US20080052808A1 - Protective helmet and method of manufacture thereof - Google Patents

Protective helmet and method of manufacture thereof Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080052808A1
US20080052808A1 US11846302 US84630207A US2008052808A1 US 20080052808 A1 US20080052808 A1 US 20080052808A1 US 11846302 US11846302 US 11846302 US 84630207 A US84630207 A US 84630207A US 2008052808 A1 US2008052808 A1 US 2008052808A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
shell
panel
protective helmet
helmet according
edge
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11846302
Inventor
Patrick Leick
Herve Favre-Felix
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Salomon SAS
Original Assignee
Salomon SAS
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/003Helmet covers

Abstract

A protective helmet according to the invention includes an outer shell and a shock-absorbing cap arranged within the shell, the shell being formed by a thin shell. The shell is covered, at least locally, by a panel made of a flexible material, the panel being stretched against the shell and connected thereto at least one seam line along one of its edges. According to the manufacturing method, the outer shell is made, a panel of flexible material is prepared, the outer shell is then covered with the panel by at least one seam between an edge of the panel and the shell, and the inside of the shell is then fitted with the cap.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119 of French Patent Application No. 06 07572, filed on Aug. 29, 2006, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference thereto in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The invention relates to a protective helmet. The invention also relates to a method for manufacturing the protective helmet.
  • 2. Description of Background and Other Information
  • It is increasingly common to wear a protective helmet during recreational sporting activities, such as inline skating, ice skating, biking, skiing, and the like. As a general rule, helmets of this type have an outer shell made of a thin but rigid material, such as polycarbonate or ABS, and have internally a shock-absorbing cap made of polystyrene, for example. Such helmets are further equipped with a chin strap and, if necessary, a secondary retaining device that extends over the nape of the wearer's neck. Typically, the helmets also have comfort elements such as foam pads, a textile fitting, sometimes referred to as a lining, inside the cap, or the like.
  • Vents forming ventilation ducts are provided in the area of the outer shell and of the cap to make the helmet more pleasant to wear.
  • Two techniques are mainly used to make such helmets. In a first technique, the shell and the cap are made separately and then assembled by means of glue or other means to assemble the two components together.
  • According to a second technique, after the shell is made, it is positioned inside a mold in order to inject a material that will form the cap after expansion and curing.
  • In both cases, the outer envelope of the helmet is formed by the thin shell.
  • In the second case, the shell is constituted by a very thin sheet of a PVC type of material having a thickness such that, when it is bare, the shell is not adequately rigid to provide the protection that could be expected from the finished helmet. Generally speaking, the cap is made of expanded polystyrene or of a similar material. Because the cap and the shell are assembled directly in the mold, during the polystyrene expansion phase, this method for manufacturing the helmet is known as the “in-mold” technique.
  • Helmets are protective accessories that are not directly involved with the user's performance during the sporting activity. Thus, to make the helmet more attractive to buy and use, manufacturers have sought to improve its aesthetic appearance. A first approach was to work on the shape of the outer shell and of the vents of the helmet. Another approach was to add accessories, such as a visor. A further approach involved decorating the outer shell by means of self-adhesives, transfers, silk printing, or painting, for example, so as to imprint a pattern directly on the shell.
  • Yet another approach was to add an envelope made of a flexible material in order to change the outer aspect of the shell. Such devices are disclosed in the patent documents FR 2 680 305, EP 1 256 285, and EP 1 358 810.
  • These devices have the common characteristic of being removable and, if necessary, interchangeable. However, their aesthetic effect is not entirely satisfactory because the fastening mechanisms do not allow the envelope to be stretched over the entire covered surface without causing folds to occur.
  • Furthermore, it can be difficult to position these devices in helmets made using the in-mold technique, because the material that will constitute the outer skin of the helmet, that is, the shell, is relatively fragile when not supported by the cap.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In view of this state of the art, there is a need for a helmet and a method of manufacture thereof that are improved in that the covering of the shell has a better appearance and, in particular, in that it does not have folds.
  • The foregoing and other objects which will become apparent from the description are achieved by a decorating method according to the invention, and by a helmet manufactured by implementing the method.
  • In particular, the invention provides a protective helmet that includes an outer shell and a shock-absorbing cap arranged within the shell, the latter being formed by a thin shell and covered, at least locally, by a panel made of a flexible material, this panel being stretched against the shell and connected thereto by at least one seam line, formed by stitching or other assembly technique, along one of its edges.
  • In a particular implementation of the invention, the seam line is visible from the outside.
  • Further, in a particular implementation, the panel includes a plurality of widths, and a seam line at the junction of two widths connects the panel to the shell. Possibly, the widths have a different texture and/or color.
  • The panel can also be fixed to the shell by a supplemental assembly expedient, such as a strip of glue or other adhesive, for example.
  • The shell can have openings forming vents for ventilation. In such a case, the panel has cutouts that coincide with the openings.
  • The flexible material can also be a textile fabric, a band of leather or of any other flexible material.
  • The invention is also directed to an implementation of a method for manufacturing a helmet having a thin outer shell and an inner shock-absorbing cap, and which includes the following:
      • making the outer shell;
      • preparing a panel of flexible material;
      • connecting the outer shell to the panel by means of at least one seam line;
