game player by tracking the playing cards and/or poker chips using of a detectable tracking device implanted within or upon the playing cards and chips. In some embodiments, the methods, systems, programs and devices can also be used to foil other forms of cheating and is not restricted to collusion. Detectors that detect the tracking device may be placed anywhere in the gaming facilities, including but not limited to, under, upon, above, within, adjacent to the gambling table, casino floor, casino entrances and exits, and any other locations within the gaming facilities. Indeed, the tracking device can even be added to employees as clothing, jewelry, etc.
  • The invention disclosed herein also relates to methods, systems, programs and devices for monitoring a specific player's pattern of playing a game. These methods, systems, programs and devices include tracking an individual person's playing cards and/or poker chips using of a detectable tracking device implanted within or upon the playing cards and chips. The information detected from the playing cards and/or chips is then linked to a specific player via the player's use of his comp card. In some embodiments, the methods, systems, programs and devices can also be used to foil forms of cheating such as collusion.
  • Embodiments of the present invention are directed to the detection and/or prevention of cheating (also termed fraud and/or theft) that occurs during casino game play. The present invention is also directed towards the detection and/or prevention of player cheating during gambling events by monitoring the betting activities. The betting activity may include, for example, the amounts of bids, the pattern of bidding, when a player switches tables, and the like.
  • Embodiments of the present invention are also directed to the detection and/or prevention of gaming host cheating during gambling events by monitoring the bet resolving activities of the gaming host.
  • Further, certain embodiments are directed to providing the player with information required for tax or regulation purposes.
  • Embodiments of the present invention are also directed to expediting game play by computing and displaying values of player and/or dealer cards. Since this is computed automatically, players and gaming hosts need not spend a significant amount of time manually making these computations.
  • Embodiments of the present invention are also directed to improving the performance of a gaming host by monitoring the way a gaming host plays and tracking any mistakes made. This information can be used to inform the gaming host when mistakes are made and aid in improving future performance.
  • Embodiments may also be designed to track the performance of dealers to provide awards and bonuses for superior performance. Similarly, embodiments of the present invention can be used to teach and improve performance of a player, providing real-time analysis of potential odds and potential plays for the novice or advanced player. This real-time analysis can form the basis of consumer gambling games for use at home or in parties. Alternatively, this information can be provided to the player-consumer at the gaming table in real-time to increase his sophistication, expertise or transition to skilled gambler.
  • It is an object of certain embodiments of the present invention to provide a method of tracking a playing card in the casino and/or on (or within proximity to) a gaming table.
  • Another object of certain embodiments is prevent persons from cheating by removing playing cards from the gaming table or acceptable place gambling cards may be held.
  • Radio frequency identification (RFID) provides an effective means monitoring and collecting information concerning gaming cards and their location quickly, easily and without human error. Further, RFID provides a contactless data link, without need for line of sight or concerns about harsh or dirty environments that restrict other optical means, methods or devices. It is therefore a general object of the present invention is to provide anti-cheating methods and means which employ RFID tags and labels.
  • Another object of certain embodiments is to ensure that the count of the playing cards has not changed at any time during game play by use of an RFID detector.
  • Another object of certain embodiments is to ensure that the betting amount has not changed at any time during game play by use of an RFID detector.
  • Another object of a preferred embodiment is to employ the RFID methods and means of the present invention as a means of detecting, monitoring and preventing the removal of cards from the game play and/or introduction of cards into the game play.
  • Another object of certain embodiments is to imprint or write onto the RFID tag one or more pieces of information that enable the casino to confirm the suit and value of each playing card, as well as its relative position within the deck or play. The RFID detectors of the present invention can read the suit and value of each playing card, and therefore determine not only the physical location of each card (e.g., where it has been dealt) but also specifically the suit and number of each card.
  • Further, another object of certain embodiments of the invention contemplate use of a playing card deck shuffler which is enabled to detect the RFID tag of the playing cards and thereby determine which cards are present in the deck shuffler. More interestingly, the shuffler may be enabled to detect if any cards are missing from the deck shuffler or other abnormality.
  • Another object of certain embodiments contemplates use one or more RFID detectors placed within an effective proximity to the playing cards or gaming chips at a gambling table such that the RFID detector can read the one or more pieces of information encoded or written into the RFID tags.
  • One object of certain embodiments is to provide a method and gaming system to detect the suit and number of playing cards held by the player and gaming hosts, detect the amount of the bet placed by the player and detect the amount of money lost by the player or paid out by the gaming host each round. Preferably, the method further comprises a computer system that records the playing cards, bets and money won/lost and compares this information to the rules of the game. Even more preferably, the method and gaming system comprise notifying the gaming host if the playing cards or bet is inappropriately changed during game play. Most preferably, the method and gaming system comprise a visual display for the gaming host and/or the player.
  • Other objects of the present invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the relevant art from the disclosure contained herein.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment in accordance with the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that although the following Detailed Description will proceed with reference being made to preferred embodiments, the present invention is not intended to be limited to these embodiments.
