US20080052830A1 - Bed foundation with drop-in unit - Google Patents

Bed foundation with drop-in unit Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080052830A1
US20080052830A1 US11/845,751 US84575107A US2008052830A1 US 20080052830 A1 US20080052830 A1 US 20080052830A1 US 84575107 A US84575107 A US 84575107A US 2008052830 A1 US2008052830 A1 US 2008052830A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
bed
platform
drop
unit
bed foundation
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/845,751
Inventor
Daniel Koughan
Paul Mahoney
James Gifft
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Select Comfort Corp
Original Assignee
Select Comfort Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US82394006P priority Critical
Application filed by Select Comfort Corp filed Critical Select Comfort Corp
Priority to US11/845,751 priority patent/US20080052830A1/en
Assigned to SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION reassignment SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KOUGHAN, DANIEL J., MAHONEY, PAUL, GIFFT, JAMES
Publication of US20080052830A1 publication Critical patent/US20080052830A1/en
Assigned to JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT reassignment JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION
Assigned to WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION reassignment WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: SELECT COMFORT CANADA HOLDING INC., SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION, SELECT COMFORT RETAIL CORPORATION, SELECTCOMFORT.COM CORPORATION
Assigned to SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION reassignment SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT
Assigned to SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION reassignment SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C19/00Bedsteads
    • A47C19/005Bedsteads dismountable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C20/00Head -, foot -, or like rests for beds, sofas or the like
    • A47C20/04Head -, foot -, or like rests for beds, sofas or the like with adjustable inclination
    • A47C20/041Head -, foot -, or like rests for beds, sofas or the like with adjustable inclination by electric motors

Abstract

A bed foundation may be retrofitted or otherwise converted in the field to include one or more additional function. In one illustrative embodiment, the bed foundation may be retrofitted or otherwise converted by incorporating a drop-in articulation unit. Such an articulation unit may permit a user to raise and/or lower the head of their bed. In some cases, a second articulation unit may be placed at the foot of a bed foundation to permit the user to independently raise and/or lower the head and the foot of their bed. In other illustrative embodiments, drop-in units may add other functions to existing bed foundations. In some cases, the bed foundation and/or drop-in units may be configured such that it can be easily shipped and assembled in the field by a user.

