US20070293292A1 - Display of game win information on a secondary display - Google Patents

Display of game win information on a secondary display Download PDF

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US20070293292A1
US20070293292A1 US11/454,201 US45420106A US2007293292A1 US 20070293292 A1 US20070293292 A1 US 20070293292A1 US 45420106 A US45420106 A US 45420106A US 2007293292 A1 US2007293292 A1 US 2007293292A1
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win
game
information
gaming machine
chance
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US11/454,201
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David A. Gipp
Bryan D. Wolf
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International Game Technology
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International Game Technology
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • G07F17/3204Player-machine interfaces
    • G07F17/3211Display means

Abstract

Methods, systems, and apparatus are provided for presenting win information associated with games played on gaming machines. The win information may be presented on a secondary display of a gaming machine having multiple displays.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • Over the past few years, the experience of players at gaming machines has changed dramatically. For example, the hand pulled lever used to initiate game play is being replaced with a push button located beneath a main display on gaming machines. Cashless gaming machines are also becoming prevalent. When a player wins a game played on a cashless machine, he or she can cash out by pushing a button and the machine will print out a cashless ticket or other voucher. The player can then obtain cash by presenting his or her ticket to a cashier, typically at a location removed from the gaming machine where the player may have won a significant amount.
  • While cashless machines provide an efficient way of handling currency in a casino, they lack the “cha-ching” or clatter of coins dropping in traditional gaming machines when a player wins. Hence, big wins at gaming machines are now often silent events that go unnoticed by other casino patrons. Opportunities are missed for generating excitement among casino patrons.
  • When a player wins today, sometimes the only notice of the win is a presentation of the win amount on a thin strip at the bottom of the gaming machine's video display. In traditional slot machines, this strip is sometimes called a “bit plane.” Some modern machines do not technically include a “bit plane” but most include a similarly limited region for displaying the win information. For convenience, all such regions will be referred to as “bit planes” herein. The typical bit plane displays only limited text information pertaining to game play. Because of its location and size, the bit plane is not easily visible to players other than the player at the gaming machine.
  • As a consequence, relatively little excitement is generated at the time of a win. Often, players at surrounding machines and in the general proximity have no knowledge that a player has actually won a recent game play, even a very large jackpot. As a consequence, casinos and other gaming establishments may lose valuable opportunities to generate excitement for players and potential players in the vicinity of a winning gaming machine.
  • In view of the above, it would be desirable to have improved modes of presenting information about wins on gaming machines.
  • SUMMARY
  • The invention described herein provides methods, systems, and apparatus for presenting win information associated with games played on gaming machines. In some aspects, the win information is presented on a secondary display of a gaming machine having multiple displays.
  • Certain method embodiments of the invention involve displaying win information from a game of chance presented on a gaming machine having both a primary display and the secondary display. In such embodiments, at least a portion of a primary game of chance is presented on the primary display. In one example, a method may be characterized by the following operations: (a) determining that a win has occurred in a game play of the primary game of chance on the gaming machine; and (b) displaying information about the win on the secondary display.
  • Examples of primary games of chance include slot games, (mechanical or video), video poker, video black jack, video pachinko, lotteries, keno, bingo games, and baccarat games. In certain embodiments, the gaming machine also presents a bonus game associated with the primary game. In such cases, information about a win in the bonus game may also be displayed on a secondary display.
  • In many cases, the primary and secondary displays are separately controlled, each having its own associated controller and/or physical support structure. For example, the gaming machine may comprise a main chassis and a top box, with the secondary display being situated in the top box. In some gaming machines, a single board controls rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display. In some cases, the single board comprises a dual head video card.
  • The win information can be displayed on the secondary display in many different formats and styles. In one preferred embodiment, the secondary display presents the information about the win in 3-dimensional images. Further, the win information may include an image displaying an amount of the win in a format that is thematically coupled to the primary game of chance. In a further example, the information about the win is displayed in a first format when the win amount is of a first size and is displayed in a second format when the win amount is of a second size. Still further, the information about the win may be displayed in or by a thematic image such as fireworks, explosions, flames, coins, treasure, bills, money bags, collections of gems, fish, etc., color, length or size, intensity, and hierarchy. Also, in some embodiments, the information about the win is displayed in or by an image showing a winning combination of symbols that resulted in the win in the game play of the primary game of chance.
  • Various pieces of information may be presented about the win. Typically, the information about the win information includes at least a total win amount. It may also include an amount won on at least one line presented with the primary game of chance. Further, it may include amounts won on multiple different lines, or multiple card hands played, or multiple tries, or multiple games, or multiple free spins, each presented with the primary game of chance. These may be displayed simultaneously on the secondary display. Further, the amounts won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins may be displayed simultaneously with a total win amount.
  • In many cases, the win information is displayed for a period of time and then removed from the secondary display. For example, the win information may be displayed until at least one subsequent game play has been completed. Of course, the win information may be displayed for even longer periods of time. As an example, the win information may be displayed until another win occurs in a later game play of the primary game of chance.
  • Another aspect of the invention pertains to gaming machines that may be characterized by the following features: (a) a primary display; (b) a secondary display; (c) game presentation logic for (i) presenting at least a portion of a primary game of chance on the primary display, and (ii) presenting information about a win on the primary game of chance on the secondary display. The logic may provide various capabilities for the primary and secondary display modes as described above. For example, the primary game of chance provided by the gaming machine may be any one of those mentioned above such as keno, a slot game, video poker, etc.
  • Various structural features sometimes included on gaming machines may be present on gaming machines of this invention. For example, the gaming machine comprises a main chassis and a top box, wherein the secondary display is located in the top box. Also, as mentioned, a gaming machine of this invention may include a single board for controlling the rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display and such board may comprise a dual head video card.
  • Another aspect of the invention pertains to systems comprising one or more gaming machines on a network. At least one of the gaming machines on the network will possess some of the general features described above (e.g., ability to present win information on a secondary display). The network may also include other gaming machines that do or do not have these features. Further, the network may include one or more servers, which provide information for executing game plays on at least one of the gaming machines. Other servers such as those responsible for accounting, etc. may be networked with the gaming machines.
  • These and other features and advantages of the invention will be described in more detail below with reference to associated drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B present a game display comprising a “bit plane” showing win information in a multi-line game.
  • FIG. 1C presents a schematic illustration of a gaming machine secondary screen displaying win information in an eye catching format.
  • FIG. 2 presents a display simultaneously presenting amounts won on multiple different paylines together with a total win amount.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B present an example in which the size and format of win information varies in relation to the size of a win.
  • FIGS. 4A-4C present various examples of themes for displaying win information content.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective drawing of a gaming machine having a top box and other devices.