      • fitting the inside of the shell with the cap.
  • In a particular embodiment, the cap is made by injection inside the shell, which is already covered by the panel of flexible material.
  • The protective helmet includes an outer shell and a shock-absorbing cap arranged within the shell, the assembly defining a plane of symmetry, the shell being formed by a thin shell. The shell is covered, at least locally, by a panel made of a flexible material. The panel is stretched against the shell and is connected thereto by at least one seam line along one of its edges.
  • According to the manufacturing method, the outer shell is made, a panel of flexible material is prepared, the outer shell is connected to the panel by means of at least one seam line along an edge of the panel, and the inside of the shell is fitted with the cap.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention will be better understood from the description that follows, with reference to the annexed drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 shows the general construction of a helmet according to the invention;
  • FIG. 2 shows a rear view of a helmet according to a first embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a side view of the helmet of FIG. 2;
  • FIG. 4 is a rear view of a helmet according to another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a side view of the helmet of FIG. 4;
  • FIGS. 6 to 9 schematically show various modes of assembly of the panel directly on the surface of the shell;
  • FIGS. 10 to 14 show various modes for assembling the widths of a panel;
  • FIGS. 15 to 18 show various modes for mounting the panel in the area of an opening of the shell;
  • FIGS. 19 to 21 show various modes for mounting the panel along an edge of the shell;
  • FIG. 22 shows a phase in the manufacturing method of the invention;
  • FIG. 23 relates to an alternative embodiment of the method.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a helmet 10 including an outer shell 11 and an inner cap 12.
  • The outer shell is formed by a shell of plastic material, the shell being thin, having a thickness of 1.5 millimeters (mm), or a thickness of about 1.5 mm or less than about 1.5 mm. In particular, the shell can be produced from a flat sheet of polycarbonate or of PVC having a thickness between 0.7 mm and 1.5 mm, or between about 0.7 mm and about 1.5 mm, that has been cut and shaped by thermoforming. The shell can, optionally, have openings, such as the openings 14, 15, 16, and other openings, if necessary or desired, as well as recessed or raised zones, possibly with form-breaking edges, which may or may not correspond to the openings.
  • The inner cap 12 forms a shock-absorbing layer provided to envelop and protect the user's head. It can be made of expanded polystyrene, for example. It is provided to line the outer shell 11 internally. The outer surface of the cap assumes the inner shape of the shell. In a particular embodiment, the outer surface of the cap has openings that correspond to the openings of the shell so as to generally form vents that facilitate air circulation beneath the cap.
  • Generally, the shell and the cap have a shape of a part of a sphere, which shape is symmetrical with respect to a vertical median plane demarcating two hemispheres. This plane is parallel to the plane of FIGS. 3 and 5. Hereinafter, the term “longitudinal” will designate a direction parallel to this plane and “transverse” will designate a perpendicular direction, that is, a direction that extends from one hemisphere to the other.
  • The symmetry of the shell and of the cap in relation to the median plane makes is possible to produce helmets whose left portion is identical, albeit inverted, to the right portion. This is not a limiting characteristic of the invention, and helmets according to the invention can be provided not to have a right-left symmetry.
  • The cap is made and assembled to the shell by any appropriate means. According to a first technique, the shell and the cap are made separately and then assembled to one another, in an exemplary manner such as by means of glue or by means of a one-sided or double-sided self-adhesive strip, or by means of any other technique.
  • According to another known technique, a cut and shaped shell is positioned in a mold and material is then injected inside the mold to form the cap. For example, polystyrene pellets and water steam are injected into the mold under pressure so as to cause the expansion of the polystyrene and to form the cap directly against the shell.
  • Other manufacturing techniques are also within the scope of the invention.
  • The shell further includes a device for retention on the user's head, and comfort elements, if necessary. For example, these parts can include a chin strap formed with strap portions connected to the cap and which are provided to be fastened together under the user's chin. There can also be an occipital retaining mechanism that may or may not be associated with the chin strap, as well as pads or fittings made of foam or of any other hygienic or comfort material. Such devices are known and are not shown in the drawings.
  • FIGS. 2 and 3 show a helmet according to a first embodiment of the invention. This helmet has a shell 21 and a cap 22. A panel 23, or yoke, externally covers the shell 21, i.e., it extends around the rear and lower portion of the shell 21. However, the openings 25 and 26, which are located in this zone, are not covered. The panel 23 is made here with two widths 23 a, 23 b that are assembled to one another such that the panel follows the curvature of the shell in the covered zone. The manner of assembly of the panel is described below.
  • The panel 23 is made of a flexible material such as a skin, a film, or a fabric based on either natural or synthetic fibers. The material can be colored, embroidered, or patterned. It can also be imprinted, silk printed, or painted. The patterns of the panel can be coordinated with the decoration of the shell. The widths can be of the same or of different type with respect to texture and color. In a particular embodiment, the material is extensible, such that it assumes the rounded shape of the shell without making folds. For example, the material can be leather or imitation leather that has the advantage of being flexible and compressible depth-wise, i.e., thickness-wise, which produces a volume effect. Such a material contrasts well with the appearance of the shell itself. Other materials are suitable, such as a textile fabric, especially blue jeans fabric, i.e., denim.
  • Other manners of construction are also within the scope of the invention. In particular, the panel could cover the entire shell, or it could include more or less than two widths or pieces. Furthermore, one could provide that there are a plurality of panels positioned at various locations of the shell.