  • The invention methods, systems, programs, and devices for monitoring and/or tracking playing cards and/or gaming chips by use of a tracking device implanted within or upon the playing cards and/or gaming chips. In addition, the playing cards and/or chips played by a player or dealer may then be saved with the specific ID of the player or dealer.
  • To play a card game of chance at a gaming establishment, the gaming establishment provides a player both the gaming chips and the playing cards. If the gaming establishment has a method to track the location and type of poker chips and playing cards at a gaming table, the gaming establishment is in a unique position to use the rules of the game to determine if there is collusion between the gaming host and the player.
  • The comp card, or “player identification card”, is typically a plastic device, but may be made of any materials. The player identification card typically contains a player identifier that is read by a detecting device. The detecting device is connected to a player database that can link the information on the comp card to information concerning a specific player. The player information in the database may be created and/or updated, for example, based on information received from a player, a casino employee, a terminal, a gaming machine, an input device, and/or any combination thereof. For example, the information may be created when a player registers with a casino and receives a player identification card (e.g., encoded with a player identifier). The information may be subsequently updated, for example, when a player requests to update the information (e.g., when a player indicates a desire to change an associated credit card number) or when additional information is obtained about the player via the casino's interactions with the player (e.g., the lifetime win/(loss) may be updated on an ongoing or periodic basis as the player plays games at the casino).
  • The player identifier may be, for example, a numeric, alphanumeric, or other type of code associated with a player who may operate a gaming machine or kiosk, or may play a table game at a casino. The player identifier is preferably unique, and may be generated or selected, for example, by the slot machine or by the player (e.g., when a player first registers with a casino). For each player, the player database may also store the player's name (e.g., for use in outputting messages to the player). In one or more embodiments, the player's name may comprise a nickname, “handle”, or other designation for the player that is selected by the player or a casino. In one or more embodiments, the nickname may comprise a designation that reflects the player's status (e.g., “premium player”; “low bid player”). Such a status may indicate, for example, the typical spending range of the player, the typical session length of the player, or other indication about the player. Such a designation may or may not be known to the player.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of the invention. This embodiment contemplates three distinct phases for detection: the betting phase, the gaming phase, and the resolving phase. In each phase, the playing cards and/or gaming chips may be detected by any means. To start, the betting phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 101-105. To start the game, the player first presents his player identification card to the gaming host 101. The player identification card is detected by a device 102 and sent to a software system 105 by a communication means.
  • Once the player identification card is presented, the players placed the gaming chips in a betting area 103. A betting area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player to put the gaming chips that the player is willing to play in this gaming round. Preferably, one or more detectors 104 are coupled to the betting area. In the preferred embodiments, it is contemplated that the cards will contain embedded and detectable information including, inter alia, a unique identifier (such as a serial number) for each card in the deck, the suit of the card, the value of the card, and any other such information deemed useful to the user of the invention.
  • The information from the detector is then sent by a communication means to a software system 105. The software system is capable of using the information from the detector to determine the number of chips in the betting area and the value of each chip, and therefore can determine the total bet placed by a specific player. The software system is also capable of recording any change in the bet in the betting area and determines if this change in bet amount is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the bet amount changes during the betting phase, gaming phase or resolving phase, in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system sends an alert to the gaming host 120 to inform them of potential cheating. When the betting phase ends is at the discretion of the gaming host.
  • Furthermore, it is contemplated that the software system 105 is also capable of saving information concerning one or more player's playing cards and/or gaming chips to a player database where the playing card and/or gaming chips information are associated with the o the player identifier of the player identification card.
  • The gaming phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 106-114. From steps 106 to 110, the gaming chips in the betting area are read by the detectors 111. The information from the detector is then sent by a communication means to a software system 112. If during the gaming phase the number of gaming chips or the total amount of the gaming chips changes in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system 112 will send a warning to the gaming host 120 to alert them of possible cheating. During the gaming phase, one or more playing cards are dealt by the gaming host 107. The number of playing cards and manner in which the cards are dealt is dependent upon the game, but typically, the players and the gaming host each receive playing cards 107. The playing cards are placed in a card area. The card area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player and/or host to put the playing cards. Preferably, one or more detectors are coupled to the card area. The playing card information read by the detector 113, which sends the information by a communication means to a software system 114. The software system may be capable of determining information such as the number of playing cards, and the value of each playing card, and the suit of each playing card. The software system may also be capable of recording any change of playing cards in the card area of the player 108 and the gaming host 109 and determines if this change in playing cards is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the number of cards, or type of card, changes during the gaming phase in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system sends an alert to the gaming host 120 to inform them of potential cheating. As during the betting phase, the detectors 104 can read the number and type of gaming chips in the betting area and this information is communicated to the software system 112. If the bet changes in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, again the software system will send an alert to the gaming host 119.