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of networked gaming machines and gaming devices that provide gaming terminals for various forms of game play including progressive and linked bonus games for embodiments of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Overview
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B show a sequence of two consecutive presentations on a gaming machine display screen that might be presented after a game-play win. As shown, a display screen 101 includes a main portion 103 where the main portion of the game presentation occurs and a lower bit plane 105 (thin strip on a lower portion of the screen) where the win information is presented. In the depicted example, the game in question is a slot game having multiple lines, each of which allows for a separate winning combination. Thus, in a given game play, there may be multiple lines that win. The total win amount is the sum of the wins on individual lines. As shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, a first portion 107 of the bit plane 105 shows the total value of the wins (summed over all winning lines in the slot game). A second portion 109 of the bit plane 105 shows the win amount on an individual line. In FIG. 1A, the second portion 109 shows the win amount on a line 3 (15 credits), while the second portion 107 shows the total win across all lines (108 credits). Subsequently, as shown in FIG. 1B, the information displayed in the first portion of the bit plane is changed to show the win amount on a line 2 (70 credits). As more time elapses, the bit plane information would be updated to show an amount won another pay line (e.g., 23 credits on a line 1).
  • To appreciate a winning game play using this approach, a player or a nearby observer must focus her attention on the small bit plane located at the bottom of the screen 101. Further, when multiple lines provide a winning combination, the user or observer must stay focused on the second portion of the game play to understand how much was won on each individual pay line. If the player is only interested in learning how much was won in total, she must still zero in on the information displayed in the first portion of the bit plane.
  • Conventionally, the win information provided is provided about a primary game on a main screen of a gaming machine. Note that gaming machines may include one, two or even more display screens. Many embodiments of this invention pertain to gaming machines having at least two display screens. While win information may be shown in a bit plane on the secondary display screen in accordance with certain embodiments of this invention, this is not a preferred embodiment. As explained more fully below various opportunities exist for displaying win information on a secondary screen in creative fashions.
  • FIG. 1C is a schematic illustration of a gaming machine having a primary display 120 and a secondary display 122. Frequently, though not necessarily, the secondary display is provided above or on top of the primary display. In some embodiments, a gaming machine will have a main chassis where the primary display is housed and a top box where the secondary display is located.
  • In the depicted embodiment, the primary display shows a slot game having a winning combination 124. Information about this win is presented in an eye-catching visual effect 126 on the secondary display 122. This visual effect may be accompanied by recorded or generated sounds, animation, video clips, etc. One goal of this approach is to report the win to the player and surrounding patrons in a manner that generates excitement for further game play.
  • In this disclosure various modes of conveying win information are presented to show a small range of possible embodiments that fall within the scope of this invention. As illustrated in the next section, these include conveying the win information in bonus game, thematically coupled to the primary game, in proportion to the size of the win, etc. Obviously, there are many ways to implement the invention beyond the specific visual effect shown in FIG. 1C. Some of these will now be described.
  • Modes of Displaying Win Information
  • As indicated there are many ways to improve upon the current state of the art in displaying win information. This section presents a few of them. Typically, though not necessarily, these modes of displaying win information are presented on a secondary display screen while the main display of a game of chance is provided on a primary display screen. However, this is not necessarily the case.
  • The embellished win information may alternatively (or in addition) be presented on the primary screen, sometimes in a position that overlaps with the display of the primary game of chance and other times in a position that is removed from the position where the game is displayed. In some embodiments, the display screen is divided into sectors, with one or more of these sectors identified for or even reserved for or display of win information. In some embodiments, the win information is displayed on a machine separate from the machine where the machine where the primary game of chance is presented. For example, a group of gaming machines may share a secondary display, e.g., elevated above the members of the group, that presents win information from any one of the members. In another case, a group of gaming machines may be set up side-by-side such that primary or secondary displays of these machines are aligned and in relatively close proximity with one another. The win information from any of the machines is presented across the displays of these multiple machines simultaneously and/or consecutively, possibly in a flowing manner.
  • Regardless of which displays are responsible for displaying the win information, that information may be provided with a particular format or content. In a base case, the mere fact of the win is prominently displayed. Some examples of suitable formats for presenting additional win information will now be presented.
  • Numerical Information About a Win
  • One important feature that may be presented is numerical information about the win; with the most logical feature being the amount of a win. However, other types of information may be provided where appropriate; e.g., how recently the machine or the player previously had a previous winning combination, the amount won by the player to date at a particular gaming property, average win on a particular machine or bank of machines, total win over time by all players on a machine or bank of machines, and other statistical information pertinent to the current win.
  • As indicated, the total win amount is a basic feature that may be presented to the player after a win. Also as indicated, a game may have multiple pay lines or other means for providing multiple winning combinations. In addition to slot games which have multiple pay lines in a slot game, other games having multiple winning combinations include video card games (e.g., poker, blackjack and the like) providing multiple hands that can be played simultaneously, bingo or keno providing multiple different playing patterns that can be played simultaneously, etc. More generally classes of games with multiple win sources include games with multiple pay lines, multiple card game hands, multiple tries, multiple games played, and/or multiple free spins. Other examples will occur to those of skill in the art. In each of these exemplary games, a win can come from multiple sources (poker hands, pay lines, etc.), individually or concurrently.
  • In certain embodiments, a bonus play or bonus mode of a primary game allows the possibility of extra or enhanced winnings. For example, in some games a bonus mode applies a multiplier or other enhancement to the normal winnings attained by playing the primary game. Thus, in certain bonus modes any monetary award won on a primary game of chance is multiplied by two or some other value to provide enhanced winnings. In other examples, the player is allotted a free spin or play of the primary game in which any winnings during the free play are enhanced according to the multiplier or other mathematical enhancement. The multiplier or other mathematical enhancement may be depicted in a separate display region sometimes referred to as a “mathbox.” More generally, mathboxes are used to “explain” to the player the combination of wins and outcomes from multiple components or stages of a bonus game. For example one mathbox may state:
  • Stage 1 Win: 50
  • Stage 2 Win: +75
  • Stage 3 Win: +30
  • Total Win: =155
  • Multiplier ×3
  • Grand Total Win: =465
  • Another may state:
  • Bonus Win: 50
  • Initiating Lines: ×2
  • Line Bet: ×10
  • Total Bonus: =1,000
  • In accordance with certain embodiments of this invention, any enhanced winnings due to a multiplier or other manipulation can be displayed on the secondary display. Further, a mathbox itself may be presented on the secondary display. The enhanced winnings may be shown separately as the base win along with the multiplier or other mathematical enhancement (expression) to give the total win amount. Such information may be displayed simultaneously or successively; e.g., the base win is shown first, followed by the multiplier (or other mathematical enhancement), and finally the total win resulting from the base win and the mathematical enhancement. Further, wins at individual stages or game components can be displayed sequentially or together.
  • In accordance with certain embodiments of this invention, the source of a win (e.g., a particular pay line) is presented, typically along with the win amount from that source. If a game allows for separate concurrent wins from multiple sources during a game play, then in accordance with this invention, a total win amount may be displayed in addition to information about two or more separate wins from the individual sources. Hence, in one example, the invention provides for display of the total win amount along with the win amounts from individual sources within the primary game. These individual sources may be separately identified (e.g., 50 credits from pay line 8) or not.