  • FIGS. 4 and 5 show a helmet 30 according to another embodiment of the invention. The shell 31 of the helmet is covered by a panel 33 that covers the upper portion of the shell, leaving the front and rear portions uncovered.
  • The panel here is formed of five widths, or pieces, including widths or pieces 33 a, 33 b, 33 c, 33 d that are shown in the drawings. As described above, the pieces are assembled so that the panel assumes the rounded shape of the shell without forming folds. The panel is cut in the area of the vents of the helmet so as not to hinder air circulation between the outside and the inside.
  • The material of the panel 33 is the same as that described for the previous helmet. As in the preceding case, the panel can cover the cap in a different manner, and it can have a more or less substantial number of pieces.
  • A panel generally includes two transverse edges that extend from one hemisphere of the shell to the other, as well as connecting edges between these transverse edges.
  • According to a characteristic of the invention, the panel is assembled to the shell by at least one seam, such as stitching, made along an edge. According to a particular implementation of the invention, the edge involved is a transverse edge of the panel. This edge is sewn to the shell in its surface or along one of its own edges. The panel can be sewn or glued to the shell at the other transverse edge, as well as in the area of the vents, or the edge of the panel can be folded over itself and sewn before being glued on the shell, as described below.
  • Other seams can also be made between the various widths of a panel, by connecting or without connecting the shell and the panel in this zone.
  • Because the shell is thin, the seams can be made easily, for example by means of a conventional sewing machine such as those used in shoe-making. A material such as polycarbonate or ABS can be easily perforated with a needle and lends itself well to stitch assembly.
  • The seams closely keep the panel on the shell. They maintain a long-lasting tension in the panel, which prevents folds from forming. The seams provide an assembly that withstands outside attacks, especially impacts or tears. Moreover, the seams form lines on the surface of the shell, and they leave on the panel a raised imprint that brings out its texture and contribute to making the appearance of the helmet more attractive. Once stitched, the panel is irremovable, that is, it cannot be disassembled without being damaged, unless such an operation is performed by an experienced person.
  • The helmet can have zones where the wall of the shell forms a recess, and the panel naturally tends to move away from the wall of the shell in these zones. These zones can be glued prior to applying the panel on the shell, and pressure can be applied on the panel so that it stretches locally and assumes the shape of the shell in these recessed zones.
  • FIGS. 6 to 21 show various methods for mounting the connection between the panel and the shell. More particularly, they show the assembly of the panel 23 on the shell 21 of the first embodiment. For an easier understanding of the invention, the reference numerals of FIGS. 2 and 3 are used again in FIGS. 6 to 21 to designate the shell and the various widths of the panel.
  • FIGS. 6 to 9 show various methods for mounting the panel directly on the surface of the shell.
  • According to FIG. 6, the transverse upper edge of the width 23 b, or piece, forms a cuff, the flap of which is sewn to the shell 22 at a seam line 40. The seam line is not visible in this case.
  • According to FIG. 7, the edge of the width 23 b forms a cuff; the assembly is then sewn at a seam line 41.
  • According to FIG. 8, the flap of the cuff is sewn to the shell 22 along a first seam line 43; the assembly is then sewn to the shell at a second seam line 44.
  • According to FIG. 9, a cuff is formed and sewn at a seam line 45; the assembly is then glued to the shell by means of a strip of glue 46. In this case, the seam is visible, but it does not connect the panel to the shell. The other transverse edge is then arranged to be the one sewn to the shell.
  • FIGS. 10 to 14 show the junction between the two widths 23 a and 23 b. According to FIG. 10, the two widths are sewn edge to edge at a seam line 48 that is positioned with the flaps on the side of the shell.
  • According to FIG. 11, a cuff is formed at the edge of the width 23 b, which is sewn to the width 23 a at a seam line 49.
  • FIG. 12 shows the same type of assembly, but the seam line 50 also connects the shell.
  • According to FIG. 13, the two widths are sewn edge to edge at a seam line 52, and then each flap is sewn at a seam line 53, 54.
  • According to FIG. 14, the two widths are sewn edge to edge at a seam line 55, and then each width edge is sewn to the shell at a seam line 56, 57 that is visible from the outside.
  • FIGS. 15 to 18 show the mounting of the width 23 a in the area of the opening 26 of a vent.
  • According to FIG. 15, the width is cut and the edges of the cutout are folded back through the opening 26 inside the shell. They are sewn at a seam line 60.
  • According to FIG. 16, the edges of the cutout are passed through the cutout and are glued inside the shell by means of a strip of glue 61.
  • According to FIG. 17, the edges of the cutout are folded back on the panel itself, and the assembly is sewn on the shell at a seam line 62.
  • According to FIG. 18, the panel is cut flush with the opening 26, and its edges are glued by a strip of glue 63.
  • FIGS. 19 to 22 show the mounting of an edge of the panel along an edge of the shell 22.
  • According to FIG. 19, the edge of the panel 23 is folded back and glued inside the shell 22 by a strip of glue 64.
  • According to FIG. 20, rather then being glued, the edge is sewn at a seam line 65 that extends through the assembly and is visible from the outside.
  • According to FIG. 21, the flap of the panel 23 is folded back between the panel and the shell, and the assembly is sewn at a seam line 66.
  • These various methods of assembly make it possible to cover the shell with the panel, and to stretch the latter without forming folds. The panel is then completely integrated into the structure of the helmet in terms of aesthetics. The method of assembly is selected as a function of the material used to make the panel, of the shape of the pieces/widths, and also of the desired aesthetic effect. Other methods of assembly are also within the scope of the invention.
  • According to the manufacturing method of the invention, the shell of the helmet and the panel are initially made and assembled, and then the shell is fitted with the cap using one of the previously mentioned techniques.
  • FIG. 22 shows this part of the method. First, a bare shell 68 is prepared, cut and shaped by any appropriate technique, such as thermoforming in particular. The shell is given its final shape with, if necessary, the openings for ventilation and the shape-breaking ridges for the recessed or raised zones.
