US20070277422A1 - Firearm target illumination implement - Google Patents

Firearm target illumination implement Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070277422A1
US20070277422A1 US11/444,040 US44404006A US2007277422A1 US 20070277422 A1 US20070277422 A1 US 20070277422A1 US 44404006 A US44404006 A US 44404006A US 2007277422 A1 US2007277422 A1 US 2007277422A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
body
firearm
target illumination
fastener
implement according
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Abandoned
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US11/444,040
Inventor
Tai Lai Ding
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Leapers Inc
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Leapers Inc
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Priority to US11/444,040 priority Critical patent/US20070277422A1/en
Assigned to LEAPERS, INC. reassignment LEAPERS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DING, TAI-LAI
Publication of US20070277422A1 publication Critical patent/US20070277422A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G11/00Details of sighting or aiming apparatus; Accessories
    • F41G11/001Means for mounting tubular or beam shaped sighting or aiming devices on firearms
    • F41G11/003Mountings with a dove tail element, e.g. "Picatinny rail systems"
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G1/00Sighting devices
    • F41G1/32Night sights, e.g. luminescent
    • F41G1/34Night sights, e.g. luminescent combined with light source, e.g. spot light
    • F41G1/35Night sights, e.g. luminescent combined with light source, e.g. spot light for illuminating the target, e.g. flash lights

Abstract

A firearm target illumination implement is disclosed. The firearm target illumination implement includes a body that is adapted for removable-attachment to a barrel of a firearm. According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes an illumination device disposed in the body and a plurality of illumination device actuators ambidextrously-arranged on the body to provide control of on/off switching and focusing of light emitted from the illumination device. According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes a mounting plate that is removably-secured to the body, at least one fastener that passes through the mounting plate and into the body, and a portion of the at least one fastener that provides tactile feedback to an operator when the at least one fastener is moved by the operator from a first position to a second position. According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes two or more axes extending, respectively, through the two or more energy cell cavities formed in the body that are parallel to but not coincident with a axis of the barrel of the firearm.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The disclosure relates to firearm implements and, more particularly, to a firearm implement that provides target illumination.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART
  • It is known in the art that firearm implements may include, for example, flashlights that illuminate a target in low lighting conditions for a firearm operator. Although adequate in providing illumination of a target, conventional firearm target illumination implements are known to have several limitations regarding 1) weight, 2) size, 3) universal adaptability to a plurality of firearms, 4) firearm operator reach of illumination focus/on/off features, and the like. Accordingly, a need therefore exists for an improved firearm target illumination implement that is light in weight, compact in size, configured to be secured to more than one firearm, and is adapted for quick and ambidextrous access/activation of illumination features and the like.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A firearm target illumination implement is disclosed. The firearm target illumination implement includes a body that is adapted for removable-attachment to a barrel of a firearm.
  • According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes an illumination device disposed in the body and a plurality of illumination device actuators ambidextrously-arranged on the body to provide control of on/off switching and focusing of light emitted from the illumination device.
  • According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes a mounting plate that is removably-secured to the body, at least one fastener that passes through the mounting plate and into the body, and a portion of the at least one fastener that provides tactile feedback to an operator when the at least one fastener is moved by the operator from a first position to a second position.