  • In certain embodiments, when amounts are won on multiple different sources (e.g., multiple pay lines), each amount won from a different source is displayed simultaneously on the secondary display. Further, when multiple sources are employed, each of the amounts won on the multiple different lines may be displayed simultaneously and, in certain embodiments, together with a total win amount. This example is shown in FIG. 2. As shown there, three different paylines in a slot game (paylines 1, 2, and 3) each result in a separate win as depicted on a main display 203 of a gaming machine 201. A secondary display 205 simultaneous presents the winning amount on each payline together with a total payout amount.
  • Win Information is Thematically Coupled to Primary Game
  • In certain embodiments, the information about the win comprises an image displaying an amount of the win that is thematically coupled to the primary game of chance. The theme may be linked to the nature of the fundamental underlying game of chance (e.g., a slot game) or to a specific version of the fundamental game (e.g., a slot game employing reel symbols based on a particular TV show). Thus, in the first case, the theme may be generically tied to a slot game, a video poker game, a video black jack game, a video pachinko game, a lottery, a keno game, a bingo game, a baccarat game, etc. For example, a win on a slot game may be depicted by a three-dimensional animation of slot reels spinning faster and faster and/or growing in size until they explode and out of the explosion the winning amount is displayed. In another example, a win in a video blackjack game is depicted by a dance between the cards making up the winning hand (e.g., a Ace of Spades and Queen of Hearts) followed by a flashing display of the amount won. Still further, in certain embodiments, the information about the win is displayed in or by an image of a winning combination of symbols that resulted in the win in the game play of the primary game of chance. The symbols may be reel symbols in a slot game, cards in a poker game, etc.
  • Each of the generic games of chance may be embellished with a specific theme such as media entertainment (e.g., TV shows, movies, etc.), a type of activity (e.g., mining, sporting events, concerts, etc.), popular heros or entertainers (e.g., musicians, sports stars, Norse Gods, etc.), and the like. In a specific example, a slot game is presented with a mining theme (e.g., the reel symbols show diamonds or mining carts piled with gold) and the winning amount is shown in gold or silver ingots, diamonds, or other valuable metal or gem typically extracted by mining.
  • In some embodiments, presentation of the win involves morphing a representation of a theme (e.g., a sporting event) into the amount won. For example, a baseball hit on a home run trajectory may morph into a series of numbers representing an amount won. In another example, a winning combination of slot reel symbols into piles of gold, silver, or gems sized in proportion to the amount won.
  • In the above examples, the information about the win is typically displayed on a secondary display screen. But as explained above some embodiments of the invention allow for display of such information on a primary screen (the same screen where the main game play is displayed) or even on a different screen shared by multiple gaming machines.
  • Size of Win Corresponds to Format of Displayed Win Information
  • In certain embodiments, the information about the win is displayed in one format for win amounts in certain size range and is displayed in a different format for win amounts in different size range. In a typical situation, the win information is displayed in larger characters when the win amount is larger than certain a threshold. The win information characters may be of one size when the win is smaller than a first threshold, a second, larger size when the win is greater than the first threshold but smaller than a second threshold, a third, still larger size when the win is greater than the second threshold, etc. In certain embodiments, the win information is displayed in characters whose size varies monotonically with the size of the win. In these embodiments, bigger wins are effectively displayed more prominently and may be expected to generate more excitement among those in the vicinity of gaming machines where large wins occurred.
  • In typical embodiments, the displayed win information includes the amount of a win or wins. However, the win information may include other information such as the mere fact that a win occurred as well as more esoteric information such as the player's winnings to date, and other statistical information intended to generate excitement.
  • Variations in format are not limited to variations in the size of characters used to present information about the win. The font, colors in a presentation, length and intensity of display (pulsating depiction of win information), etc. may also be employed to highlight large wins. For example, the length of time displaying the win information may be varied in relation to the size of the win and/or characters may turn from blue to red-hot as a win size increases.
  • In a specific embodiment, the number, size, and/or color of fireworks used to celebrate the win varies with size of the win amount. A relatively large win might be entitled to a long and loud fireworks display. In another example, a character on the secondary display dances when there is a win. The duration and/or intensity of the character's dance moves can correspond with the size of the win. In another example, the brilliance of a sunrise corresponds to the size of a win. In yet another example, the volume of a motorcycle revving its engine corresponds to the size of the win. Many other variations and themes will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • A few general categories of scalable display formats will now be described. First, the game may present win information in the form of a “collection,” in which the number of objects in collection represents win amount. In specific examples, the collections include gems, jewelry, ingots, ore nuggets, gift wrapped boxes, food, cars, boats, planes, prize ribbons, prize wreaths, beads, shells, bottles of spirits, bowling pins, and number of fish. Another category employs length or size (e.g., compact car versus stretch limo, the size and time length of a volcanic eruption, the size and duration of a water fountain display, the size or number of points on deer antlers, thermometer temperature, tree growth, a skyscraper versus cottage, the size of a fish caught on a fishing pole, a balloon size (barely inflated versus ready to pop), and the like). Another category makes use of a color shift, with a progression of cool to warm to “white hot” colors. The win amount may for example correspond to fire versus ice, the color of coals, campfire smoke versus yellow flames versus red hot marshmallow coals, black versus red branding irons, etc. Still another general category of scalable display format is the intensity of an activity such as the speed of a race horse or race car, mild versus spicy chili peppers, a cheerleader's enthusiasm level, a facial expression (bored versus excited), electricity level (quiet versus buzzing), etc. Yet another general category relates to “hierarchy.” Specific examples that correlate with win size include position in an organizational chart (e.g., president versus intern), evolutionary development (e.g., a microbe versus a lemur versus a man), military or societal rank (e.g., general versus private or king versus plebe), etc.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B show a simple example of this in which the size and format of win information varies in relation to the size of a win. In the figures, a video slot game is played on a main display 303 of a gaming machine 301. The gaming machine also includes a secondary display 305 on which various types of information may be displayed, including information about the win. In the example depicted in FIGS. 3A and 3B, a relatively small win of 20 credits results in a modest display of win information on secondary display 305 (FIG. 3A), while a significantly larger win of 500 credits results in a larger and more animated display of win information on secondary display 305 (FIG. 3B).
  • Time Period for Display
  • The information about the win may be displayed for a period of time and then removed from the secondary display or other display region designated for presenting the win information. Various events may be used to trigger removal of the information about the win from the display. As indicated in the above section, the size of a win may dictate how long the win information is displayed. In another approach, the win information is displayed for a predetermined period of time or until a specified event takes place; e.g., until at least one subsequent game play has been started or completed. In still another embodiment, the win information is displayed until another win occurs in a later game play of the primary game of chance.
