US20080002755A1 - Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor - Google Patents

Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080002755A1
US20080002755A1 US11/477,267 US47726706A US2008002755A1 US 20080002755 A1 US20080002755 A1 US 20080002755A1 US 47726706 A US47726706 A US 47726706A US 2008002755 A1 US2008002755 A1 US 2008002755A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
carbon nanotubes
component
method
die
including
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/477,267
Inventor
Nachiket R. Raravikar
Neha Patel
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Intel Corp
Original Assignee
Intel Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Intel Corp filed Critical Intel Corp
Priority to US11/477,267 priority Critical patent/US20080002755A1/en
Assigned to INTEL CORPORATION reassignment INTEL CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: PATEL, NEHA, RARAVIKAR, NACHIKET R.
Publication of US20080002755A1 publication Critical patent/US20080002755A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01KMEASURING TEMPERATURE; MEASURING QUANTITY OF HEAT; THERMALLY-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G01K7/00Measuring temperature based on the use of electric or magnetic elements directly sensitive to heat ; Power supply, e.g. by thermoelectric elements
    • G01K7/16Measuring temperature based on the use of electric or magnetic elements directly sensitive to heat ; Power supply, e.g. by thermoelectric elements using resistive elements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B82NANOTECHNOLOGY
    • B82YSPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MEASUREMENT OR ANALYSIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF NANOSTRUCTURES
    • B82Y15/00Nanotechnology for interacting, sensing or actuating, e.g. quantum dots as markers in protein assays or molecular motors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01KMEASURING TEMPERATURE; MEASURING QUANTITY OF HEAT; THERMALLY-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G01K2211/00Thermometers based on nanotechnology
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2224/00Indexing scheme for arrangements for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies and methods related thereto as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2224/01Means for bonding being attached to, or being formed on, the surface to be connected, e.g. chip-to-package, die-attach, "first-level" interconnects; Manufacturing methods related thereto
    • H01L2224/10Bump connectors; Manufacturing methods related thereto
    • H01L2224/15Structure, shape, material or disposition of the bump connectors after the connecting process
    • H01L2224/16Structure, shape, material or disposition of the bump connectors after the connecting process of an individual bump connector
    • H01L2224/161Disposition
    • H01L2224/16151Disposition the bump connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive
    • H01L2224/16221Disposition the bump connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive the body and the item being stacked
    • H01L2224/16225Disposition the bump connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive the body and the item being stacked the item being non-metallic, e.g. insulating substrate with or without metallisation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2224/00Indexing scheme for arrangements for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies and methods related thereto as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2224/01Means for bonding being attached to, or being formed on, the surface to be connected, e.g. chip-to-package, die-attach, "first-level" interconnects; Manufacturing methods related thereto
    • H01L2224/26Layer connectors, e.g. plate connectors, solder or adhesive layers; Manufacturing methods related thereto
    • H01L2224/31Structure, shape, material or disposition of the layer connectors after the connecting process
    • H01L2224/32Structure, shape, material or disposition of the layer connectors after the connecting process of an individual layer connector
    • H01L2224/321Disposition
    • H01L2224/32151Disposition the layer connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive
    • H01L2224/32221Disposition the layer connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive the body and the item being stacked
    • H01L2224/32225Disposition the layer connector connecting between a semiconductor or solid-state body and an item not being a semiconductor or solid-state body, e.g. chip-to-substrate, chip-to-passive the body and the item being stacked the item being non-metallic, e.g. insulating substrate with or without metallisation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2224/00Indexing scheme for arrangements for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies and methods related thereto as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2224/73Means for bonding being of different types provided for in two or more of groups H01L2224/10, H01L2224/18, H01L2224/26, H01L2224/34, H01L2224/42, H01L2224/50, H01L2224/63, H01L2224/71
    • H01L2224/732Location after the connecting process
    • H01L2224/73201Location after the connecting process on the same surface
    • H01L2224/73203Bump and layer connectors
    • H01L2224/73204Bump and layer connectors the bump connector being embedded into the layer connector
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/0001Technical content checked by a classifier
    • H01L2924/00011Not relevant to the scope of the group, the symbol of which is combined with the symbol of this group
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/0001Technical content checked by a classifier
    • H01L2924/00014Technical content checked by a classifier the subject-matter covered by the group, the symbol of which is combined with the symbol of this group, being disclosed without further technical details
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/15Details of package parts other than the semiconductor or other solid state devices to be connected
    • H01L2924/151Die mounting substrate
    • H01L2924/153Connection portion
    • H01L2924/1531Connection portion the connection portion being formed only on the surface of the substrate opposite to the die mounting surface
    • H01L2924/15311Connection portion the connection portion being formed only on the surface of the substrate opposite to the die mounting surface being a ball array, e.g. BGA
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S977/00Nanotechnology
    • Y10S977/902Specified use of nanostructure
    • Y10S977/932Specified use of nanostructure for electronic or optoelectronic application
    • Y10S977/953Detector using nanostructure
    • Y10S977/955Of thermal property
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2918Rod, strand, filament or fiber including free carbon or carbide or therewith [not as steel]