  • According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement includes two or more axes extending, respectively, through the two or more energy cell cavities formed in the body that are parallel to but not coincident with a axis of the barrel of the firearm.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Embodiments of the disclosure will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is an environmental perspective view of a firearm target illumination implement secured to a firearm (shown in phantom) according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a firearm target illumination implement according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 3A is an exploded perspective view of a firearm target illumination implement according to FIG. 2;
  • FIG. 3B is an exploded perspective view of a firearm target illumination implement according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a mounting screw and mounting plate according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 5A is a cross-sectional view of the mounting screw and locking pin according to line 5-5 of FIG. 2 according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 5B is a cross-sectional view of the mounting screw in another position relative the locking pin according to FIG. 5A;
  • FIG. 6A is a magnified view of the mounting screw in a first position relative the locking pin according to line 6A of FIG. 5A;
  • FIG. 6B is a magnified view of the mounting screw in a second position relative the locking pin according to line 6B of FIG. 5B;
  • FIG. 7A is a cross-sectional view of the firearm target illumination implement according to line 7-7 of FIG. 2 illustrating a rotary dial and bulb shroud reflector in a first position according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 7B is a cross-sectional view of the firearm target illumination implement according to FIG. 7A illustrating the rotary dial and bulb shroud reflector in another position according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 8A is a top, partially broken view of a rotary dial and switch connector including a conductor in a first position according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 8B is a top, partially broken view of the rotary dial and switch connector showing the conductor in another position according to an embodiment; and
  • FIG. 9 is a circuit diagram of the firearm target illumination implement according to an embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring now to the drawings, the preferred illustrative embodiments of the present disclosure are shown in detail. Although the drawings represent some preferred embodiments of the present disclosure, the drawings are not necessarily to scale and certain features may be exaggerated to better illustrate and explain the present disclosure. Further, the embodiments set forth herein are not intended to be exhaustive or otherwise limit or restrict the disclosure to the precise forms and configurations shown in the drawings and disclosed in the following detailed description.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, an exemplary firearm is shown generally at F (in phantom). The firearm, F, may be, for example, a pistol, handgun, revolver, or the like. The illustrated firearm, F, according to an embodiment, is a pistol and is shown to include a barrel, B, one or more barrel rail slot(s), S, a handle grip, H, and a trigger, T. An axis of the barrel, B, is shown generally at A1, according to an embodiment. Secured under the barrel, B, proximate the one or more rail slot(s), S, and forward of the handle grip, H, and trigger, T, is a firearm target illumination implement, which is shown generally at 10, according to an embodiment.
  • According to an embodiment, the firearm target illumination implement 10 includes a body 12, a removable mounting plate 14, an illumination device 16, and one or more illumination device actuators, which are shown generally at 18 a-18 c. The body 12 may be constructed from any desirable material, such as, for example, extruded aluminum, to impart maximum strength and precision when the body 12 is machined. The body 12 may also include a hard anodized finish to resist wear and prevent corrosion. The illumination device 16 may include any desirable illumination component. For example, the illumination component may include a bulb 16 a (FIGS. 3A, 3B) having any desirable illumination rating to provide, for example, a long-range or short-range flashlight. It will be appreciated that the illumination component is not limited to a bulb and may be, for example, a light emitting diode (LED), a super-bright LED, or the like.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, an enlarged view of the firearm target illumination device 10 is shown without the firearm, F. When the mounting plate 14 is attached to an upper portion 20 of the body 12, a generally U- or C-shaped channel 22 is formed that permits the firearm target illumination device 10 to be secured to the firearm, F, proximate the one or more rail slots, S. Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the securing channel 22 provides a universal clamping deck that may be adaptably- and removably-secured to fit most tactile firearms with or without rail slots, S.
  • As seen in FIGS. 2-3B, the upper portion 20 of the body 12 is also defined to include at least a top side 24 and a channel wall 26. The mounting plate 14 also includes a channel wall 28 that is substantially symmetrical to the channel wall 26 defined by the upper portion 20 of the body 12.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4, the mounting plate 14 generally includes a profile, which is shown generally at 30. The profile 30 of the mounting plate 14 mates with a profiled surface, which is shown generally at 32, of the body 12. The top side 24 of the upper portion 20 of the body 12 is also shown to include a passage 34 for receiving a securing tab 36 extending from a flexible thumb tab 38 of an end plate 40, which is discussed in detail below.
  • Referring to FIGS. 3A-4, the mounting plate 14 is removably-secured to the body 12 with at least one mounting screw 42. The one or more mounting screws 42 is/are inserted through one or more respective mounting plate passages 44 and coil springs 46. The embodiment shown in FIGS. 3B and 4 includes one mounting screw 42 and the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3A includes two mounting screws 42. However, it will be appreciated that the firearm target illumination implement 10 may include any desirable number of mounting screws 42. The following discussion and illustrated embodiments of FIGS. 3A, 3B, 7A, and 7B are shown to include two mounting screws 42.
  • When removably-attaching the mounting plate 14 to the body 12, the mounting screws 42 threadingly-engage a threaded mounting screw passage 48 formed in the body 12 to draw the mounting plate 14 generally in the direction of an arrow, X1, toward the body 12. The coil springs 46 are positioned in the screw passage 48 and between an end 58 of the mounting screw 42 and body 12 (FIGS. 5A-5B) to apply a force against the end 58 of the mounting screw 42 generally in the opposite direction of the arrow, X1. Operationally, the coil springs 46 are compacted in the screw passage 48 and may prevent the potential of the fusing of the mounting plate 14 to the body 12 as a result of ‘kick’ forces exerted by the firearm, F. Additionally, the coil springs 46 bias the mounting screw 42 in a force opposite the direction of the arrow, X1, to relieve the potential of an over-tightening the mounting screws 42.