  • The win information may be varied in format and/or content during the period of time it is displayed. For example, an initial high intensity presentation of the win information may calm to a more restrained display after a period of time (e.g., one-half minute, one minute, until a new game begins, etc.). In one example, immediately after the win, an animation, a video clip, and/or a high volume audio presentation runs for 30 seconds, then over the next 15 seconds the volume or intensity of the presentation gradually reduces, and finally the presentation reaches a static representation of the win amount, which remains displayed until a player initiates a new game.
  • 3-D Images
  • In certain embodiments, the win information is displayed in a three-dimensional format. Well-crafted three-dimensional graphics for presenting win information on a primary or secondary display screens may generate additional enthusiasm among players in the vicinity. In a specific embodiment, three-dimensional images presenting win information are displayed on secondary video screen.
  • U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/187,343, filed Jun. 27, 2002 and titled “TRAJECTORY-BASED 3-D GAMES OF CHANCE FOR VIDEO GAMING MACHINES” (Publication No. 2004-0002380), which is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes, describes various aspects of generating and rendering three-dimensional images (or two-dimensional images rendered from three-dimensional representations) in gaming machines and game design environments.
  • Generally, a three-dimensional gaming environment may be a simulation implemented on a computing device on the gaming machine. To generate game win information, a sequence of 2-D images may be rendered from the 3-D gaming environment using one or more virtual cameras. The 3-D gaming environment may comprise data and/or instructions for generating: 1) one or more 3-D objects; 2) one or more rotation, vibration, and/or trajectory rules that are used to determine the motion of a 3-D object in the 3-D gaming environment; 3) one or more collision rules that are used to determine effects of a collision between 3-D objects in the 3-D gaming environment; and 4) one or more exit rules that are used to remove the moving 3-D object. The 3-D gaming environment may be comprised of a plurality of 3-D objects and surfaces. The 3-D objects are typically defined in a rectangular, spherical, or polar coordinate system.
  • The 3-D gaming environment may incorporate various themes and backgrounds. For instance, one theme and background may relate to a cityscape where the game objects used in the trajectory-based game of chance are launched into the city. In one embodiment, the player may be able to select backgrounds and gaming environments that correspond to different cities, such as Paris, New York and London. The gaming environment for each city may include objects that model buildings in each city.
  • Graphical rendering properties, sound properties and/or bonus properties may be used to generate presentation states for the win information. These properties may be used to distinguish between different types of objects. For instance, red objects may be assigned one set of physical properties while blue objects may be assigned a different set of physical properties. In one example, different objects are associated with win information on different pay lines. In another example, different objects are associated with primary game and bonus game win information. The player may be able to distinguish between object's with different properties according to their color or some other graphical rendering property such as a texture or a shade.
  • The graphical rendering properties may describe, for example, shading and color of the 3-D game object along its trajectory. The shading and the color of the 3-D game object may be rendered into 2-D images used in a win information presentation that are derived from the 3-D gaming environment.
  • As indicated, one or more virtual cameras may be employed to generate 2-D images of objects in the 3-D environment. A virtual camera is used to “capture” a portion of the 3-D gaming environment and to render the portion of the 3-D gaming environment to a 2-D image. A display screen may present a sequence of 2-D images used as part of a win information presentation for a primary or bonus game of chance.
  • The virtual camera may be positioned to capture all or a portion of one or more game objects in a 3-D gaming environment. The position of a virtual camera used to present win information may vary from one game of chance to another and does not have to remain fixed. The position of the virtual camera may also vary during a presentation sequence for win information on a single game of chance. Further, a plurality of virtual cameras may be used to generate the sequence of 2-D images used to generate the win information presentation. In certain embodiments, a virtual camera may travel with the game object. For instance, as a game object travels toward a surface, the 2-D images rendered from the camera may show the surface appearing to get closer and closer.
  • In one embodiment, two virtual cameras are employed in game display environment—one for a primary game play display and the other for presenting win information on a secondary display. In another embodiment, one wide aspect ratio virtual camera is employed with a pixel line for dividing an image into one portion that is displayed on a first display screen and another portion that is displayed on a second display screen. For, example a portion of an image below the pixel line represents game play on a primary game and is presented on the primary display screen and a portion of the image above the pixel line represents win information and is presented on a secondary display.
  • Additional details of using the virtual camera are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,887,157, issued May 3, 2005 to LeMay, et al., and titled, “Virtual Cameras And 3-D Gaming Environments In A Gaming Machine,” incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.
  • Additional Themes
  • As alluded to above, various themes may be employed to embellish display of the win information. Unlike the examples presented above, these need not be associated with the primary game play that resulted in the win. In some embodiments, the theme used to depict the winning amount is a theme that is independent of the game presented on the primary display. For example, during certain times of year or during local events, a gaming establishment may set up a casino-wide temporary theme. Examples of such themes include a motorcycle convention, a sports all-star game, ski season, a swimsuit contest, etc. In such cases, the winning information is displayed in the exhaust of a revving motorcycle, in the powder kicked up by a skier tearing down a difficult run, or similar non-game theme.
  • Other themes or images for displaying win information include, for example, fireworks, explosions, flames, coins, treasure (e.g., treasure chests), bills, money bags, collections of gems, types of fish in a virtual aquarium, etc., color, length or size, intensity, and hierarchy. Each of these may be applied to or used in conjunction with any of the above (or any other examples) presented herein. Some simple examples are presented in FIGS. 4A-4C, in which a gaming machine 401 includes a primary display 403 presenting a slot game and a secondary display 405 presenting win information in a thematic format. Many variations on these themes will be apparent to those of skill in the art.
  • Displayed with a Bonus Game
  • In some embodiments, a gaming machine may provide a bonus game associated with a primary game. Conventionally, bonus games allow players to win additional amounts above amounts available in a primary game. Information about wins in bonus games should be presented to the player. This can present additional challenges for the game designer. Certain embodiments of this invention involve displaying information about a win in the bonus game on a gaming machine.
  • A secondary display on a gaming machine provides an appropriate medium for presenting bonus games as well as displaying win information about those games. However, in certain embodiments, win information about a bonus game is displayed on the primary display screen when the bonus game itself is presented on the secondary display. In some cases, this is an inversion of the primary game where the game itself is presented on a primary display and information about the win is presented on the secondary display.
  • For clarity, a bonus game can be viewed as a game or a component of a game involving procedures in addition to the primary game on a gaming machine. For example, if the primary game is a reel slot game, the bonus game may allow players the possibility of winning more than the primary game pay table indicates. Typically, but not necessarily, the bonus game outcome will depend upon the outcome of the primary game. For example, a bonus game outcome may be contingent upon a “cherry” symbol being displayed on a slot reel at the end of a slot game play. Also, the bonus game outcome may depend upon winning a payout from a slot game play while the gaming machine is in a “bonus zone.” In alternative embodiments, the bonus game may be unconnected with the outcome of a primary game play.