Abstract

Temperatures in microelectronic integrated circuit packages and components may be measured in situ using carbon nanotube networks. An array of carbon nanotubes strung between upstanding structures may be used to measure local temperature. Because of the carbon nanotubes, a highly accurate temperature measurement may be achieved. In some cases, the carbon nanotubes and the upstanding structures may be secured to a substrate that is subsequently attached to a microelectronic package.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • This relates generally to measuring temperature in connection with microelectronic packages and components.
  • The effects of temperature on microelectronic packages and components may be various. Many packaging processes involve the application of elevated temperatures. These elevated temperatures may adversely affect components, including the integrated circuit chip within the package. In addition, the packages may be exposed to various other temperature effects which may have an impact on the packaged components. Also, the integrated circuits themselves can be exposed to various temperature conditions.
  • It is known how to integrate integrated circuit temperature sensors within an overall integrated circuit. Temperature readings can be obtained from serpentine, integrated temperature sensors. However, the accuracy of these measurements may, in some cases, be limited. Moreover, the temperature sensors may take up a relatively significant percentage of the overall available integrated circuit space. Also, in some cases, the places at which such temperature sensors can be formed are limited. Namely, there are generally limited to areas of sufficient size that can receive such an integrated element.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a greatly enlarged, partial, cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged, cross-sectional view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 after further processing;
  • FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 2 in position on an integrated circuit or other microelectronic package component;
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of a package in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of a package in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of an integrated circuit in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view of still another embodiment of the present invention using two spaced metallic lines; and
  • FIG. 8 is a system depiction in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to FIG. 1, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention, a temperature sensor 10 may be formed on an integrated circuit substrate 12. A plurality of metallic structures 16 may be formed which extend upwardly from the substrate 12. The structures 16 may be made of a material suitable for the growth of bridge-like carbon nanotubes 18. Those carbon nanotubes 18 may act as temperature sensors. Namely, the conductivity of those nanotubes is a function of temperature. By measuring the conductivity of the nanotubes, by passing current through them, one can determine the local temperature.
  • In some embodiments of the present invention, a large number of upstanding structures 16 may be formed. They may be formed in regular arrays, in some embodiments, using well known techniques. The arrays may be composed of an inner pillar 14 which may be a non-metallic material and a metallic coating that forms the upstanding structure 16.
  • Carbon nanotubes 18 may bridge between adjacent structures 16. Thus, a plurality of carbon nanotubes 18 may be randomly arranged in a generally horizontal configuration transverse to the upstanding structures 16.
  • In some embodiments of the present invention, the structures 16 may be formed directly on the substrate 12. The structures 16 may include the pillars 14, in one embodiment of the present invention, covered by a metal catalyst to form the metallic structure 16. Suitable metal catalysts include iron, cobalt, and nickel. As an example, the structure 16 may be of a height of about a micron.
  • The structures may be formed, for example, by glancing angled deposition methods. By controlling the substrate 12 rotational motion, including both its angle and velocity, the structure 16 height can be controlled. Although different metal catalysts may be utilized to form the structures 16, nickel may be preferred because it may offer lower contact resistance with the nanotubes 18 to be formed subsequently.
  • In some embodiments of the present invention, some number of the upstanding structures 16 on the substrate 12 may be used to make a separable unit 20, shown in FIG. 2. The separable unit 20 may be formed of a portion of the substrate 12 whose thickness has been reduced so that the substrate thickness does not adversely affect the temperature measurements. Thus, the substrate 12 may be reduced in size and thickness to form the unit 20 with some lesser number of upstanding structures 16 formed thereon.
  • The carbon nanotubes 18, shown in FIG. 1, may be grown so as to bridge between structures 16. This is particularly useful when large arrays of structures 16 are provided in regular rows and columns. In one embodiment, gas phase chemical vapor deposition may be used to grow the carbon nanotubes. In one embodiment of the present invention, methane may be used as a source for carbon for the growth of carbon nanotubes. As a result, nanotubes may extend from one upstanding structure to another. Argon gas may be supplied during the deposition of the carbon nanotubes to reduce oxidation. A pressure of about 500 Torr and a furnace temperature in a range including, but not limited to, 800 to 950 degrees Celsius in the methane environment may be utilized in one embodiment.