  • The resolving phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 115-119. The resolving phase may begin during or after the gaming phase is complete 110. In the resolving phase, the detectors 118 may read the gaming chips in the betting area and/or the playing cards on the card area of the player and the gaming host. The information from the detectors is sent by a communication means to the software system 119 that then reconciles the card information to determine if the player has won or lost, and computes any winning amount. In parallel, the gaming host examines the cards and/or display and/or electronic record to determine if a player has won or lost. The gaming host resolves each player bet 116 by either paying the player an amount of chips for winning, or taking the player's chips from the betting area for the gaming host. The detectors also read the gaming chips from the gaming host's bet resolution and compares this information to its own computations 118. If the gaming host resolution obtained by inspection of the cards is not the same amount as the resolution determined by the software system, the software system will send a warning signal to the gaming host 120. At the end of the resolving phase 119, the gaming round has ended. In addition, it is further contemplated that the software system 105, 112, 114 and 119 may be the same or different software systems.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment of the invention. This embodiment contemplates three distinct phases for detection: the betting phase, the gaming phase, and the resolving phase. In each phase, the playing cards and/or gaming chips may be detected by any means. To start the game, the player first presents his player identification card to the gaming host 201. The player identification card is detected by a device and sent to a software system 204 by a communication means.
  • Once the player identification card is presented, the players placed the gaming chips in a betting area 202. This bet may be by an actual gaming chip or an electronic withdrawl from a bank account, credit card, debit card, electronic withdrawl from an account held by the gaming host, or similar system. Further, upon presentation of the player identification card, the bet may be funds the gaming host may electronically withdraw money from an account the player previously set up or run a credit card the player linked with the player identification card. The information concerning the withdraw or credit run may be saved to the software system. The bet is then sent by a communication means to a software system 204. The software system then records how much each player has bet and saves the betting information to each specific player's information saved in the software system. When the betting phase ends is at the discretion of the gaming host 203 or players.
  • The gaming phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 205 - 211. Once the gaming phase begins 205, the playing cards are dealt by the gaming host 206. The number of playing cards and manner in which the cards are dealt is dependent upon the game, but typically, the players and the gaming host each receive playing cards in their respective card area(s) 206. The card area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player and/or host to put the playing cards. Preferably, one or more detectors are coupled to the card area 210. The playing card information read by the detector 210, which sends the information by a communication means to a software system 211. The software system is capable of determining information such as the number of playing cards, and the value of each playing card, and the suit of each playing card. The software system is also capable of recording any change of playing cards in the card area of the player 207 and the gaming host 208 and determines if this change in playing cards is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the number of cards, or type of card, changes during the gaming phase in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system may send an alert to the gaming host 220 to inform them of potential cheating.
  • The resolving phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 212-216. The resolving phase may begin before or after the gaming phase is complete 209. In the resolving phase, the detectors 214 are coupled to the areas containing the playing cards and bets. The information from the detectors is then sent by a communication means to the software system 215 that then reconciles the card information to determine if the player has won or lost, and uses the bet from the records to compute any winning amount. In parallel, the gaming host examines the cards to determine if a player won or lost. The gaming host resolves each player bet 213 by either paying the player an amount of chips for winning, or crediting a player debit, credit, bank account or gaming account. If the gaming host resolution obtained from inspection of the cards is not the same amount as the resolution determined by the software system, the software system will send a warning signal to the gaming host 220. At the end of the resolving phase 216, the gaming round has ended. In addition, it is further contemplated that the software system 205, 210 and 215 may be the same or different software systems.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment of the invention. This embodiment contemplates three distinct phases for detection: the betting phase, the gaming phase, and the resolving phase. In each phase, the playing cards and/or gaming chips may be detected by any means. The betting phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 301-306. To start the betting phase, the player presents the player identification card to the gaming host where it is detected by a device 304. It is also contemplated that the bet may be by electronic withdrawl from a bank account, credit card, debit card, electronic withdrawl from an account held by the gaming host, and the like. Further, upon presentation of the player identification card, the bet may be funds the gaming host may electronically withdraw money from an account the player previously set up or run a credit card the player linked with the player identification card. The information concerning the withdraw or credit run may be saved to the software system 305. The bet may be placed into a betting area 302 where a betting area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player to put the gaming chips that the player is willing to play in this gaming round. Preferably, one or more detectors 304 are coupled to the betting area. The detector can read information from the gaming chip including, but not limited to, the value amount of the chip and a unique chip ID number. The information from the detector is then sent by a communication means to a software system 305.
  • The software system then records how much each player has bet and saves the betting information to each specific player's information saved in the software system. It is further contemplated that information concerning the player information or bet is presented onto a display for the gaming host or player 303. When the betting phase ends is at the discretion of the gaming host 306 or players.
  • The software system is capable of using the information from the detector to determine the number of chips in the betting area and the value of each chip, and therefore can determine the total bet placed by the player. The software system is also capable of recording any change in the bet in the betting area and determines if this change in bet amount is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the bet amount changes during the betting phase, gaming phase or resolving phase, in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system sends an alert to the gaming host 330 to inform them of potential cheating. When the betting phase ends is at the discretion of the gaming host 306 or players.
  • The gaming phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 306-316. Once the gaming phase begins 306, the playing cards are dealt 307 by the gaming host into a card area. The card area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player and/or host to put the playing cards. The number of playing cards and manner in which the cards are dealt is dependent upon the game, but typically, the players and the gaming host each receive playing cards. Preferably, one or more detectors 308 are coupled to the card area 307. The playing card information read by the detector 308, which sends the information by a communication means to a software system 309. The software system is capable of determining information such as the number of playing cards, and the value of each playing card, and the suit of each playing card. The software system may also be capable of recording any change of playing cards in the card area of the player 314 and the gaming host 315 and determine if this change in playing cards is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the number of cards or type of cards changes during the gaming phase in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system may send an alert to the gaming host 320 to inform them of potential cheating. Optionally, the software system may also present the gaming information on a display for the player(s) and/or gaming host(s). The gaming information displayed may include information such as the current bet, the cards dealt, recommended card and/or bet moves, the name and information of the player and/or gaming host, and the like.
  • The resolving phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 317-322. The resolving phase may begin after the gaming phase is complete 316. Once the resolving phase begins, the detectors 318 may read the bet and the playing cards on the card area of the player and the gaming host. The information from the detectors is then sent to the software system 319 that then reconciles the card information to determine if the player has won or lost, and uses the bet from the records to compute any winning amount. The reconciling information is then sent from the software system 319 to the display 320 where the player(s) and/or the gaming host(s) can see the reconciling information. For the gaming host to reconcile the bet, the gaming host may consult the display, examine the cards to determine if a player won or lost, or both. The gaming host resolves each player bet 321 by either paying the player an amount of chips for winning, or crediting a player debit, credit, bank account or gaming account. If the gaming host resolution is not the same amount as the resolution determined by the software system, the software system will send a warning signal to the gaming host 320. At the end of the resolving phase 322, the gaming round has ended. In addition, it is further contemplated that the software system 305, 319, 313 and 319 may be the same or different software systems.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates one embodiment of the invention. This embodiment contemplates three distinct phases for detection: the betting phase, the gaming phase, and the resolving phase. In each phase, the playing cards and/or gaming chips may be detected by any means. To start, the betting phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 401-405. Once the betting phase 401 begins, the players placed the gaming chips in a betting area 402. A betting area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player to put the gaming chips that the player is willing to play in this gaming round. Preferably, one or more detectors 404 are coupled to the betting area. In the preferred embodiments, it is contemplated that the cards will contain embedded and detectable information including, inter alia, a unique identifier (such as a serial number) for each card in the deck, the suit of the card, the value of the card, and any other such information deemed useful to the user of the invention.
  • The information from the detector is then sent by a communication means to a software system 405. The software system is capable of using the information from the detector to determine the number of chips in the betting area and the value of each chip, and therefore can determine the total bet placed by the player. The software system is also capable of recording any change in the bet in the betting area and determines if this change in bet amount is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the bet amount changes during the betting phase, gaming phase or resolving phase, in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system sends an alert to the gaming host 420 to inform them of potential cheating. When the betting phase ends is at the discretion of the gaming host 403.
  • The gaming phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 406-414. From steps 406 to 410, the gaming chips in the betting area are read by the detectors 411. The information from the detector is then sent by a communication means to a software system 412. If during the gaming phase the number of gaming chips or the total amount of the gaming chips changes in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system 412 will send a warning to the gaming host 420 to alert them of possible cheating. During the gaming phase, one or more playing cards are dealt by the gaming host 407. The number of playing cards and manner in which the cards are dealt is dependent upon the game, but typically, the players and the gaming host each receive playing cards 407. The playing cards are placed in a card area. The card area is defined as a space predetermined by the gaming host for each player and/or host to put the playing cards. Preferably, one or more detectors are coupled to the card area. The playing card information read by the detector 413, which sends the information by a communication means to a software system 414. The software system is capable of determining information such as the number of playing cards, and the value of each playing card, and the suit of each playing card. The software system is also capable of recording any change of playing cards in the card area of the player 408 and the gaming host 409 and determines if this change in playing cards is appropriate for the gaming rules. If the number of cards, or type of card, changes during the gaming phase in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, the software system sends an alert to the gaming host 420 to inform them of potential cheating. As during the betting phase, the detectors 404 can read the number and type of gaming chips in the betting area and this information is communicated to the software system 412. If the bet changes in a manner that is inappropriate to the gaming rules, again the software system will send an alert to the gaming host 419.
  • The resolving phase may include any one of, or combination of, steps 415-419. The resolving phase may begin during or after the gaming phase is complete 410. In the resolving phase, the detectors 418 may read the gaming chips in the betting area and/or the playing cards on the card area of the player and the gaming host. The information from the detectors is sent by a communication means to the software system 419 that then reconciles the card information to determine if the player has won or lost, and computes any winning amount. In parallel, the gaming host examines the cards and/or display and/or electronic record to determine if a player has won or lost. The gaming host resolves each player bet 416 by either paying the player an amount of chips for winning, or taking the player's chips from the betting area for the gaming host. The detectors also read the gaming chips from the gaming host's bet resolution and compares this information to its own computations 418. If the gaming host resolution obtained by inspection of the cards is not the same amount as the resolution determined by the software system, the software system will send a warning signal to the gaming host 420. At the end of the resolving phase 419, the gaming round has ended. In addition, it is further contemplated that the software system 405, 412, 414 and 419 may be the same or different software systems.
  • One embodiment of the present invention detects the value of the gaming chips at a gaming table. The detector also detects the type and value of the playing cards at the table. A computer program is provided to receive information from the playing card and chip detectors for each player or gaming host. It is contemplated that the same or a different software system understands the rule of the game and can therefore examine the playing cards held by the gaming host and a player, determine based on a playing card if the player has won or lost to the gaming host, calculate the correct payouts, determine what the payouts was, and reconciled the payouts differences. Further, this information may be saved to a database. Therefore, the present invention can detect if the gaming host and the player are colluding.
  • It is also contemplated that the method and system of the present invention can track the manner and rate of play for each player, tracked the efficiency of each dealer, maintained chip inventory, and enable a higher degree of real-time operational management by way of, for example, cash management and resource management throughout the gaming establishment.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the gaming chips and playing cards used with the game are tagged with an RFID tag. This helps prevent player cheating as the location of each card may be tracked. Thus, if a player were to attempt to replace a card with a card from a different deck, the detectors would notice the change and signal an alert.
  • Detection and Detectors
  • The playing cards, gaming chips and/or player identification card can be detected by any means. The location of the player cards, gaming chips and/or player identification card can be determined using global positioning satellites (GPS), radio frequency identification (RFID), access point (AP) triangulation or similar technology. It should also be appreciated that the transmission of the authorization information from the authorizing device can occur by any electronic means, including but limited to RFID, satellite communication, cellular phone communications, and the like. It is further contemplated that the player identification card may be detected by any means.
  • In one embodiment, the playing cards may be tracked by any electronic means that requires a contactless transmission to an electronic detector. The electronic detectors may be placed anywhere in the gambling place, including but not limited to, under, upon, above, within, adjacent to the gambling table, casino floor, casino entrances and exits, and any other place that persons within the gaming establishment move by. At least one software system receives the playing card information from the electronic detector. The software system then processes the playing card information and calculates the number and suit of each card and the number of cards in a predetermined location. In a preferred embodiment, the software system counts the number of playing cards transmitting playing card information and calculates if the entire deck of playing cards is present within a predetermined radius. In a more preferred embodiment, the software system displays the results of its processing on a visible display to a gaming host, including but not limited to the number and suit of each card, the number of cards in a predetermined location, the presence or absence of a card, the movement of cards into or out of a predetermined location, and the like. It is further contemplated that the gaming host may prompt the software system to process the playing card information and display the results.
  • In the preferred embodiments, it is contemplated that the cards will contain embedded and detectable information including, inter alia, a unique identifier (such as a serial number) for each card in the deck, the suit of the card, the value of the card, and any other such information deemed useful to the user of the invention.
  • Further, for all electronic means by which the playing cards can be detected, the electronic means device may be placed at any place on the playing card. For instance, it is contemplated that the electronic means device is placed at the same location on every card in one deck. For example, the electronic means device can be placed in the center of the card, adjacent to an edge of the card, in the center of one edge of the card, or the like. Further, it is known that even a very small device may create an unevenness in the card thickness. As such, it is contemplated that the electronic means device be placed at alternating, different locations on each card of one deck such that when the cards are placed onto of one another, the deck height appears uniform. Alternatively, the device can comprise or be comprised within, a sheet of material that extends the entire width and height of the card such that the thickness of the card is even across its entire surface.
  • In one preferred embodiment, the electronic means occurs by RFID. RFID tags come in various shapes, sizes and read ranges including thin and flexible “smart labels” which can be laminated between paper or plastic. RFID creates an automatic way to collect information about a product, place, time or transaction quickly, easily and without human error. It provides a contactless data link, without need for line of sight or concerns about harsh or dirty environments that restrict other automatic ID technologies such as bar codes. In addition, RFID is more than just an ID code, it can be used as a data carrier, with information being written to and updated on the tag easily. Examples of RFID tags can be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,851,617, 5,682,143, 4,654,658, 4,730,188 and 4,724,427.
  • It is further contemplated that the gaming host may use the player identification card to locate the player in the casino. There are many benefits of tracking a player as they move through a casino. For instance, the gaming host may be able to locate a player in the casino in case of emergency or determine where the player is at the gaming table. In addition, the gaming host can use the player identification card and visual surveillance such as cameras to track a potential cheater through the casino and also determine if the person interacts with others in the casino. In other embodiments, the gaming host employees carry a handheld device or can access a display so that when a player approaches the employee, the player identification card is detected and information concerning the player is displayed to the employee, where the information may be the player name, current and lifetime win/loss, person information such as family names, player contact information, previous and current hotel information, spending habits within the shops at the casino, special requests, and the like. The instant access by a casino employee to player information greatly enhanced the player experience by increasing the casino customer service.