  • During play involving the possibility of a bonus game, the gaming machine may update its secondary display to present bonus information associated with the currently available game. This may include information about the bonus game such as how it is played, what events trigger its play, how much money can be won playing it, etc. When an appropriate game play event takes place on the primary game, e.g., final slot reel positions are determined, the machine decides whether a bonus game is triggered or whether progress is being made toward a bonus game, or whether some other result associated with bonus play is implicated. In one example, the secondary display shows an appropriate animation indicating that the machine may be progressing toward a bonus game and that continued play might result in a chance to play the bonus game.
  • Should the system determine that a bonus game is triggered, the game may display an appropriate celebratory video images in secondary display. For example, secondary display may present a fireworks animation until a pay out associated with the primary game is completed.
  • Various bonus games have been described elsewhere and will not be presented here. See U.S. Pat. No. 6,315,666 issued Nov. 13, 2001, which is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes. Generally, these games are designed to supplement a standard game such as a slot machine game in which the spinning reels are displayed in the main display.
  • It should be understood that the secondary display can present other information besides a bonus game or win information about a primary or secondary game. For example, the secondary display may operate in an “attract mode.” While in the attract mode, the system may display various attract animations on secondary display. For example, it might depict “good luck” balls or other symbols moving around on the screen for a certain amount of time. It may also display spinning reels or some feature designed to attract attention to a particular feature of the game such as a large top award that is available. These various attraction animations may be displayed for a fixed length of time.
  • Example Gaming Machine and Associated Gaming Network
  • Turning to FIG. 5, a video gaming machine 2 suitable for use as a gaming terminal of the present invention is shown. Machine 2 includes a main cabinet 4, which generally surrounds the machine interior (not shown) and is viewable by users. The main cabinet includes a main door 8 on the front of the machine, which opens to provide access to the interior of the machine. Attached to the main door are player-input switches or buttons 32, a coin acceptor 28, and a bill validator 30, a coin tray 38, and a belly glass 40. Viewable through the main door is a video display monitor 34 and an information panel 36. The display 34 will typically be a cathode ray tube, a high resolution flat-panel LCD, or other appropriate electronically controlled video monitor. The information panel 36 may be a back-lit, silk screened glass panel with lettering to indicate general game information including, for example, a game denomination (e.g. $0.25 or $1). The bill validator 30, player-input switches 32, video display monitor 34, and information panel are devices used to play a game on the game machine 2. The devices are controlled by circuitry (e.g. the master gaming controller) housed inside the main cabinet 4 of the machine 2.
  • Many different types of games may be provided with gaming terminals of this invention. Examples include mechanical slot games, video slot games, video poker, video black jack, video pachinko and lottery. Further, the gaming machine 2 may be operable to provide a play of many different instances of games of chance. The instances may be differentiated according to themes, sounds, graphics, type of game (e.g., slot game vs. card game), denomination, number of pay lines, maximum jackpot, progressive or non-progressive, bonus games, etc. The gaming machine 2 may be operable to allow a player to select a game play from any one of a plurality of instances available on the gaming machine. For example, the gaming machine may provide a menu with a list of the instances of games that are available for play on the gaming machine and a player may be able to select from the list a first instance of a game of chance that they wish to play.
  • Slot machines of this invention may offer multiple pay lines, various betting options and multiple winning combinations. Such machines are sometimes dubbed scatter pay machines. In addition to a main pay line across “reels,” the winning combinations appear across the screen in horizontal lines above and below the main pay line or the diagonal lines running across the reels or even in zigzag configurations as shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B.
  • Some machines with multiple pay lines let players choose how many lines to play. In certain embodiments, for the minimum bet, only the single line running straight across the reels counts. If the player puts more money in, he or she can play the additional lines. As explained, games and gaming machines of this invention may also provide a bonus games that gives the player the opportunity for a bigger additional jackpot when triggered.
  • Code for executing the various instances of games available for play on the gaming machine 2 may be stored as game software on a mass storage device (e.g., a magnetic hard disk drive) in the gaming machine or may be generated on a remote gaming device but then displayed on the gaming machine. The gaming machine 2 may execute game software from various sources including software from a mass storage device on the gaming terminal, software provided over a network from a remote storage device, or video streaming software that allows the game to be displayed on the gaming machine. When a game instance is stored on the gaming machine 2, it may be loaded from the mass storage device into main memory (e.g., RAM) for execution. In some cases, after a selection of a game for play, the executable game software that allows the selected game to be generated is downloaded from a remote gaming device, such as another gaming machine or a game server.
  • When referring to “logic,” it is generally intended to represent any form of processing logic, typically algorithmic tasks implemented in response to executing instructions or code. Such logic may be provided as software, firmware or even hard-coded logic in hardware.
  • Returning to FIG. 5, the gaming machine 2 includes a top box 6, which sits on top of the main cabinet 4. The top box 6 houses a number of devices, which may be used to add features to a game being played on the gaming machine 2, including speakers 10, 12, and 14, a ticket printer 18 which prints bar-coded tickets 20, a key pad 22 for entering player tracking information, a display screen 16 for displaying player tracking information, a card reader 24 for entering a magnetic striped card containing player tracking information, and a video display screen 42. The ticket printer 18 may be used to print tickets for a cashless ticketing system. Further, the top box 6 may house different or additional devices than shown in the figure. For example, the top box may contain a bonus wheel or a back-lit silk screened panel which may be used to add bonus features to the game being played on the gaming machine. As another example, the top box may contain a display for a progressive jackpot offered on the gaming machine. During a game, these devices are typically controlled and powered, in part, by circuitry (e.g. a master gaming controller) housed within the main cabinet 4 of the machine 2. Further, the bonus games, progressive games, and other ancillary games may contain non-modifiable and accumulative components. These may be stored separately with the corresponding components of the primary game or they may be stored independently.
  • In certain embodiments, the gaming machine video control system comprises a single board for controlling the rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display. In a specific embodiment, the single board comprises a dual head video card such as the ATI RADEON 9800 dual-head video adaptor.
  • Understand that gaming machine 2 is but one example from a wide range of gaming machine designs on which the present invention may be implemented. For example, not all suitable gaming machines have top boxes or player tracking features. Further, some gaming machines have only a single video game display, while others are designed for bar tables and have displays that face upwards. In examples, employing only a single video display screen, it will be appropriate to divide that screen into sections, with one being intended for periodic display of win information. In other embodiments, the win information is provided on a display screen remote from the gaming machine. Still other examples employ three or more video display screens.