  • Referring to FIGS. 2 and 5A, a mounting screw 42 is shown in a position that secures the mounting plate 14 to the body 12. A substantially rounded, dome-shaped end 52 of a threaded locking pin 50 is shown frictionally engaging a portion 54 of the mounting screw 42. Referring to FIGS. 3A and 3B, the locking pin 50 is threadingly-inserted into a passage 56 that is formed in the top side 24 of the upper portion 20 of the body 12. As illustrated, the locking pin 50 engages the portion 54 at a substantially perpendicular angle.
  • The locking pin 50 is preferably inserted into the passage 56 after the mounting screw 42 has been inserted into the mounting screw passages 48 so that the locking pin 50 does not cause interference with the extension of the mounting screw 42 into the body 12 through the mounting screw passage 48. Accordingly, the locking pin 50 is threadably-inserted into passage 56 until the dome-shaped end 52 engages the portion 54 of the mounting screw 42.
  • Referring to FIGS. 5A and 5B, the portion 54 of the mounting screw 42 is non-threaded and substantially cylindrical in shape having a diameter, D1, that extends from an end 58 of the mounting screw 42. A threaded portion 60 of the mounting screw 42 is generally shown to include a diameter, D2, that is larger than the diameter, D1, of the portion 54 and extends between the end 58 and a head 59 of the mounting screw 42. However, it will be appreciated that the portion 54 may not necessarily be cylindrically-shaped and may include any desirable shape, diameter, or texture.
  • Functionally, the locking pin 50 and portion 54 of the mounting screw 42 provides a preventative means for fully removing the mounting screw 42 from the body 12 when the mounting screw 42 is ‘backed-out’ (i.e., threadably-removed) from the body 12. Referring to FIG. 6A, the dome-shaped end 52 of the locking pin 50 drags (according to a frictional constant) on an outer surface 62 of the portion 54 when the mounting screw 42 is threadably-removed from the body 12 according to the direction of the arrow, X2, which is opposite the direction of the arrow, X1. The drag cause by the contact of the dome-shaped end 52 against the outer surface 62 of the portion 54 is tactilely fed-back to the operator that is threadably-removing the mounting screw 42, and, accordingly, the operator applies an adequate torque to the mounting screw 42 to move the mounting screw 42 in the direction according to the arrow, X2.
  • Referring to FIG. 6B, as the mounting screw 42 is threadably-removed in the direction of the arrow, X2, the locking pin 50 eventually engages an end portion 64 of the mounting screw 42, thereby interrupting the drag feed-back of the locking pin 50 relative the threadably-removing movement of the mounting screw 42 in the direction of the arrow, X2, across the surface 62. As illustrated, the end portion 64 effectively increases the diameter, D1, of the portion 54 to include another diameter, D3, that is greater than the diameter, D1, but less than the diameter, D2, of the threaded portion 60.
  • Accordingly, as illustrated in FIG. 5A, a first position of the mounting screw 42 may be positioned at a first distance, Z1, as measured between an end surface of the head 59 of the mounting screw 42 and an outer wall of the body 12, and, as illustrated in FIG. 5B, a second position of the mounting screw 42 may be positioned at a second distance, Z2, that is greater than the first distance, Z1, as measured between the end surface of the head 59 of the mounting screw 42 and the outer wall of the body 12. Thus, the first position of the mounting screw 42 shown in FIG. 5A substantially secures the mounting plate 14 to the body 12, and, the second position of the mounting screw 42 shown in FIG. 5B loosely secures the mounting plate 14 to the body 12 while the mounting screw 42 at least partially engages the body 12.
  • In design, the location of the end portion 64 acts as an integrated, mechanical stop to tactilely provide feedback to an operator that the mounting screw 42 has been adequately ‘backed off’ the body 12 to a point that permits the mounting plate 14 to loosen and freely rest about the mounting screw 42 proximate the mounting plate passage 44 without having to fully remove the mounting screw 42 from the body 12. Thus, it is less likely for an operator to lose the mounting screw 42 when the firearm target illumination implement 10 is removed from the firearm, F, as a result of at least partially leaving a portion of the mounting screw 42 being threadably-mounted within the mounting screw passage 48 formed in the body 12.
  • Referring to FIGS. 3A and 3B, to provide power for activating the illumination device 16, at least two energy cells are shown generally a C1, C2. The body 12 includes an opening, which is shown generally at 66, for accommodating passage of the cells, C1, C2, into respective energy cell cavities 68 a, 68 b along respective axes A2, A3 that extend, respectively, through the energy cell cavities 68 a, 68 b. As such, the body 12 provides storage of the cells C1, C2 along axes A2, A3 that are parallel to but not coincident with one another or the axis, A1, of a barrel, B, of a firearm, F. As such, the body 12 is formed to have a generally compact shape including a width, W, that is approximately equal to or less than the width of a barrel, B, of a firearm, F. By “stacking” cells C1 and C2 vertically (as shown in FIGS. 2, 3A, 3B, 7A and 7B), illumination implement 10 assumes a short longitudinal profile especially suitable for pistols.
  • As seen in FIGS. 3A-3B, the illumination device 16 is shown to generally include a bulb 16 a, an electrical conductor 16 b, a threaded portion 16 c, a coil spring 16 d, and an o-ring sealer 16 e. The illumination device actuator 18 a generally includes a threaded cap 70, an o-ring sealer 72, a substantially transparent portion 74 of glass, plastic, or the like, a bulb shroud reflector 76, a first threaded support 78, a threaded rotary dial 80, a second threaded support 82, and a third threaded support 84. The illumination device actuator 18 b generally includes a threaded cap 86, a switch button 88, a button housing 90, and a conical coil spring 92. The illumination device actuator 18 c generally includes the end plate 40 having a rotary dial 94. The illumination device actuator 18 c also includes a cam 96, and a switch connector 98.
  • Referring to FIGS. 7A-7B, the body 12 is shown to includes a first and second outer surface threaded portions, which are shown generally at 100, 102 to respectively secure the illumination device actuators 18 a, 18 b to the body 12, respectively. The rotary dial 80 of the illumination device actuator 18 a threadably-engages the first threaded outer surface portion 100, and the threaded cap 86 of the illumination device actuator 18 b threadably-engages the second threaded outer surface portion 102. The securing tab 36, extending from a thumb tab 38 of the end plate 40, is inserted through a side passage 104 of the body proximate the opening 66 so as to allow the securing tab 36 to at least partially pass through the passage 34 of the top side 24 of the upper portion 20 (FIGS. 3A, 3B) to permit removable-securing of the illumination device actuator 18 c to the body 12.
  • Referring to FIGS. 8A and 8B, the operation of the illumination actuator device 18 c is shown according to an embodiment. As illustrated, according to an embodiment, the switch connector 98 includes a substantially U-shaped first conductor 106 and a substantially flat, planar second conductor 108. The first conductor 106 is generally connected to one of the cells C1, C2, by, for example, a first conductive lead 110 (FIGS. 7A, 7B). The second conductor 108 is generally connected to one of the other of the cells C1, C2, for example, by a second conductive lead 112 (FIGS. 7A-8B).
  • As shown in FIGS. 8A and 8B, the second conductor 108 is located in a substantially fixed position about the second conductive lead 112. Conversely, the first conductor 106 is shown in FIG. 8A in a relaxed position, and in FIG. 8B, in a stressed position. As illustrated, the first conductor 106 is moved to/from a relaxed/stressed position by rotational movement of the rotary dial 94 which is joined with cam 96 to form a single unit. To cause movement of the cam 96, the rotary dial 94 includes at least one extension 114 (FIGS. 3A, 3B) that is fitted within a bore 116 (FIGS. 3A and 3B) formed in the cam 96. Accordingly, rotational movement of the rotary dial 94 translates into rotary movement of the cam 96.
  • In operation, one or more fingers 118 of the first conductor 106 function as a cam follower that traces a perimeter profile of the cam 96. As illustrated in FIG. 8A, the first conductor 106 is in the relaxed position as the fingers 118 trace the shape of the cam 96 so as to be positioned substantially in a first channel 120 formed in the cam 96. Conversely, to place the first conductor 106 in the stressed position, the fingers 118 trace the shape of the cam 96 so as to be positioned substantially in a second, substantially higher, channel 122 formed in the cam 96.
  • As illustrated, when the first conductor 106 is placed in the relaxed position, the first conductor 106 does not contact the second conductor 108, and conversely, when the first conductor 106 is placed in the stressed position, the first conductor 106 positively contacts the second conductor 108. Thus, the relaxed position of the first conductor 106 creates an open circuit according to the circuit diagram of the firearm target illumination implement 10, which is shown generally at 200 in FIG. 9. Conversely, the stressed position of the first conductor 106 creates a closed circuit according to the circuit diagram 200. Because extension 114 rotates freely in bore 116, dial 94 can be related clockwise or counterclockwise an indefinite number of rotations without hitting a stop or the like. Thus, extension 114 can be accessed from the left side or the right side and can accommodate any switch use rotating pattern preference of any shooter.
  • As shown in FIG. 9, the circuit diagram 200 is generally a series circuit. The bulb 16 a is connected to the conductor 16 b, which contacts a positive terminal of the cell, C1, which is connected, in series, to the second cell, C2. The button 88 of the illumination device actuator 18 b is an on/off momentary switch for de/activating the bulb 16 a. Accordingly, the button 88 may also open and close the circuit 200. As explained above, the rotary dial 94 acts as a permanent on/off, or, a momentary on, release off switch for closing and opening the circuit 200 to respectively de/activate the bulb 16 a. Although not illustrated, it will be appreciated that the illumination device actuator 18 a may also include a rotary on/off switch similar to the illumination device actuator 18 c such that the bulb 16 a may be de/activated upon rotating a the rotary dial 80 to/from a first position and second position.
  • As shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B, the threaded rotary dial 80 of the illumination device actuator 18 a functions in controlling the focus a beam of light, L, emitted from the bulb 16 a. Bulb shroud reflector 78 may be shaped as a parabolic reflector having a focal point. Threaded cap 70, O-ring sealer 72, transparent portion 74, bulb shroud reflector 76, first threaded support 78, and rotary dial 80 may all form a focus adjustment subassembly. All of the components of focus adjustment subassembly rotate in unison whenever rotary dial 80 is rotated. When bulb 16A is positioned at the focal point of bulb shroud reflector 76, beam L is grouped in its tightest possible beam pattern. FIG. 7B depicts bulb 16A positioned at the focal point of bulb shroud reflector 76. When rotary dial 80 is rotated such that the focal point of bulb shroud reflector 76 moves away from X3, X4, the focus of the light beam L will generally diverge (divergent light beam L shown generally in FIG. 7A). Because of the longitudinal compactness enabled by vertically stacking the batteries, rotary dial 80 can be easily accessed and rotated with the index finger of the user without necessitating that the user release his shooting grip on the pistol grip.
  • It will be appreciated that the general ambidextrous positioning of the body 12 relative the firearm, F, imparts left/right handed, ambidextrous control of the de/activation and focus of the light beam emitted from the bulb 16 a. As such, a left-handed or right-handed firearm operator may, while holding the firearm, F, about the handle grip, H, operate the firearm target illumination implement 10 and/or trigger, T, with the same hand holding the firearm, F, about the handle grip, H. Accordingly, when a firearm operator holds the firearm, F, about the handle grip, H, the firearm operator may be able to reach and control the plurality of illumination device actuators 18 a-18 c to de/activate and focus of the light, L, with one or more of his/her digits extending from his/her hand, including, for example, his/her thumb, “trigger finger,” “middle finger,” “ring finger,” or “small finger.” As such, the firearm operator may utilize one hand to operate the firearm, F, and firearm target illumination implement 10 while freeing his/her other hand during the operation of the firearm and/or firearm target illumination implement 10. If desired, the firearm operator may alternatively hold the handle grip, H, and operate the trigger, T, with one hand while operating the firearm target illumination implement 10 with the opposite hand.
  • The present invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to the foregoing embodiments, which are merely illustrative of the best modes for carrying out the invention. It should be understood by those skilled in the art that various alternatives to the embodiments of the invention described herein may be employed in practicing the invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims. It is intended that the following claims define the scope of the invention and that the method and apparatus within the scope of these claims and their equivalents be covered thereby. This description of the invention should be understood to include all novel and non-obvious combinations of elements described herein, and claims may be presented in this or a later application to any novel and non-obvious combination of these elements. Moreover, the foregoing embodiments are illustrative, and no single feature or element is essential to all possible combinations that may be claimed in this or a later application.

Claims (17)

1. A firearm target illumination implement, comprising:
a body that is adapted for removable-attachment to a barrel of a firearm;
an illumination device disposed in said body; and
a plurality of illumination device actuators ambidextrously-arranged on said body that provide control of at least one of on/off switching and focusing of light emitted from said illumination device.
2. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 1, wherein the body is constructed from an extruded aluminum and includes a hard anodized finish.
3. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 1 further comprising a mounting plate is removably-attached to a portion of the body to define a generally U- or C-shaped channel to provide a universal clamping deck for fitting the body to one of a plurality of firearms with or without rail slots.
4. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 1, wherein one of the plurality of illumination device actuators includes a rotary dial that, when rotated, causes movement of a bulb shroud reflector to change a focus of light emitted from a bulb.
5. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 4, wherein the bulb shroud reflector is moved to/from first and second positions to,
expose a surface area of the bulb to provide a spread the focus of the light, or
at least partially encompass the surface area of the bulb to narrow the focus of the light.
6. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 1, wherein one of the plurality of illumination device actuators includes a momentary on/off push button switch.
7. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 1, wherein one of the plurality of illumination device actuators includes a rotary dial switch, wherein the rotary dial switch includes a permanent on/off switch function and a momentary on, release off function.
8. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 7, wherein rotary dial switch is disposed in an end plate, wherein a cam engages the rotary dial switch and is positioned between a switch connector and the end plate, wherein the switch connector includes a first conductor and a second conductor, wherein the first conductor includes a cam finger that follows the movement of the cam as the cam is rotated by the rotary dial switch, wherein movement of the cam causes the cam finger to move first conductor to contact or be spaced from the second conductor.
9. A firearm target illumination implement, comprising:
a body that is adapted for removable-attachment to a barrel of a firearm;
a mounting plate that is removably-secured to the body;
at least one fastener that passes through the mounting plate and into the body; and
a portion of the at least one fastener that provides tactile feedback to an operator when the at least one fastener is moved by the operator from a first position to a second position.
10. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 9, wherein the at least one fastener includes:
a threaded portion that is threadably-received by a threaded passage formed in the body; and
wherein the portion of the least one fastener extends from an end of the threaded portion and includes a non-threaded surface having a end portion.
11. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 10 further comprising at least one locking pin that is threadably-received by the body and engages the portion of the at least one fastener.
12. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 11, wherein, when moving the at least one fastener from the first position to the second position,
contact of an end of the at least one locking pin with the non-threaded surface provides drag feedback to the operator, and
contact of the end of the at least one locking pin with the end portion interrupts the drag feedback to provide the tactile feedback to the operator.
13. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 9,
wherein the first position of the at least one fastener includes a first distance between a head of the at least one fastener and the body, and
wherein the second position of the at the least one fastener includes a second distance between the head of the at least one fastener and the body, wherein the second distance is greater than the first distance.
14. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 9, wherein the first position of the fastener substantially secures the mounting plate to the body, and wherein the second position of the fastener loosely secures the mounting plate to the body while the fastener is at least partially engaged with the body.
15. A firearm target illumination implement, comprising:
a barrel of a firearm;
a body that is adapted for removable-attachment to the barrel,
wherein the body includes two or more energy cell cavities,
wherein each energy cell cavity has a respectively associated longitudinal axis, and wherein each energy cell cavity axis is parallel an axis of said firearm barrel, and wherein said energy cell cavity axes are not coincident.
16. The firearm target illumination implement according to claim 15 further including at least two energy cells, wherein each energy cell is positioned within a respectively associated energy cell cavity.
17. The fire arm target illumination implement according to claim 15, wherein the longitudinal axis of each energy cell cavity is coincident with a longitudinal axis of the respectively associated energy cell.
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US20080134562A1 (en) * 2006-11-01 2008-06-12 Wilcox Industries Corp. Modular flashlight apparatus for firearm
US20090139846A1 (en) * 2007-11-29 2009-06-04 Sagi Faifer Rocker switch and device holder
US20110167707A1 (en) * 2008-03-11 2011-07-14 Gross Barbara R Tactical illuminator
US20110255270A1 (en) * 2008-03-11 2011-10-20 Gross Barbara R Tactical Illuminator
US8510979B1 (en) * 2010-01-18 2013-08-20 Timothy Scott Mortimer Light-emitting and less-than-lethal-agent-emitting apparatus
US8584392B1 (en) * 2010-05-13 2013-11-19 CQ Innovations, Inc. Weapon mounted light
US20150276347A1 (en) * 2014-03-28 2015-10-01 Streamlight, Inc. Portable light with multiple light sources
US9453702B2 (en) * 2015-01-09 2016-09-27 Hogue, Inc. Firearm handgrip assembly with laser gunsight system
US20170146315A1 (en) * 2015-01-09 2017-05-25 Hogue, Inc. Firearm handgrip assembly with laser gunsight system
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