  • Next, the panel 69 is prepared, with its various pieces joined together, if necessary. The openings for the vents can be made before or after assembly of the panel to the shell.
  • The panel is then assembled to the shell along its various edges. A seam is made on at least one edge of the panel. A sewing or gluing technique is used on the other edges, as described above in relation to the preceding drawing figures. It is the same thing in the area of the openings.
  • Next, the shell is fitted with the cap. According to a first technique, the cap is made separately and assembled inside the shell with glue or an adhesive, or by any other appropriate means.
  • According to a second technique, the shell is positioned in an injection mold, and a material is injected in the mold to form the cap. By means of this technique, the wall of the shell is pressed against the mold imprint, including in the zones that are covered by the panel. This ensures that the panel is applied against the shell, including in the recessed zones. Possibly, one can provide to spread glue in these zones during assembly of the panel in order to reinforce adherence with the shell. One can also provide to insert a film of heat meltable glue between the panel and the shell at the time of assembly. During injection, the film of glue melts and contributes to the adherence of the panel to the shell. The same press and mold can be used to carry out the injection for helmets whose shell is covered and helmets whose shell is bare. Indeed, the presence of the panel does not significantly change the positioning of the shell in the mold.
  • For the first fitting technique, these operations can be carried out in a press, where the shell covered with the panel is compressed and, if necessary, heated.
  • When the cap is positioned by injection inside the shell, it confines all of the flaps that are folded inside the shell, including in the zones where the flaps would not have been connected to the shell.
  • FIG. 23 shows another embodiment of the invention. First, the panel 70 is prepared and then assembled on the sheet 71 of thermoforming material from which the shell is made by means, for example, of two seam lines 72 and 73 along each transverse edge of the panel. The other edges are glued, or are provided to be folded back inside the shell after it has been shaped. Next, the sheet covered with the panel is shaped, and then cut to form the covered shell. The heat required for shaping the sheet can be used, for example, to melt a glue film between the panel and the shell which reinforce the adherence between the shell and the panel.
  • This disclosure is given by way of example, and other embodiments of the invention can be applied without leaving the scope thereof.
  • In particular, the helmet can be equipped with a retaining device and comfort elements.
  • The panel could also be made of two or more separate portions.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A protective helmet comprising:
    a thin outer shell;
    a shock-absorbing cap arranged within the shell;
    the shell being at least partially covered by a panel of flexible material;
    the panel being stretched against the shell and assembled to the shell by means of at least one seam along at least one edge of the panel.
  2. 2. A protective helmet according to claim 1, wherein:
    the seam is visible from outside the helmet.
  3. 3. A protective helmet according claim 2, wherein:
    the panel is formed from a plurality of pieces.
  4. 4. A protective helmet according to claim 3, wherein:
    at a junction of two of said plurality of pieces a seam line connects the panel to the shell.
  5. 5. A protective helmet according to claim 3, wherein:
    at least two of the pieces of the panel have different textures and/or different colors.
  6. 6. A protective helmet according to claim 1, wherein:
    at least a second edge of the panel is assembled to the shell by means of at least at least one seam.
  7. 7. A protective helmet according to claim 1, wherein:
    at least a second edge of the panel is assembled to the shell by means of at least a strip of glue.
  8. 8. A protective helmet according to claim 1, wherein:
    the shell has ventilation openings; and
    the panel has cutouts coinciding with said openings.
  9. 9. A protective helmet according to claim 1, wherein:
    the flexible material of the panel is a textile fabric.
  10. 10. A protective helmet comprising:
    an outer shell formed from a flat sheet having a thickness between 0.7 mm and 1.5 mm, or between about 0.7 mm and about 1.5 mm;
    a shock-absorbing cap arranged within the shell;
    the shell being at least partially covered by a panel of flexible material;
    the panel being stretched against the shell and assembled to the shell by means of at least one seam along at least one edge of the panel.
  11. 11. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    the seam is visible from outside the helmet.
  12. 12. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    the panel is formed from a plurality of pieces.
  13. 13. A protective helmet according to claim 12, wherein:
    at a junction of two of said plurality of pieces a seam line connects the panel to the shell.
  14. 14. A protective helmet according to claim 12, wherein:
    at least two of the pieces of the panel have different textures and/or different colors.
  15. 15. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    at least a second edge of the panel is assembled to the shell by means of at least at least one seam.
  16. 16. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    at least a second edge of the panel is assembled to the shell by means of at least a strip of glue.
  17. 17. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    the shell has ventilation openings; and
    the panel has cutouts coinciding with said openings.
  18. 18. A protective helmet according to claim 10, wherein:
    the flexible material of the panel is a textile fabric.
  19. 19. A method for manufacturing a helmet having a thin outer shell and an inner shock-absorbing cap, said method comprising:
    making the outer shell;
    making a panel of flexible material;
    connecting the outer shell with the panel by means of at least one seam along at least one edge of the panel;
    fitting an inside of the shell with the cap.
  20. 20. A method according to claim 19, further comprising:
    making the cap by injection of material inside the shell, the shell having been covered by the panel prior to making the cap.
US11846302 2006-08-29 2007-08-28 Protective helmet and method of manufacture thereof Abandoned US20080052808A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR0607572A FR2905235B1 (en) 2006-08-29 2006-08-29 Helmet protection and process for its production.
FR06.07572 2006-08-29