  • Advantageously, adjacent structures 16 are spaced reasonably proximately so that the carbon nanotubes (FIG. 3) of a given length may span across them.
  • The structures 16 may be formed, in one embodiment, by depositing a catalyst over the pillar 14, preformed on the substrate 12. For example, the pillars 14 may be silicon or silicon dioxide pillars. The pillars may be formed, for example, by growing or depositing the pillar material, masking, and etching to form the pillars in the desired arrangement. In some embodiments, at least two of the pillars may be aligned with a crystallographic plane of the substrate 12 in an embodiment where the substrate is a crystalline semiconductor.
  • During catalyst film deposition, the substrate 12 may be tilted twice about +/−45 degrees to spread the catalyst over the pillars 14 to form the structures 16. The carbon nanotubes 18 later form on the tops and sidewalls of the pillars 14 where the catalyst is present. The catalyst may not completely cover the pillars in some cases.
  • In some embodiments, an array of pillars (not shown) may be grown, but only some of the pillars may be activated with the catalyst. For example, only two pillars may be activated with catalyst so carbon nanotubes bridge only the two catalyst activated pillars. The selective activation may be accomplished using masks or selective catalyst deposition. While cylindrically shaped structures 16 are depicted, other shapes may also be used.
  • Generally, the nanotubes 18 grow generally or roughly horizontally from the top to the bottom along the structures 16. The nanotubes span like bridges over the substrate 12.
  • In some embodiments, the substrate 12 (FIG. 1) may subsequently be thinned down to form the unit 20 (FIG. 2) so that its own thickness does not contribute to changes in the temperature of the die whose temperature is being measured. A thinned down unit 20 may then be glued onto any polymeric or ceramic surface.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, the nanotubes 18 may then be electrically coupled to an external temperature sensor (not shown) using metal lines 30. Particularly, the unit 20 may be adhesively secured to a structure 32 whose temperature is to be measured. Then, metal lines 30 may be deposited or otherwise formed to the structures 16. The metal lines 30 may then connect each side of the array of carbon nanotubes 18 to a suitable pad (not shown) to which a temperature sensing circuit may be attached. The metal lines 30 and the pads may be printed using conventional processes such as screen printing or plating.
  • In other embodiments, the nanotubes may be prepared on a substrate using a tall pillar pattern such as one which uses staples secured to a substrate. By “tall,” it is intended to refer to structures 16 having a height on the order of (but not limited to) 0.7 centimeters. Subsequently, the nanotubes are grown and metallizations are completed. Other structures 16 may be also be utilized to grow bridge-like carbon nanotubes, including telephone pole and soccer goal oriented office staples. Literally, upstanding office staples may be utilized by securing them to silicon wafers using an appropriate adhesive such as carbon tape. The staples may have their points upstanding (“telephone poles”) or inverted (“soccer goal”) and extending into the substrate.
  • Then, carbon nanotubes may be grown using chemical vapor deposition in a furnace at 1373 degrees Kelvin under about 100 m Torr vacuum. To 0.02 g/ml solution of ferrocene and 10 ml of hexane, two volume percent thiophene is added. The hexane may act as a source of carbon and the ferrocene acts as a catalyst for gas diffusion formation of carbon nanotubes. The solution may be heated to 150° C. and then introduced into a horizontal quartz tube furnace at an average rate of 0.1 mls. per minute for ten minutes. Other process parameters may also be used.
  • Thiophene is known to promote the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in a hydrogen gas atmosphere, whereas multi-walled carbon nanotubes are found to grow predominantly in the absence of a hydrogen gas atmosphere. Single walled carbon nanotubes or multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be used by controlling the nanotubes growth conditions by controlling the hydrogen gas concentration in the furnace (no hydrogen gas atmosphere giving multi-walled carbon nanotubes, whereas hydrogen gas atmosphere may promote the single walled carbon nanotube growth).
  • Although the recipe and numbers recited above are recommended to grow carbon nanotubes, the growth conditions are not limited to this recipe or these numbers, but, rather, is inclusive of them. In some temperature sensing applications, multi-walled carbon nanotubes may be advantageous.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, temperatures associated with surface mount techniques may be measured by growing carbon nanotubes across second level interconnects, such as solder ball or surface mount pads 26 a. The pads 26 a may mount solder balls 34. The solder balls 34 may couple the package 37 to an external printed circuit board (not shown) such as a motherboard.
  • The carbon nanotubes 18 may be grown so as to span between sufficiently adjacent pads 26 a. In some cases, only some of the pads 26 a may be used for the temperature measurement and other pads may have no such function, but, instead, function conventionally as second level interconnects. In some cases, the pads 26 a may be otherwise electrically non-functional and may only be used for temperature measurement purposes.
  • The pads 26 a may be formed on a suitable substrate 36, over which is mounted the integrated circuit die 40. A housing 38 may cover the die 40 and be secured to the substrate 36. First level interconnects 44 may be positioned between the die 40 and the substrate 36.
