US20080023914A1 - Board game and method of playing - Google Patents

Board game and method of playing Download PDF

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US20080023914A1
US20080023914A1 US11/493,964 US49396406A US2008023914A1 US 20080023914 A1 US20080023914 A1 US 20080023914A1 US 49396406 A US49396406 A US 49396406A US 2008023914 A1 US2008023914 A1 US 2008023914A1
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game
board
player
card
playing
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Ronald Locke
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Ronald Locke
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00119Board games concerning music, theatre, cinema, or art
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00006Board games played along a linear track, e.g. game of goose, snakes and ladders, along an endless track
    • A63F2003/00018Board games played along a linear track, e.g. game of goose, snakes and ladders, along an endless track played along an endless track
    • A63F2003/00022Board games played along a linear track, e.g. game of goose, snakes and ladders, along an endless track played along an endless track played along concentric endless tracks

Abstract

The instant invention is a board game that anticipates the career path possibilities of a rock star, singer or musician. Players move instrument shaped pieces across a board while garnering managers, contracts, and gigs. Players can sign with recording studios, take tours cross country or even around the world, and eventually make it to Hollywood. Pitfalls are available, too, like lawsuits and illness.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to board games, and more particularly, to a board game that emphasizes the music industry for the entertainment of those playing the game.
  • 2. Preliminary Discussion
  • Despite the increased popularity of electronic video and computer games, board games, which have been played for thousands of years in all parts of the world, remain a popular form of competitive amusement for both children and adults. Today's board games may be classified into several broad categories. Games such as chess and checkers are of a type that generally divides the game board into a series of squares, and game pieces are moved from square to square as dictated by the rules of the game without necessarily having to follow a particular pathway or route. There are also a wide variety of board games wherein the game pieces are moved sequentially along a standardized play path, usually consisting of a sequence of blocks or spaces having at least a beginning space and an ending space, as in monopoly. Finally, there are board games which attempt to simulate or mimic a particular sport or activity such as baseball and football. Countless variations and combinations of such types of board games are known in the prior art, many of which employ some form of chance-determining means, such as one or more die, a spinner having numerals thereon, or “informational” cards, for determining the movement of the game pieces.
  • While previous games have fulfilled their respective, particular objectives and requirements, no known board game has effectively and realistically imitated the realities of the music industry.
  • 3. Description of Related Art
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,719,290 issued to K. Kershner discloses a board game in the likeness of a circle, wherein a revolving disc containing characters representing events in a story is situated on the game board. Players move the game pieces by following the instructions of the game after the disc is spun and comes to rest.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,897,115 issued to D. E. and M. L. Sherry discloses a motivational game teaching obedience skills to a pet. As the tokens progress around the game board, they encounter obedience task indicia. The token cannot pass until the pet exhibits the desired training skill.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,871,211 issued to M. C. Was discloses a method and device, using a gaming board, for classification of thinking patterns and styles. The game discloses four different styles of thought: Identify, Expand, Unify, and Stabilize. The game evokes group interactions and individual patterns to classify thought patterns.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,540,441 issued to A. and D. Ilam discloses a game designed to teach the method of a pyramid scheme. The game mimics a lottery, and shows the operation of a similar method.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,784,394 issued to Y. Sumin discloses a board game designed to teach subjects such as geography, history, and social events regarding a specific locale. Shopping, restaurants, entertainment events, and hotel accommodations in the locale are displayed.
  • U.S. Pat. 4,093,235 issued to D. Barry discloses another tourist board game designed to illustrate tourist attractions within a particular region. Specific areas on the board are marked to indicate appropriate transportation methods for access to said areas. Tokens corresponding to the transportation methods are included in the game. The appropriate token must be selected to access an area accessible by the corresponding transit method.
  • Almost every board game has its particular novel and attractive features, as evidenced by the above patents. However, the inventor does not believe that any known board games include the inventor's unique combination of elements. In particular, the inventor's use of “informational” cards provides an educational result in addition to the entertainment of the game. Both positive and negative results can be found in such card. The player learns the opportunities and potential setbacks within a career in the music industry.
  • OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION
  • It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved board game that is entertaining and amusing to the players.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a board game in which the rules, terminology, strategy, situations, and history of the music industry are revealed to the players.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a board game in which the game board realistically depicts or portrays aspects of the music industry.
  • It is a still further object of the invention to provide a board game in which the game pieces are moved in a manner suggestive of typical career movements of musicians or other participants of the music industry.
  • Still other objects and advantages of the invention will become clear upon review of the following detailed description in conjunction with the appended drawings.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides a unique board game and method of playing that is both a game of chance and an educational game designed to be played by two or more players wherein as players or participants meets challenges and learns the rules, terminology, strategies, situations, and history of the music industry.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the game is divided into four levels of increasing sophistication and experience level. Each level has a specific purpose and teaching element related to the music industry.
  • At level One, the player starts as an amateur player in a garage rock band. The player wants to advance to the upper levels of the professional musician. To do this, he must through the play and the informational cards obtain a manager and a contract. These elements will allow him to advance to Level Two.
  • Level Two embraces the elements of a recording studio and the US tour by the band. The player moves up from this level by issuing recordings, having gold records, and contracts for more gigs.
  • Level Three is for the advancing player. His band now goes on world-wide tours and collects many awards.
  • Finally, Level Four is where the musician becomes actor (or producer), and produces videos and movies.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of the preferred embodiment of the game board of the current invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a view of the front sides of the various tokens of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a view of the management personnel cards used in the invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a view of the disk tokens of the invention.
  • FIG. 5 shows the recording studio contract cards used in Level of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a view of the signed contract cards used in the invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a view of the management cards used in the invention.
  • FIGS. 8A thru 8H illustrate tokens used in the upper levels of the invention.
  • FIG. 9 is a view of the sales cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 10 is a view of the expense cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 11 is a view of the USA tour cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 12 is a view of the recording studio cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 13 is a view of the world tour cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 14 is a view of the Hollywood video recording cards of the invention.
  • FIG. 15 is a view of the “Band on Trial” cards of the invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The following detailed description is of the best mode or modes of the invention presently contemplated. Such description is not intended to be understood in a limiting sense, but to be an example of the invention presented solely for illustration thereof, and by reference to which in connection with the following description and the accompanying drawings one skilled in the art may be advised of the advantages and construction of the invention.
  • Referring now to the Figures, FIG. 1 shows the game board of the preferred embodiment of the board game apparatus of the invention and additional features of games played employing the apparatus. As will hereinafter be more fully described, the board game apparatus of the preferred embodiment includes a means for realistically portraying a career track of a professional musician or rock star, as well as means for simulating the basic movement of players in such a career. In addition, the board game apparatus includes a teaching or educational aspect, wherein the players learn about strategies and pitfalls in the career of a rock star. It is also envisioned that a video or computer game version of the game would be equally as entertaining and educational.
  • FIG. 1 shows the various elements of the board game 10 of the preferred embodiment of the invention. The game 10 includes a game board 12, a set of coins or tokens, a pair of dice, music instrument game pieces, career question cards, and “management” question cards. Game board 12 is comprised of squares that have various locations or corporate entity identifications marked thereupon. Preferably, the game board 12 is also foldable so that it can lie flat for easy storage.
  • It will be noted that game board 12 has a plurality of tracks around which the tokens move. Players start at the first or outside level, and move toward the inner tracks when they meet the criteria stated in the rules of the game.
  • FIG. 2 shows examples of the playing tokens. A player selects the token corresponding to the musical instrument they enjoy playing, or can so imagine. A microphone indicates an aspiring vocal singer. There is no particular limit to the number and type of each token in play. It is advantageous to have different colors of the same token style, so as to avoid confusion among several players with the same token type.
  • FIG. 3 shows the faces of the management cards. These are just ordinary faces, but are invaluable to the budding entertainer's career. A player cannot leave the first level without a manager.
  • FIG. 4 shows some examples of the record disks used in the game. There are black, red, gold, and platinum records. FIG. 4 also shows some cards on which the images of the disks appear.
  • FIG. 5 shows the recording studio cards. These also represent the corner squares of the outer track of the game board. The player needs to land on one of these with a manager and a signed contract in order to move up into the second level of the game.
  • FIG. 6 shows the cards representing signed contract pages. This is the final piece the player needs to move up into the second level of the game.
  • FIG. 7 shows management cards that are used in the game. The player must draw one of these that matches the instrument of his token in order to make use of the manager.
  • FIG. 8 shows several of the auxiliary tokens used in the game. The records are shown again, along with a tape reel and video cassette, an old gramophone and the Oscar statue.
  • FIG. 9 shows informational cards relating to sales of the band's recordings. This is one method for the player to build up assets, which he will need for the upper stages of the game.
  • FIG. 10 shows the informational cards relating to expenses. Any number of expenses can crop up for a band, from medical expenses to recording costs, from hiring stage hands to paying tax bills.
  • FIG. 11 shows examples of cards drawn while on a tour of the USA. Many of these require the player to lose a turn, or to advance to a store to purchase new musical equipment.
  • FIG. 12 shows cards for the recording studio. Also, new audition cards are displayed.
  • FIG. 13 shows cards initiating a world tour. The tour may start in Asia, Africa, South America, or Europe.
  • FIG. 14 shows the card that sends the player to Hollywood to begin a career in video and the movies.
  • FIG. 15 shows several cards that land the band or the individual player in court.
  • Playing the Game
  • The game comes with a game board, playing tokens, dice, informational cards, and auxiliary tokens. Optional CD or video may be included with the game to provide instructions. A player selects a token corresponding to the instrument (or vocal music) she wishes to play (or sing).
  • The player starts off as an amateur player in a suburban garage band, represented by the outside track on the game board. The player places her token on the board, on a square bearing a manager's image. The player rolls a pair of dice, and moves her token clockwise the number of squares exposed on the dice. The player draws a card of the category shown on the square on which her token lands, or in some cases follows the directions printed on the square.
  • When a player lands on a manager's spot, she draws a card from the manager's set. If the manager on the card matches the manager on the square, the player automatically can draw a contract card. If there is no match, the player can keep the manager card or return it. (It is advisable to keep at least one manager card, as the player cannot advance without one.)
  • Then the player continues playing on the first level until she lands her token on one of the corner squares containing a recording studio. If the player has a manager card, she may now draw a contract card. If the contract card carries a logo that matches the recording studio on which the player's token has landed, you are automatically signed, and can advance to the second level. If the contract is unsatisfactory, of course, the player can decline to sign, and play on in the hopes of landing a better contract.
  • The player can also obtain a contract by landing on a manager's square, and drawing a signed manager's card. However, note that a player cannot draw a manager's card if he already holds 3 such cards. So it is best to limit your manager's cards.
  • Manager's cards also help in token movement. If a player has yet to acquire a manager, he must roll 2 dice and advance the number of squares indicated. If the player has a manager, every roll of dice he rolls gives him a choice of squares to move his player clockwise:
      • If he rolls dice showing unequal values (ie, not ‘doubles’), he may advance his token the sum of the dice (the usual move), or he may advance only the number of squares shown on either one of the dice. Thus, he has 3 options—the lesser number shown, the greater number shown, or the sum of the two dice.
      • If the player rolls two dice showing equal values (‘doubles’), he may move his token forward one value, forward two values (the total amount showing), backward one value (counter-clockwise), or backward 2 values (sum of dice). Thus, the player has 4 choices of movement by holding a manager and rolling doubles.
  • “Snake eyes” (rolling two dice, each showing a value of 1) offers a special opportunity for the player. In addition to moving in accord with the above rule (forward or backward 1 or 2 squares), the player may draw a manager card or a contract card. However, he may not draw a signed card from rolling snake eyes.
  • At the outer (first) level, the players have no money. They may go into debt, though they will have to pay off before exiting the final level. The player simply holds on to the expense card until receiving the money to pay it off and turn it in.
  • At the 2nd level and above, players can earn money through playing ‘gigs’ and through receiving sales cards. Only cards and gigs specifying amounts are payable to the player. There is no credit for movie and video recordings and productions, for ‘lucky breaks’, and the like.
  • A player advances to the 2nd level by landing on a corner recording studio for which he has a contract, signed, and a manager. The player hands back any Level 1 cards to the bank, for he has no further need of them. The player collects a signing bonus per the contract, and a new release black record disk. On the next turn, the player may advance to the 2nd row on the board—a U.S. tour.
  • Level Two The United States Tour
  • The player has now advanced to the upper levels. As noted previously she will place her token on the recording studio whose contract she has accepted and signed. Collect a black record disk, and when recording is completed on your next turn, you will roll two dice and choose one, moving your token the value of the die selected. All movement on upper levels is clock wise only unless you roll doubles. If you do roll doubles, you may either move forward or backward the value of one die. [The World tour on Level 3, however, used one die only, clockwise.]
  • The player will begin his US Tour at the first city at the upper left of your studio logo, for instance, Los Angeles is the starting point for WB Records. For example, suppose the player entering level two rolls a one and a five. The player will choose the movement of one over the five and collect $ 500,000 cash for each of your performances in Los Angeles, 1 square from WB studios. Had the player selected the 5, his token would land in Seattle, thus worth only $100,000 per performance.
  • In each turn thereafter, the player continues to roll two dice and choose one only to indicate token movement. If either one of the numbers rolled equals the exact number necessary to reach an expense card square, the player must take that value and draw an expense card. Thus, the choice of die to control movement cannot avoid expense cards.
  • Snake eyes gives her a choice of card to draw, management, sales, or expense. The token can be moved in the manner used for doubles, forward or backwards the value of 1 die.
  • Management Cards
  • Management cards determine work, such as recording new releases, going on world tours, producing videos or movies, and so forth. They also include potential traps. Most of these cards however are positive and are needed to keep the contract pieces flowing. Notice that the management spots each have a musical Instrument on them. These form an added strategic bonus, potentially to the player's advantage. If a player's token lands on his Instrument spot, the player can choose to draw any card, record a new release, begin a world tour, or perform a benefit concert if needed. This helps even the opportunities allowing musicians closer to fulfilling the terms of their contracts. The player must follow the Instructions on each card drawn.
  • Level Three The World Tour
  • One way a player may advance to the world tour is through drawing a management card with a globe on it which says ‘World Tour’.
  • The only other method is by landing her token on her instrument. The card will instruct her which country to begin her world tour in. If she landed on the square by choice, she may choose the starting country. She must hold on to her world tour card until she has decided to exit the tour permanently. This will remind her where on the board her token came from if she decides to, or must leave the tour for any reason other than a conviction resulting in jail time. The choice is hers. If she wants to resume a world tour, she may do so. Or she may simply start into a US tour, for instance if a card has taken her out of the tour for any reason. When ending your world tour, turn in the card. On this level you roll one die and move clock wise only. Collect as much cash as you can and be strategic with your decisions.
  • Returning to the world tour does not allow the player to collect another globe. She has probably made a strategic decision to return to the world tour to collect a lot of money.
  • Level Four: Hollywood
  • On this Final level, the player is assigned to do a specific job—to produce videos or movies. The player arrives at Level Four by drawing a management card that instructs her go to Hollywood for video recording. If she decides to accept this work offer, she must place her token on the video space in level four, roll one die and multiply the value on the card by $ 100,000. This is her budget for each video. A player can only make three videos per black disc in hand. Flops, Gold, and Platinum disks don't count toward the total. Thus if a player has two black discs, he can make a maximum of six videos as long as he has the hard cash to pay for them. If he can only afford one video, then he may make only one video. Sorry, no credit for videos.
  • For example: you placed your piece on the video tape in Hollywood and roll a four. Your cost is $ 400,000 per video. You then get another free toss before the end of that turn. You roll a three. Place $ 300,000 on the video card in front of you. You need $ 100,000 more to collect your token. Next turn you roll a five. You now have $ 800,000, which you can use to pay for and collect two video cassettes. Continue on in this manner each turn rolling one die and paying the indicated sum of money until you either reach your maximum video allowance or you run out of cash. When finished taping them simply return to the US tour unless you have drawn the taping card from the world tour and you choose to return there. You must have your world tour card in hand in order to return to the world tour.
  • Movies are produced much—the same way. Instead of rolling two dice you roll one die and multiply by $ 1,000,000. That will indicate the player's budget per movie. Be sure you have this amount in hard cash—otherwise you can not make your movie. In the same turn roll two dice and multiply by $ 100,000 and place that amount in front of you. Then each turn thereafter follow the same process, setting aside the amount determined by the roll. Collect the movie reel and a black sound track disc once the budget has been reached. You may then resume your tour as before.
  • After a player has produced a movie, she can now be nominated for an Oscar, and collect movie royalties. Plan these strategies wisely. A player should have a minimum of $ 6,000,000 cash on hand before accepting a movie offer.
  • Oscars and Grammy Nominations
  • Musicians receive Oscar and Grammy nominations through Sales records or by landing on the Awards ceremony spot. The card will be either an Oscar or a Grammy nomination. [They are two different awards and tokens.] Most contracts require the musician to win at least one or both awards.
  • If nominated by a sales card, the player will pick up her token and place it on the award ceremony spot located on one of the four corners. On the player's next turn, she must choose high or low. High represents a die showing four or better, with low being three or less. The player then rolls one die. If the ‘high-low’ selection turns out correct (ie, she rolls a 4 after selecting ‘high’), the player wins the award. She may give her speech and collect her prize. If the player mis-guesses, no award.
  • On the next turn, the player may elect to continue a U.S. tour or resume a world tour. If she were nominated while on world tour, she can choose to return to that tour, or simply proceed now on a US tour. Alternatively, the player may elect to try one more time to win the Award. Again, she will pick high or low, and roll one die. With good luck, she will win the award 2nd time. If not, she must roll on next turn and elect a tour as per above.
  • Royalties
  • Royalties are granted by either choosing to land on the spot or by drawing a sales card which indicates where to place the player's token on the board. Royalties pay one hundred thousand dollars times the number showing on the sum of two dice, after the player rolls the dice. Sales cards offer even greater rewards, paying higher dollar payouts per roll of one or two dice. The player should, as always, read and follow the instructions on the sales card. Royalties are drawn from sales of records, videos, movies and merchandising residuals of all sorts.
  • Vacation
  • A player whose token lands on a vacation square in the normal course of play pays nothing. It's a free spot unless one's token is sent there on card instruction. On occasion, a token will be sent there by a card drawn from Management and Expense cards. Unless a player voluntarily stops on this spot, he will always lose one turn for rest and relaxation, and pay for the vacation.
  • The amount paid for the vacation is determined by rolling the dice as specified on the instructions on the card. If the player doesn't have the money for the vacation, he'll have to ‘charge it’ by holding on to that card and paying the maximum value when the player later has the cash to pay off debts.
  • Court
  • A musician, or the entire band, is sent to court by drawing an Expense or management card. This spot means nothing if the player chooses to stop and visit the court room on that turn. But if the player has drawn a card in which he is being sued or facing criminal charges, again the player must follow instructions on the card. ‘Pick up your token and place it in the court room and do exactly what the card says.’
  • Most civil suits can be settled out of court. A musician may wish to do so—if he has the money. This avoids the player wasting precious time that could be spent earning money working on his Contract. Alternatively, the player can fight the case by rolling a specific roll of one or two dice as specified in the court docket. If a settlement is possible, a player can settle at any time while fighting the charges before the third turn dead line. After 3 turns, he loses his opportunity to settle, and must fight.
  • If you a player loses a case and doesn't have the money to pay the damages, he may hold on to the court card and pay it when he acquires the money. No player may claim victory of the game unless all debts are paid.
  • Criminal cases could end in jail time. If a player is jailed, he will stay there until he rolls doubles, allowing him to he released. Good news though. While in jail, you were highly creative. He can after release return to the studio and record a new release. Collect a black disc at studio expense.
  • While the present invention has been described at some length and with some particularity with respect to the several described embodiments, it is not intended that it should be limited to any such particulars or embodiments or any particular embodiment, but it is to be construed with references to the appended claims so as to provide the broadest possible interpretation of such claims in view of the prior art and, therefore, to effectively encompass the intended scope of the invention.

Claims (10)

1. A board game emulating career choices in the music industry, said game comprising:
a game board imprinted with indicia appropriate to the music industry;
token pieces representing the players;
tokens representing money;
a pair of dice;
informational cards, each such card imprinted with information relating to the music industry on one face thereof, with a blank or patterned nonindicating surface on the opposite face; and,
a set of tokens in the shape of records.
2. The board game of claim 1, said method further comprising of a plurality of levels;
wherein the upper levels are only accessed by a player when he successfully negotiates the challenge presented by the lower levels.
3. The board game of claim 1, wherein said informational cards include information of events likely to occur during a music band touring the United States.
4. The board game of claim 1, wherein said informational cards include information of events likely to occur during a music band touring the world
5. The board game of claim 1, wherein said informational cards include information of events likely to occur if a music band or one of its members defends a lawsuit.
6. The method of playing a board game in accordance with claim 1 wherein the board consists of a plurality of levels, corresponding to difference aspects of a career in music.
7. A method of playing the board game of claim 1, said method comprising:
each player selects a playing token, and places it on the board;
in turn, each player rolls the dice and moves his token the corresponding number of spaces on the board, in a clockwise direction;
selects an informational card, if so directed by the instructions on the space on which his piece has landed; and,
following the directions printed on the informational card.
8. The method of playing a board game in accordance with claim 7 wherein the game is played with a chance means comprising a pair of six-sided dice with each side containing indicia of typical situations which occur during play of the game being simulated.
9. The method of playing a board game in accordance with claim 7 wherein the sets of questions are designed to teach the players about the rules, terminology, strategy, situations, and history of the music industry being simulated.
10. The method of playing a board game in accordance with claim 7 wherein the board consists of a plurality of levels, corresponding to difference aspects of a career in music.
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