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080052808A1 true true US20080052808A1 (en) 2008-03-06

Family

ID=37907037

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11846302 Abandoned US20080052808A1 (en) 2006-08-29 2007-08-28 Protective helmet and method of manufacture thereof

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US20080052808A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1894483B1 (en)
DE (2) DE602007002957D1 (en)
FR (1) FR2905235B1 (en)

Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080250549A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-16 Teton Outfitters, Llc Helmet
US20100043127A1 (en) * 2008-08-20 2010-02-25 Wang ze-ping Infusion in-mould helmet
US20100134596A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2010-06-03 Reinhard Becker Apparatus and method for capturing an area in 3d
US20110113170A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2011-05-12 Faro Technologies, Inc. Interface
US20120011631A1 (en) * 2010-07-16 2012-01-19 Daniel Crossman Headpiece assembly having removable ballistic shell and bump shell with suspension assembly
US20120019806A1 (en) * 2010-07-26 2012-01-26 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US20120047635A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2012-03-01 Kuji Sports Ltd Deformable safety helmet
US8384914B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2013-02-26 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8555423B2 (en) 2011-01-19 2013-10-15 Smith Optics, Inc. Goggle attachment system for a protective helmet
US20130340149A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2013-12-26 Craig A. RICHWINE Detachable protective helmet shield and helmet
US8625106B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2014-01-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for optically scanning and measuring an object
US8699036B2 (en) 2010-07-29 2014-04-15 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8705016B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2014-04-22 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8705012B2 (en) 2010-07-26 2014-04-22 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8730477B2 (en) 2010-07-26 2014-05-20 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US20140143937A1 (en) * 2012-11-29 2014-05-29 Bell Sports, Inc. Multi-component helmet construction
US20140189937A1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2014-07-10 Bell Sports, Inc. Helmet with integrated electronic components
US8776272B1 (en) * 2012-03-08 2014-07-15 Protective Sports Equipment International Inc. Helmet cover
US8830485B2 (en) 2012-08-17 2014-09-09 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8896819B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2014-11-25 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8997362B2 (en) 2012-07-17 2015-04-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Portable articulated arm coordinate measuring machine with optical communications bus
US9009000B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2015-04-14 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for evaluating mounting stability of articulated arm coordinate measurement machine using inclinometers
US20150157083A1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-11 Bell Sports, Inc. Multi-layer helmet and method for making the same
US9072331B2 (en) 2011-01-17 2015-07-07 Smith Optics, Inc. Goggle attachment system for a helmet
US9074883B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2015-07-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9113023B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2015-08-18 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with spectroscopic energy detector
US9163922B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2015-10-20 Faro Technologies, Inc. Coordinate measurement machine with distance meter and camera to determine dimensions within camera images
US9168654B2 (en) 2010-11-16 2015-10-27 Faro Technologies, Inc. Coordinate measuring machines with dual layer arm
US9210288B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2015-12-08 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with dichroic beam splitters to capture a variety of signals
US20160029731A1 (en) * 2014-07-31 2016-02-04 Theodore Paul MAGEE Shock absorption system
US9329271B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2016-05-03 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9372265B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2016-06-21 Faro Technologies, Inc. Intermediate two-dimensional scanning with a three-dimensional scanner to speed registration
US9417056B2 (en) 2012-01-25 2016-08-16 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9417316B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2016-08-16 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US20160286886A1 (en) * 2012-03-08 2016-10-06 Protective Sports Equipment International, Inc Helmet
US9513107B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2016-12-06 Faro Technologies, Inc. Registration calculation between three-dimensional (3D) scans based on two-dimensional (2D) scan data from a 3D scanner
US9529083B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2016-12-27 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with enhanced spectroscopic energy detector
US9551575B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2017-01-24 Faro Technologies, Inc. Laser scanner having a multi-color light source and real-time color receiver
US9607239B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2017-03-28 Faro Technologies, Inc. Articulated arm coordinate measurement machine having a 2D camera and method of obtaining 3D representations
US9628775B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2017-04-18 Faro Technologies, Inc. Articulated arm coordinate measurement machine having a 2D camera and method of obtaining 3D representations
US9655783B2 (en) 2013-03-11 2017-05-23 Smith Optics, Inc. Strap attachment systems and goggles including same
US9861153B2 (en) * 2016-04-04 2018-01-09 Pro-Tekt Athletic Sciences, Inc. Protective headgear with non-rigid outer shell
USD822905S1 (en) 2016-10-31 2018-07-10 Smith Optics, Inc. Helmet
US10067231B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2018-09-04 Faro Technologies, Inc. Registration calculation of three-dimensional scanner data performed between scans based on measurements by two-dimensional scanner

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR3035778B1 (en) * 2015-05-06 2017-05-12 Salomon Sas Sports Headphones