  • Referring to FIG. 5, basically the same package is shown. However, in this case, the carbon nanotubes 18 are grown between first level interconnects 44, instead of between second level interconnects, as depicted in FIG. 4. In this way, carbon nanotubes 18 can be selectively grown between appropriately spaced elements to make temperature measurements for first and/or second level interconnects.
  • In some cases, the length of the carbon nanotubes may be different for different applications in order to span the necessary space. For example, in some cases, it may be desirable to have carbon nanotubes on the order of 1 micron to span between metal lines on a die, 10 to 50 microns to span between adjacent surface mount pads, and all the way up to 1 millimeter for adjacent solder bumps.
  • Generally, different techniques may be utilized to form the carbon nanotubes in different applications. In one embodiment, some interconnects, such as the solder ball pads 26, may be masked and other interconnects, such as the solder balls 26 a, may not be masked so that the carbon nanotubes form only between the exposed pads 26 a. As another example, a unit 20 may be laminated into position between adjacent pads 26 a to achieve a comparable effect. As still another possibility, nanotubes in a solvent solution may be dispensed as a liquid at selected locations at room temperature and allowed to dry. As still another option, electrodeposition may be utilized.
  • For the first level interconnects, it may be desirable to use the electrodeposition or liquid deposition techniques to avoid exposing the substrate or die 40 to excessive temperatures that may be required in some carbon nanotube fabrication processes.
  • In some embodiments, it may be desirable for the first level interconnects, from the silicon to the substrate, to connect to second level interconnects that are actually active (non-temperature sensing) interconnects, even though the first level interconnects with the carbon nanotubes between them may be electrically non-functional for their normal interconnect (non-temperature sensing) purposes. Thus, the first level interconnects with the carbon nanotubes connected to them may be only functional for sensing temperature, but may be connected to second level interconnects that are effective, but are effective really only to convey the signals to and from the carbon nanotubes of the first level interconnects. Similarly, the second level interconnects with carbon nanotubes may be functional only for purposes of providing signals to and from the carbon nanotubes for purposes of making temperature measurements and perform no other interconnection function, in some embodiments.
  • In some embodiments, the nanotubes may be highly accurate temperature indicators. Because they have anisotropic characteristics in the length dimension and have very small dimensions transversely to length dimensions, high temperature resolutions may be obtained with carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes may tend to be atomically relatively perfect and chemically stable and, therefore, may be more reliable as sensors than metallic structures of similar dimensions. In addition, temperatures in hard to reach locations may be measured in some cases.
  • Referring to FIG. 6, the units 20 may be secured to opposite sides of an integrated circuit die 40 in another embodiment. In one embodiment, a unit 20 may be secured to the front side 42 of the die 40 and, in another embodiment, a unit 20 may be secured to the back side 44 of the die 40, as shown. In some cases, temperature sensing units 20 may be provided on both die sides, together with suitable metallizations to an external temperature sensor. The suitable metallizations may be provided to a current source which provides current to the carbon nanotubes in the units 20 and measures the resulting current therefrom to determine temperature in accordance with known principles.
  • Referring to FIG. 7, in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, spaced metal lines 26 may be bridged by carbon nanotubes 18. The carbon nanotubes 18 may span an intermediate underlying trench 24 and a substrate 22. The metal lines 26 may be dummy metal lines for temperature purposes only or, in some cases, could be actual metal lines. Where the lines 26 are actual metal lines, these metal lines may be subsequently used for carrying signals, for example, by first destroying the carbon nanotubes 18 after having used them, if desired, for temperature measurements. Alternatively, the lines 26 may couple to a temperature sensor that uses the varying resistance of the nanotubes to develop a temperature indication.
  • Finally, referring to FIG. 8, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention, the integrated circuits or packaged devices with the integrated temperature sensors may be incorporated into a system including a processor 10. The processor 10 may be coupled by a bus 38 to a dynamic random access memory 40 and an input/output device 42. While a simple architecture is shown, many other embodiments may be possible.
  • References throughout this specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” mean that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one implementation encompassed within the present invention. Thus, appearances of the phrase “one embodiment” or “in an embodiment” are not necessarily referring to the same embodiment. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be instituted in other suitable forms other than the particular embodiment illustrated and all such forms may be encompassed within the claims of the present application.
  • While the present invention has been described with respect to a limited number of embodiments, those skilled in the art will appreciate numerous modifications and variations therefrom. It is intended that the appended claims cover all such modifications and variations as fall within the true spirit and scope of this present invention.

