US20080047285A1 - Solar air conditioning system - Google Patents

Solar air conditioning system Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080047285A1
US20080047285A1 US11/825,006 US82500607A US2008047285A1 US 20080047285 A1 US20080047285 A1 US 20080047285A1 US 82500607 A US82500607 A US 82500607A US 2008047285 A1 US2008047285 A1 US 2008047285A1
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refrigerant
air conditioning
turbine generator
energy
lens
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US11/825,006
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James Boule
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James Boule
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B27/00Machines, plant, or systems, using particular sources of energy
    • F25B27/002Machines, plant, or systems, using particular sources of energy using solar energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S23/00Arrangements for concentrating solar-rays for solar heat collectors
    • F24S23/30Arrangements for concentrating solar-rays for solar heat collectors with lenses
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S20/00Solar heat collectors specially adapted for particular uses or environments
    • F24S20/20Solar heat collectors for receiving concentrated solar energy, e.g. receivers for solar power plants
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S90/00Solar heat systems not otherwise provided for
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A30/00Adapting or protecting infrastructure or their operation
    • Y02A30/27Relating to heating, ventilation or air conditioning [HVAC] technologies
    • Y02A30/272Solar heating or cooling
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/20Solar thermal
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/40Solar thermal energy, e.g. solar towers

Abstract

A solar powered air conditioning system includes an energy generating loop and a cooling loop. The energy loop includes a tank containing liquid refrigerant, a pump, a heat supply container including a coil, a magnifier lens and a turbine generator. The lens intensifies energy from the sun and directs it to the coil. When the pump is engaged, the refrigerant travels to the heat supply container where the sun heats and changes it from a liquid to a gas. The gas is conducted to the generator producing electricity. The cooling loop includes a shutoff valve, a fan disposed in an environment of interest, a separator, a condenser and an evaporator. In a cooling cycle, the gaseous refrigerant moves from the generator to the separator. The refrigerant is passed to the condenser. The fan directs air to the condenser where the refrigerant absorbs heat to cool the environment of interest.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This patent application claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 19(e) of copending, U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/839,540, filed Aug. 22, 2006, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • This invention relates to a solar air conditioning system and, more particularly, to a solar air conditioning system that is powered by the magnification of the sun's heat rays onto a coil absorption system.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART
  • It is well known to use solar energy to minimize the usage of fossil fuels and/or electricity in air conditioning systems. Solar air conditioning systems are seen to minimize the need to burn fossil fuel and to aide in reducing global warming by not producing carbon dioxide in their production of electrical power. As a result, solar air conditioning systems provide an environmental benefit.
  • For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,539,738, issued to Gonzalez-Cruz et al., discloses a compact solar-powered air conditioning system employing flat-plate collectors and a thermal storage tank. Gonzalez-Cruz et al. disclose the use of lithium-bromide as a refrigerant and a water-based absorption fluid.
  • The inventor has seen a number of perceived deficiencies in solar systems employing collectors similar to that disclosed by Gonzalez-Cruz et al. For example, the inventor has discovered that a solar absorption coil is more affordable in cost as compared to photo-electric collectors, which typically are seen to cost about eighteen to thirty thousand dollars ($18,000 to $30,000). On the other hand, a system including a coil absorption system as described herein can be constructed for about ten percent (10%) of the cost of photo-electric collectors. Also, it is known that solar collector cells typically convert light to electrical power at an efficiency of approximately twenty-five percent (25%), whereas a system employing a solar absorption coil as provided herein converts light to electrical power at an efficiency of approximately seventy-nine percent (79%). Since the conversion rate (percentage) of conventional systems is relatively low, there typically is a need to increase the quantity of solar cells and/or panels in a given system. As can be appreciated, the additionally cells and/or panels result in a system having a relatively large footprint (e.g., the greater the number of cells the greater the required space) to achieve the requisite electrical power to drive the system. The increased footprint and associated hardware connections result in a more expensive system for consumers. Additionally, as the system footprint can not exceed that the available space on a structure employing the system, there typically is a tradeoff between the system's output and cost of building and maintaining the system. Such tradeoffs often result in systems that may not provide enough energy to effectively cool a commercial structure or today's increasingly larger household.
  • Accordingly, the inventor has realized that there remains a need for improved solar air condition systems that are more environmentally friendly, efficient and provide enough electrical power to drive the ever-changing variety of commercial and residential structures.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present invention is directed to a solar powered air conditioning system. The solar powered air conditioning system includes an energy generating loop and a cooling loop. In one embodiment, the energy generation loop includes a storage tank containing a refrigerant mixture in a liquid state, a pump, a heat supply container including a heat generating coil, a magnifier lens coupled to the heat supply container, a turbine generator and a first plurality of pipes. The magnifier lens collects and intensifies energy from the sun and directs the energy to an absorption end of the heat generating coil. The first pipes are coupled to the pump and define a path from the storage tank through the heat supply container to the turbine generator. When the pump is engaged, the pipes conduct the refrigerant mixture from the storage tank to the heat supply container where it is heated by the energy from the sun to cause the refrigerant mixture to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state. The gaseous refrigerant is conducted to the turbine generator where back pressure turns the turbine generator producing electricity.
  • In one embodiment, the cooling loop includes a thermostatic control, a shutoff valve coupled to the thermostatic control, a fan disposed in an environment of interest and coupled to the thermostatic control, a separator for separating water and gas from a gaseous mixture, a condenser, an evaporator, and a second plurality of pipes. The second pipes are coupled to the turbine generator and define a path from the turbine generator through the shutoff valve, the separator, the condenser, the evaporator and to the storage tank. When in a cooling cycle, the thermostatic control opens the shutoff valve to direct the gaseous refrigerant from the turbine generator to the separator. The gaseous refrigerant is passed to the condenser. The fan directs ambient air to the condenser where the gaseous refrigerant absorbs heat to cool the environment of interest. The gaseous refrigerant is then passed to the evaporator where heat is exhausted from the gaseous refrigerant such that it returns to a liquid state and is provided back to the storage tank.
  • In one embodiment of the solar powered air conditioning system, the refrigerant liquid is comprised of water and ammonia.
  • In another aspect of the invention, the cooling loop further includes a refrigeration loop coupling the separator and the evaporator. The refrigeration loop includes a refrigeration unit for cooling articles of interest.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The features and advantages of the present invention will be better understood when the Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiments given below is considered in conjunction with the figures provided.
  • FIG. 1 depicts a solar absorption coil, configured and operating in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, retrofitted to an energy system of a structural environment of interest.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates components of a solar air conditioning system, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, for heating and cooling an environment of interest.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a solar air conditioning and electrical generating system in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates one embodiment of a heat supply container depicted in FIG. 2.
  • In these figures like structures are assigned like reference numerals, but may not be referenced in the description of all figures.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • In one aspect of the present invention, illustrated in FIG. 1, a solar absorption coil 10 (as described below) retrofits to an existing energy system 20 such as, for example, a heating, air conditioning, refrigerant system, and the like, of a structural environment of interest 30 such as, for example, a commercial or residential structure. The solar absorption coil 10 is mounted, for example, to a roof 32 of the structure 30 thus reducing the heat collecting area and providing a cost effective solution to consumers. In one embodiment, the solar absorption coil 10 is attached to a sun tracker 12 (as is generally known in the art) such that a magnifier lens 14 of the absorption coil system 10 follows the sun and produces temperatures up to, for example, five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (500° F.), which is an ample source of energy.
  • As can be appreciated, it is within the scope of the present invention to alter the shape and size of the magnifier lens 14 and the coil 10 to meet the requirements of a range of British thermal units (BTUs) depending on needs of an application and/or structure of interest. For example, twelve thousand (12,000) BTUs typically equate to about one (1) ton of air conditioning. An average residential structure, e.g., a two (2) bedroom, approximately one thousand square feet of living space (1,000 sq. ft.), requires about two (2) tons or twenty-four thousand (24,000) BTUs of cooling. In one embodiment, a coil 10 configured to provide an approximately twenty-four thousand (24,000) BTUs is housed in a structure (as described below) of about two feet (2 ft.) in height and three feet (3 ft.) in width. The flexibility of the system saves consumers money and obtains the energy required to run existing domestic hot water 22 and boiler heating systems, air conditioners, and refrigerant systems 20. Additionally, the inventor has discovered that the increased efficiency of the inventive system provides excess energy, which if not needed for as an energy source in the subject structure, may be provided (e.g., sold) back to a local power company's electrical grid 50. In this instance, the solar absorption coil 10 is connected to a directional meter 40 that is, in turn, coupled to the local power company's electrical grid 50.
  • FIG. 2 depicts a solar air conditioning system 100 configured and operating in accordance with the present invention for harnessing rays from the sun (sun light) to provide electrical power for driving an environmental system such as, for example, a heating and/or cooling system, for conditioning (e.g., heating or cooling) a structure of interest. In FIG. 2, a refrigerant liquid 112 is a quantity of ammonia, water, and hydrogen stored in tank 110. A pump 120 transfers the refrigerant liquid 112 through a flow check value 130 to a heat generating coil 142 within a heat supply container 140. In one embodiment, the heat generating coil 142 includes about one hundred (100) feet of coil and three (3) pancakes 143 at an absorbing end of the coil 142, shown generally at 144. A magnifier lens 150 (e.g., a fresnel lens) coupled to the heat supply container 140 collects sun rays 160 and intensifies the sun rays 160 producing temperatures of up to about five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (500° F.) within the container 140. The coil 142 absorbs the heat and, in turn, heats the refrigerant liquid 112 within the coil 142. As the refrigerant liquid 112 is heated, an ammonia gas is produced within the coil 142. The heated refrigerant liquid 112′ is vaporized forming ammonia gas, which flows out of the heat supply container 140 through pipe 146. In one embodiment, a sun tracker 170 is coupled to the heat supply container 140 and follows the sun such that an optimal number of sun rays 160 impinge upon the magnifier lens 150 throughout a given period.
  • In one embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 4, the heat supply container 140 is comprised of an insulated steel container 140′. For example, in one embodiment the container 140′ is comprised of a steel container having insulated walls 141 enclosing the fresnel lens or magnifier lens 150 and a secondary, refractive or concentrator lens 152 supported, by rods 145, at a focal point of the magnifier lens 150. The concentrator lens 152 intensifies the sun rays 160 further to increase a temperature at the lens 152 (e.g., the 500° F. temperature) to a higher temperature within the container 140′ (e.g., at the pancake coils 143 located at the absorption end 144 of the coil 142) to temperatures of up to about one thousand five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (1500° F.) within the container 140′. In yet another embodiment, a battery powered heater 180 is coupled to the pipe 146 such that the refrigerant liquid 112 is heated (e.g., to produce and/or sustain the ammonia gas vapor) at night or on non-sunny days.
  • The heated refrigerant 112′ (ammonia gas and water vapor) passes from the pipe 146 through an orifice 190 producing back pressure to power a turbine generator 200. The turbine generator 200 charges a back up battery 210. Once the back up battery 210 is at full charge, electricity from the turbine generator 200 is supplied to a directional meter 220 and to (e.g., sold to) a power company's electrical grid 230.
  • From the turbine generator 200 the heated refrigerant 112′ passes along a pipe 240 to a shut-off valve 250. When directed to operate in a “cooling” cycle (as described below), the shut-off valve 250 is open and the heated refrigerant 112′ passes to a separator 260. At the separator 260, the water is pulled from the heated refrigerant 112′ and passed back to the storage tank 110 along pipe 270. The ammonia gas passes from the separator 260 along pipe 280 to a condenser 290. A fan 310 directs ambient air 320 from within an environment of interest 300 (e.g., structure to be cooled) to the condenser 290. In the condenser 290, the ammonia gas absorbs heat making the area within the condenser 290 cool. By circulating the ambient air 320 through the condenser 290, the environment 300 is cooled (e.g., thermal load is diminished).
  • When the system 100 is required to cool the environment 300, the ammonia gas flows from the condenser 290 through pipe 340 to an evaporator 350. A fan 360 directs air 370 external from the environment of interest 300 (e.g., structure to be cooled) to the evaporator 350. The external air 370 passing through the evaporator 350 removes heat from the ammonia gas returning the ammonia gas to a liquid state. The liquid is a mix of ammonia and hydrogen. The ammonia and hydrogen liquid flows through pipe 380 to the storage tank 110 to rejoin the refrigerant liquid 112. The evaporator 350 is turned off if the system 100 is required to heat the environment 300.
  • When a desired temperature is reached within the environment 300, a control 330 (e.g., a thermostat) stops the fan 310 and closes the shut-off valve 250. When closed, the shut-off valve 250 stops flow of the heated refrigerant 112′ to the separator 260 thus terminating the cooling cycle as described above. In this closed state, the shut-off valve 250 directs the heated refrigerant 112′ along pipe 390 to the evaporator 350. As described above, the evaporator 350 exhausts excessive heat to cool the heated refrigerant 112′ and to return it to a liquid state. The liquid returns to the storage tank. When bypassing the separator 260 and condenser 290, the solar air conditioning system 100 is turning the turbine 200 producing electricity only.
  • In one embodiment, the solar air conditioning system 100 includes a refrigeration loop, 400 where the ammonia gas is directed from the separator 260 along the refrigeration loop 400 through a refrigeration unit 410 and returns to pipe 340 at the evaporator 350. Preferably, the ammonia gas is directed through the refrigeration loop 400 only when the refrigeration unit 410 calls for cooling. In one embodiment, a second condenser within the refrigeration unit is employed.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the refrigeration loop 400 utilizes the evaporator 350. In this way no additional heat is added to the environment 300.
  • In another embodiment, hot water is provided to the environment 300 by coupling a coil 450 in a storage tank 460 to pipe 270 running from the separator 260 to the storage tank 110. In this embodiment, the storage tank holds water, which when heated by the hot water passing through the pipe 270, provides domestic hot water to occupants of the environment 300. In one embodiment, the domestic hot water operates a base board hot water heating system, as is generally known in the art. As such, the solar air condition system 100 functions as a solar energy generation system for providing a system to condition the environment during both hot and cold weather months (e.g., providing air conditioning during hot weather months and heating during cold weather months).
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a solar electrical generation system 500, configured and operating in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, employing a solar coil collector to provide electrical power to an environment of interest. In FIG. 3, a electricity control panel 510 starts pump 520 to move a mixture 532 of water and non toxic anti freeze such as, for example, a non-toxic anti-freeze typically available at a plumbing supply store or the like for use on boilers and camp trailers, from tank 530 through check valve 540 through flex line 550 to a heat generator coil 562 of a heat generator unit 560. A magnifier lens 564 of the heat generator unit 560 magnifies the sun's heat waves 570 and intensifies the rays 570 producing temperatures of up to about five hundred degrees Fahrenheit (500° F.) within the generator unit 560, thus heating the water anti-freeze mixture 532. In one embodiment, the coil 562 is comprised of about one hundred (100) feet of one half (½) inch pipe and three (3) pancakes at an absorbing end, shown generally at 566. In one embodiment, the lens 564 is coupled to a sun tracker 580, as is generally known in the art, such that an optimum number of rays 570 impinge the lens 564.
  • The heated water anti-freeze mixture 532′ passes through an orifice 590 producing a pressure. The pressure is released to turn an electrical turbine generator 600. In one embodiment, a shaft of the generator 600 is connected to a refrigerant pump 610, which is engaged if cooling is needed. For example, the refrigerant pump 610 is connected to an existing air conditioning system (not shown), and when engaged it turns off an existing air conditioner compressor. A shut off valve 620 is used if no cooling is needed.
  • The turbine generator 600 produces electricity and is connected to the electrical control panel 510. An inverter 512 of the control panel 510 converts AC voltage to DC voltage to charge a battery 514. In one embodiment, the control panel 510 is connected to a directional meter 630 which can supply not needed power to a local power company's electrical grid 640.
  • When the shut off valve 620 is off and the cooling line disconnected, the water anti-freeze mixture 532 flows through pipe 650 back to the tank 530. As shown in FIG. 3, the tank 530 has two coils. A first coil 534 of the tank 530 is connected to a boiler (not shown) of a heating loop 660 for heating a structure of interest such as, for example, a residential or commercial structure. A temperature valve 662 of the heating loop 660 controls the water temperature that is supplied to the boiler. A second coil 536 of the tank 530 is connected to a domestic hot water heating loop 670 within for example, a hot water tank. A temperature valve 672 of the hot water heating loop 670 controls the water temperature to the domestic hot water heater.
  • In one embodiment, the tank 530 includes a fill valve 537 for regulating the amount of the mixture 532 held in the tank and circulated through out the solar electrical generation system 500. In one embodiment, the tank 530 also includes a pressure release valve 539 for regulating pressure within the tank 530 at safe operating levels.