  • As another example, a game may be generated in on a host computer and may be displayed on a remote terminal or a remote gaming device. The remote gaming device may be connected to the host computer via a network of some type such as a local area network, a wide area network, an intranet or the Internet. The remote gaming device may be a portable gaming device such as but not limited to a cell phone, a personal digital assistant, and a wireless game player. Images rendered from 3-D gaming environments may be displayed on portable gaming devices that are used to play a game of chance. Further a gaming machine or server may include gaming logic for commanding a remote gaming device to render an image from a virtual camera in a 3-D gaming environments stored on the remote gaming device and to display the rendered image on a display located on the remote gaming device. Thus, those of skill in the art will understand that the present invention, as described herein, can be deployed on most any gaming machine now available or hereafter developed. However, the machine should allow for separate, preferably video, depiction of win information.
  • Some gaming machines of the present assignee are implemented with special features and/or additional circuitry that differentiates them from general-purpose computers (e.g., desktop PC's and laptops). Gaming machines are highly regulated to ensure fairness and, in many cases, gaming machines are operable to dispense monetary awards of multiple millions of dollars. Therefore, to satisfy security and regulatory requirements in a gaming environment, hardware and software architectures may be implemented in gaming machines that differ significantly from those of general-purpose computers.
  • At first glance, one might believe that adapting PC technologies to the gaming industry would be a simple proposition because both PCs and gaming machines and other gaming terminals employ microprocessors that control a variety of devices. However, because of such reasons as (1) the regulatory requirements that are placed upon gaming machines, (2) the harsh environment in which gaming machines operate, (3) security requirements and (4) fault tolerance requirements, adapting PC technologies to a gaming machine presents numerous engineering obstacles. Further, techniques and methods for solving a problem in the PC industry, such as device compatibility and connectivity issues, might not be adequate or appropriate in the gaming environment. For instance, a fault or a weakness tolerated in a PC, such as security holes in software or frequent crashes, may not be tolerable in a gaming terminal.
  • In certain embodiments, gaming terminals are designed to be state-based systems. In a state-based system, the system stores and maintains its current state in a non-volatile memory, such that, in the event of a power failure or other malfunction the gaming machine will return to its current state when the power is restored. For instance, if a player was shown an award for a game of chance and, before the award could be provided to the player the power failed, the gaming machine, upon the restoration of power, would return to the state where the award is indicated.
  • Typically, a gaming machine will have safeguards that prevent an operator or player of a gaming machine from manipulating hardware and software in a manner that gives them an unfair and some cases an illegal advantage. The gaming machine may have a means to determine if the code it will execute is valid. If the code is not valid, the gaming machine can prevent the code from being executed.
  • A typical method of operation for game software employs a state machine. Different functions of the game (bet, play, result, points in the graphical presentation, etc.) may be defined as separate states. When a game moves from one state to another, critical data regarding the game software may be stored in a non-volatile memory subsystem. As explained, this ensures the player's wager and credits are preserved and it minimizes potential disputes in the event of a malfunction on the gaming machine. Such critical data is preserved when a downloaded game is removed or deactivated in a particular gaming terminal.
  • In general, the gaming machine does not advance from a first state to a second state until critical information that allows the first state to be reconstructed is stored. This feature allows the game to recover operation to the current state of play in the event of a malfunction, loss of power, etc that occurred just prior to the malfunction. After the state of the gaming machine is restored during the play of a game of chance, game play may resume and the game may be completed in a manner that is no different than if the malfunction had not occurred. As explained, battery backed RAM devices are sometimes used to preserve this critical data during, at least, the time when a game is available on a terminal, although other types of non-volatile memory devices may be employed.
  • As described in the preceding paragraph, when a malfunction occurs during a game of chance, the gaming machine may be restored to a state in the game of chance just prior to when the malfunction occurred. The restored state may include accumulative information such as metering information and graphical information that was displayed on the gaming machine in the state prior to the malfunction. For example, when the malfunction occurs during the play of a card game after the cards have been dealt, the gaming machine may be restored with the cards that were previously displayed as part of the card game. As another example, a bonus game may be triggered during the play of a game of chance where a player is required to make a number of selections on a video display screen. When a malfunction has occurred after the player has made one or more selections, the gaming machine may be restored to a state that shows the graphical presentation at the point just prior to the malfunction including an indication of selections that have already been made by the player. In general, the gaming machine may be restored to any state in a plurality of states that occur in the game of chance that occurs while the game of chance is played or to states that occur between the play of a game of chance. Of critical importance, win information about a primary game or a bonus game may be stored in a non-volatile memory device. Such information may include information presented on the primary or secondary video display screens in accordance with this invention.
  • Trusted memory devices are included in certain gaming terminals and/or servers to ensure the authenticity of the software that may be stored on less secure memory subsystems, such as mass storage devices. Trusted memory devices and controlling circuitry are typically designed to not allow modification of the code and data stored in the memory device while the memory device is installed in the slot machine. The code and data stored in these devices may include authentication algorithms, random number generators, authentication keys, operating system kernels, etc. The purpose of these trusted memory devices is to provide gaming regulatory authorities a root trusted authority within the computing environment of the slot machine that can be tracked and verified as original. This may be accomplished via removal of the trusted memory device from the slot machine computer and verification of the secure memory device contents is a separate third party verification device. Once the trusted memory device is verified as authentic, and based on the approval of the verification algorithms contained in the trusted device, the gaming machine is allowed to verify the authenticity of additional code and data that may be located in the gaming computer assembly, such as code and data stored on hard disk drives. A few details related to trusted memory devices that may be used in the present invention are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,685,567 from U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/925,098, filed Aug. 8, 2001 and titled “Process Verification,” which is incorporated herein in its entirety and for all purposes.
  • Mass storage devices used in a general-purpose computer typically allow code and data to be read from and written to the mass storage device. In a gaming machine environment, modification of the gaming code stored on a mass storage device is strictly controlled and would only be allowed under specific maintenance type events with electronic and physical enablers required. Though this level of security could be provided by software, certain gaming computers of this invention that include mass storage devices include hardware level mass storage data protection circuitry that operates at the circuit level to monitor attempts to modify data on the mass storage device and will generate both software and hardware error triggers should a data modification be attempted without the proper electronic and physical enablers being present.
  • Returning to the example of FIG. 5, when a user wishes to play the gaming machine 2, he or she inserts cash through the coin acceptor 28 or bill validator 30. Additionally, the bill validator may accept a printed ticket voucher which may be accepted by the bill validator 30 as an indicia of credit when a cashless ticketing system is used. At the start of the game, the player may enter playing tracking information using the card reader 24, the keypad 22, and the florescent display 16. Certain game preferences of the player playing the game may be read from a card inserted into the card reader. Before playing, the player may also chose a particular game to play from a game selection menu may be provided on a video display, which offers a choice of at least two electronic games. Typically, the choices of games available to the player are only those licensed and downloaded for play on the gaming platform. During the game, the player views game information using the video display 34. As indicated, other game and prize information may also be displayed in the video display screen 42 located in the top box.
  • During the course of a game, a player may be required to make a number of decisions, which affect the outcome of the game. For example, a player may vary his or her wager on a particular game, select a prize for a particular game selected from a prize server, or make game decisions, which affect the outcome of a particular game. The player may make these choices using the player-input switches 32, the video display screen 34 or using some other device which enables a player to input information into the gaming machine. In some embodiments, the player may be able to access various game services such as concierge services and entertainment content services using the video display screen 34 and one more input devices.
  • During certain game events, the gaming machine 2 may display visual and auditory effects that can be perceived by the player. These effects add to the excitement of a game, which makes a player more likely to continue playing. Auditory effects include various sounds that are projected by the speakers 10, 12, and 14. Visual effects include flashing lights, strobing lights or other patterns displayed from lights on the gaming machine 2 or from lights behind the belly glass 40. After the player has completed a game, the player may receive game tokens from the coin tray 38 or the ticket 20 from the printer 18, which may be used for further games or to redeem a prize. Further, the player may receive a ticket 20 for food, merchandise, or games from the printer 18.
  • In certain embodiments, the present invention pertains to gaming systems or networks comprising multiple nodes. Typically, at least one of the nodes is a game terminal such as the gaming machine just described. Another node, a server node, may control availability of game instances on various game terminals or provide other shared services. It may provide, for example, downloaded games to the individual game terminals as well as the instructions needed to remove games from specific game terminals. Further, it may provide information for controlling a video display screen shared by two or more gaming terminals on a network for presented win information on any of these terminals.
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of networked gaming machines and gaming devices that provide gaming terminals for various forms of game play including progressive and linked bonus games for embodiments of the present invention. One or multiple instances of a master gaming controller 224 is used to present one or more games of chance on the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63. The master gaming controller(s) 224 may also control display of win information on these machines. As a game controller, the master gaming controller 224 may be used to generate games on one (e.g., stand-alone game) or more gaming machines (e.g., a linked game). For instance, in linked game play, a plurality of game players may play games of chance in a shared gaming environment. In one embodiment, the game may be generated as a bonus game to the one or more games of chance played on the gaming machines, such as 61, 62 and 63. Win information may be displayed on any video display of any one or more of these machines, regardless of where the winning game was presented.
  • For a primary or bonus game involving a plurality of linked gaming machines, a game server 90 with a game controller 92 may be used to generate the outcome of the game which is displayed on the plurality of gaming machines such as 61, 62 and 63. The outcomes of the bonus games and other linked games may be based upon game play generated on the plurality of gaming machines in communication with the game server 90. In one embodiment, the game server 90 or a gaming machine, such as 61, 62 and 63, may provide a plurality of games presented in parallel; i.e., at the same time.
  • The master gaming controllers 224 execute a number of gaming software modules to operate gaming devices 70, such as coin hoppers, bill validators, coin acceptors, speakers, printers, lights, displays (e.g. 34) and other input/output mechanisms. The master gaming controller 224 may also execute gaming software enabling communications with gaming devices located outside of the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63, such as game servers (e.g., 90), a progressive game server (e.g., 82), a cashless system server (e.g., 99), player tracking servers (e.g., 96), bonus game servers (e.g., 94), and the like. In some embodiments, communications with devices located outside of the gaming machines may be performed using the main communication board 215 and network connections 71. The network connections 71 may allow communications with remote gaming devices via a local area network, an intranet, the Internet 97 or combinations thereof. The game server 90 may also communicate with a number of game devices via the network connections 71 such as but not limited to the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63, a progressive game server 82 and possibly remote gaming machines.
  • The gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 may use gaming software modules to generate a game of chance that is distributed between local file storage devices and remote file storage devices (e.g., device 81). For example, to play a game on gaming machine 61, the master gaming controller may load gaming software modules into RAM 56 that may be located in 1) a file storage device 226 on gaming machine 61, 2) a game server 90, 3) a file storage device 226 on gaming machine 62, 4) a file storage device 226 on gaming machine 63, or 5) combinations thereof. In one embodiment of the present invention, the gaming operating system may allow files stored on the local file storage devices and remote file storage devices (e.g., device 81) to be used as part of a shared file system where the files on the remote file storage devices are remotely mounted to the local file system. The file storage devices may be a hard-drive, CD-ROM, CD-DVD, static RAM, flash memory, EPROM's, compact flash, smart media, disk-on-chip, removable media, or combinations thereof. For both security and regulatory purposes, gaming software executed on the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 by the master gaming controllers 224 may be regularly verified by comparing software stored in RAM 56 for execution on the gaming machines with certified copies of the software stored on the gaming machine (e.g. files may be stored on file storage device 226), accessible to the gaming machine via a remote communication connection.
  • The game server 90 may also be a repository for game software modules and software for other game services provided on the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63. In one embodiment of the present invention, the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 may download game software modules from the game server 90 to a local file storage device to play a game of chance. The download of game software may be initiated by the game server 90. One example of a game server that may be used with the present invention is described in co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/595,798, filed on Jun. 16, 2000, titled “Using a Gaming Machine as a Server” which is incorporated herein in its entirety and for all purposes. In another example, the game server might also be a dedicated computer or a service running on a server with other application programs.
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, the processors used to generate a game and display win information about that game may be distributed among different machines. For instance, the game flow logic to play a game may be executed on the game server 90 by the game controller 92 while the game presentation logic and/or win information display logic for the game may be executed on gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 by the master gaming controllers 224. The gaming operating systems on gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 and the game server 90 may allow gaming events, including win information, to be communicated between different gaming software modules executing on different gaming machines via defined APIs. Thus, a game flow software module executed on the game server 90 may send gaming events to a game presentation software module executed on gaming machine 61, 62 or 63 to control the play of a primary game of chance or to control the play of a bonus game of chance presented on gaming machines 61, 62 and 63. It may also send win information display commands to any of the local gaming machines. As another example, the gaming machines 61, 62 and 63 may send gaming events to one another via network connection 71 to control the play of the shared bonus game played simultaneously on the different gaming machines.
  • Progressive jackpots may be awarded as part of a game. The progressive jackpots may be funded by groups of gaming machines of various sizes. For example, a group of gaming machines connected together in a casino may fund a progressive jackpot in a game. As another example, gaming machines distributed over many gaming properties may be used to fund a progressive jackpot in a primary game. In all progressive games, it will be important to display win information on one or more primary or secondary displays associated with game machines participating in the progressive game.
  • In FIG. 6, a progressive game server 82 is connected to gaming machine 61, 62 and 63 and possibly a remote gaming machine via a wide area progressive network 98. The progressive game server 82 may also contain a game controller and provide games to the gaming machines in communication with the progressive game server. It may also include logic for controlling display of win information on one or more displays on gaming machines 61, 62, and 63, or on a remote shared display. A portion of the participation fees for games played at the gaming machines in communication with the progressive game server 82 may be used to fund a progressive jackpot. The amount of the game progressive jackpot may be continually updated and displayed by the progressive game server. Further, the amount of the game progressive jackpot may be displayed on the individual gaming machines in communication with progressive game server or may be displayed on a display device near the gaming machines.