Claims (25)

1. A method comprising:
using carbon nanotubes to measure temperature on a microelectronic integrated circuit.
2. The method of claim 1 including forming a pair of spaced apart vertical structures on a substrate and growing carbon nanotubes between said vertical structures.
3. The method of claim 2 including forming a unit by reducing the thickness of said substrate.
4. The method of claim 3 including securing said unit to an integrated circuit.
5. The method of claim 3 including securing said unit to a package component of a microelectronic integrated circuit.
6. The method of claim 5 including securing said unit to a first level interconnect.
7. The method of claim 5 including securing said unit to a second level interconnect.
8. The method of claim 6 including providing current to said unit in a first level interconnect through a second level interconnect.
9. The method of claim 1 including providing a plurality of carbon nanotubes extending across adjacent interconnects.
10. The method of claim 1 including providing at least two carbon nanotubes on the back side of an integrated circuit die to measure temperature on said die.
11. A microelectronic component comprising:
a microelectronic element; and
a pair of carbon nanotubes supported on said element to measure the temperature of said element.
12. The component of claim 11 wherein said component is a first level interconnect.
13. The component of claim 11 wherein said component is a second level interconnect.
14. The component of claim 11 wherein said component is part of an integrated circuit package.
15. The component of claim 11 wherein said component is an integrated circuit die.
16. The component of claim 15 including carbon nanotubes on opposite sides of said die.
17. The component of claim 11 wherein said carbon nanotubes are mounted on a substrate secured to said component.
18. The component of claim 17 wherein said carbon nanotubes are glued to said component.
19. The component of claim 11 wherein said component is a first level interconnect and is coupled to a second level interconnect.
20. The component of claim 11 wherein said carbon nanotubes extend between a pair of metallic structures.
21. A system comprising:
a processor;
a dynamic random access memory coupled to said processor; and
said processor including a microelectronic element and a pair of carbon nanotubes supported on said element to measure the temperature of said element.
22. The system of claim 21 wherein said processor is in the form of a die having carbon nanotubes on two opposed sides of said die.
23. The system of claim 21 wherein said processor includes a package and carbon nanotubes on said package.
24. The system of claim 21 wherein said processor includes a die having carbon nanotubes formed on at least one side thereof.
25. The system of claim 21 wherein said carbon nanotubes are formed on a substrate and secured to said die.
US11/477,267 2006-06-29 2006-06-29 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor Abandoned US20080002755A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/477,267 US20080002755A1 (en) 2006-06-29 2006-06-29 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/477,267 US20080002755A1 (en) 2006-06-29 2006-06-29 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor
TW96123330A TWI451541B (en) 2006-06-29 2007-06-27 Method for measuring temperature in a microelectronic integrated circuit package, microelectronic component and computing system
CN 200710129019 CN101097164B (en) 2006-06-29 2007-06-29 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor
HK08106952A HK1116537A1 (en) 2006-06-29 2008-06-23 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor
US13/447,469 US9028142B2 (en) 2006-06-29 2012-04-16 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/447,469 Continuation US9028142B2 (en) 2006-06-29 2012-04-16 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080002755A1 true US20080002755A1 (en) 2008-01-03

Family

ID=38876632

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/477,267 Abandoned US20080002755A1 (en) 2006-06-29 2006-06-29 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor
US13/447,469 Active 2026-08-11 US9028142B2 (en) 2006-06-29 2012-04-16 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/447,469 Active 2026-08-11 US9028142B2 (en) 2006-06-29 2012-04-16 Integrated microelectronic package temperature sensor