Citations (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US514278A (en) * 1894-02-06 Sunshade for hats
US857644A (en) * 1907-01-19 1907-06-25 Adolph Mayer Hat.
US1368864A (en) * 1920-04-02 1921-02-15 Turner Ella Hat-protector
US1483881A (en) * 1922-01-11 1924-02-19 Hart Henry Ridgeway Football helmet
US1539558A (en) * 1922-03-27 1925-05-26 P Goldsmith Sons Company Athletic protective garment
US1587681A (en) * 1925-02-26 1926-06-08 Ludwig F Schumacher Sun and rain shield for hats
US1831680A (en) * 1930-05-14 1931-11-10 Elsie F Miller Hat protector
US2339189A (en) * 1941-05-07 1944-01-11 Pickles Robert Protective cover applicable to the rims of metal shrapnel helmets and the like
US2880422A (en) * 1956-01-18 1959-04-07 Blauer Maurice Combination raincoat pouch and garrison hat rain cover
US3039108A (en) * 1958-07-14 1962-06-19 John W Lohrenz Protective helmet
US3103015A (en) * 1962-02-01 1963-09-10 Plastino Mario Head-protecting head gear
US3174155A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-03-23 Dallas Sports Knitting Co Inc Protective helmet having a padded outer surface
US3445860A (en) * 1967-04-17 1969-05-27 Fred Rodell Detachable cover for helmets and the like
US3906546A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-09-23 Elwyn R Gooding Hand gun bullet proof protective headgear
US4345336A (en) * 1979-03-30 1982-08-24 Plastino Mario A Head protecting headwear
US4809690A (en) * 1985-07-24 1989-03-07 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Protective skull cap for the skull
US5226180A (en) * 1991-12-02 1993-07-13 Leach Robert E Protective cap for golfers
US5450631A (en) * 1993-09-17 1995-09-19 Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc. Bicycle helmet
US5519895A (en) * 1993-04-28 1996-05-28 Barnes, Jr.; Montie M. Cap for sports helmet
US5638544A (en) * 1996-05-23 1997-06-17 Ranger Joe's Columbus Army Surplus Co. Military helmet with camouflage band retaining system and method for retaining a camouflage band on a military helmet
US5833796A (en) * 1994-03-04 1998-11-10 Armacel Pty Limited Method and apparatus for forming structural articles
US5887289A (en) * 1997-06-19 1999-03-30 Theoret; Normand Safety cap with removable fabric cover
US6061836A (en) * 1998-10-28 2000-05-16 Peters; Randall G. Slip-on, elastic, fabric cover for hard hats and the like
US6070271A (en) * 1996-07-26 2000-06-06 Williams; Gilbert J. Protective helmet
US20010004773A1 (en) * 1999-12-23 2001-06-28 Toni Moore Slip-on, insulating and decorative cover for bicycle safety helmets
US6256799B1 (en) * 1999-08-10 2001-07-10 Mcglasson Shirley J. Helmet covers
US6848122B1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-02-01 Joe Meeds Decorative removable helmet cover for ski, showboard, skateboard and various types of helmets
US20050028253A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-10 Fowler David B. Decorative protective helmet
US20070107112A1 (en) * 2005-11-16 2007-05-17 Janice Boyd Motorcycle helmet cover
US20080083053A1 (en) * 2006-10-09 2008-04-10 Lin Paul S Hat and protective helmet
US20080222782A1 (en) * 2005-08-05 2008-09-18 Paul Michael Stokes Decorative Removable Helmet Cover
US20090070920A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2009-03-19 Holloway Scott M Helmet Jacket
US20100024097A1 (en) * 2008-07-29 2010-02-04 Peter Saenim Protective Headgear System
US20100031425A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-11 Klamerus Jr Richard Hat cover and frame

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2680305B1 (en) 1991-08-13 1997-03-07
ES2197029T3 (en) * 1999-03-19 2004-01-01 New Max S.R.L. Process for the manufacture of a motorcyclist helmet and helmet so manufactured.
EP1256285A3 (en) 2001-05-11 2003-09-17 Andrea Manni Cover for helmets
EP1358810A1 (en) * 2002-04-29 2003-11-05 HELCAP S.r.l. Elasticized-fabric cap for covering helmets