  • CONCLUSION
  • Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail for purposes of clarity of understanding, it will be apparent that certain changes and modifications may be practiced without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the claims. For instance, while the gaming machines of this invention have been depicted as having a display screen physically viewed through a vertical glass panel attached to a main gaming machine cabinet, the use of gaming devices in accordance with this invention is not so limited. For example, the display screen features may be provided on a table top gaming machine where the display screen is viewed through a horizontal glass panel. Further, features of the invention described herein may be provided alone or in any combination.

Claims (55)

1. A method of displaying win information pertaining to game play in a game of chance in a gaming machine having a primary display and the secondary display, wherein at least a portion of a primary game of chance is presented on the primary display, the method comprising:
(a) determining that a game outcome in a game play of the primary game of chance on the gaming machine is a win; and
(b) displaying information about the win on the secondary display, wherein the win information is not displayed in a bit line.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the primary game of chance comprises a mechanical or video slot game, video poker, video black jack, video pachinko, a lottery, keno, a bingo game, or a baccarat game.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the gaming machine comprises a main chassis and a top box, and wherein the secondary display is located in the top box.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the gaming machine also presents a bonus game associated with the primary game.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising displaying information about a win in the bonus game on the secondary display.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the gaming machine comprises a single board for controlling the rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the single board comprises a dual head video card.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the secondary display presents the information about the win 3-dimensional images.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win comprises an image displaying an amount of the win that is thematically coupled to the primary game of chance.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win comprises a total win amount.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on at least one line presented with the primary game of chance.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on multiple different lines, or multiple hands played, or multiple tries, or multiple games, or multiple free spins, each presented with the primary game of chance.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein each amount won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins is displayed simultaneously on the secondary display.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein each of the amounts won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games or free spins is displayed simultaneously with a total win amount.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win is displayed in a first format when the win amount is of a first size and is displayed in a second format when the win amount is of a second size.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win is displayed in or by a thematic image selected from the group fireworks, explosions, flames, coins, treasure, bills, money bags, collections of gems, fish, etc., color, length or size, intensity, and hierarchy.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein the information about the win is displayed in or by an image showing a winning combination of symbols that resulted in the win in the game play of the primary game of chance.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein the win information is displayed for a period of time and then removed from the secondary display.
19. The method of claim 1, wherein the win information is displayed until at least one subsequent game play has been completed.
20. The method of claim 1, wherein the win information is displayed until another win occurs in a later game play of the primary game of chance.
21. A gaming machine comprising:
(a) a primary display;
(b) a secondary display;
(c) game presentation logic for (i) presenting at least a portion of a primary game of chance on the primary display, and (ii) presenting information about a win on the primary game of chance on the secondary display, wherein the win information is not displayed in a bit line.
22. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the primary game of chance comprises a mechanical or video slot game, video poker, video black jack, video pachinko, a lottery, keno, a bingo game, or a baccarat game.
23. The gaming machine of claim 21, further comprising a main chassis and a top box, wherein the secondary display is located in the top box.
24. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for presenting a bonus game associated with the primary game.
25. The gaming machine of claim 24, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying information about a win in the bonus game on the secondary display.
26. The gaming machine of claim 21, further comprising a single board for controlling the rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display.
27. The gaming machine of claim 26, wherein the single board comprises a dual head video card.
28. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for presenting the information about the win in 3-dimensional images on the secondary display.
29. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the information about the win comprises an image displaying an amount of the win that is thematically coupled to the primary game of chance.
30. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the information about the win comprises a total win amount.
31. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on at least one line presented with the primary game of chance.
32. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on multiple different lines, or multiple hands played, or multiple tries, or multiple games, or multiple free spins, each presented with the primary game of chance.
33. The gaming machine of claim 32, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for simultaneously displaying each amount won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins, each on the secondary display.
34. The gaming machine of claim 33, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for simultaneously displaying a total win amount with each of the amounts won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins.
35. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying the information about the win in a first format when the win amount is of a first size and displaying the information in a second format when the win amount is of a second size.
36. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the information about the win is displayed in or by a thematic image selected from the group consisting of fireworks, explosions, flames, coins, treasure, bills, money bags, collections of gems, fish, etc., color, length or size, intensity, and hierarchy.
37. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying the information about the win in or by an image showing a winning combination of symbols that resulted in the win in the game play of the primary game of chance.
38. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying the win information for a period of time and then removing it from the secondary display.
39. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying the win information until at least one subsequent game play has been completed.
40. The gaming machine of claim 21, wherein the game presentation logic further comprises logic for displaying the win information until another win occurs in a later game play of the primary game of chance.
41. A system comprising one or more gaming machines on a network, wherein at least one of the gaming machines comprises:
(a) a primary display;
(b) a secondary display;
(c) game presentation logic for (i) presenting at least a portion of a primary game of chance on the primary display, and (ii) presenting information about a win on the primary game of chance on the secondary display, wherein the win information is not displayed in a bit line.
42. The system of claim 41, further comprising a server on the network, which server provides information for executing game plays on at least one of the gaming machines.
43. The system of claim 42, wherein the game plays are for the primary game.
44. The system of claim 41, wherein the gaming machine further comprises a main chassis and a top box, wherein the secondary display is located in the top box.
45. The system of claim 41, wherein the gaming machine further comprises a single board for controlling the rendering of video on both the primary display and the secondary display.
46. The system of claim 45, wherein the single board comprises a dual head video card.
47. The system of claim 41, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for presenting the information about the win in 3-dimensional images on the secondary display.
48. The system of claim 41, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on at least one line presented with the primary game of chance.
49. The system of claim 41, wherein the information about the win comprises an amount won on multiple different lines, or multiple hands played, or multiple tries, or multiple games, or multiple free spins, each presented with the primary game of chance.
50. The system of claim 49, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for simultaneously displaying each amount won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins, each on the secondary display.
51. The system of claim 50, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for simultaneously displaying a total win amount with each of the amounts won on the multiple different lines, hands, tries, games, or free spins.
52. The system of claim 41, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for displaying the information about the win in a first format when the win amount is of a first size and displaying the information in a second format when the win amount is of a second size.
53. The system of claim 41, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for displaying the information about the win in or by an image showing a winning combination of symbols that resulted in the win in the game play of the primary game of chance.
54. The system of claim 41, wherein the game presentation logic of the gaming machine further comprises logic for displaying the win information for a period of time and then removing it from the secondary display.
55. The system of claim 41, comprising at least two gaming machines on the network, wherein the at least two gaming machines share said information about the win.
US11/454,201 2006-06-16 2006-06-16 Display of game win information on a secondary display Abandoned US20070293292A1 (en)

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PCT/US2007/071129 WO2007147006A2 (en) 2006-06-16 2007-06-14 Display of game win information on a secondary display
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AU2007260774A1 (en) 2007-12-21

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