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US20080002755A1 (en)
CN (1) CN101097164B (en)
HK (1) HK1116537A1 (en)
TW (1) TWI451541B (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090135883A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2009-05-28 International Business Machines Corporation Multi-Layered Thermal Sensor for Integrated Circuits and Other Layered Structures
US20090192241A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2009-07-30 Nachiket Raravikar Aligned nanotube bearing composite material
ITSA20080022A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-09 Univ Degli Studi Salerno Temperature sensor based on self-sustaining networks of carbon nanotubes.
US20100308848A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Kaul Anupama B Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes
CN102359828A (en) * 2011-07-12 2012-02-22 东南大学 Micro-electronic temperature sensor and manufacturing process thereof
US20120056149A1 (en) * 2010-09-02 2012-03-08 Nantero, Inc. Methods for adjusting the conductivity range of a nanotube fabric layer
US20130230703A1 (en) * 2007-05-30 2013-09-05 Ramot At Tel-Aviv University Ltd. Nanotube network and method of fabricating the same
US9022644B1 (en) * 2011-09-09 2015-05-05 Sitime Corporation Micromachined thermistor and temperature measurement circuitry, and method of manufacturing and operating same
US20150168565A1 (en) * 2012-07-12 2015-06-18 Università degli Studi di Salerno Carbon nanomaterials based real time radiation dosimeter

Families Citing this family (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8568027B2 (en) 2009-08-26 2013-10-29 Ut-Battelle, Llc Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors
CN104011850B (en) * 2011-12-27 2017-07-18 英特尔公司 Carbon nanotubes and semiconductor device manufacturing method of nano-deterministic
US20130195140A1 (en) * 2012-01-31 2013-08-01 Vittorio Scardaci Temperature Sensor
US10067006B2 (en) 2014-06-19 2018-09-04 Elwha Llc Nanostructure sensors and sensing systems
US10285220B2 (en) 2014-10-24 2019-05-07 Elwha Llc Nanostructure heaters and heating systems and methods of fabricating the same
US20160123911A1 (en) * 2014-10-31 2016-05-05 Elwha Llc Systems and methods for selective sensing and selective thermal heating using nanostructures
CN104501982A (en) * 2014-12-19 2015-04-08 桂林电子科技大学 Temperature sensor comprising modified carbon nanotubes
US10178763B2 (en) 2015-12-21 2019-01-08 Intel Corporation Warpage mitigation in printed circuit board assemblies
US10260961B2 (en) * 2015-12-21 2019-04-16 Intel Corporation Integrated circuit packages with temperature sensor traces

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6919730B2 (en) * 2002-03-18 2005-07-19 Honeywell International, Inc. Carbon nanotube sensor
US20060038167A1 (en) * 2004-08-20 2006-02-23 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated carbon nanotube sensors
US7105851B2 (en) * 2003-09-24 2006-09-12 Intel Corporation Nanotubes for integrated circuits
US7118941B2 (en) * 2003-06-25 2006-10-10 Intel Corporation Method of fabricating a composite carbon nanotube thermal interface device
US20070102809A1 (en) * 2003-06-25 2007-05-10 Dubin Valery M Methods of fabricating a composite carbon nanotube thermal interface device
US20070155136A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2007-07-05 Intel Corporation Carbon nanotube and metal thermal interface material, process of making same, packages containing same, and systems containing same
US20070228361A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Nachiket Raravikar Carbon nanotube-solder composite structures for interconnects, process of making same, packages containing same, and systems containing same
US7335983B2 (en) * 2005-12-16 2008-02-26 Intel Corporation Carbon nanotube micro-chimney and thermo siphon die-level cooling
US20080067619A1 (en) * 2006-09-19 2008-03-20 Farahani Mohammad M Stress sensor for in-situ measurement of package-induced stress in semiconductor devices