Patent Citations (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US514278A (en) * 1894-02-06 Sunshade for hats
US857644A (en) * 1907-01-19 1907-06-25 Adolph Mayer Hat.
US1368864A (en) * 1920-04-02 1921-02-15 Turner Ella Hat-protector
US1483881A (en) * 1922-01-11 1924-02-19 Hart Henry Ridgeway Football helmet
US1539558A (en) * 1922-03-27 1925-05-26 P Goldsmith Sons Company Athletic protective garment
US1587681A (en) * 1925-02-26 1926-06-08 Ludwig F Schumacher Sun and rain shield for hats
US1831680A (en) * 1930-05-14 1931-11-10 Elsie F Miller Hat protector
US2339189A (en) * 1941-05-07 1944-01-11 Pickles Robert Protective cover applicable to the rims of metal shrapnel helmets and the like
US2880422A (en) * 1956-01-18 1959-04-07 Blauer Maurice Combination raincoat pouch and garrison hat rain cover
US3039108A (en) * 1958-07-14 1962-06-19 John W Lohrenz Protective helmet
US3103015A (en) * 1962-02-01 1963-09-10 Plastino Mario Head-protecting head gear
US3174155A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-03-23 Dallas Sports Knitting Co Inc Protective helmet having a padded outer surface
US3445860A (en) * 1967-04-17 1969-05-27 Fred Rodell Detachable cover for helmets and the like
US3906546A (en) * 1973-04-16 1975-09-23 Elwyn R Gooding Hand gun bullet proof protective headgear
US4345336A (en) * 1979-03-30 1982-08-24 Plastino Mario A Head protecting headwear
US4809690A (en) * 1985-07-24 1989-03-07 Commissariat A L'energie Atomique Protective skull cap for the skull
US5226180A (en) * 1991-12-02 1993-07-13 Leach Robert E Protective cap for golfers
US5519895A (en) * 1993-04-28 1996-05-28 Barnes, Jr.; Montie M. Cap for sports helmet
US5450631A (en) * 1993-09-17 1995-09-19 Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc. Bicycle helmet
US5833796A (en) * 1994-03-04 1998-11-10 Armacel Pty Limited Method and apparatus for forming structural articles
US5638544A (en) * 1996-05-23 1997-06-17 Ranger Joe's Columbus Army Surplus Co. Military helmet with camouflage band retaining system and method for retaining a camouflage band on a military helmet
US6070271A (en) * 1996-07-26 2000-06-06 Williams; Gilbert J. Protective helmet
US5887289A (en) * 1997-06-19 1999-03-30 Theoret; Normand Safety cap with removable fabric cover
US6061836A (en) * 1998-10-28 2000-05-16 Peters; Randall G. Slip-on, elastic, fabric cover for hard hats and the like
US6256799B1 (en) * 1999-08-10 2001-07-10 Mcglasson Shirley J. Helmet covers
US20010004773A1 (en) * 1999-12-23 2001-06-28 Toni Moore Slip-on, insulating and decorative cover for bicycle safety helmets
US20050028253A1 (en) * 2003-08-07 2005-02-10 Fowler David B. Decorative protective helmet
US6848122B1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-02-01 Joe Meeds Decorative removable helmet cover for ski, showboard, skateboard and various types of helmets
US20080222782A1 (en) * 2005-08-05 2008-09-18 Paul Michael Stokes Decorative Removable Helmet Cover
US20070107112A1 (en) * 2005-11-16 2007-05-17 Janice Boyd Motorcycle helmet cover
US7802321B2 (en) * 2005-11-16 2010-09-28 Janice Boyd Motorcycle helmet cover
US20080083053A1 (en) * 2006-10-09 2008-04-10 Lin Paul S Hat and protective helmet
US20090070920A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2009-03-19 Holloway Scott M Helmet Jacket
US7752683B2 (en) * 2007-09-18 2010-07-13 Holloway Scott M Helmet jacket
US20100024097A1 (en) * 2008-07-29 2010-02-04 Peter Saenim Protective Headgear System
US20100031425A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-11 Klamerus Jr Richard Hat cover and frame