Description

  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/823,940, filed Aug. 30, 2006.
  • FIELD
  • The invention generally relates to beds and more particularly to bed foundations.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Beds that articulate have been widely used in hospitals and other medical facilities for many years. Some bed manufactures have adapted these beds and sold them for home use. Such beds typically allow a user to move a head portion of the bed between a lowered and raised position. In the raised position, the occupant of the bed is in a more sitting position. In some cases, the user is also allowed to move the foot of the bed between a lowered and raised position for increased comfort.
  • Such articulating beds are often designed and shipped as articulating beds from the factory, and are not typically convertible from a non-articulating to an articulating bed in the field, or from an articulating bed to a non-articulating bed. Also, the articulating structure of these beds is typically not modular in the sense that individual articulating units cannot be independently selected, purchased and installed, and adapted to only control the articulation of a portion of the bed, such as either the head portion or the foot and/or leg portion of the bed. Instead, the articulating structure of these beds is typically designed into the overall structure of the bed.
  • More generally, beds of all kinds are typically delivered to a user with certain pre-designed features. It is often difficult to add or remove functionality at a later date and in the field. What would be desirable, therefore, is bed that can be initially purchased by a user, and if an additional function is desired later, the user may simply purchase one or more drop-in units and relatively easily install them into the existing bed in the field.
  • SUMMARY
  • The following summary is provided to facilitate an understanding of some of the innovative features unique to the present invention and is not intended to be a full description. A full appreciation of the invention can be gained by taking the entire specification, claims, drawings, and abstract as a whole.
  • The present invention generally relates to beds and more particularly to bed foundations. In some instances, the present invention provides structural elements that may be employed to convert a flat bed foundation into an adjustable bed foundation using an articulation unit, or from an adjustable bed foundation to a flat bed foundation, as desired. Such an articulation unit may permit a user to raise or lower a portion of a bed, such as a head portion of a bed or a foot and/or leg portion of a bed. In some embodiments, a second articulation unit may be employed, which when used in conjunction with a first articulation unit, may permit the user to independently raise or lower both the head portion of the bed and the foot and/or leg portion of the bed, as desired. In some embodiments, the first and second articulation units may be separate modular units, but his is not required.
  • The articulation units may be modular in the sense that each articulating unit may be independently installed into an existing bed foundation in the field, and may only control the articulation of a corresponding portion of the bed, such as either the head portion or the foot and/or leg portion of the bed. This may allow, for example, an existing bed foundation that is already in the field, and that does not have an articulating capability, to be relatively easily retrofitted or converted into an articulating bed having desired characteristics. In some cases, the articulating units may be simply dropped-in to the bed foundation to provide the articulating capability. Likewise, removing the articulating unit may allow a bed with an articulating capability to be relatively easily retrofitted or converted into a non-articulating bed, if desired.
  • In some instances, an adjustable bed foundation that is segmented or modularized for easier and less costly shipping may be provided. The articulation units may be sized to permit shipping via common carriers such as U.P.S., FedEx and the like. In some instances, the remaining portions of the adjustable bed foundation may also be configured such that they can be relatively easily broken down into sections that are more easily shippable and then assembled by a user. When so provided, the entire bed foundation, including the drop in articulating unit, may be capable of being shipped relatively inexpensively via common carrier, and then assembled by the user in the field. In addition, and for those that already have an existing bed foundation in the field that does not have an articulating capability, the modular drop-in articulation unit(s) may be ordered and shipped separately, and then installed by the user to convert their existing bed foundation to an articulating bed foundation. Moreover, and in some cases, the entire bed foundation including the drop in articulating unit may be capable of being relatively easily disassembled by the user in the field. This may be useful when, for example, the bed foundation is to be moved for one reason or another.
  • More generally, it is contemplated that modular drop-in units may be provided to relatively easily retrofit or otherwise convert an existing bed foundation in the field to include one or more additional functions. In some cases, the bed foundation and/or drop-in units may be configured such that it can be easily shipped and assembled in the field by a user.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION
  • The invention may be more completely understood in consideration of the following detailed description of various embodiments of the invention in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 is a partially exploded perspective view of another illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 10 with the head, leg and foot top sections of the platform removed;
  • FIG. 12 is a partially exploded perspective view of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 10 with two “drop-in” articulation units;
  • FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the bottom of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 12 with the two “drop-in” articulation units installed;
  • FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 13 with the two “drop-in” articulation units partially articulated;
  • FIG. 15 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation having a drop-in unit in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 16 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 17 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 18 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 19 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 20 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 21 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 22 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 23 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of the drop-in unit of FIG. 22 taken along line 23-23; and
  • FIG. 24 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation of FIG. 15.
  • While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the invention.
  • DESCRIPTION
  • The following description should be read with reference to the drawings, in which like elements in different drawings are numbered in like fashion. The drawings, which are not necessarily to scale, depict selected embodiments and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention. Although examples of construction, dimensions, and materials are illustrated for the various elements, those skilled in the art will recognize that many of the examples provided have suitable alternatives that may be utilized.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 are schematic perspective views of an illustrative but non-limiting bed foundation 10. Bed foundation 10 includes a platform 12 and a frame 14. It should be recognized that bed foundation 10 may be configured to support and hold a mattress (not shown). Any suitable mattress may be placed atop bed foundation 10. Examples of suitable mattresses include coil spring mattresses, foam mattresses, water beds, air mattresses, etc. In particular instances, bed foundation 10 may be configured to support and hold an adjustable air mattress, such as the adjustable air mattresses sold by Select Comfort Corporation, located in Minneapolis, Minn.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, platform 12 includes three top sections 16, 18 and 20. In some cases, platform 12 may include only one or two sections, or may in some cases include four, five or more sections. Platform 12 may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, one or more of sections 16, 18 and/or 20 may be injection molded, blow molded or extruded of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In some instances, one or more of sections 16, 18 and/or 20 may be formed of a metal such as steel or aluminum. In other cases, one or more of sections 16, 18 and/or 20 may be formed of wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • In some instances, each of top sections 16, 18 and 20 may simply rest atop frame 14. If desired, one or more of top sections 16, 18 and 20 may be secured to frame 14 using nails, screws, snap or interference fit, or any desired attachment method or technique. In some cases, sections 16, 18 and 20 may be unsecured, relying upon gravity and the weight of the mattress (not illustrated) to hold top sections 16, 18 and 20 in place.
  • In some cases, one or more of top sections 16, 18 and 20 may include an L-shaped lip or the like that overlaps the outer top edge of frame 14. In FIG. 2, for example, section 20 can be seen to include a short edge lip 22 and a long edge lip 24. While only a single short edge lip 22 and a single long edge lip 24 are visible in this illustration, it will be recognized that section 20 may, if desired, include a second, opposing short edge lip on the non-visible side of the section 20. Section 16 may be similarly configured, although the long edge lip may be on the opposing side. Section 18, being positioned between section 16 and section 20, may include opposing short edge lips but no long edge lips.
  • In this, long and short are relative terms that refer to the illustrated embodiment. It will be recognized that bed foundation 10 may be manufactured in differing sizes to accommodate a wide variety of mattress sizes, ranging from twin, long twin, double, queen, king and California king, among others. Depending on the size of bed foundation 10 and the numbers of sections used to form platform 12, section 20 may be long and narrow, or may even be close to square.
  • In some instances, frame 14 may include a long side 26 and a short side 28. As bed foundation 10 is typically square or rectangular, it will be recognized that frame 14 may include opposing long sides 26 and/or opposing short sides 28. In many cases, each of the short sides 28 may have a rectangular shape having a height of perhaps 6 to 12 inches, a thickness of about ½ to about 2 inches, and a length of perhaps about 3 to about 7 feet. The length of each short side 28 may be determined by the size of mattress that bed foundation 10 is designed to accommodate. These dimensions are only examples.
  • In some instances, each long side 26 may be a single piece having a height of perhaps about 6 to about 12 inches, a thickness of about ½ to about 2 inches, and a length of about 6 to about 8 feet. In some cases, each long side 26 may be formed of several distinct sections that are short/small enough to be shipped relatively inexpensively, e.g. by UPS at Over-Size Package Category 2 or below. Currently, Over-Size Package Category 2 is defined as the shipped package having a length plus girth greater than 108 inches but not more than 130 inches, and having a weight of less than 70 pounds. The length corresponds to the longest side of the package shipping package, and the girth corresponds to two times the width plus two times the height of the shipping package.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, long side 26 includes sections 30, 32, and 34. Sections 30, 32 and 34 may be individual sections that can be separated for shipping and then rejoined by a homeowner or other users using dowels, pegs, screws, nuts and bolts, or any other attachment method. In some instances, individual sections and/or corners may include complementary dovetail shapes that fit together. If desired, a predrilled hole extending down through the joint may permit a homeowner, for example, to fit a peg into the joint to secure the joint.
  • While not expressly illustrated, it is contemplated that sections 30, 32 and 34 may be hingedly attached to each other. That way, long side 26 may be folded together for shipping and then simply straightened out by the homeowner. In some cases, it is contemplated that a short side 28 and a long side 26 may also be hingedly secured to each other. In some instances, it is possible that the entire frame 14 is hinged together.
  • Each of the long side(s) 26 and the short side(s) 28 may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, one or more of long side(s) 26 and the short side(s) 28 may be injection molded, blow molded or extruded of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In some instances, one or more of long side(s) 26 and the short side(s) 28 may be formed of a metal such as steel or aluminum. In some cases, one or more of long side(s) 26 and the short side(s) 28 may be formed of wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood and other engineered laminates, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • As can be seen in FIG. 2, frame 14 may, if desired, include additional support. In some cases, frame 14 may include one, two, three, four or more cross members 36 that may be attached to long sides 26 in any suitable manner. In some instances, the cross members 36 may be nailed, screwed or bolted to long sides 26. In some cases, the cross members 36 may slide into grooves provided (not illustrated) at appropriate locations along each long side 26. This may provide a benefit of ensuring that the cross members 36 are positioned appropriately. While not explicitly shown, it is contemplated that the cross members 36 may be attached to short sides 28, rather than long sides 26. It is also contemplated that various cross members 36 may be attached to short sides 28 and long sides 26, and/or between other cross members 36, if desired.
  • The cross members 36, if included, may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, the cross members 36 may be injection molded, blow molded or extruded of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In some instances, the cross members 36 may be formed of a metal such as steel or aluminum. In some cases, on the cross members 36 may be formed of wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood and other engineered laminates, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • FIGS. 3 through 9 illustrate possible modifications that can, if desired, be made to the bed foundation 10. These modifications can include adding one or two articulations units. These articulation units may be added to an existing bed foundation 10 in the field. In some cases, bed foundation 10 may be constructed to include one or more articulation units directly from the factory. It should be noted that construction details of the bed foundation, aside from elements directly discussed with respect to FIGS. 3 through 9, can be considered as the same or at least substantially the same as that discussed with respect to FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, bed foundation 10 is being prepared for insertion of an articulation unit 40. FIG. 5 illustrates articulation unit 40 disposed within bed foundation 10. In FIG. 3, platform section 20 has been removed, as well as a cross member 36. In some instances, this can be done by the homeowner in the field. In some cases, depending on the size of bed foundation 10 and the size of the articulation unit 40 to be added, it may be necessary to remove more than one platform section and/or more than one cross member 36. It can be seen that removal of section 20 and cross member 36 provides a cavity 38, defined by the long sides 26 and short sides 28, into which an articulation unit 40 may be inserted.
  • FIG. 4 includes a diagrammatic illustration of the articulation unit 40. It can be seen that articulation unit 40 may be sized to fit into cavity 38 previously discussed. Articulation unit 40 is shown as a box structure 42 having an articulating top surface 44. The “box” shape of box structure 42 is merely schematic in nature, and it is contemplated that the shape of articulating unit 40 may have any desired shape or configuration. It will be recognized that box structure 42 may represent the mechanics necessary to raise and lower top surface 44. These mechanics, such as an electric or pneumatic motor, struts, a controller, a remote control unit, and the like, are generally known and thus are not illustrated in detail herein. An electric motor, if present, may interact directly with the other mechanical elements such as, arms, struts, shafts, braces, etc., via direct gear drive, chain drive, screw drive, or other suitable methods. In some cases, some of the mechanics may be placed or extend into the cavity under platform section 18, if desired. When the articulating unit 40 includes a remote control for allowing an occupant to control the articulating unit from, for example the bed, it is contemplated that the remote control may include a memory function, whereby the user may store one or more articulated positions of the articulating unit. Subsequently, the user may press one or more buttons on the remote control to return the articulating unit to a selected stored articulated position.
  • In some cases, if desired, box structure 42 may be sized to simply sit on the floor within cavity 38. In other instances, such as in the illustrated embodiment, box structure 42 may include hooks 46 that are secured to the side of box structure 42 and that are configured to interact with frame 14 to hang the articulation unit 40 from the frame 14. Hooks 46 may be formed of any suitably strong material, including metals such as steel, plastic or any other suitable material, as desired. In some cases, frame 14 may include grooves or indentations (not shown) to accommodate a thickness of the hooks 46 so that top surface 44 may lie flush with or below the platform 12 when articulation unit 40 is in a fully down position.
  • Top surface 44 may be formed of any suitable material, such as those discussed previously with respect to platform 12. As will be understood, articulation unit 40 may include one or more arms that are driven via a motor or other motive force to move between a horizontal or substantially horizontal position corresponding to top surface 44 being aligned with platform 12 and an angled or tilted position corresponding to top surface 44 being disposed at an acute angle with respect to platform 12. In other instances, it is contemplated that articulation unit 40 may include other apparatus for raising and lowering top surface 44, such as hydraulic cylinders and the like.
  • FIG. 6 is an illustrative but non-limiting schematic perspective view of bed foundation 10 a including an articulation unit 40 a. Articulation unit 40 a includes, similar to before, a box structure 42 that schematically represents the articulation hardware, and may include hooks 46. Articulation unit 40 a also includes, as illustrated, a pair of articulating arms 48. The pair of arms 48 may be moved in any suitable manner, such as by electric motor, hydraulics, etc.
  • In some cases, top surface 44 (see FIG. 4) may be formed from platform section 20, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Platform 20 may be secured to arms 48 via attachments 50. In some instances, attachments 50 may be screws or bolts, as desired. In some cases, attachments 50 may represent rivets, adhesives or any other attachment mechanism. By utilizing platform section 20 as the top surface of articulation unit 40 a, platform section 20 may be recycled, rather than being thrown away when the articulation unit 40 a is installed. Moreover, articulation unit 40 a may have a lighter weight (absent the top surface), which may provide savings particularly in shipping expenses. Another possible advantage is that the top surface of articulation unit 40 a may visibly match sections 16 and 18 of platform 12. This may provide aesthetic advantages, particularly if part of platform 12 is visible even with a mattress disposed thereon.
  • FIGS. 7 and 8 are illustrating but non-limiting schematic perspective views of a bed foundation 100 that includes a platform 102 and a frame 104. Except as described herein, platform 102 may be essentially the same in construction, assembly and materials as platform 12. Likewise, frame 104 may be essentially the same in construction, assembly and materials as frame 14. While frame 104 is illustrated as having single piece short sides 106 and single piece long sides 108, it is considered that the short sides 106 and/or the long sides 108 may be formed of multiple sections as discussed with respect to frame 14.
  • As illustrated, platform 102 includes sections 110, 112, 114 and 116. It is contemplated that platform 102 could include fewer sections, or in some instances could include more than four sections. In some instances, section 110 and section 112 may be hingedly secured to each other. In other cases, section 110 and section 112 may be a single integral section (not illustrated).
  • As best seen in FIG. 8, bed foundation 100 may include a first articulation unit 118 that may be considered as being disposed at a foot end of bed foundation 100, and a second articulation unit 120 that may be considered as being disposed at a head end of bed foundation 100. Thus, bed foundation 100, with first and second articulation units installed, permits a user to independently raise the foot end or portion and/or the head end or portion of the bed to an articulated position.
  • For the most part, each of first articulation unit 118 and second articulation unit 120 may be constructed similarly to articulation units 40 and/or 40 a discussed above. Each of first articulation unit 118 and second articulation unit 120 may be constructed such that they may be retrofitted or “dropped into” an existing bed foundation simply by removing relevant portions of platform 102 and perhaps one or more cross members 122, if present.
  • As shown, first articulation unit 118 is shown having a box structure 142 that schematically represents the mechanics necessary to raise and lower platform sections 110 and 112. These mechanics, such as an electric motor, a controller and the like, are generally known and thus are not illustrated in detail herein. It will be recognized that platform sections 110 and 112 may represent original platform sections that have been recycled by attaching them to arms or a plate (not visible) of first articulation unit 118. In some cases, platform sections 110 and 112 may represent new top surfaces that are sold and shipped with first articulation unit 118.
  • Likewise, second articulation unit 120 is shown having a box structure 145 that schematically represents the mechanics necessary to raise and lower platform section 116. These mechanics, such as an electric motor, a controller and the like, are generally known and thus are not illustrated in detail herein. It will be recognized that platform section 116 may represent an original platform section that has been recycled by attaching it to arms or a plate (not visible) of second articulation unit 120. In some cases, platform section 116 may represent a new top surface that is sold and shipped with second articulation unit 120.
  • FIG. 9 is an illustrative but non-limiting schematic perspective view of a bed foundation 200 that includes a platform 202 and a frame 204. Except as described herein, platform 202 may be essentially the same in construction, assembly and materials as platform 12. Likewise, frame 204 may be essentially the same in construction, assembly and materials as frame 14. While frame 204 is illustrated as having single piece short sides 206 and single piece long sides 208, it is considered that the short sides 206 and/or the long sides 208 may be formed of multiple sections as discussed with respect to frame 14.
  • In some instances, platform 202 may include a first section 210 and a second section 212 that may fit onto frame 204 in a manner similar to that discussed with respect to platform 12. In the illustrative embodiment, an articulation unit 240 can be “dropped into” cavity 238, which is defined by frame 204, in a manner similar to that discussed previously. The illustrative articulation unit 240 includes a box structure 242 that schematically represents the articulation mechanism. In some cases, the box structure 242 may include hooks 46 that may be adapted to hang the articulation unit 240 from the frame 204. In other cases, the box structure 242 may be secured relative to the frame 204 via one or more support elements 216, which may be near or under second section 212. The illustrative articulation unit 240 includes a top surface 244 that may be moved between a horizontal or substantially horizontal position to a position at which top surface 244 is at an acute angle with respect to platform 202.
  • Platform section 212 may include structure 214 that generically represents at least a portion of the machinery needed to raise and lower top surface 244 of articulation unit 240. In some instances, structure 214 may include one or more support elements 216, which may represent hinges, actuating bars moved by a motor or other motive force (not illustrated), or any other machinery that may be used to interact with articulation unit 240 to hold articulation unit 240 in place and/or move top surface 244.
  • In one case, support elements 216 may include mounting bars that securely attached to articulation unit 240 and help secure articulation unit 240 to frame 204. In other cases, and as further described below, support elements 216 may include hinge mounts that attached to articulation unit 240 to help secure articulation unit 240 to frame 204, yet allow the articulation unit 240 to articulate relative to the frame 204. It is contemplated that structure 214 may include one or more actuators that extend between a motor, which in some cases may be located in second section 212, and mechanics within articulation unit 240.
  • It is contemplated that an existing flat bed foundation may be retrofitted into an adjustable or articulating bed foundation by removing relevant portions of platform 202 and/or frame 204, and installing in platform section 212 some or all of the machinery discussed above, and “dropping in” an articulation unit 240 and securing corresponding elements of the articulation unit 240 to corresponding elements of structure 214. In some cases, it is contemplated that a bed foundation may be sold already including at least some of the elements of structure 214 in section 212, but this is not required or even desired in some embodiments. If at some point in the future a user wishes to convert their bed into an adjustable bed, they may only need to purchase and install the articulation unit 240, and possible some of the elements of structure 214. By including some of the mechanics within section 212, the articulation unit 240 may be produced less expensively and may have a lower shipping cost and/or weight, but this is not required.
  • FIG. 10 is a partially exploded perspective view of another illustrative but non-limiting example of a bed foundation 300 in accordance with the present invention. The illustrative bed foundation 300 includes a platform 302 and a bed frame 304. As in FIG. 1, it should be recognized that bed foundation 300 may be configured to support and hold a mattress (not shown). Any suitable mattress may be placed atop bed foundation 300. Examples of suitable mattresses include coil spring mattresses, foam mattresses, water beds, air mattresses, etc. In particular instances, bed foundation 300 may be configured to support and hold an adjustable air mattress, such as the adjustable air mattresses sold by Select Comfort Corporation, located in Minneapolis, Minn.
  • In the illustrated embodiment of FIG. 10, platform 302 includes four sections 306, 308, 310 and 312. Section 306 may be referred to as the head section, section 308 maybe referred to as the center section, section 310 may be referred to as the leg section, and section 312 may be considered the foot section. In some cases, platform 302 may include only one or two sections, or may in some cases include four, five or more sections, depending on the application.
  • It is contemplated that platform 302 may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, one or more of the sections 306, 308, 310 and/or 312 may include an injection molded, blow molded or extruded portion of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In other instances, one or more of sections 306, 308, 310 and/or 312 may include a metal such as steel or aluminum. In other cases, one or more of sections 306, 308, 310 and/or 312 may include wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • In some instances, each of sections 306, 308, 310 and 312 may include a relatively planar member that simply rest atop frame 304. If desired, one or more of sections 306, 308, 310 and 312 may be secured to frame 304 using nails, screws, snap or an interference fit, or any other desired attachment method or technique. In some cases, sections 306, 308, 310 and 312 may be unsecured, relying upon gravity and the weight of the mattress (not illustrated) to hold sections 306, 308, 310 and 312 in place relatively to frame 304.
  • In some cases, one or more of sections 306, 308, 310 and 312 may include an L-shaped lip (as discussed above), a bracket, or some other structure that is adapted to overlap the outer top edge of frame 304. In FIG. 10, for example, center section 308 can be seen to include a number of brackets 314 that extend over the top edge of frame 304. Similar brackets may be provided on the opposing side of center section 308, if desired. It is contemplated that such brackets 314 may serve to hold the center section 308 in place relative to the frame 304, and also provide support and rigidity to the frame 304. While the use of brackets 314 is shown in FIG. 10 for the center section 308, it is contemplated that the center section 308 may be secured relative to the frame 304 in any suitable manner, including through the use of bolts, screws, pins, adhesives, and/or any other suitable attachment mechanism.
  • In some instances, frame 304 may include a long side 320 and a short side 322. As a bed foundation 304 is typically square or rectangular, it will be recognized that frame 304 may include opposing long sides 320 and/or opposing short sides 322. In many cases, each of the short sides 322 may have a rectangular shape having a height of perhaps 6 to 12 inches, a thickness of about ½ to about 2 inches, and a length of perhaps about 3 to about 7 feet. The length of each short side 322 may be determined by the size of mattress that bed foundation 304 is designed to accommodate. These dimensions are only examples.
  • In some instances, each long side 320 may be a single piece having a height of perhaps about 6 to about 12 inches, a thickness of about ½ to about 2 inches, and a length of about 6 to about 8 feet. In some cases, each long side 320 may be formed of several distinct sections that are short/small enough to be shipped relatively inexpensively, e.g. by UPS at Over-Size Package Category 2 or below. Currently, Over-Size Package Category 2 is defined as the shipped package having a length plus girth greater than 108 inches but not more than 130 inches, and having a weight of less than 70 pounds. The length corresponds to the longest side of the package shipping package, and the girth corresponds to two times the width plus two times the height of the shipping package.
  • In the illustrated embodiment of FIG. 10, long sides 320 include two sections 320 a and 320 b. Sections 320 a and 320 b may be individual sections that can be separated for shipping and then rejoined by a homeowner or other user using dowels, pegs, screws, nuts and bolts, or any other attachment mechanism. In FIG. 10, sections 320 a and 320 b are jointed at a joint 326 via complementary dovetail shapes that fit together. If desired, a predrilled hole extending down through the joint may permit a homeowner, for example, to fit a peg into the joint to secure the joint. Corner pieces, such as corner pieces 328, may be used to secure the long sides 320 to the short sides 322, as shown.
  • While not expressly illustrated, it is contemplated that sections 320 a and 320 b may be hingedly attached to each other. When so provided, long sides 320 may be folded together for shipping and then simply straightened out by the homeowner. In some cases, it is contemplated that the short sides 322 and the long sides 320 may also be hingedly secured to each other. In some instances, it is possible that the entire frame 14 is hinged together.
  • Each of the long side(s) 320 and the short side(s) 322 may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, one or more of long side(s) 320 and the short side(s) 322 are injection molded, blow molded or extruded of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In some instances, one or more of long side(s) 320 and short side(s) 322 may be formed of a metal such as steel or aluminum. In other cases, one or more of long side(s) 320 and the short side(s) 322 may be formed of wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood and other engineered laminates, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • Frame 304 may, if desired, include additional support. In some cases, and as shown in FIG. 10, frame 304 may include one, two, three, four or more cross members that may be attached between the short sides 322 and the center section 308. In FIG. 10, a first cross member 330 a is secured between the center section 308 and one of the short sides 322, and a second cross member 330 b is secured between the center section 308 and the opposing short side 322. The cross members 330 a and 330 b may provide additional structural support to the frame 304. In some instances, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be nailed, screwed or bolted to the corresponding short sides 322. Alternatively, or in addition, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be slid into grooves provided (not illustrated) at appropriate locations along each of the corresponding short sides 322. This may provide a benefit of ensuring that the cross members 36 are positioned appropriately. In some cases, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may include hooks that extend over the top of the corresponding short sides 322. As best show in FIG. 13, the other ends of the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be secured to one or more brackets 350 a and 350 b of center section 308.
  • The cross members 330 a and 330 b, if included, may be formed of any suitable material. In some cases, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be injection molded, blow molded or extruded of a lightweight but relatively strong polymer. In other instances, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be formed of a metal such as steel or aluminum. In yet other cases, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may be formed of wood. Examples of suitable wood products include plywood and other engineered laminates, oriented strand board (sometimes referred to as OSB) and particle board.
  • In FIG. 10, the head section 306, leg section 310 and foot section 312 of the platform 302 are shown elevated above the frame 304 for illustrative purposes only. During actual use, the head section 306, the leg section 310 and the foot section 312 are supported by the frame 304 to provide a stable non-articulating bed foundation for a mattress.
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 10 with the head section 306, leg section 310 and foot section 312 of the platform 302 removed completely. As can be seen, the long sides 320 and the short sides 322 of the frame 304 define a cavity 338. The cavity 338 may be adapted to accommodate one or more “drop in” articulation units, as further described below.
  • As can best be seen in FIG. 11 and FIG. 13, the center section 308 may include a support frame 340 that extends between the short sides 322 of the frame 304. In the illustrative embodiment, and support frame 340 of the center section 308 may include one or more hinge brackets. For example, three spaced hinge brackets 342 a-342 c are shown facing the foot end of the bed. Likewise, three spaced hinge brackets 344 a-344 c are shown facing the head end of the bed. Hinge brackets 342 a-342 c and 344 a-344 c may be included and sold along with non-articulating bed units. The hinge brackets 342 a-342 c and 344 a-344 c may serve no functional purpose unless or until a corresponding “drop in” articulation unit is subsequently obtained and installed in the field, as further described below.
  • As best shown in FIG. 13, the center section 308 may also include one or more brackets, such as brackets 350 a and 350 b. The cross members 330 a and 330 b may be coupled to brackets 350 a and 350 b of center section 308. In some instances, the brackets 350 a and 350 b may be positioned such that the cross members 330 a and 330 b are located within the cavity 338 sufficiently far below the top of the frame 304 so that an articulation unit can be placed above. When so provided, the cross members 330 a and 330 b may remain in place after one or more articulation units installed, and still provide structural support to the frame 304.
  • FIG. 12 is a partially exploded perspective view of the illustrative bed foundation of FIG. 10 with two “drop-in” articulation units. While two “drop in” articulation unit are shown in FIG. 12, it is contemplated that only one of the “drop in” articulation units may be provided and used in the field, depending on the desires of the user.
  • To convert the non-articulating bed foundation 300 of FIG. 10 into an articulating bed foundation, it is contemplated that the one or more “drop in” articulation units may be provided. In one illustrative embodiment, the “drop in” articulation units may be of a size and/or weight that can be shipped relatively inexpensively, e.g. by UPS at Over-Size Package Category 2 or below. As such, a bed foundation, such as that shown in FIG. 10, may be initially purchased by a user, and then if an articulation function is desired later, the user may simply purchase the one or more articulation units and install them into the existing bed foundation in the field. In some cases, the one or more articulation units may be shipped to the user relatively inexpensively, e.g. by UPS at Over-Size Package Category 2 or below, and may be relatively easy to install such that a user can create an articulating bed foundation from a non-articulating bed foundation.
  • In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 12, the head section 306 of the bed of FIG. 10 may be removed and lifted from the frame 304. Next a first articulation unit 360, which may be ordered and shipped to the user, may be installed in the cavity 338 of the non-articulating bed foundation. In the illustrative embodiment, the first articulation unit 360 includes a support frame 362. The support frame 362 may include a support structure that is capable of supporting the original head section 306 during articulation. That is, in the illustrative embodiment, the original head section 306 is reused and secured to the support structure of the support frame 362 of the articulation unit 360 using screws, bolts, adhesives or any other suitable attachment mechanism.
  • The support frame 362 of the first articulation unit 360 may also include one or more spaced hinge brackets 364 a-364 c that are in registration with and that can be hingedly attached to the spaced hinge brackets 344 a-344 c of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. In one illustrative embodiment, each of the spaced hinge brackets 364 a-364 c may simply include a hole passing though a tubular bar of the support frame 362. The tubular bars of the support frame 362 may then be received by U-shaped hinge brackets 344 a-344 c of the center section 308. Each of the U-shaped hinge brackets 344 a-344 c may have corresponding holes in the U-arms of the U-shaped hinge brackets 344 a-344c. A pin or the like may be provided though the holes in the U-arms of each U-shaped hinge bracket 344 a-344 c and through the hole passing though the corresponding tubular bar of the support frame 362 to form a hinged connection therebetween.
  • As shown, the support frame 362 of the first articulation unit 360 may also include a lever arm 370 for connection to a first end of a motor assembly 372. The motor assembly 372 may be part of the first articulation unit 360. As best shown in FIG. 13, the other end of the motor assembly 372 may be attached to a motor mount 352 b on the opposing side of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. The motor assembly 372, when activated, may provide a motive force to lever arm 370, which may cause the support frame 362 of the first articulation unit 360 to rotate about the hinge formed by the hinge brackets 364 a-364 c of the support frame of the first articulation unit 360 and the brackets 344 a-344 c of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. FIG. 14 shows the bed foundation after the first articulation unit 360 has been actuated to a partially elevated position. By reversing the motor assembly 372, the first articulation unit 360 may lower the head section 306 of the bed foundation to a flat or substantially flat position.
  • In some cases, it may be desirable to provide articulation to the leg section 310 and foot section 312 of the bed foundation. In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 12, the leg section 310 and the foot section 312 of the bed of FIG. 10 may be removed and lifted from the frame 304. Next a second articulation unit 390, which may be ordered and shipped to the user, may be installed in the cavity 338 of the bed foundation. In the illustrative embodiment, the second articulation unit 390 includes a support frame 392. The support frame 392 may include a support structure that is capable of supporting the original leg section 310 and foot sections 312 during articulation. That is, in the illustrative embodiment, the original leg section 310 and the original foot section 312 are reused and secured to the support structure of the support frame 392 of the second articulation unit 390 using screws, bolts, adhesives or any other suitable attachment mechanism.
  • The support frame 392 of the second articulation unit 390 may also include one or more spaced hinge brackets 394 a-394 c that are in registration with and that can be hingedly attached to the spaced hinge brackets 342 a-342 c of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. In one illustrative embodiment, each of the spaced hinge brackets 394 a-394 c may simply include a hole passing though a tubular bar of the support frame 392. The tubular bars of the support frame 392 may then be received by U-shaped hinge brackets 342 a-342 c of the center section 308. Each of the U-shaped hinge brackets 342 a-342 c may have corresponding holes in the U-arms of the U-shaped hinge brackets 342 a-342 c. A pin or the like may be provided though the holes in the U-arms of each U-shaped hinge bracket 342 a-342 c and through the hole passing though the corresponding tubular bar of the support frame 392 to form a hinged connection therebetween.
  • As shown, the support frame 392 of the first articulation unit 360 may also include a lever arm 400 for connection to a first end of another motor assembly 402. The motor assembly 402 may be part of the second articulation unit 390. As best shown in FIG. 13, the other end of the motor assembly 402 may be attached to a motor mount 352a on the opposing side of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. The motor assembly 402, when activated, may provide a motive force to lever arm 400, which may cause the support frame 392 of the second articulation unit 390 to rotate about the hinge formed by the hinge brackets 394 a-394 c of the support frame of the second articulation unit 360 and the brackets 342 a-342 c of the support frame 340 of the center section 308. FIG. 14 shows the bed foundation after the second articulation unit 390 has been actuated to a partially elevated position. By reversing the motor assembly 402, the second articulation unit 390 may lower the leg section 310 and foot section 312 of the bed foundation to a flat or substantially flat position.
  • As can be seen, the articulation units 360 and 390 may be modular in the sense that each articulating unit may be independently installed into an existing bed foundation in the field, and may only control the articulation of a corresponding portion of the bed, such as either the head portion or the foot and/or leg portion of the bed. This may allow, for example, an existing bed foundation that is already in the field, and that does not have an articulating capability, to be relatively easily retrofitted or converted into an articulating bed having desired characteristics. In some cases, the articulating units 360 and 390 may simply be dropped-in to the bed foundation to provide the desired articulating capability.
  • It is contemplated that one or more other functions may be added to a bed foundation that are in addition to, or in place of, the articulation capability discussed above. In some cases, this may allow, for example, an existing bed foundation that is already in the field, and that does not have one or more desired functions, to be relatively easily retrofitted or converted into a bed foundation that does provide the desired functions. Like the drop-in articulating units discussed above, these one or more other functions may, in some cases, be provided by a drop-in unit that may be separately selected, ordered and then dropped into an existing bed foundation.
  • FIG. 15 is a schematic perspective view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 that may add one or more desired functions to an existing bed foundation 402. The bed foundation 402 shown in FIG. 15 is similar to that shown and described with respect to FIG. 4 above. As seen in FIGS. 15, bed foundation 402 is first prepared for insertion of the drop-in unit 400, and then the drop-in unit 400 is dropped into at least part of the void or cavity 404 formed by the side walls of the bed foundation 402. In some instances, this can be done by the homeowner in the field. In some cases, and depending on the size of bed foundation 402 and the size of the drop-in unit 400 to be added, it may be necessary to remove more than one platform section and/or one or more cross members, as described above.
  • The drop-in unit 400 may provide one or more desired functions that the existing bed foundation 402 currently does not yet provide. For example, the drop-in unit 400 may provide one or more of articulation (as described above), heating, cooling, massage, magnetic therapy, adjustable lumbar support, sound, light, aromatherapy, air purifier/filtration, fold-out tray/table capability, on-board bed controls, on board TV and other controls, TV-A/V-phone connections and/or mounts, air pump holder for air beds, storage, as well as any other suitable function or functions, as desired.
  • In some cases, if desired, drop-in unit 400 may be sized to simply sit on the floor within cavity 404. In other instances, such as in the illustrated embodiment shown in FIG. 15, drop-in unit 400 may include hooks 406 or the like that are configured to interact with the side walls of the bed foundation 402 to hang the drop-in unit 400 from the side walls of the bed foundation 402. The illustrative hooks 46 may be formed of any suitably strong material, including metals such as steel, plastic or any other suitable material, as desired. In some cases, the side walls of the bed foundation 402 may include grooves or indentations (not shown) to accommodate a thickness of the hooks 406 so that a top surface 408 may lie flush with, above, or below the top of the side walls of the bed foundation 402 as desired. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 may include a laterally extending portion that extend laterally out past the side walls of the bed foundation 402, and may sit in a recess formed in the top side of the side walls of the bed foundation 402. More generally, it is contemplated that the drop-in unit 400 may be secured to the bed foundation 402 in any suitable manner, including screws, bolts, adhesives or any other suitable connector.
  • FIG. 16 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 a, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. In FIG. 16, the drop-in unit 400 a includes a top surface 410 that is adapted to support a mattress. A number of sensors 412, indicated by a “+” sign may be provided. The sensors 412 may be any type of sensors including, for example, pressure sensors, strain sensors, temperature sensors, vibration sensors, sound sensors, humidity sensors, gas and/or particulate matter sensors, or any other suitable sensor for sensing any suitable parameter(s). It is contemplated that the sensors 412 may all be of a single sensor type, or may include multiple sensor types, depending on the application. Although not explicitly shown n FIG. 16, it is contemplated that one or more of the sensor(s) 412 may be positioned to sense ambient conditions at or near the bed foundation 402, rather than conditions under the mattress. Example ambient conditions may include, for example, temperature, humidity, sound, gas and/or particulate matter concentrations, and/or any other suitable condition or parameter, as desired.
  • A controller 414 may be coupled to and receive signals from the sensors 412. Using the outputs from the sensors, the controller 414 may detect, for example, if an occupant of the bed is uncomfortable. For example, if pressure or strain sensors are provided under the mattress, movement of the occupant may be detected by noting changes in pressure or strain over time, which can correspond to movement and thus discomfort of the occupant in the bed. Once detected, the controller 414 may take corrective action, such as activate or make adjustments to one or more functions of the bed foundation (e.g. articulate, massage, vibration, alarm, and/or any other function, some or all of which might be provided by the drop-in unit 400 a), and/or the mattress (e.g. change the air pressure in an air mattress), as desired.
  • In another example, sound sensors may detect noise, which through signal processing via controller 414, may detect movement and thus discomfort of the occupant in the bed. In some cases, it is contemplated that signal processing techniques may be used to detect different noises and classify them into different categories. Such signal processing techniques are known. One illustrative signal processing technique is shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,956,463 to Patrick et al. In one example, the controller 414 may use such signal processing techniques to classify detected noises among, for example, an occupant discomfort category, an occupant snoring category, an occupant sleep apnea event category, and/or any other desired category or categories as desired. Depending on the identified category or categories, the controller 414 may take appropriate corrective action, such as activating or making adjustments to certain functions of the bed foundation (e.g. articulate, massage, vibration, alarm, and/or any other function, some or all of which might be provided by the drop-in unit 400 a) and/or the mattress (e.g. change the air pressure in an air mattress), as desired. In some cases, the controller 414 may record the detected event(s), and report the event(s) to the user of the bed at a later time.
  • In yet another example, the sensors 412 may include one or more temperature sensors. When so provided, the controller 414 may be programmed to function as a thermostat, and may active a heating and/or cooling feature. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 a may include a heating and/or cooling pad, which when activated, may heat and/or cool the mattress and thus the occupant of the bed. In some cases, the occupant of the bed may provide a desired temperature set point to the controller 414 to control the temperature of the bed.
  • In yet another example, a gas sensor may sense the concentration of a gas (e.g. CO2) in or around the bed. If the gas concentration exceeds some threshold, the controller 414 may be programmed to activate a fan, a ventilation system of the occupant's house, or turn on an air purifier or the like. The above examples are only illustrative of the types of conditions that can be detected by the sensors 412, and some illustrative corrective actions that may be taken by the controller 414.
  • FIG. 17 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 b, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. The drop-in unit 400 b includes a number of massage elements 420. In some cases, the massage elements 420 may vibrate or otherwise move to provide a massage sensation to the occupant of the bed. A controller 422 may be used to control the massage elements.
  • In some cases, the massage elements 420 may be constructed to provide a “shiatsu-type” massage. In such cases, some or all of the massage elements 420 may be formed as balls, fingers, and/or any other suitable structure to help produce the massage sensation. In some cases, each of the massage elements 420 may be moved in a pattern by a motor or the like to produce the overall massage sensation. Alternatively, or in addition, one or more of the massage elements 420 may produce an acoustical wave of a certain frequency or frequency pattern over time to produce an acoustical massage, if desired.
  • In some cases, and rather than providing massage elements 420 or in addition to providing massage elements, a number of magnets may be provided. In some cases, the magnets may be permanent magnets, and may be positioned to provide a desired magnet therapy to the occupant(s) of the bed. In other cases, the magnets may be electromagnets. The polarity, strength and/or frequency of the magnetic fields produced by the electromagnets may be controlled by controller 422 to provide a desired magnetic therapy.
  • FIG. 18 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 c, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. In the illustrative embodiment, the drop-in unit 400 c includes a lumbar support 430. The lumbar support may be controlled by a controller 432. In some cases, the lumbar support 430 may include, for example, a left lumbar support 430 a and a right lumbar support 430 b, both of which are adjustable. The left lumbar support 430 a may provide an adjustable lumbar support for a first occupant of the bed, and the right lumbar support 430 b may provide an adjustable lumbar support for a second occupant of the bed. Although not required, the use of lumbar support 430 may be particularly useful when the drop-in unit 400 c also includes an articulation capability. When so provided, the lumbar support 430 may provide increased comfort when, for example, the drop-in unit 400 c raises the head of the bed in an upright position for reading. This, however, is just one example.
  • FIG. 19 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400d, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. In the illustrative embodiment, the drop-in unit 400 d may include a heating and/or cooling pad 440, which when activated, may heat and/or cool the mattress and thus the occupant of the bed. The heating and/or cooling pad 440 may be controlled by a controller (not explicitly shown in FIG. 19).
  • In some cases, the controller may be programmed to function as a thermostat, and may active the heating and/or cooling pad 440. In some cases, one or more sensors may be provided to sense the temperature of the mattress and/or the temperature of the ambient air near the bed. When so provided, the occupant of the bed may provide a desired temperature set point to the controller to control the temperature of the bed via the heating and/or cooling pad 440.
  • FIG. 20 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 e, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. In this illustrative embodiment, the drop-in unit 400 e includes a pump storage module 450 to store one or more pumps, such as air pumps for air mattresses 452 a and 452 b. The air mattresses 452 a and 452 b may be supported by a top surface of the drop-in unit 400 e, as shown. The module 450 may, in some cases, include sound and/or vibration insulation to help reduce the noise and/or vibration produced by the air pumps to increase the comfort of the occupants of the bed. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 e may include integrated tubing, such as integrated tubing 454 a and 454 b, which can be used to help deliver pressurized air between the air pumps and the air mattresses 452 a and 452 b. This may help reduce and/or eliminate the length of separate tubing that is required.
  • FIG. 21 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 f, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. In this illustrative embodiment, the drop-in unit 400 f provides built-in drawers 460 a and 460 b, cabinets, and/or lock boxes that can provide the consumer with desirable storage locations for clothes, valuables, and other items within the cavity 404 formed by the side walls of the bed foundation 402. In the illustrative embodiment, the drawers 460 a and 460 b extend through the side walls of the bed foundation 402. In some cases, the existing side walls of the bed foundation 402 can include removable sections that can be removed by the user prior to installing the drop-in unit 400 f to accommodate the drawers 460 a and 460 b. In other cases, new side walls may be provide along with the drop-in unit 400 f that include openings to receive the drawers 460 a and 460 b.
  • FIG. 22 is a schematic top view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 g, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. The illustrative drop-in unit 400 g is used to show a variety of functions that may be added to a bed foundation. As shown in FIG. 22, the drop-in unit 400 g may include one or more speakers 470 a and 470 b. The speakers 470 a and 470 b may be used to play music or other audio, sound an alarm, create white noise to counter or drown out background noise, and/or produce any other suitable sound, as desired.
  • The drop-in unit 400 g may include a number of features generally shown at 472 a and 472 b. These may include, for example, an integrated MP3 docking station to receive an MP3 player, connections or mounts for a TV, a phone, other AN connections, and/or one or more remote controls, etc., as desired. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 g may include hardwired remote controls to give a more streamlined look to the bed.
  • In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 g may provide air purification and/or air filtration. One of the features 472 a and 472 b may include an air inlet and an air outlet for an air purification and/or air filtration system that may be incorporated into the drop-in unit 400 g. In one illustrative embodiment, cleaned air may be provided from an air outlet 472 a along the left side of the bed, and dirty air may be drawn into an air inlet 472 b along the right side of the bed, creating a pressure differential cross the top of the bed. This pressure differential may help create an envelope of pure, pollutant-free air around the occupant of the bed.
  • In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 g may provide aromatherapy. One or more of the features 472 a and 472 b may provide a discharge of an aroma into the room that is pleasing to the occupant of the bed. A controller (not shown) may be used to allow, for example, continuous or manual control of the aromatherapy.
  • FIG. 23 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of the drop-in unit of FIG. 22 taken along line 23-23. As can be seen in FIG. 23, the drop-in unit 400 g may include lights, such as under bed lights 476 a and 476 b. Under bed lighting may provide safer movement around the bed at night, or may provide mood lighting to enhance the bedroom environment. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 g may also include a motion sensor to detect when an occupant of the bed gets out of bed at night, and in response, a controller may turn on the under bed lights 476 a and 476 b, if desired.
  • While lights 476 a and 476 b provide under bed lighting, it is contemplated that the drop-in unit 400 g may provide other lighting. For example, the drop-in unit 400 g may include one or more retractable or directional light sources that can be used for reading. In some cases, the drop-in unit 400 g may interface with the lighting controls for the bed room. This may allow the occupant and/or a controller of the drop-in unit 400 g to turn the lights of the room on and/or off. In some cases, a controller of the drop-in unit 400 g may turn the lights in the room “on” at a programmed time in the morning to function as a “sunrise” type waking alarm.
  • In FIG. 23, part of the drop-in unit 400 g extends laterally out past the side walls of the bed foundation 22. In some cases, one or more recesses in the top of the side walls may allow that laterally extending portion of the drop-in unit 400 g to extend laterally out past the side walls of the bed foundation. Although not shown in the schematic diagram of FIG. 23, it is contemplated that the part of the drop-in unit 400 g that extends laterally out past the side walls of the bed foundation 402 may extend in an upward direction to provide easier user access to functions and/or controls provided by the drop-in unit.
  • FIG. 24 is a schematic cross-sectional side view of an illustrative but non-limiting example of a drop-in unit 400 h, which may be used in conjunction with the bed foundation 402 of FIG. 15. Drop-in unit 400 h may include a fold-out tray or table. The fold-out tray or table may provide a surface for working, reading, eating or engaging on other activities. It is contemplated that the fold-out table may swing or slide out from underneath or alongside the bed, or may swing or slide down from the head of the bed. In some cases, the fold-out table may include integrated wiring to for electrical, phone, internet, AV, lighting, etc.
  • In the illustrative embodiment of FIG. 24, the drop-in unit 400 h may include a left fold-out table 500 a and a right fold-out table 500 b. The left and right fold out tables 500 a and 500 b are shown similarly constructed, and both swing or slide out from alongside the bed foundation. As shown in FIG. 24, in the folded away position, the left fold-out table 500 a hangs down from a pivot 502 adjacent to the left side wall of the bed foundation 402, and out of the way. To use the left fold-out table 500 a, the user may simply rotate the left fold-out table 500 a in an upward direction, and then tilt the table to a horizontal direction, as shown generally at 504. In the position shown at 504, the long dimension of the table top 506 may extend into the page for a distance. The user may rotate the table top 506 in a horizontal plane, until the long dimension of the table top 506 extends across the bed, and assumes the general configuration shown for the right fold-out table 500 b. This is just one example of a drop-in unit 400 h that may be configured to provide a fold-out tray or table to the occupant of a bed. More generally, it is recognized that any suitable structure may be used to provide a drop-in unit 400 h that can provide a fold-out tray or table to the occupant of a bed.
  • In some cases, special purpose drop-in units that provide one or more of the functions described above, and/or other functions, may be provided to address certain situations, such as medical conditions. For example, a drop-in unit may be provided for addressing sleep apnea. Such a drop-in unit may include one or more sensors to detect an apnea event, and a controller that can take corrective action such as articulating the head of the bed, sounding an alarm to wake the occupant, turn on a massage feature, and/or take some other corrective action. Alternatively, or in addition, such a drop in unit may include a mask for an occupant, and a discretely placed oxygen source within a storage compartment of the drop-in unit.
  • In another example, a drop-in unit may be provided for addressing acid reflux. Such a drop-in unit may manually or automatically elevate the head of the occupant and/or perform some other corrective action. In yet another example, a drop-in unit may be provided for addressing pregnancy. Such a drop-in unit may manually or automatically elevate the head and/or foot of the bed, provide heating and/or cooling on demand or automatically, and/or perform some other corrective action.
  • In some cases, a drop-in unit may be provided that includes a formed top surface, rather than a simple flat surface. Such a formed top surface may provide additional comfort and benefit to the occupant(s) of the bed. The formed top surface may include, for example, an elevated or depressed portion at a location that corresponds to the pillow location on the bed. In another example, an integrated lumbar support may be provided in the formed top surface. It is contemplated that the formed top surface may have any desired topology, and in some cases, may be customized or fit to the body of a particular occupant, if desired.
  • In some cases, a drop-in unit may include a lifting or other capability. While an articulating head portion of the bed may help some individuals get out of bed, other degrees or motion may be added to allow for elderly or handicapped individuals to more easily get in/out of the bed. For example, a drop-in unit may be provided that articulates the head area about a rotational axis, but also moves the head area of the bed in an up and down direction. In another example, a drop-in unit may be provided that moves the hip area of the bed up and down. In some cases, a drop-in unit may provide a railing on the side of the bed foundation for additional assistance and support.
  • It is contemplated that any number of functions can be selected and incorporated into a drop-in unit. In some cases, the drop-in unit may be shipped to a user in the field, and installed by the user. Such drop-in units may allow an existing bed foundation that is already in the field, to be relatively easily retrofitted or converted into bed that has the selected function(s) of the drop-in unit.
  • The invention should not be considered limited to the particular examples described above, but rather should be understood to cover all aspects of the invention as set out in the attached claims. Various modifications, equivalent processes, as well as numerous structures to which the invention can be applicable will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art upon review of the instant specification.

Claims (25)

1. A method of converting a flat bed foundation located at a customer site, wherein the bed foundation includes side walls that define a cavity, the side walls supporting a platform, and the platform adapted to support a bed mattress, the method comprising:
removing a portion of the platform; and
installing an articulation unit that is adapted to articulate only a portion of the bed mattress, the articulation unit extending into at least part of the cavity.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the removing step includes removing only a portion of the platform.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising a step of having the articulation unit shipped to the customer site.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising attaching at least part of the removed platform portion to the articulation unit to form a top surface of the articulation unit.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein the portion of the platform that is removed corresponds to a head portion of the platform.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein the portion of the platform that is removed corresponds to a foot and/or leg portion of the platform.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein the articulation unit is a self-contained articulation unit.
8. A bed foundation having at least a head section and a foot section, comprising:
a frame having one or more side walls that define a cavity therebetween;
a platform supported by the frame, the platform having at least a head section and a foot section; and
a drop-in articulation unit that is configured to be dropped into at least part of the cavity defined by the side walls, and once installed, capable of articulating only one of the head section or foot section of the bed foundation.
9. The bed foundation of claim 8 wherein the head section of the platform is secured to the drop-in articulation unit, wherein the drop-in articulation unit causes the head section of the platform to be moveable between a horizontal position and an angled position.
10. The bed foundation of claim 8 wherein the foot section of the platform is secured to the drop-in articulation unit, wherein the drop-in articulation unit causes the foot section of the platform to be moveable between a horizontal position and an angled position.
11. The bed foundation of claim 8 wherein the drop-in articulation unit includes one or more support members that secure the drop-in articulation unit relative to the frame.
12. The bed foundation of claim 11 wherein the one or more supports include one or more hooks that extend over one or more of the side walls of the frame.
13. The bed foundation of claim 8 further comprising one or more cross-members that extend between opposing side walls of the frame, and wherein the drop-in articulation unit includes a motor that is coupled to one or more of the cross-members.
14. The bed foundation of claim 8 further comprising one or more cross-members that extend between opposing side walls of the frame, and wherein the drop-in articulation unit is hinged relative to one or more of the cross-members.
15. A bed foundation comprising:
a frame;
a platform supported by the frame; and
an articulation unit for articulating only a portion of the platform, the articulation unit having the one or more supports that hang the articulation unit from the frame.
16. The bed foundation of claim 15, wherein the frame comprises one or more sections that are sized for shipping by UPS at OS2 or below.
17. The bed foundation of claim 15, wherein the one or more supports of the articulation unit comprise one or more hooks that interact with the frame to hang the articulation unit from the frame.
18. The bed foundation of claim 17, wherein the frame comprises indentations to accommodate the hooks.
19. The bed foundation of claim 17, wherein at least one of the platform sections comprises indentations to accommodate the hooks.
20. A method of converting an existing bed foundation located at a customer site, wherein the bed foundation includes side walls that define a cavity, the side walls supporting a platform, and the platform adapted to support a bed mattress, the method comprising:
removing a portion of the platform; and
installing a drop-in unit that is adapted to add at least one function to the bed foundation, the drop-in unit extending into at least part of the cavity.
21. The method of claim 20 wherein the at least one function includes one or more of articulation, temperature control, massage, lumbar support, lighting, aromatherapy, air filtration, sound, storage, and magnetic therapy.
22. The method of claim 20 wherein the drop-in unit includes one or more sensors with sensor outputs and a controller, wherein the controller is configured to detect the presence of one or more conditions based on the sensor outputs, and in response, take a corrective action.
23. The method of claim 22 wherein the corrective action includes articulating the bed.
24. The method of claim 22 wherein the corrective action includes activating a heating or cooling element of the bed.
25. A method of converting an existing bed foundation located at a customer site, the platform adapted to support a bed mattress, the method comprising:
removing a portion of the platform; and
installing a drop-in unit that is adapted to add at least one function to the bed foundation, wherein the at least one function includes one or more of lighting, aromatherapy, air filtration, sound, and storage.
US11/845,751 2006-08-30 2007-08-27 Bed foundation with drop-in unit Abandoned US20080052830A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US82394006P true 2006-08-30 2006-08-30
US11/845,751 US20080052830A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2007-08-27 Bed foundation with drop-in unit

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/845,751 US20080052830A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2007-08-27 Bed foundation with drop-in unit
CA 2662207 CA2662207A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2007-08-28 Bed foundation with drop-in unit
PCT/US2007/077016 WO2008027906A2 (en) 2006-08-30 2007-08-28 Bed foundation with drop-in unit

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080052830A1 true US20080052830A1 (en) 2008-03-06

Family

ID=39027515

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/845,751 Abandoned US20080052830A1 (en) 2006-08-30 2007-08-27 Bed foundation with drop-in unit

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20080052830A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2662207A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2008027906A2 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080104761A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20090121660A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-05-14 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Controlling adjustable bed features with a hand-held remote control
US20090139029A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-06-04 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Adjustable bed frame
WO2010081023A2 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-07-15 Ashley Furnitures Industries, Inc. Mattress foundation and kit for same
US8909357B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2014-12-09 Martin B Rawls-Meehan System for tandem bed communication
US8926535B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2015-01-06 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed position control
US20170135491A1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2017-05-18 Floyd Design, LLC Bed frame assembly
US10064784B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2018-09-04 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System and method of an adjustable bed with a vibration motor
US10226132B2 (en) * 2013-09-20 2019-03-12 Integrated Furniture Technologies Limited Adjustable bed

Citations (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US195850A (en) * 1877-10-02 Improvement in mattresses
US2666216A (en) * 1949-12-09 1954-01-19 Irvine K Schnaitter Inclined bed rest
USRE26411E (en) * 1968-06-25 Tilting accessohy for standard bed and tilting hollywood bed frame
US3593350A (en) * 1969-03-13 1971-07-20 Dominion Metalware Ind Ltd The Retractable bed
US3644946A (en) * 1970-05-15 1972-02-29 Acme Spring Co Adjustable bed
US3781928A (en) * 1971-04-05 1974-01-01 Erik Pettersson Device for raising the head end and/or foot end of a bed
US3898702A (en) * 1974-06-03 1975-08-12 Rca Corp Adjustable bed
US3931653A (en) * 1974-09-30 1976-01-13 Bien Jack M Power operated back rest
US4188677A (en) * 1977-11-30 1980-02-19 Zur Henry C Lounger bed and adjustable body supporting assembly
US4227269A (en) * 1978-09-01 1980-10-14 Burke, Inc. Adjustable bed
US4242767A (en) * 1978-08-30 1981-01-06 Mcmullen Susan L Play pillows
US4258445A (en) * 1976-07-15 1981-03-31 Zur Henry C Beds and adjustable body supporting assemblies
US4271547A (en) * 1979-10-18 1981-06-09 Aldo Grossutti Mattress and boxspring extender
US4376316A (en) * 1980-12-31 1983-03-15 Joerns Furniture Company Hinge for adjustable beds and the like
US4381571A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-05-03 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed
US4385410A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-05-31 Maxwell Products, Inc. Articulated adjustable bed having a single motor drive
US4407030A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-10-04 Maxwell Products, Inc. Safety device for an adjustable bed
US4853990A (en) * 1986-12-29 1989-08-08 Mechanical Backrest, Inc. Mechanical backlift
US4910816A (en) * 1988-05-31 1990-03-27 Jvj Enterprises, Inc. Adjustable bed table
US4982466A (en) * 1988-10-12 1991-01-08 Leggett & Platt, Incorporated Body support system
US5062169A (en) * 1990-03-09 1991-11-05 Leggett & Platt, Incorporated Clinical bed
US5063623A (en) * 1990-10-15 1991-11-12 Bathrick Leeland M Power module for an ariculated bed
US5129115A (en) * 1988-10-12 1992-07-14 L&P Property Management Company Method of prefilling and supporting person on fluid filled body support system
US5165129A (en) * 1991-02-26 1992-11-24 Niagara Corporation Adjustable bed frame with inclined guide and drive elements
US5235258A (en) * 1991-03-27 1993-08-10 Santino Antinori Remotely controlled articulated bed
US5245718A (en) * 1992-10-09 1993-09-21 Joerns Healthcare, Inc. Adjustable bed with single actuator
US5404604A (en) * 1991-06-14 1995-04-11 Koninklijke Auping B.V. Adjusting device for a bed or chair
US5425150A (en) * 1993-06-17 1995-06-20 Palmer, Jr.; John M. Articulating device for a flat bed
US5537701A (en) * 1994-03-15 1996-07-23 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed
US5544376A (en) * 1994-01-31 1996-08-13 Maxwell Products, Inc. Articulated bed with customizable remote control
US5568661A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-10-29 C.E.B. Enterprises, Inc. Articulated bed with frame mounted power module
US5579550A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-12-03 C.E.B. Enterprises, Inc. Articulated bed with collapsible frame
US5640730A (en) * 1995-05-11 1997-06-24 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed with tiltable head portion
US5706536A (en) * 1995-12-14 1998-01-13 Joerns Healthcare Inc. Latch mechanism for articulated beds and the like
US5765246A (en) * 1995-09-19 1998-06-16 Select Comfort Corporation Inflatable mattress with improved border support wall
US5787528A (en) * 1995-10-04 1998-08-04 Antinori; Santino Method and apparatus for providing bed recall functions
US5829075A (en) * 1996-12-13 1998-11-03 Ark-Ell Springs, Incorporated Adjustable foundation for use with a bed frame
US5829077A (en) * 1994-10-25 1998-11-03 Neige; Jean-Francois Device for tilting the top end and/or bottom end of a bed
US5848450A (en) * 1996-03-05 1998-12-15 L&P Property Management Company Air bed control
US5978992A (en) * 1995-02-13 1999-11-09 Antinori; Santino Mattress retention bracket for adjustable beds
US6000077A (en) * 1998-07-14 1999-12-14 Cyr; David R. Single motor fully adjustable bed
US6055689A (en) * 1997-04-07 2000-05-02 Cavazos; Frank G. Modular mattress and innerspring
US6101647A (en) * 1998-03-10 2000-08-15 L&P Property Management Company Adjustable bed
US6108844A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-08-29 Sleeptec, Inc. Air mattress for a sleeper sofa
US6138305A (en) * 1999-04-30 2000-10-31 Smith; Jerome P. Bed frame insert
US20040034934A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-02-26 Weinman Adam Michael Universal adjustable bed
US6855158B2 (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-02-15 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Thermo-regulating patient support structure
US6990698B2 (en) * 2004-05-12 2006-01-31 Wall Sr Daniel P UPS shippable adjustable articulating bed
US20070157387A1 (en) * 2006-01-11 2007-07-12 L&P Property Management Company Modular bedding system including modular bed base
US20080104750A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20080250562A1 (en) * 2003-02-05 2008-10-16 Tekulve Daniel R Articulating bed frame