  • Although it is contemplated that there may be more than one detector at single gaming table, it should be appreciated that the gaming establishment can decrease signal collision by any means, including frequency division multiplexing and carrier sense multiple access. Preferably, collision is decreased by proximity coupling the RFID tag to its detector. Less preferred, the RFID is vicinity coupled to the detector. Preferably, the RFID for the player card and gaming chips is operating at a low frequency of about 125 to 134 kHz or a high frequency of about 13.56 MHz. Less preferably, the RFID is operating at an ultra-high frequency of about 868 to 928 MHz. An overview of the RFID technology and its application is found in “RFID, Radio Frequency Identification,” Steven Shepard (2005 McGraw-Hill Publishing), the text of which is incorporated by reference.
  • Further, a general RFID reader may be capable of reading signals from a 4? region of space surrounding the detector. This is not desirable because it would allow a player to place a playing card under the table near the detector, causing the detector to inaccurately compute the playing cards placed on the table in the betting area. To limit this, an electromagnetic frequency (EMF) shield is placed under the table behind the reader to assure that the reader only received signals originating from the betting area of the table.
  • Detectors that register the tracking device may be placed anywhere in the gambling place, including but not limited to, under, upon, above, within, adjacent to the gambling table, casino floor, casino entrances and exits, and any other place that persons within the casino move by.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the determination of the playing cards placed in the betting area is facilitated by using a plurality of detectors. When two or more detectors are used in conjunction, it is possible to triangulate the special positioning of each playing card. Using this technique, it is possible to compute the specific location of each playing card placed and only count those playing cards placed in a predefined three-dimensional volume in the region of the betting area. Thus, in this embodiment, a player attempting to cheat by placing a playing card under the table but near a detector will be unsuccessful because the system is able to determine that the playing card is in fact under the table and thus not part of playing cards properly dealt by the player. The plurality of detectors can include non-RFID detectors such as the use of laser bar code readers on the deck shuffler combined with bar codes on the face of the cards.
  • It is also desirable to prevent a player from cheating by sending electromagnetic (EM) signals to the reading device in an attempt to confuse the device and cause the reading device to improperly compute the playing cards. In order to limit this, an EMF shield is placed around the circuitry of the reading device.
  • It is also desirable to prevent cheating by securing the casing and wiring of the detectors. This may be facilitated by using hardened steel, such as carbon steel to surround the detector and/or the circuitry leading from the detector to the display. This structure prevents a player from manually tampering with the device. However, since it may be necessary to perform maintenance on the detectors, it is also useful to provide a simple way to obtain access to the detectors and/or the circuitry leading to the display. This is facilitated by placing a lock, such as a cylinder or cam lock, in/on the case. Maintenance is preformed by unlocking the case and opening the case allowing easy access to the components of the system.
  • The information from the detectors is sent by a communications means to the software system. It is also contemplated that the communication means mentioned in any of the previous embodiments may use an Internet, intranet, extranet, WAN, LAN, satellite communication, cellular phone communications, communications on a motherboard, and the like.
  • Display
  • In the preferred embodiment, a display is included which enables the casino management and/or law enforcement to view the value and suit of the card. If the cards are placed in an automatic shoe, the reader can determine information including, inter alia, the order of the cards in the deck (e.g., so as to allow the casino or law enforcement to ensure that the deck is being dealt accurately and fairly), that there are the appropriate number of cards in the deck (e.g., 52 cards in a standard) deck, all of the same deck (verified by an unique identifier that is on each card in the deck, thereby allowing the casino to know if cards are removed or added to the deck), and that there are the proper cards in the deck (e.g., in a standard 52 card deck—4 suits of each of the cards ace through ten, Jack, Queen, King).
  • In certain embodiments, the player will also have a display in addition to that/those available to one or more of the dealer, the various levels of casino floor supervising personnel, security, management, and the like.
  • By way of non-limiting example, if a player were playing blackjack, a display may show the players total card value and suit. This facilitates the player in determining whether to ‘hit’ or ‘stand’. It is also contemplated that a display will show the appropriate value and suit of the playing cards in a predetermined location to the gaming host. This allows the gaming host to confirm that the playing cards are properly computed by the electronic detector. In addition, this feature aids the gaming host by accurately computing the totality of the playing card hand. If the player wins the bet, the gaming host does not need to manually count the total number of the cards, calculate the combination of numbers and suits but rather the gaming host may rely on the number and suit calculation displayed to compute the proper payout. Additionally, it allows the casino to determine if the hand is properly paid, thereby preventing collusive payment on a losing hand.
  • For the gaming host, the display may include information such as the correct calculated pay out for each player, whether a player has won or lost the hand as per the gaming rules, warnings to the gaming host that another gaming host suspects a player of cheating, player information associated with the player identification card such as player name, length of stay, personal information concerning family or spending habits, and the like.