Cited By (56)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100134596A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2010-06-03 Reinhard Becker Apparatus and method for capturing an area in 3d
US20080250549A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-16 Teton Outfitters, Llc Helmet
US7987525B2 (en) * 2007-04-13 2011-08-02 Klim Helmet
US20100043127A1 (en) * 2008-08-20 2010-02-25 Wang ze-ping Infusion in-mould helmet
US20120047635A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2012-03-01 Kuji Sports Ltd Deformable safety helmet
US20110113170A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2011-05-12 Faro Technologies, Inc. Interface
US8850622B2 (en) * 2009-02-13 2014-10-07 Kuji Sports Ltd. Deformable safety helmet
US8719474B2 (en) 2009-02-13 2014-05-06 Faro Technologies, Inc. Interface for communication between internal and external devices
US9074883B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2015-07-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9551575B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2017-01-24 Faro Technologies, Inc. Laser scanner having a multi-color light source and real-time color receiver
US8384914B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2013-02-26 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8625106B2 (en) 2009-07-22 2014-01-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for optically scanning and measuring an object
US8896819B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2014-11-25 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9210288B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2015-12-08 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with dichroic beam splitters to capture a variety of signals
US8705016B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2014-04-22 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9417316B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2016-08-16 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9113023B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2015-08-18 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with spectroscopic energy detector
US9529083B2 (en) 2009-11-20 2016-12-27 Faro Technologies, Inc. Three-dimensional scanner with enhanced spectroscopic energy detector
US9607239B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2017-03-28 Faro Technologies, Inc. Articulated arm coordinate measurement machine having a 2D camera and method of obtaining 3D representations
US9163922B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2015-10-20 Faro Technologies, Inc. Coordinate measurement machine with distance meter and camera to determine dimensions within camera images
US10060722B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2018-08-28 Faro Technologies, Inc. Articulated arm coordinate measurement machine having a 2D camera and method of obtaining 3D representations
US9009000B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2015-04-14 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for evaluating mounting stability of articulated arm coordinate measurement machine using inclinometers
US9628775B2 (en) 2010-01-20 2017-04-18 Faro Technologies, Inc. Articulated arm coordinate measurement machine having a 2D camera and method of obtaining 3D representations
US9684078B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2017-06-20 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9329271B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2016-05-03 Faro Technologies, Inc. Method for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US20120011631A1 (en) * 2010-07-16 2012-01-19 Daniel Crossman Headpiece assembly having removable ballistic shell and bump shell with suspension assembly
US8730477B2 (en) 2010-07-26 2014-05-20 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8705012B2 (en) 2010-07-26 2014-04-22 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8699007B2 (en) * 2010-07-26 2014-04-15 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US20120019806A1 (en) * 2010-07-26 2012-01-26 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US8699036B2 (en) 2010-07-29 2014-04-15 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9168654B2 (en) 2010-11-16 2015-10-27 Faro Technologies, Inc. Coordinate measuring machines with dual layer arm
US9072331B2 (en) 2011-01-17 2015-07-07 Smith Optics, Inc. Goggle attachment system for a helmet
US8555423B2 (en) 2011-01-19 2013-10-15 Smith Optics, Inc. Goggle attachment system for a protective helmet
US9417056B2 (en) 2012-01-25 2016-08-16 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9795179B2 (en) * 2012-03-08 2017-10-24 Protective Sports Equipment International, Inc. Helmet
US20160286886A1 (en) * 2012-03-08 2016-10-06 Protective Sports Equipment International, Inc Helmet
US8776272B1 (en) * 2012-03-08 2014-07-15 Protective Sports Equipment International Inc. Helmet cover
US20130340149A1 (en) * 2012-06-22 2013-12-26 Craig A. RICHWINE Detachable protective helmet shield and helmet
US8997362B2 (en) 2012-07-17 2015-04-07 Faro Technologies, Inc. Portable articulated arm coordinate measuring machine with optical communications bus
US8830485B2 (en) 2012-08-17 2014-09-09 Faro Technologies, Inc. Device for optically scanning and measuring an environment
US9739886B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2017-08-22 Faro Technologies, Inc. Using a two-dimensional scanner to speed registration of three-dimensional scan data
US9513107B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2016-12-06 Faro Technologies, Inc. Registration calculation between three-dimensional (3D) scans based on two-dimensional (2D) scan data from a 3D scanner
US9372265B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2016-06-21 Faro Technologies, Inc. Intermediate two-dimensional scanning with a three-dimensional scanner to speed registration
US9618620B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2017-04-11 Faro Technologies, Inc. Using depth-camera images to speed registration of three-dimensional scans
US9746559B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2017-08-29 Faro Technologies, Inc. Using two-dimensional camera images to speed registration of three-dimensional scans
US10067231B2 (en) 2012-10-05 2018-09-04 Faro Technologies, Inc. Registration calculation of three-dimensional scanner data performed between scans based on measurements by two-dimensional scanner
US10039335B2 (en) * 2012-11-29 2018-08-07 Bell Sports, Inc. Multi-component helmet construction
US20140143937A1 (en) * 2012-11-29 2014-05-29 Bell Sports, Inc. Multi-component helmet construction
US9549583B2 (en) * 2013-01-04 2017-01-24 Bell Sports, Inc. Helmet with integrated electronic components
US20140189937A1 (en) * 2013-01-04 2014-07-10 Bell Sports, Inc. Helmet with integrated electronic components
US9655783B2 (en) 2013-03-11 2017-05-23 Smith Optics, Inc. Strap attachment systems and goggles including same
US20150157083A1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-11 Bell Sports, Inc. Multi-layer helmet and method for making the same
US20160029731A1 (en) * 2014-07-31 2016-02-04 Theodore Paul MAGEE Shock absorption system
US9861153B2 (en) * 2016-04-04 2018-01-09 Pro-Tekt Athletic Sciences, Inc. Protective headgear with non-rigid outer shell
USD822905S1 (en) 2016-10-31 2018-07-10 Smith Optics, Inc. Helmet

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP1894483A1 (en) 2008-03-05 application
EP1894483B1 (en) 2009-10-28 grant
FR2905235A1 (en) 2008-03-07 application
DE602007002957D1 (en) 2009-12-10 grant
DE202007011997U1 (en) 2007-11-29 grant
FR2905235B1 (en) 2009-03-13 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5173970A (en) Combined visored cap type protective helmet and pouch for bicyclists or the like
US5613246A (en) Cap with a removable and reversible visor
US5337420A (en) Method and apparatus for mounting and locating a helmet comfortably on the head of a person, and combination resulting therefrom
US5946734A (en) Head protector apparatus
US5519895A (en) Cap for sports helmet
US6125488A (en) Corner guard for a mattress foundation
US20050268497A1 (en) Article of footwear with exterior ribs
US4549316A (en) Foldable hat
US5546604A (en) Hood with a concealing face mask
US5416928A (en) Versatile garment attachment and article of clothing
US5428844A (en) Removable, advertising, sweat-absorbing cushioning band for headgear
US5966742A (en) Adjustable cap
US5070545A (en) Cap assembly
US6177155B1 (en) Trim assembly for vehicle and method for manufacturing the same
US3921313A (en) Injection molded boots
US20020139009A1 (en) Phat tongueTM
US5181277A (en) Reversible hat assembly
US5435011A (en) Necktie with pocket
US3295536A (en) Head covering with detachable wig for interchanging hairpieces
US4439871A (en) Head protecting headwear
USRE35193E (en) Combined visored cap type protective helmet and pouch for bicyclists or the like
US5862523A (en) Modular headwear system
US5488740A (en) Reversible and size adjustable hat
US5197150A (en) Visor cap with retractable protective visor and method of construction therefore
US5481759A (en) Expandable baseball hat and cover

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SALOMON S.A., FRANCE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LEICK, PATRICK;FAVRE-FELIX, HERVE;REEL/FRAME:020114/0502;SIGNING DATES FROM 20071002 TO 20071004

AS Assignment

Owner name: SALOMON S.A.S.,FRANCE

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SALOMON S.A.;REEL/FRAME:024563/0157

Effective date: 20100202

Owner name: SALOMON S.A.S., FRANCE

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SALOMON S.A.;REEL/FRAME:024563/0157

Effective date: 20100202