Patent Citations (58)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US195850A (en) * 1877-10-02 Improvement in mattresses
USRE26411E (en) * 1968-06-25 Tilting accessohy for standard bed and tilting hollywood bed frame
US2666216A (en) * 1949-12-09 1954-01-19 Irvine K Schnaitter Inclined bed rest
US3593350A (en) * 1969-03-13 1971-07-20 Dominion Metalware Ind Ltd The Retractable bed
US3644946A (en) * 1970-05-15 1972-02-29 Acme Spring Co Adjustable bed
US3781928A (en) * 1971-04-05 1974-01-01 Erik Pettersson Device for raising the head end and/or foot end of a bed
US3898702A (en) * 1974-06-03 1975-08-12 Rca Corp Adjustable bed
US3931653A (en) * 1974-09-30 1976-01-13 Bien Jack M Power operated back rest
US4258445A (en) * 1976-07-15 1981-03-31 Zur Henry C Beds and adjustable body supporting assemblies
US4188677A (en) * 1977-11-30 1980-02-19 Zur Henry C Lounger bed and adjustable body supporting assembly
US4242767A (en) * 1978-08-30 1981-01-06 Mcmullen Susan L Play pillows
US4227269A (en) * 1978-09-01 1980-10-14 Burke, Inc. Adjustable bed
US4271547A (en) * 1979-10-18 1981-06-09 Aldo Grossutti Mattress and boxspring extender
US4376316A (en) * 1980-12-31 1983-03-15 Joerns Furniture Company Hinge for adjustable beds and the like
US4407030A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-10-04 Maxwell Products, Inc. Safety device for an adjustable bed
US4385410A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-05-31 Maxwell Products, Inc. Articulated adjustable bed having a single motor drive
US4381571A (en) * 1981-02-09 1983-05-03 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed
US4853990A (en) * 1986-12-29 1989-08-08 Mechanical Backrest, Inc. Mechanical backlift
US4910816A (en) * 1988-05-31 1990-03-27 Jvj Enterprises, Inc. Adjustable bed table
US4982466A (en) * 1988-10-12 1991-01-08 Leggett & Platt, Incorporated Body support system
US4986738A (en) * 1988-10-12 1991-01-22 Leggett & Platt Incorporated Airflow control system pump and housing
US5129115A (en) * 1988-10-12 1992-07-14 L&P Property Management Company Method of prefilling and supporting person on fluid filled body support system
US5062169A (en) * 1990-03-09 1991-11-05 Leggett & Platt, Incorporated Clinical bed
US5063623A (en) * 1990-10-15 1991-11-12 Bathrick Leeland M Power module for an ariculated bed
US5165129A (en) * 1991-02-26 1992-11-24 Niagara Corporation Adjustable bed frame with inclined guide and drive elements
US5235258A (en) * 1991-03-27 1993-08-10 Santino Antinori Remotely controlled articulated bed
US5404604A (en) * 1991-06-14 1995-04-11 Koninklijke Auping B.V. Adjusting device for a bed or chair
US5245718A (en) * 1992-10-09 1993-09-21 Joerns Healthcare, Inc. Adjustable bed with single actuator
USRE35201E (en) * 1992-10-09 1996-04-09 Krauska; Bernard J. Adjustable bed with single actuator
US5425150A (en) * 1993-06-17 1995-06-20 Palmer, Jr.; John M. Articulating device for a flat bed
US5600214A (en) * 1994-01-31 1997-02-04 Maxwell Products, Inc. User-controllable adjustable massage bed
US5544376A (en) * 1994-01-31 1996-08-13 Maxwell Products, Inc. Articulated bed with customizable remote control
US5537701A (en) * 1994-03-15 1996-07-23 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed
US5740568A (en) * 1994-03-15 1998-04-21 Maxwell Products, Inc. Snap-together bed
US5577280A (en) * 1994-03-15 1996-11-26 Maxwell Products, Inc. Snap-together adjustable, articulated bed
US5870784A (en) * 1994-03-15 1999-02-16 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed
US5579550A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-12-03 C.E.B. Enterprises, Inc. Articulated bed with collapsible frame
US5568661A (en) * 1994-09-19 1996-10-29 C.E.B. Enterprises, Inc. Articulated bed with frame mounted power module
US5829077A (en) * 1994-10-25 1998-11-03 Neige; Jean-Francois Device for tilting the top end and/or bottom end of a bed
US5978992A (en) * 1995-02-13 1999-11-09 Antinori; Santino Mattress retention bracket for adjustable beds
US5640730A (en) * 1995-05-11 1997-06-24 Maxwell Products, Inc. Adjustable articulated bed with tiltable head portion
US5765246A (en) * 1995-09-19 1998-06-16 Select Comfort Corporation Inflatable mattress with improved border support wall
US5787528A (en) * 1995-10-04 1998-08-04 Antinori; Santino Method and apparatus for providing bed recall functions
US5706536A (en) * 1995-12-14 1998-01-13 Joerns Healthcare Inc. Latch mechanism for articulated beds and the like
US5848450A (en) * 1996-03-05 1998-12-15 L&P Property Management Company Air bed control
US5829075A (en) * 1996-12-13 1998-11-03 Ark-Ell Springs, Incorporated Adjustable foundation for use with a bed frame
US6055689A (en) * 1997-04-07 2000-05-02 Cavazos; Frank G. Modular mattress and innerspring
US6101647A (en) * 1998-03-10 2000-08-15 L&P Property Management Company Adjustable bed
US6108844A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-08-29 Sleeptec, Inc. Air mattress for a sleeper sofa
US6161231A (en) * 1998-03-11 2000-12-19 Sleeptec, Inc. Sleeper sofa with an air mattress
US6000077A (en) * 1998-07-14 1999-12-14 Cyr; David R. Single motor fully adjustable bed
US6138305A (en) * 1999-04-30 2000-10-31 Smith; Jerome P. Bed frame insert
US6855158B2 (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-02-15 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Thermo-regulating patient support structure
US20040034934A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-02-26 Weinman Adam Michael Universal adjustable bed
US20080250562A1 (en) * 2003-02-05 2008-10-16 Tekulve Daniel R Articulating bed frame
US6990698B2 (en) * 2004-05-12 2006-01-31 Wall Sr Daniel P UPS shippable adjustable articulating bed
US20070157387A1 (en) * 2006-01-11 2007-07-12 L&P Property Management Company Modular bedding system including modular bed base
US20080104750A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed

Cited By (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080127418A1 (en) * 2006-08-29 2008-06-05 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9700149B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2017-07-11 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9161633B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2015-10-20 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System of memory positions for an adjustable bed
US9149126B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2015-10-06 Martin B Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9717344B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2017-08-01 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9314105B2 (en) * 2006-08-29 2016-04-19 Martin B Ralws-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9128474B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2015-09-08 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9737150B2 (en) 2006-08-29 2017-08-22 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed with an actuator safety slot
US20080120776A1 (en) * 2006-08-29 2008-05-29 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20080104761A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20090121660A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-05-14 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Controlling adjustable bed features with a hand-held remote control
US20090139029A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-06-04 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Adjustable bed frame
US10064784B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2018-09-04 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System and method of an adjustable bed with a vibration motor
US9867478B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2018-01-16 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Closed feedback loop to verify a position of an adjustable bed
US20080104755A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US8032263B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2011-10-04 Martin B Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20080104756A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US8069512B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2011-12-06 Martin B Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed frame
US8375488B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2013-02-19 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed frame
US8565934B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2013-10-22 Martin B Rawls-Meehan Touch screen control of an adjustable bed
US8682457B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2014-03-25 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Wireless control of an adjustable bed
US20080104757A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20080104760A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US8926535B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2015-01-06 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed position control
US9031673B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2015-05-12 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System of adjustable bed control via a home network
US9066602B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2015-06-30 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Closed feedback loop to verify a position of an adjustable bed
US8869328B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2014-10-28 Martin B Rawls-Meehan System of two-way communication in an adjustable bed with memory
US20080104750A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US20080104759A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9226593B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2016-01-05 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System of adjustable bed control via a home network
US9237814B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2016-01-19 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Feedback loop in control of an adjustable bed including a memory
US20080104754A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-05-08 Rawls-Meehan Martin B Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US8032960B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2011-10-11 Martin B Rawls-Meehan Methods and systems of an adjustable bed
US9295338B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2016-03-29 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan Adjustable bed position control
US8909357B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2014-12-09 Martin B Rawls-Meehan System for tandem bed communication
US9737155B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2017-08-22 Martin B. Rawls-Meehan System for tandem bed communication
WO2010081023A2 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-07-15 Ashley Furnitures Industries, Inc. Mattress foundation and kit for same
WO2010081023A3 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-10-14 Ashley Furnitures Industries, Inc. Mattress foundation and kit for same
US20100175187A1 (en) * 2009-01-08 2010-07-15 Ashley Furniture Industries, Inc. Mattress foundation and kit for same
US10226132B2 (en) * 2013-09-20 2019-03-12 Integrated Furniture Technologies Limited Adjustable bed
US10039386B2 (en) * 2015-11-12 2018-08-07 Floyd Design Llc Bed frame assembly
US20170135491A1 (en) * 2015-11-12 2017-05-18 Floyd Design, LLC Bed frame assembly

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2008027906A2 (en) 2008-03-06
CA2662207A1 (en) 2008-03-06
WO2008027906A3 (en) 2008-04-24

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8782830B2 (en) Environmentally conditioned bed assembly
EP1496773B1 (en) Cassette bedding system
US5640730A (en) Adjustable articulated bed with tiltable head portion
US7426760B2 (en) Bariatric bed apparatus and methods
CA2789496C (en) Adjustable bed position control
US4915461A (en) Storage cabinet retrieval system
DE60032019T2 (en) Bedside
JP2011136145A (en) Sensor control for apparatus for supporting and monitoring person
US5568661A (en) Articulated bed with frame mounted power module
US7000269B2 (en) Adjustable base for supporting adjustable beds of different widths
US4103373A (en) Portable folding bed cabinet
CN102170810A (en) Infant care apparatus
EP1711085A2 (en) Multi-position reclining bed with desk
US5709441A (en) Cremation urn display pedestal
US5743672A (en) Headboard attaching bracket
CN103429212A (en) Adjustable bed controls
JP2005515801A (en) Building structures on the bed coupling device
JP2002510994A (en) Mattress joint structure
AT303089T (en) Motorized adjustable support for padding a seat and / or living furniture, such as a mattress or bed
US5063623A (en) Power module for an ariculated bed
US8069512B2 (en) Adjustable bed frame
CN101219024B (en) Air bed mattress
US7363665B2 (en) Bed frame with extended bumper assembly
CA2348553A1 (en) Articulating bed frame
US5216768A (en) Bed system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION, MINNESOTA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:KOUGHAN, DANIEL J.;MAHONEY, PAUL;GIFFT, JAMES;REEL/FRAME:020084/0782;SIGNING DATES FROM 20070829 TO 20070830

AS Assignment

Owner name: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS AGENT, ILLINOIS

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:021076/0230

Effective date: 20080530

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION

AS Assignment

Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,MINNESOTA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION;SELECT COMFORT RETAIL CORPORATION;SELECT COMFORT CANADA HOLDING INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:024151/0673

Effective date: 20100326

Owner name: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, MINNESOTA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION;SELECT COMFORT RETAIL CORPORATION;SELECT COMFORT CANADA HOLDING INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:024151/0673

Effective date: 20100326

AS Assignment

Owner name: SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION,MINNESOTA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT;REEL/FRAME:024213/0729

Effective date: 20100326

Owner name: SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION, MINNESOTA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT;REEL/FRAME:024213/0729

Effective date: 20100326

AS Assignment

Owner name: SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION, MINNESOTA

Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION;REEL/FRAME:028459/0241

Effective date: 20120604