  • For the player, the display may include information such as rules of the game, recommendations on how to play a round of the game, the correct pay out amounts for a round of the game, and the total amount of chips the player has bet the total amount of chips the player has with him/her at the table. It is further contemplated that the player's display may be used to order a drink, order a cab, surf the internet, examine the hotel features and amenities, purchase items, for example, tickets for events, airplane tickets, translate speech from the gaming hosts or other nearby persons, purchase more chips by use of a credit card, bank card, or other means. Further, the player's display may show information associated with the player identification card such as previous electronic withdrawls, items purchased, and the like. Optionally, the player's display may further include advertisements placed on the display by the gaming establishment.
  • The gaming host and/or the player may have at least one display. The display may be a liquid crystal display (LCD), cathode ray tube (CRT), light emitting diode (LED), plasma display or the like.
  • Software System
  • The present invention also contemplates a software system that may be enabled to track the bet amount, track the playing cards dealt and played, resolve the game, and associate the gaming activity with a specific player.
  • In the preferred embodiment, a software system is provided to track the movement of the playing cards. If it is determined that a playing card is removed from a predetermined three-dimensional volume, the software system may signal an alert to the gaming host.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the system comprises a card associated with at least one player, where the card is detectable within the casino. It is contemplated that the gaming host can use this “player card” to track in real-time the location and direction of travel of the player card and hence the player. The location of the player card can be determined using global positioning satellites (GPS), radio frequency identification (RFID), access point (AP) triangulation or similar technology. As a supplement to these location-tracking schemes or as an alternative approach, a player's location may be determined by interpreting the data of real-time scanning being performed by the player.
  • In a preferred embodiment, a software system is also provided to compute the spatial location of a gaming chip from data obtained by the chip detectors. This software is provided as input which detectors have sensed a chip and any directional information as to the relative location of the cheque to the detector. If multiple detectors have sensed the same chip, the software system will determine the approximate spatial location of the cheque. Further, in a less preferred embodiment, the software system can track the location of every gaming chip in the casino and track the movement of the chip from one detector region to another. It is contemplated that this embodiment would enable the gaming host to calculate the number and location of the chips located in the casino at any point in time.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the system comprises a card associated with at least one player, where the card is detectable within the casino. It is contemplated that the gaming host can use this “player card” to track in real-time the location and direction of travel of the player card and hence the player. The location of the player card can be determined using global positioning satellites (GPS), radio frequency identification (RFID), access point (AP) triangulation or similar technology. As a supplement to these location-tracking schemes or as an alternative approach, a player's location may be determined by interpreting the data of real-time scanning being performed by the player.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the software system calculates how much a player wins. This is useful in the detection and prevention of cheating. It can also provide the necessary evidence to support claims for lost profits in subsequent civil litigation by the gaming host. Gaming hosts typically know the maximum frequency a game may be won by a player properly playing. By monitoring the amount won by a given player, it is possible to compute the statistical probability for a player winning that amount. Furthermore, it is possible to compute the statistical confidence that a player is cheating. As the software tracks and computes this in real time, the software may alert a security team when the confidence that a player is cheating rises above a predetermined threshold. The security team may monitor the player and determine if the player is actually cheating at the game or this information may be accumulated as evidence in the legal prosecution of the cheating individual.
  • It is further contemplated that the software system comprises the ability to generate a log file to list the game server (or servers) played by the player and/or gaming host, the amount of each wager, the amount of the player's and gaming host's stake, the average size of the wager, the past games played by the player and his success, and the player's request for additional information concerning a game. The network manager, the secure server or other managers in the gaming establishment, or third parties, may maintain this log file. It is further contemplated that this software system collects statistical information regarding the location of the player, the won/lost percentage and the duration of play for each player and on a cumulative basis. This information is updated while the player plays at the game server (or servers) by logging the information to the log file. As each player terminates play, the software system closes the player's account by crediting winnings, deducting losses and saving the log file. The statistical information may be updated at this time or at selected intervals throughout the day. When the player subsequently returns and presents the player identification card, the software system opens the player's account so that new information may be added to the log file.
  • Embodiments of the present invention are also directed towards improving the performance of a gaming host by monitoring the way a gaming host's employee plays and tracking any mistakes made. This information can be used to inform the gaming host when mistakes are made and aid in improving future performance. Embodiments may also be designed to track the performance of dealers to provide awards and bonuses for superior performance. Similarly, embodiments of the present invention can be used to teach and improve performance of a player, providing real-time analysis of potential odds and potential plays for the novice or advanced player. This real-time analysis can form the basis of consumer gambling games for use at home or in parties. Alternatively, this information can be provided to the player-consumer at the gaming table in real-time to increase his sophistication, expertise or transition to skilled gambler.
  • Other embodiments of the present invention are directed to improving ability of a gaming host to service the player. For instance, if the player previously signed up for a table at the restaurant, the use of the player identification card with the software enables the gaming host to track the player and inform him his table is ready. Further, if the player has not played a certain game such as blackjack before, and sits at a blackjack table, it is contemplated that the player present his player identification card, the software system detects the player identifier, the software system associates the player identifier with the location of the detector to find the player is at a blackjack table, the software system reads the player log files to find the player has not played blackjack before, and the software system therefore informs the gaming host that the player may need assistance with the rules and play. Further, is is contmaplted that when the player identification card is presented at a game table that the player has not attended before, the software system detects the type of table the player is at, reads past player log files to find if the player has played this game before, and the software system may automatically display the gaming rules on the player display and assist the player in play.
  • When the player identification card is presented, or by accessing a selected player's log file, the gaming host can access the player identifier and select the player's log file detailing the series of plays for the player,. This allows the gaming host to determine in real time whether the player is eligible for casino comps. Since the log file contains significant information regarding each player, the casino may sort the information to determine their most loyal players for purpose of providing casino comps. By way of example, casino comps may include discounts on food, entertainment, lodging, travel to the casino and the like. By associating each player's log file with account information, the comps can be tailored to the specific needs or desires of the player. Further, the information may be used to automatically rate the play of each player in terms of wagered amounts, duration of play or individual strategies/habits for each player.
  • It is further contemplated that the present invention may include a method for periodically or on-demand generating a corporate report and for updating said corporate report in real-time. The present invention further includes a method for periodically or on-demand generating a casino gaming network status report and for updating said casino gaming network status report in real-time.
  • It is further contemplated that the present invention may include a method for generating an on-line report for the player to present the player with information required for federal and state taxes. For instance, the player may use a number or code associated with their player identification card to access player information from a remote location. Types of tax information that may be accessed may include but not limited to, money won or lost, non-monetary wins such as cars, vacations, and the like.
  • The present invention further includes a method for periodically or on-demand monitoring selected games and collecting game statistics for various games to verify the odds and payout decisions as well as planning for new games and for updating said corporate report in real-time.
  • The present invention further includes a method for periodically or on-demand determining the inventory of chips at each game table and verifying against the expected figures calculated from total payout in the interval, in real-time without interrupting ongoing games.
  • It is also contemplated that the software system disclosed herein may be one or more separate programs. It is further contemplated that the software system mentioned in any of the previous embodiments may comprise a single database residing on a single server, multiple databases residing on a single data store, or a distributed database residing on a plurality of servers. In addition, in a less preferred embodiment, the data store may reside on the access server or the access-processing server.
  • It is also contemplated that the communication means may include direct network communications using a communication protocol such as TCP/IP, IPX, RFC 793, or another standard or proprietary communication protocol. Furthermore, the communication means may include simple message communications, remote procedure calls or other distributed application messages, Web Messaging, Web Services, MSMQ, MQ Series, XML messages, file transfers, or the like. It should be appreciated that the communication means described herein may include any system for exchanging data or transacting business or information, such as Internet, intranet, extranet, WAN, LAN, satellite communication, cellular phone communications, and the like. Further, the present invention might further employ any number of conventional techniques for data transmission, signaling, data processing, network control, and the like. For example, radio frequency and other wireless techniques can be used in place of any communication described herein.
  • It is contemplated that the gaming host may include any person or computer system involved in monitoring a game at a gaming table. A gaming host may include, but is not limited to, the playing card dealer, the pit boss, gaming security, other gaming related personnel, casino employees, or third parties employed by the casino for purposes of monitoring gaming tables.
  • It is further contemplated that a third party vendor or service may be involved with any monetary transactions, access and/or action chain in any of the embodiments, where the third party vendor or service tracks any activity associated with the player and/or gaming hosts and notify the player and/or gaming host of such activity. The third party vendor or service may then notify the person and/or gaming host along the transaction, access and/or action chain of the person or corporation's response. It is contemplated that notification of such response will result in approval or rejection of the transaction, access request, or action request.
  • It should be appreciated that the particular implementations shown and described herein are illustrative of the invention and are not intended to otherwise limit the scope of the present invention in any way. Indeed, for the sake of brevity, conventional data networking, application development and other functional aspects of the systems (and components of the individual operating components of the systems) may not be described in detail herein. Furthermore, the connecting lines shown in the various figures contained herein are intended to represent exemplary functional relationships and/or physical couplings between the various entities. It should be noted that many alternative or additional functional relationships or physical connections might be present in a practical electronic transaction or transmission.
  • In each of the above embodiments, different, specific embodiments of invention are disclosed. However, it is the full intent of the inventor of the present invention that the specific aspects of each embodiment described herein may be combined with the other embodiments described herein. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that various adaptations and modification of the preferred embodiments can be configured without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention may be practiced other than that specifically described therein.

Claims (1)

  1. 1. A method of detecting collusion between a player and a casino employee, the method comprising:
    Detection of the suit and number of the player cards,
    Detection of the suit and number of the casino employee cards,
    Detection of the amount of the player bet, and
    Software system enabled to calculate the amount of money won by the player.
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