  • One or more embodiments of the present invention have been described. Nevertheless, it will be understood that various modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, many construction techniques and materials may be utilized. Accordingly, other embodiments are within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (8)

1. A solar powered air conditioning system, comprising:
an energy generating loop, including:
a storage tank containing a refrigerant mixture in a liquid state;
a pump;
a heat supply container including a heat generating coil;
a magnifier lens coupled to the heat supply container, the magnifier lens collecting and intensifying energy from the sun and directing the energy to an absorption end of the heat generating coil;
a turbine generator; and
a first plurality of pipes coupled to the pump and defining a path from the storage tank through the heat supply container and to the turbine generator;
wherein when the pump is engaged the pipes conduct the refrigerant mixture from the storage tank to the heat supply container where it is heated by the energy from the sun to cause the refrigerant mixture to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, the gaseous refrigerant being conducted to the turbine generator where back pressure turns the turbine generator producing electricity; and
a cooling loop including:
a thermostatic control;
a shutoff valve coupled to the thermostatic control a fan disposed in an environment of interest and being coupled to the thermostatic control;
a separator for separating water and gas from a gaseous mixture;
a condenser;
an evaporator; and
a second plurality of pipes coupled to the turbine generator and defining a path from the turbine generator through the shutoff valve, the separator, the condenser, the evaporator and to the storage tank;
wherein when in a cooling cycle, the thermostatic control opens the shutoff valve to direct the gaseous refrigerant from the turbine generator to the separator, the gaseous refrigerant is passed to the condenser, the fan direct ambient air to the condenser where the gaseous refrigerant absorbs heat to cool the environment of interest, the gaseous refrigerant is passed to the evaporator where heat is exhausted from the gaseous refrigerant such that it returns to a liquid state and is provided back to the storage tank.
2. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, wherein the refrigerant liquid is comprised of water and ammonia.
3. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, wherein the energy generating loop further includes a battery coupled to the turbine generator for storing electricity.
4. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, wherein the energy generating loop further includes a back up heat supply coupled between the heat supply container and the turbine generator for providing supplemental energy to heat the refrigerant.
5. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, wherein when in a non-cooling cycle the thermostatic control closes the shutoff valve and directs the gaseous refrigerant from the turbine generator to the evaporator bypassing the separator and the condenser.
6. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, wherein the cooling loop further includes a refrigeration loop coupling the separator and the evaporator, the refrigeration loop comprising a refrigeration unit for cooling articles of interest.
7. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 1, further comprising:
a secondary lens disposed between the magnifier lens and the absorption end of the beat generating coil at a focal point of the magnifier lens, the secondary lens collecting and intensifying energy from the magnifier lens and directing the intensified energy to the absorption end of the heat generating coil.
8. The solar powered air conditioning system of claim 7, wherein the magnifier lens is comprised of a fresnel lens and the secondary lens is comprised of a refractive lens.
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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ITBZ20100003A1 (en) * 2010-01-28 2011-07-29 Walter Klotz Thermal system powered by a fluid heated by a solar absorber.
US8448458B2 (en) 2010-11-15 2013-05-28 James Peter Hammond Solar collector and solar air conditioning system having the same
US9664421B1 (en) 2015-12-30 2017-05-30 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Low-temperature solar-thermal cooling system employing fluorocarbon refrigerants and a method thereof
US9671144B1 (en) 2016-04-12 2017-06-06 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Thermal-compression refrigeration system
WO2020051483A1 (en) * 2018-09-06 2020-03-12 Jeffrey Thramann Energy storage canopy
US20200217528A1 (en) * 2019-01-07 2020-07-09 Sonny James Gubbine Energy efficient power station intergrated with an energy efficient air conditioner

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US20070089449A1 (en) * 2005-01-18 2007-04-26 Gurin Michael H High Efficiency Absorption Heat Pump and Methods of Use

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US8448458B2 (en) 2010-11-15 2013-05-28 James Peter Hammond Solar collector and solar air conditioning system having the same
US9200821B2 (en) 2010-11-15 2015-12-01 James Peter Hammond Solar collector and cooling system having the same
US9664421B1 (en) 2015-12-30 2017-05-30 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Low-temperature solar-thermal cooling system employing fluorocarbon refrigerants and a method thereof
US9791187B2 (en) 2015-12-30 2017-10-17 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Solar refrigeration system with a closed refrigerant loop
US10337771B2 (en) 2015-12-30 2019-07-02 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Closed loop solar refrigeration system
US9671144B1 (en) 2016-04-12 2017-06-06 King Fahd University Of Petroleum And Minerals Thermal-compression refrigeration system
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US20200217528A1 (en) * 2019-01-07 2020-07-09 Sonny James Gubbine Energy efficient power station intergrated with an energy efficient air conditioner

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