Family Cites Families (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8920619B2 (en) * 2003-03-19 2014-12-30 Hach Company Carbon nanotube sensor
CN1193430C (en) * 2000-06-27 2005-03-16 三星电子株式会社 Vertical nanometer size transistor using carbon monometer tube and manufacturing method thereof
US6778316B2 (en) * 2001-10-24 2004-08-17 William Marsh Rice University Nanoparticle-based all-optical sensors
US20070114573A1 (en) * 2002-09-04 2007-05-24 Tzong-Ru Han Sensor device with heated nanostructure
US20070045756A1 (en) * 2002-09-04 2007-03-01 Ying-Lan Chang Nanoelectronic sensor with integral suspended micro-heater
JP3921533B2 (en) * 2002-12-04 2007-05-30 独立行政法人物質・材料研究機構 Temperature sensing element and its manufacturing method, and a nano thermometer
US20040188780A1 (en) * 2003-03-25 2004-09-30 Kurtz Anthony D. Nanotube semiconductor structures with varying electrical properties
US20040238907A1 (en) * 2003-06-02 2004-12-02 Pinkerton Joseph F. Nanoelectromechanical transistors and switch systems
US20050036905A1 (en) * 2003-08-12 2005-02-17 Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Defect controlled nanotube sensor and method of production
US7011737B2 (en) * 2004-04-02 2006-03-14 The Penn State Research Foundation Titania nanotube arrays for use as sensors and method of producing
US7194912B2 (en) * 2004-07-13 2007-03-27 United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for continually sensing changes in a structure
US7135679B2 (en) * 2004-12-06 2006-11-14 Thermophotonics Inc. Method and system for enhanced radiation detection
DE102005005704B4 (en) * 2005-02-03 2010-08-12 Hamstein Consult Gmbh Use of particles for determining the local temperature in organic and inorganic bodies
TWI256877B (en) * 2005-04-15 2006-06-11 Hon Hai Prec Ind Co Ltd Thermal interface material and method of making the same
TWI256660B (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-06-11 Hon Hai Prec Ind Co Ltd Carbon nanotube array and method for making the same
US7733479B2 (en) * 2005-06-01 2010-06-08 Chwen-Yang Shew Charged carbon nanotubes for use as sensors
US8133465B2 (en) * 2005-09-12 2012-03-13 University Of Dayton Polymer-carbon nanotube composite for use as a sensor
TWI299399B (en) * 2005-12-13 2008-08-01 Jung Tang Huang Method to integrate carbon nanotube with cmos chip into array-type microsensor
US7465605B2 (en) * 2005-12-14 2008-12-16 Intel Corporation In-situ functionalization of carbon nanotubes
US8623509B2 (en) * 2006-05-06 2014-01-07 Anchor Science Llc Thermometric carbon composites
ITSA20080022A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-09 Univ Degli Studi Salerno Temperature sensor based on self-sustaining networks of carbon nanotubes.
US8529124B2 (en) * 2009-06-03 2013-09-10 California Institute Of Technology Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes
US8568027B2 (en) * 2009-08-26 2013-10-29 Ut-Battelle, Llc Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors
JP5374354B2 (en) * 2009-12-25 2013-12-25 日東電工株式会社 Carbon nanotube composite structures and adhesive member
US20130195140A1 (en) * 2012-01-31 2013-08-01 Vittorio Scardaci Temperature Sensor

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6919730B2 (en) * 2002-03-18 2005-07-19 Honeywell International, Inc. Carbon nanotube sensor
US7118941B2 (en) * 2003-06-25 2006-10-10 Intel Corporation Method of fabricating a composite carbon nanotube thermal interface device
US20070102809A1 (en) * 2003-06-25 2007-05-10 Dubin Valery M Methods of fabricating a composite carbon nanotube thermal interface device
US7105851B2 (en) * 2003-09-24 2006-09-12 Intel Corporation Nanotubes for integrated circuits
US20060038167A1 (en) * 2004-08-20 2006-02-23 International Business Machines Corporation Integrated carbon nanotube sensors
US7335983B2 (en) * 2005-12-16 2008-02-26 Intel Corporation Carbon nanotube micro-chimney and thermo siphon die-level cooling
US20070155136A1 (en) * 2005-12-30 2007-07-05 Intel Corporation Carbon nanotube and metal thermal interface material, process of making same, packages containing same, and systems containing same
US20070228361A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-04 Nachiket Raravikar Carbon nanotube-solder composite structures for interconnects, process of making same, packages containing same, and systems containing same
US20080067619A1 (en) * 2006-09-19 2008-03-20 Farahani Mohammad M Stress sensor for in-situ measurement of package-induced stress in semiconductor devices

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090135883A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2009-05-28 International Business Machines Corporation Multi-Layered Thermal Sensor for Integrated Circuits and Other Layered Structures
US8425115B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2013-04-23 International Business Machines Corporation Multi-layered thermal sensor for integrated circuits and other layered structures
US7946763B2 (en) * 2006-03-14 2011-05-24 International Business Machines Corporation Multi-layered thermal sensor for integrated circuits and other layered structures
US20110176579A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2011-07-21 International Business Machines Corporation Multi-layered thermal sensor for integrated circuits and other layered structures
US20090192241A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2009-07-30 Nachiket Raravikar Aligned nanotube bearing composite material
US8530890B2 (en) * 2006-06-29 2013-09-10 Intel Corporation Aligned nanotube bearing composite material
US20120270008A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2012-10-25 Intel Corporation Aligned nanotube bearing composit material
US8222750B2 (en) * 2006-06-29 2012-07-17 Intel Corporation Aligned nanotube bearing composite material
US20130230703A1 (en) * 2007-05-30 2013-09-05 Ramot At Tel-Aviv University Ltd. Nanotube network and method of fabricating the same
ITSA20080022A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-09 Univ Degli Studi Salerno Temperature sensor based on self-sustaining networks of carbon nanotubes.
US20110210415A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2011-09-01 Claudia Altavilla Freestanding carbon nanotube networks based temperature sensor
WO2010016024A1 (en) * 2008-08-08 2010-02-11 Università degli Studi di Salerno Freestanding carbon nanotube networks based temperature sensor
US8529124B2 (en) * 2009-06-03 2013-09-10 California Institute Of Technology Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes
US20100308848A1 (en) * 2009-06-03 2010-12-09 Kaul Anupama B Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes
US8941094B2 (en) * 2010-09-02 2015-01-27 Nantero Inc. Methods for adjusting the conductivity range of a nanotube fabric layer
US20120056149A1 (en) * 2010-09-02 2012-03-08 Nantero, Inc. Methods for adjusting the conductivity range of a nanotube fabric layer
CN102359828A (en) * 2011-07-12 2012-02-22 东南大学 Micro-electronic temperature sensor and manufacturing process thereof
US9022644B1 (en) * 2011-09-09 2015-05-05 Sitime Corporation Micromachined thermistor and temperature measurement circuitry, and method of manufacturing and operating same
US9677948B1 (en) 2011-09-09 2017-06-13 Sitime Corporation MEMS device with micromachined thermistor
US9945734B1 (en) * 2011-09-09 2018-04-17 Sitime Corporation Micromachined thermistor
US20150168565A1 (en) * 2012-07-12 2015-06-18 Università degli Studi di Salerno Carbon nanomaterials based real time radiation dosimeter

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN101097164B (en) 2014-02-12
US20120199830A1 (en) 2012-08-09
HK1116537A1 (en) 2014-10-24
TW200822332A (en) 2008-05-16
TWI451541B (en) 2014-09-01
CN101097164A (en) 2008-01-02
US9028142B2 (en) 2015-05-12

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6405592B1 (en) Hermetically-sealed sensor with a movable microstructure
US6894381B2 (en) Electronic device having a stack of semiconductor chips and method for the production thereof
US6848320B2 (en) Mechanical deformation amount sensor
US4144636A (en) Method for manufacture of a moisture sensor
US5440241A (en) Method for testing, burning-in, and manufacturing wafer scale integrated circuits and a packaged wafer assembly produced thereby
US7202173B2 (en) Systems and methods for electrical contacts to arrays of vertically aligned nanorods
US20020011655A1 (en) Chip-like electronic components, a method of manufacturing the same, a pseudo wafer therefor and a method of manufacturing thereof
US6954000B2 (en) Semiconductor component with redistribution circuit having conductors and test contacts
CN100346168C (en) Magnetic sensor producing method and lead wire frame
US6130148A (en) Interconnect for semiconductor components and method of fabrication
EP0832424B1 (en) Vapor pressure sensor and method
CN1203726C (en) Silicon-based sensor system
US7671612B2 (en) Integrated compound nano probe card and method of making same
US7265430B2 (en) Semiconductor device, magnetic sensor, and magnetic sensor unit
US7370530B2 (en) Package for MEMS devices
US20090015251A1 (en) Magnetic sensor and production method thereof
US20020001873A1 (en) Chip scale surface-mountable packaging method for electronic and MEMS devices
KR100248880B1 (en) Micro-electronic assembly including a flip-chip mounted micro-device and method
US6522762B1 (en) Silicon-based sensor system
US20050067695A1 (en) Micro-sensor
KR101406270B1 (en) Making and using carbon nanotube probes
CA2581058C (en) Resistive elements using carbon nanotubes
EP1589329A1 (en) Semiconductor pressure sensor and process for fabricating the same
US6882167B2 (en) Method of forming an electrical contact
US8124953B2 (en) Sensor device having a porous structure element

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: INTEL CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:RARAVIKAR, NACHIKET R.;PATEL, NEHA;REEL/FRAME:019638/0769

Effective date: 20060627

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION