US20070271001A1 - Method of remotely managaing the distribution of medicine - Google Patents

Method of remotely managaing the distribution of medicine Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070271001A1
US20070271001A1 US11/775,611 US77561107A US2007271001A1 US 20070271001 A1 US20070271001 A1 US 20070271001A1 US 77561107 A US77561107 A US 77561107A US 2007271001 A1 US2007271001 A1 US 2007271001A1
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Prior art keywords
medicine
control circuit
medicine container
container
additional
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Abandoned
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US11/775,611
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Nitesh Ratnakar
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Nitesh Ratnakar
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Priority to US10/905,032 priority Critical patent/US7269476B2/en
Application filed by Nitesh Ratnakar filed Critical Nitesh Ratnakar
Priority to US11/775,611 priority patent/US20070271001A1/en
Publication of US20070271001A1 publication Critical patent/US20070271001A1/en
Priority claimed from US12/611,912 external-priority patent/US8483872B2/en
Priority claimed from US12/613,520 external-priority patent/US20100100237A1/en
Priority claimed from US12/613,528 external-priority patent/US20100096399A1/en
Priority claimed from US13/915,237 external-priority patent/US20130304255A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J7/00Devices for administering medicines orally, e.g. spoons; Pill counting devices; Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine
    • A61J7/04Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers
    • A61J7/0409Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers
    • A61J7/0481Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers working on a schedule basis
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J7/00Devices for administering medicines orally, e.g. spoons; Pill counting devices; Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine
    • A61J7/02Pill counting devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F11/00Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles
    • G07F11/02Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles from non-movable magazines
    • G07F11/44Coin-freed apparatus for dispensing, or the like, discrete articles from non-movable magazines in which magazines the articles are stored in bulk
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/0092Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for assembling and dispensing of pharmaceutical articles
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F9/00Details other than those peculiar to special kinds or types of apparatus
    • G07F9/02Devices for alarm or indication, e.g. when empty; Advertising arrangements in coin-freed apparatus
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J7/00Devices for administering medicines orally, e.g. spoons; Pill counting devices; Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine
    • A61J7/04Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers
    • A61J7/0409Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers
    • A61J7/0418Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers with electronic history memory
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J7/00Devices for administering medicines orally, e.g. spoons; Pill counting devices; Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine
    • A61J7/04Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers
    • A61J7/0409Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers
    • A61J7/0427Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers with direct interaction with a dispensing or delivery system
    • A61J7/0436Arrangements for time indication or reminder for taking medicine, e.g. programmed dispensers with timers with direct interaction with a dispensing or delivery system resulting from removing a drug from, or opening, a container
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H20/00ICT specially adapted for therapies or health-improving plans, e.g. for handling prescriptions, for steering therapy or for monitoring patient compliance
    • G16H20/10ICT specially adapted for therapies or health-improving plans, e.g. for handling prescriptions, for steering therapy or for monitoring patient compliance relating to drugs or medications, e.g. for ensuring correct administration to patients
    • G16H20/13ICT specially adapted for therapies or health-improving plans, e.g. for handling prescriptions, for steering therapy or for monitoring patient compliance relating to drugs or medications, e.g. for ensuring correct administration to patients delivered from dispensers

Abstract

A method is provided of remotely managing the distribution of medicine. The method includes the step of providing a plurality of medicine containers. Each medicine container receives at least one dosage of medicine therein and includes a control circuit. Each control circuit controls distribution of a dosage of medicine from a corresponding medicine container. The control circuits and a central server are interconnected to a communications network. Instructions are transmitted by the central server to the control circuits over the communications network.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims priority as a divisional patent application from U.S. application Ser. No. 10/905,032, filed on Dec. 11, 2004, and incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to medicine containers, and more specifically, to a medicine container with an inbuilt pill dispensing assembly that automatically dispenses a prescribed dose of medicine at prescribed times. According to another aspect, the present invention relates to medicine containers that communicate with remote parties like health care professionals and ancillary medical devices like a glucose meter. According to yet another aspect, the present invention relates to medicine containers that monitor and report patient compliance with a medicine regimen.
  • BACKGROUND AND PRIOR ART
  • The advances in medicine are enhancing the quality and longevity of human lives. Ailments, for which there were no effective treatments before, are now effectively treated by one or more drugs. In many cases, patients have to remember to take a dose of medicine at prescribed times. A number of ailments require treatment with one or more combination of medicines. With most medicines (e.g., pills, syrups), doses have to be taken at specific intervals (every six hours) or at certain times of the day (morning, afternoon, evening, before bed time etc). A patient may have difficulty remembering to take medicine at recommended times. Sometimes, patients have difficulty remembering that they have already taken a dose. Some patients have difficulty remembering the recommended dose of medicine to be taken, especially if a medicine dose requires more than one pill of the same medicine. In a multiple drug regimen, such a scenario is even more convoluted and may pose grave consequences to the patient. This is especially true for patients with inadequate skills or knowledge to follow a medicine regimen like elderly, disabled and cognitively impaired and patients with psychiatric disorders (Levy R L et al, American Journal of Gastroenterology 1999; 94:1733-1742 & Nigro J, Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 2001; 32:66-82). This segment of the population is the most vulnerable as their medicine regimen usually comprises of multiple medicines, each with a different schedule and a different set of instructions. In addition, eyesight fade with age and reading labels of medicine containers can present a problem. Even young and alert patients are sometimes overwhelmed by life, work, family and other responsibilities and forget to take their medicines. This is especially apparent with temporary treatments, such as antibiotics, where the medicine is only taken for a short period of time. In this case, patients are unable to generate a routine based around taking the medicine. The end result of the above situations is that the amount of medicine taken is either too low to affect the course of the ailment, or is too high and causes overdose reactions.
  • There are many studies that show that management of chronic diseases is unsatisfactory in spite of the great advances in medicine. Factors that have been implicated are 1) poor compliance with medicine regimen because patients forget to take their medicines 2) frequent need to go the pharmacist for refills and education 3) need for frequent visit to the health care professional's office to monitor the treatment response and to make any required changes in medicine regimen 4) lack of adequate health education and inadequate reinforcement thereof 5) under or over dosing of medicine 6) altered dosing regimen 7) incorrect administration of medicine (Kane S et al, Advanced Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease; 2002:9-11). Even more worrisome is the practice that patients do not inform physicians of their non compliance with medicine regimen. Physicians, in such a case, conclude that patient's condition is not responding to the current medicine regimen and make changes in medicine dose, add or substitute another medicine. This results in unnecessary changes in patient's medicine regimen which can be detrimental to the health of the patient. This practice also increases health care cost.
  • Medicines including pills, capsules, tablets, caplets and the like have traditionally been packaged in bottles or other such containers capped with a variety of closure devices. The caps or closures for these containers have taken a variety of forms and, more recently, have included a key system, depress-and-turn system, or the like, designed to prevent small children from gaining access to the contents. These medicine containers do not have features to assist patients remember to take their medicines or to record their compliance with a medicine regimen. There are many prior art attempts to address problems of this nature which generally incorporate some type of a time, date or dosage indicating device on the cap or other part of the container which involves a moveable pointer or other such device designed to be indicative of the status of medicine administration. These devices generally involve the relative motion of a pointer, plate or other indicator relative to a dial which is moved each time the medicine container is used to indicate the fact that the medicine has been taken and/or the time when the next dose is due.
  • Systems including a pointer and dial indicator on the container cap are illustrated. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,279,422, Adams disclosed a device suitable as a closure cap for a medicine container. The device has indicia circumferentially marked on the upper surface of the device representing the time for next taking the medicine in the container. An arm rotatably and pivotably mounted in the center of the device is set to point at the time for next taking the medicine. The arm is releasably retained in position by cooperating pegs and indentations on the upper surface of the device and the underside of the rotatable arm. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,216,975, Bartholomew disclosed a combination medicine container cap and indicator device adapted to function as the closure or cover for a medicine container or container. The device includes an indicator providing a visual indication for the user that a pill has been or should be removed from the bottle for consumption. While these approaches are viable as long as they are properly used, the indicating position is easily altered and presents no reliable permanent record.
  • Various other devices include mechanical advancing systems that coordinate with the operation of the bottle cap. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,753,189, Mastman et al, disclosed a medicine bottle unit having a closure for indicating dosage and other information, which changes automatically as the closure is rotated on the bottle of the unit. The closure includes an outer cap and an inner member within the cap. The cap and inner member have co-operable indicia thereon. The inner member moves with the cap as the cap is rotated in one direction on the bottle. However, the cap moves relative to the bottle and the inner member when the cap is rotated in the opposite direction on the bottle, thus assuring a change in the information represented by the indicia on the cap and the indicator on the inner member, or by indicia on the inner member visible through a hole in the cap. Several embodiments of medicine bottle unit are disclosed. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,975,010, Marshall disclosed indicators and methods of indicating which are intended primarily for use with medicine containers. The devices typically indicate the number of doses of medicine ingested or remaining to be taken by a patient during a particular period. These devices additionally provide tactile assistance to patients in appropriately repositioning the indicator arms and, when used correctly, may reduce the possibility of patient overdose by restricting improper attempts to advance the indicator arm. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,405,045, Villa-Real disclosed a color-coded, two-component medicament container comprising a cap means with variously pre-set structural interval spacing between each pair of preformed window system to differentiate a fixed three-hour time interval cap from a four-hour interval cap, a six-hour time interval cap, an 8-hour time interval cap and from a unitary pre-formed window for a 12 or 24-hour time interval cap; each kind of cap to be specifically used according to the prescribed frequency of drug administration such as every 3-hour frequency, every 4-hour frequency, every 6-hour frequency, every 8-hour frequency and every 12 or 24-hour frequency, respectively, as coordinated in a snug-fitting but safety lock wisely rotatable engagement with a complementarily shaped cylindrical medicament container having safety lock-like numeral indicia ranging from 1 to 12 and equidistantly arranged as in a safety lock there around the supper circumferential exterior wall of the said medicament container is disclosed.
  • Both, use of the dial or pointer devices and operation of container cap, require manual dexterity and intact cognition. Moreover, with these devices, patients have to learn complex instruction each time a change is made in medicine dose or frequency. Both these are problematic in elderly, disabled or in patients with cognitive impairment.
  • The need for a device that automatically dispenses the proper pill(s) in the proper amount(s) at the proper time(s) each day and alerts the user to take the dispensed pill(s) is evident by the numerous devices described in the prior art. In U.S. Pat. No. 4,915,256, Tump disclosed a dispensing assembly for dispensing a series of different pills over a prescribed period. The dispensing assembly is provided with an indicator that is adjustable to preset the start of the pill regiment on whatever day desired. The pill package and dispensing assembly are constructed and arranged so that after the indicator has been preset, the pill package can be fixedly positioned in the dispensing assembly with the first pill of the regimen in position to be taken by the user on the first pre selected day. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,915,589, Lim has disclosed a device that can be loaded with appropriate pills and programmed to automatically dispense the proper amount(s) and proper type(s) of pill(s) at the proper time(s) each day. The device also includes a system for alerting the pill taker that pills have been dispensed and need to be taken, a system for providing voice messages to coach the pill taker to use the device and consume the pills, a system for alerting an off-site caregiver when the pill taker has not responded as required or when there is a problem with the operation of the device, and a system for an efficient and accurate loading of pills into the device.
  • In U.S. Pat. No. 4,573,606 Lewis et al., in U.S. Pat. No. 4,674,651 Scidmore et al., in U.S. Pat. No. 4,838,453 Luckstead and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,044,516 Hoar have described an automatic pill dispensing assembly that has pill storage regulating wheels that are rotated constantly by electric safety lock motors. The constantly rotating pill storage regulating wheel of these devices successively moves each pill storage compartment of the regulating wheel into a temporary alignment with a pill discharge outlet at a cyclical and fixed time interval. When a pill storage compartment is in alignment with the pill discharge outlet, any pill stored in the compartment will fall by gravity through the outlet into a pill receptacle. Automatic pill dispensing assemblies that do not employ rotating wheels are also known. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,763,810 to Christiansen shows a device that uses a series of pill storage compartments that are arrayed in a checkerboard fashion and U.S. Pat. No. 4,798,309 to Stone et al shows a device that uses a series of pill storage compartments that are spirally arranged on an elongate cylinder. Although these examples seem to be different, the basic operating principle of all these dispensing assemblies, are nonetheless similar.
  • However, there are problems with the devices described in the prior art. These devices entail loading of individual pill storage compartments by the pharmacist. This is a time consuming and manpower intensive process that makes these devices costly and inefficient. None of these devices provide the ease and cost effectiveness of the present day throwaway plastic medicine containers where a bulk supply of medicaments can be dispensed at one time.
  • There have been many prior art attempts to incorporate a device into the medicine container that is able to record the opening and closures of the caps of the medicine containers. These prior arts have attempted to use the operation of the closure of medicine container as a surrogate marker for compliance. In U.S. Pat. No. 6,604,650 Sagar has proposed a medicine-dispensing system that has a medicine reminder to assist the patient in following a drug regimen. In an example embodiment, a medicine reminder comprises a timer programmable to a predetermined interval. A user-alert is responsive to the timer, reminding the user to take a dose of medicine at the predetermined interval. A sensor detects whether the medicine container cap has been opened and a dose-indication informs the user of the time since the last dose. The dose indication further informs the user as to whether to take a next medicine dose. The time of the last dose is determined by the timer receiving a signal from the sensor. A communications interface enables programming of a parameter associated with administering a medicine.
  • There are major disadvantages to the inventions that rely on medicine container cap removal as a measure of compliance. Medicine containers with cap allow access to the bulk medicine supply during each dispensing event. Once the device recognizes the removal of the cap, any number of doses may be removed from the bottle without proper recognition, thus seriously compromising the device's ability to properly record compliance. Even more troublesome is the possibility that the cap device might not be reinstalled on the bottle; if not, the subsequent removal of medicines from the bottle go unmonitored.
  • In addition, the devices described in prior inventions share some common drawbacks that include: 1) none of the prior art devices have the ability to automatically count and dispense a prescribed quantity of medicine at prescribed times from a bulk supply within the medicine container. 2) These devices do not provide any protection against abuse of prescription medicines. Once the closure is opened any number of doses can be removed. This is of particular concern with medicines that have a high abuse potential such as morphine. 3) The prior art devices do not provide any protection against the consumption of medicines that have expired. Medicines that are beyond their expiry date are associated with significant life threatening side effects. 4) They do not provide security features to prevent use by a person other than the intended patient. 5) Devices proposed by the prior inventions do not allow for remote medicine management. Whenever a change is made to a medicine regimen, a new prescription has to be filled and the medicine container has to be taken to the pharmacist for a change of label. The patient has to learn new information regarding the new dosage regimen. These are major deterrents to continued compliance with pharmacotherapy for chronic medical conditions. 6) Prior art devices do not assist with comprehensive disease management. Adequate disease management requires frequent monitoring of health related parameters to assess the efficacy of medicines. Studies have shown that frequent home based monitoring of health parameters and subsequent prompt adjustment of treatment regimens significantly improves disease outcomes. At the present time, such monitoring, reporting and adjustment of medicine regimen requires intensive participation by patients, including multiple visits to health care professional's office. Prior art devices do not provide a solution to this problem. 7) The devices of prior inventions are cumbersome and expensive to manufacture. None of the prior inventions have provided the necessary reliability and inexpensive implementation to present itself as a viable alternative to today's plastic throwaway medicine containers. The value of additional features suggested by the prior inventions, have not justified the added costs.
  • Some prior art devices provide limited solution to individual problems faced by patients, health care professionals and pharmacists in ensuring compliance. However none of these devices have provided a comprehensive one stop solution to manage the multiple complex problems that hinder patient's compliance with a medicine regimen. Hence, while “childproof” construction has been mandated, to date there has been no other major addition to the conventional throw away plastic medicine containers.
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine is provided. The method includes the step of providing a medicine container for housing at least one dosage of medicine therein. The medicine container includes a control circuit. The control circuit is interconnected to a communications network. Data transmitted over communications network is received by the control circuit.
  • At least one dosage of medicine is distributed from the medicine container and the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container is monitored. Predetermined information corresponding to the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine is transmitted from the medicine container to a central server over the communications network. A number of dosages of medicine in the medicine container is determined and data corresponding to the number of dosages is transmitted to a central server over the communications network.
  • The number of dosages in the medicine container is stored on a central server. A visual display may be provided in response the data received by the control circuit. In addition, a dosage or a predetermined number of dosages of medicine is distributed in response to the data received by the control circuit. Alternatively, the distribution of the at least one of medicine may be prevented in response to the data received by the control circuit.
  • In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention, a method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine is provided. The method includes the steps of providing a medicine container for receiving at least one dosage of medicine therein and providing a control circuit for controlling distribution of a dosage of medicine from the medicine container. The control circuit is interconnected to a communications network. Instructions are transmitted over the communications network to the control circuit.
  • At least one dosage of medicine is distributed from the medicine container and the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container is monitored. Predetermined information corresponding to the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine is transmitted from the medicine container to a central server over the communications network. A number of dosages of medicine in the medicine container is determined and data corresponding to the number of dosages is transmitted to a central server over the communications network.
  • The number of dosages in the medicine container are stored on a central server. A visual display may be provided in response the data received by the control circuit. In addition, a dosage or a predetermined number of dosages of medicine is distributed in response to the data received by the control circuit. Alternatively, the distribution of the at least one of medicine may be prevented in response to the data received by the control circuit.
  • In accordance with a still further aspect of the present invention, a method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine is provided. The method includes the step of providing a plurality of medicine containers. Each medicine container receives at least one dosage of medicine therein and includes a control circuit. Each control circuit controls distribution of a dosage of medicine from a corresponding medicine container. The control circuits and a central server are interconnected to a communications network. Instructions are transmitted by the central server to the control circuits over the communications network.
  • Each of the plurality of medicine containers provides a visual display in response the instructions received by the control circuit. In addition, each control circuit controls the distribution of a dosage of medicine in response to the instructions received by the control circuit.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:
  • FIG. 1A is a coronal section of the smart medicine container and shows the pill dispensing assembly built into the medication container itself;
  • FIG. 1B shows the regulating wheel with two pill receptacles;
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of the smart medicine container showing the electronic display unit, audio speakers, visual alarm and a plurality of control switches;
  • FIG. 3 shows the collecting conveyor belt with a ‘Y’ shaped pill organizer located above it;
  • FIG. 4 is a posterior view of the lower part of the smart medicine container showing the communication ports and electrical inlet;
  • FIG. 5 is a coronal section of the lower part of the smart medicine container showing the modem with wireless transceiver, communication ports and battery compartment with a battery;
  • FIG. 6 is a view of the bottom surface of the smart medicine container showing the docking port, electrical port and the outlet door;
  • FIG. 7 is a transparent view of the cap of the smart medicine container showing the microprocessor, memory chip and universal safety lock;
  • FIG. 8 is a posterior view of the sync cradle showing the docking terminal, electrical terminal, communication ports and electrical inlet;
  • FIG. 9 shows an algorithm of the dispensation cycle of the smart medicine container.
  • FIG. 10 shows an algorithm of the dispensation cycle of the smart medicine container in relation to the consumption time;
  • FIG. 11 shows the communication network of the smart medicine container; and
  • FIG. 12 shows the pill dispensing assembly of the present invention adapted for use in the pharmaceutical industry, such as to fill multiple pill bottles with a fixed quantity of pills.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • In this respect, before explaining at least one embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. As such, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception, upon which this disclosure is based, may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out one or several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • Medicine Container:
  • As shown in FIG. 1A, the present invention comprises of a smart medicine container (10) that has an inbuilt pill dispensing assembly. The medicine container in the preferred embodiment is elliptical in shape but it may be of any convenient shape and size. It has three compartments—storage compartment (11), counting compartment (12) and dispensing compartment (13) that is stacked on top of one another. The storage compartment (11) is located at the top and is ‘U’ or ‘V’ shaped. It has an aperture at the bottom to allow the passage of pills (121) into the counting compartment (12) which is guarded by a regulating wheel (15). The pill dispensing assembly of the present invention has an inbuilt pill counting apparatus that provides the means to automatically dispense a desired quantity of medicine at desired times from a bulk supply within the smart medicine container (10). The pill dispensing assembly comprises of a regulating wheel (15) will two pill receptacles (24), a collecting conveyor belt (16), a dispensing conveyor belt (17), motors to power the conveyor belts and the regulating wheel and a multitude of photoelectric sensors placed along the path of relay of the pills (121). A microprocessor (71) present within the smart medicine container regulates the operation of the entire pill dispensing assembly. The regulating wheel (15) is powered by a motor (not shown) and has two pill receptacles (24) placed at 180 degrees from each other (FIG. 1B). It guards the aperture between the storage and counting compartments. The pill receptacles (24) collect pills (121) when facing the storage compartment (11) and discharge them onto the collecting conveyor belt (16) when facing the counting compartment (12). The regulating wheel (15) provides the means for a controlled and orderly discharge of pills (121) from the storage compartment onto the collecting conveyor belt (16) in the counting compartment (12). The regulating wheel (15) also prevents migration of pills (121) out of the storage compartment (11) when it remains idle. The counting compartment (12) is located in the middle and has a collecting conveyor belt (16) on top, a dispensing conveyor belt (17) below and photoelectric sensors (19 & 20) that line the path of relay of pills (121) along the conveyor belts. The collecting conveyer belt (16) has a ‘Y’ shaped pill organizer (31) located above its surface, shown in FIG. 3, which aligns the pills (121) in one column for an orderly discharge onto the dispensing conveyer belt (17). In the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1A, the passageway from the collecting conveyer belt (16) to the dispensing conveyer belt (17) has photoelectric sensors (19), but any other suitable sensing instrument can be used. The dispensing conveyor belt (17) collects pills (121) from the collecting conveyor belt (16) and discharges them into the dispensing compartment (13). The dispensing conveyor belt (17) again has a ‘Y’ shaped pill organizer located above its surface which aligns the pills (121) in one column for an orderly discharge into the dispensing compartment (13). In the preferred embodiment, the passageway from the dispensing conveyer belt (17) to the dispensing compartment (13) has photoelectric sensors (20), but any other suitable sensing instrument may be used. The collecting and the dispensing conveyor belts move on two separate sets of wheels (18A & 18B) that are powered by motors (not shown). In the preferred embodiment, the speed of the dispensing conveyor belt (17) is greater than of the collecting conveyor belt (16). The dispensing compartment (13) is located at the bottom and has an outlet door (22) through which pills (121) is dispensed to the patient. The outlet door (22) has a sensor (23) which captures its operation.
  • FIG. 2 shows the anterior aspect of the smart medicine container. A plurality of control switches (28) are provided that can be used for multiple purposes, including but not limited to—1) as a keypad for command and data entry 2) to actuate display of compliance data and other information in different formats 3) as a keypad for operation of the universal safety lock (73). An audio speaker (27) and a visual alarm (26) are provided that is activated when a dose of medicine is ready to be taken. FIG. 2 also shows an electronic display unit (25), which in the preferred embodiment is a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen.
  • FIGS. 4 & 5 show the posterior and saggital views of the lower part of the smart medicine container respectively. A modem (51) and three communication ports (41) are provided which enable the smart medicine container (10) to send and receive communication from external devices via telephone line, wireless network, internet, LAN or any other communication network. In the preferred embodiment, the modem (51) also contains a wireless two-way transceiver. Alternatively, the wireless transceiver can be present separately. Data can be transferred between the smart medicine container (10) and a computing device such as pharmacy or physician computer using the communication ports (41). A battery compartment (52) containing a battery (53) is provided which powers the smart medicine container. In addition, an electrical inlet (42) is provided which serves as an alternate source of power for the smart medicine container.
  • The smart medicine container (10) is covered on top by a cap (14) shown in FIG. 7. In the preferred embodiment, the cap (14) has a universal safety lock (73) that is operable by a unique combination of numbers that is entered using the control switches (28). Alternatively, the universal safety lock (73) can be coupled with a radio frequency identification (RFID) reader. The universal safety lock (73) in this case is operable when the RFID reader reads an authorized RFID tag. Authorized users having an authorized RFID tag will be able to operate the universal safety lock (73). The safety lock (73) adds a safety feature to the smart medicine container (10) and allows only authorized access to the contents thereof. The smart medicine container (10) has an internal microprocessor (71) and a memory chip (72) located in the cap (14). The electronic apparatus of the smart medicine container (10) is hardwired to the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72). The microprocessor (71) is programmed to execute various functions of the smart medicine container (10) including, but not limited to, data analysis, operational control of electronic functions and external communication. The memory chip (72) stores operational data, information about the contained medicament and any other relevant information. The smart medicine container (10) has an internal clock with a timer (not shown) which triggers the time sensitive functions of the smart medicine container (10).
  • Now referring to FIG. 6, a docking port (21A) and an electrical port (21B) are provided on the bottom of the smart medicine container (10). It also houses the outlet door (22). FIG. 8 shows a ‘sync cradle’ (80) with a docking terminal (81) and an electrical terminal (82) that are adapted for operative engagement with the docking port (21A) and electrical port (21B) of the smart medicine container. Three communication ports (83) are also provided. The docking port (21A) along with the docking terminal (81) and communication ports (83) enable the smart medicine container (10), while it is sits in the sync cradle, to communicate with external communication devices. An electrical inlet (84) is provided which, along with electrical terminal (82) and electrical port (21B) powers the smart medicine container during the time it sits in the sync cradle (80). The sync cradle (80) is provided as an optional gadget that would help reduce the size and weight of the smart medicine container (10) and improve its portability. It also provides a more convenient way to transfer data between the smart medicine container (10) and other computing devices such as a pharmacy or physician computer.
  • Operation:
  • According to one aspect of the present invention, a smart medicine container (10) is connected to the pharmacy computer using the communication ports (41). Alternatively, it can be connected to the pharmacy computer by placing it in the sync cradle (80) that is connected to the pharmacy computer. The smart medicine container (10) can also communicate with the pharmacy computer wirelessly using the wireless transceiver. Pharmacist enters the medicine data including medicine name, strength, dose, frequency, physician information, authorized refills, expiration date and other relevant information. The pharmacist also enters the time the first dose is to be dispensed and time from which automatic dispensation will commence. The pharmacist can have pre programmed time regimen for various administration schedules. For example QID regimen (four times a day) may mean that the medicine is to be taken at 8 AM, 12 PM, 4 PM and 8 PM everyday or it may mean that the medicine is to be taken at 7 AM, 11 AM, 3 PM and 7 PM everyday. Pharmacies can have their own time regimen, there can be a universal time regimen or there can be a time regimen customized according to patient's preference and habits. Additional data, like patient's allergies, drug to drug and drug to food interactions, medicine adverse/side effect can be entered. This information is stored in the memory chip (72) and displayed on the electronic display unit (25) of the smart medicine container (10). In effect, the electronic display unit (25) replaces the paper label of conventional medicine containers. However, it is to be appreciated that the electronic display unit (25) provides a more dynamic, comprehensive and interactive platform to access information about the contained medicine. The microprocessor (71) uses the entered information to regulate the dispensation of medicine and to perform other functions of the smart medicine container (10). It also uses this information to analyze and report patient's compliance with a medicine regimen. Using this system, the pharmacist has no additional responsibility besides his/her normal customary responsibility to enter pertinent medicine information in the pharmacy computer system, which then automatically programs the smart medicine container (10) with the same information.
  • FIG. 9 shows an algorithm that guides the pill dispensing assembly of the smart medicine container (10). Once the predetermined time to dispense medicine arrives, the dispensing conveyor belt (17) is activated. This ensures that any remaining pill on the dispensing conveyor belt (17) from previous cycle is dispensed before a fresh batch is released from the storage compartment (11). The dispensing conveyor belt (17) stops if the desired number of pills (121) is dispensed before completion of one cycle. If the desired number of pills (121) is not dispensed within the first cycle, the remainder of the pill dispensing assembly comprising of the regulating wheel (15) and collecting conveyor belt (16) is activated. The pill receptacles (24) of the regulating wheel (15) collect pills (121) from the storage compartment (11) and dispense them onto a moving collecting conveyor belt (16). The speed of the collecting conveyor belt (16) is greater than the rotational speed of the regulating wheel (15), which amplifies the pill separation provided by the regulating wheel (15). As the pills (121) fall off from the collecting conveyor belt (16) they are counted by photoelectric sensors (19), which relay this data to the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72). Once the microprocessor (71) senses that desired number of pills (121) have been dispensed, it stops the regulating wheel (15) and the collecting conveyor belt (16). The collecting conveyor (16) transfers the pills (121) onto a moving dispensing conveyor belt (17). The dispensing conveyor belt (17) moves at a greater speed than the collecting conveyor belt which further amplifies the pill separation achieved so far. The dispensing conveyor belt (17) transfers the pills (121) into the dispensing compartment (13). The photoelectric sensors (20) count the pills (121) as they fall from the dispensing conveyor belt (17) into the dispensing compartment (13) and relay this data to the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72). The dispensing conveyor belt (17) stops once the microprocessor (71) signals that prescribed quantity of pills (121) have been dispensed into the dispensing compartment (13). In effect, the entire pill dispensing assembly of the smart medicine container is inactivated at this time.
  • The time when a medicine dose is dispensed into the dispensing compartment (13) is recorded as the ‘dispensation time’ and serves as a measure of reliability of the smart medicine container (10). The reliability data is relayed to the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72) and can be viewed by an authorized user on the electronic display unit (25) or it can be downloaded to a computer and viewed. The reliability data is also relayed to and stored in a central server and can be accessed by authorized users. The smart medicine container (10) gives an audio and/visual alarm (26) to alert the patient that a medicine dose is due. In addition, after a reasonable wait time after the actual due time, the smart medicine container sends a remote reminder to patient or caregiver by phone, fax, pager, cellular phone, internet or any other communication device preferred by the patient. The patient can turn off the alarm using a control switch (28). The alarm feature of the smart medicine container can also be turned off for a period of time using a control switch (28). This is useful when patients may not want to be disturbed by the alarm such as when they are asleep.
  • Once a medicine dose is dispensed, the outlet door (22) is unlocked. The patient can open the door and can take his/her medicine. The time of opening of the outlet door (22) is recorded as ‘consumption time’ by the sensor (23) and is useful in determining patient compliance with a medicine regimen. This mechanism allows passive recording of compliance data as opposed to active recording wherein patients are required to manually operate a switch to indicate medicine consumption. The compliance data is relayed to the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72) and can be viewed by an authorized user on the electronic display unit (25) or it can be downloaded to a computer and viewed. The compliance data is also relayed to and stored in a central server and can be accessed by authorized users.
  • The electronic apparatus of the medicine container remains disabled until the outlet door (22) is opened and then closed. This ensures that another dose of medicine is not dispensed until the previous dose has been consumed. Consumption time is also used as a reference for timing the next dose. As shown in FIG. 10, for medicines that are to be taken at fixed hourly intervals, like every six hours, the next dose is dispensed at the prescribed interval from the consumption time. In case of medicines that are to be taken at certain times of the day, like four times a day, the next cycle starts according to a pre programmed algorithm. In the illustrated example of four times a day, if the consumption time is within 2 hours of a scheduled time, the dose due at that scheduled time is skipped and the dispensing cycle starts from the scheduled time thereafter. Otherwise, the dispensing cycle starts from the scheduled time following the consumption time. This is consistent with the current practice guidelines. Similarly, algorithms for other dosing schedules can be made according to accepted guidelines.
  • The smart medicine container (10) provides multiple unique safety features 1) the cap (14) has a universal safety lock (73), which in the preferred embodiment is operable by a unique combination of numbers. It allows only authorized access to the contents of the smart medicine container (10). The universal safety lock (73) is connected to the internal clock and can be used for other useful purposes. The universal lock (73) can be programmed to remain open only during the time when a medicine dose is due to be taken. It can also be programmed to automatically lock irreversibly once the contained medicament is past its expiration date. 2) The pill dispensing assembly of the smart medicine container automatically dispenses a prescribed quantity of medicine at desired times. In addition, the pill dispensing assembly remains inactive until the previously dispensed dose has been removed from the medicine container. These features allow access to only one prescribed dose of a medicine at any given time and that too, only when it is time to take a dose. This prevents overdose. In addition the pill dispensing assembly stops dispensing when the contained medicine is past its expiration date which prevents patients from consuming medicines that have expired. 3) The outlet door (22) has a lock that remains locked from the time it is closed until the time a medicine dose is dispensed. This prevents patients from consuming more than prescribed dose of a medicine. In addition, the outlet door locks irreversibly once the medicine in the smart medicine container (10) is past its expiration date which prevents patients from gaining access to an expired medicine. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the outlet door can have a lock that is coupled with a radiofrequency (RFID) reader. Access to the contents of the smart medicine container can be limited to authorized users with a corresponding RFID tag.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, the locking apparatus containing a RFID reader can be used for other applications in the pharmaceutical industry. For example, medicine dispensing units used in hospitals can have a lock coupled with a RFID reader. This lock is operable when the RFID reader reads an authorized RFID tag. Authorized RFID tags are given only to authorized users. According to another aspect of the present invention, RFID reader can be coupled with any locking apparatus. The locking apparatus can be made operable when the RFID reader of the locking apparatus reads an authorized RFID tag. It is to be appreciated that this feature of the present invention makes the operation of any such locking apparatus fast, secure and user friendly.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a modem (51) and three communication ports (41) are provided in the smart medicine container (10). In the preferred embodiment, the modem (51) also has a two-way wireless transceiver. As shown in FIG. 11, the smart medicine container has means to communicate with external devices including communication devices and medical devices. It can communicate with remote parties like physicians via external communication devices such as phone (110), pager (113), fax (112), cellular phone (111), computer (115), web server (114) and the like using phone line, wireless network, internet, LAN or any other communication network. The smart medicine container (10) is also able to communicate with appropriately configured medical devices such as glucose meter (116), blood pressure monitor, coagulation monitor and the like.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a multitude of smart medicine containers (10) are connected to a central server to form a network. Each smart medicine container (10) has a unique identifier that is readable by the central server. In the preferred embodiment, the unique identifier is a number stored in the memory chip (72). The server has access to data from all smart medicine containers in its network. The server synchronizes with the smart medication containers in its network at frequent intervals to keep the data updated. This has many practical applications—1The server compiles and stores patient compliance data from the smart medicine containers within its network 2) The server stores the medicine inventory data for individual smart medicine containers within its network 3) The server can serve as a nodal point for communication between the smart medicine container and remote parties like health care providers, enabling them to access patient compliance data and remotely control the functions of the smart medicine container 4) The server stores back up data for the smart medicine containers within its network 5) According to another aspect of the present invention, the server can remotely actuate the functions of the microprocessor (71) and memory chip (72) of the smart medicine container (10) within its network and can thereby, remotely control the functions of the smart medicine container (10). These features have many practical applications some of which are discussed below.
  • 1) Remote Medicine Management: The smart medicine container (10) can send remote reminders to patient or their caregiver when a medicine dose is ready to be taken. The smart medicine container (10) can receive instructions remotely from health care professionals and the pill dispensing assembly can accordingly initiate, modify or discontinue a medicine regimen. It is to be appreciated that patient will have no additional learning to do when these changes are made as the smart medicine container (10) will automatically dispense medicine according to the new instructions. The changes and the new instructions are displayed on the electronic display unit (25) or played in audio using the speakers (27). It is also to be appreciated that patient will not need to go to the health care professional or pharmacist for these changes to be made or to be educated about their new medicine regimen. Similarly, the smart medicine container (10) can send a reminder to the pharmacist when refills are needed. These features are of particular benefit to the elderly as they frequently have trouble learning new information and are commonly unable to drive.
  • 2) Health Education: Health information can be fed into the memory chip (72) at the time a prescription is filled or it can be fed remotely via the modem (51). Patients can view this information on the electronic display unit (25) or it can be played in audio using the speakers (27). The strategic timing of providing health information at the time of consumption of medicines provides a powerful learning tool and will result in improved and lasting retention of the given information. It is also to be appreciated that the smart medicine container provides a dynamic, interactive and flexible platform for health education wherein different messages can be displayed at different times and in different formats.
  • 3) Disease Management: The modem (51) enables the smart medicine container (10) to communicate with other appropriately configured medical devices such as blood pressure monitor, glucose meter, coagulation meter and the like. The pill dispensing assembly is able to initiate, change or discontinue a medicine regimen based on information received from the medical devices. The microprocessor (71) is programmed with instructions on changes to be made based on information received from medical devices. These instructions can be fed either at the time of filling a prescription or remotely. Alternatively, data obtained from medical devices can be sent to a health care professional who can then remotely change a medicine regimen. It is evident from the foregoing discussion that the smart medicine container (10) can play an important role in comprehensive disease management and improve clinical outcomes. This unique feature of the present invention also reduces the need for a patient to go to physician's office.
  • 4) Epidemic Control: A multitude of smart medicine containers (10) are connected to a central server to form a network. The central server can access medicine regimen data of all smart medicine containers (10) within the network. The server can remotely send a command to all smart medicine containers (10) containing an effective medicine, instructing the pill dispensing assembly therein to dispense prescribed doses and alert the patient. In addition, the central server can send information about the epidemic to all smart medicine containers (10) within the network. This information is displayed on the electronic display unit (25) or played in audio using the speakers (27). It is to be appreciated from the foregoing discussion that the smart medicine container (10) can be a powerful tool in controlling an epidemic by 1) instantly dispensing effective medicines to a large number of at risk patients and 2) quickly disseminating information about the epidemic, including preventive measures, to a large number of people.
  • 5) Medicine Recall: Medicines are sometimes recalled from the market based on newly discovered adverse effects. The central server instructs all smart medicine containers within the network containing the recalled medicament to immediately stop dispensing the said medicament. The central server also instructs the smart medicine containers to display the recall information on their electronic display units. It is evident from the above discussion that the smart medicine container enables a quick and extremely cost effective method to withdraw a medicine from the market.
  • 6) Web Based Medicine Inventory Management System: This provides a dynamic inventory status of the smart medicine containers within the network and can be helpful in inventory management and product tracking. A pharmacy can review the inventory of all smart medication containers within its network and quickly assess the demand for various medicines based on the remaining refills. It can then accordingly stock its inventory and update its supply chain.
  • 7) Web Based Compliance Monitoring System: The server stores compliance data from all smart medicine containers in its network. This data is made accessible to authorized parties like physicians. In addition, an interactive web site and intelligent application software capable of data analysis can provide a comprehensive solution in dose administration of non complaint patients. This data can also be helpful to researchers in studying, among other things, epidemiology of diseases and patient behavior patterns.
  • Pill bridging is a major problem with any pill dispensing assembly. The present invention has multiple unique features that prevent pill bridging. The first layer of protection is provided by the ‘U’ or ‘V’ shaped storage compartment (11) with a regulating wheel (15) with pill receptacles (24) guarding its outlet. This assembly enables an orderly and controlled discharge of pills (121) from the storage compartment onto the collecting conveyor belt (16). The use of gravitational force to discharge pills (121) from the pill receptacles of the regulating wheel onto the collecting conveyor belt (16) provides the second layer of protection against pill bridging. Even if multiple pills (121) are present in the receptacle, each is discharged at a different instance, thus providing pill separation. The collecting conveyor belt (16) moves at a faster speed than the rotational speed of the regulating wheel (15) which provides the third layer of protection against pill bridging. It amplifies the pill separation provided during discharge of pills (121) from the regulating wheel (15). The pills (121) are then discharged onto the dispensing conveyor belt (17). The separation of pills (121) at this stage is further amplified by moving the dispensing conveyor belt (17) at a faster speed than the collecting conveyor belt (16). This provides the fourth layer of protection against pill bridging. We believe that these four layers of protection provide a very reliable mechanism to prevent pill bridging and allow for an accurate dispensation of prescribed quantity of medicine.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, the pill dispensing assembly can adapted for use in the pharmaceutical industry to dispense a desired quantity of medicine, such as to fill a prescription at the pharmacy or to fill multiple medicine bottles with a fixed number of pills. This aspect of the present invention is shown in FIG. 12. The pill dispensing assembly is placed in a housing (120) which has a storage tank (122) on top, dispensing assembly in the middle and an outlet bay at the bottom. Pills (121) are conveyed into the storage tank (122) using an appropriate mechanical assembly, which in the preferred embodiment is a tube (131). The outlet from the storage tank (122) into the dispensing assembly is guarded by a regulating wheel with two receptacles (123). The outlet door (133) at the bottom of the housing is coupled with a pill bottle (132). The dispensing assembly comprises of a collecting conveyor belt (124) and a dispensing conveyor belt (125) that move on two separate sets of wheels (126 & 127). Photoelectric sensors (128 & 129) are provided along the path of relay of pills between the collecting conveyor belt (124) and the dispensing conveyor belt (125) and between the dispensing conveyor belt (125) and the outlet bay. A photoelectric sensor (130) is also provided at the outlet door (133) which is activated when the pill bottle (132) is removed from the outlet door (133). A separate control unit housing a processor, memory chip and a plurality of control switches is provided (not shown).
  • Once the command to dispense pills is given, the dispensing conveyor belt (125) is activated. This ensures that any remaining pill on the dispensing conveyor belt (125) from previous cycle is dispensed before a fresh batch is released from the storage tank (122). The dispensing conveyor belt (125) stops if desired number of pills (121) is dispensed before completion of one cycle. If the desired number of pills (121) is not dispensed within the first cycle, the remainder of the pill dispensing assembly comprising of the regulating wheel (123) and collecting conveyor belt (124) is activated. The pill receptacles of the regulating wheel (123) collect pills (121) from the storage tank (122) and dispense them onto a moving collecting conveyor belt (124). The speed of the collecting conveyor belt (124) is greater than the rotational speed of the regulating wheel (123) which amplifies the pill separation provided by the regulating wheel (123). As the pills (121) fall from the collecting conveyor belt (124) onto the dispensing conveyor belt (125), they are counted by photoelectric sensors (128), which relay this data to the processor and memory chip. Once the processor senses that desired number of pills (121) have been dispensed, it stops the regulating wheel (123) and the collecting conveyor belt (124). The collecting conveyor (124) transfers the pills (121) onto a moving dispensing conveyor belt (125). The dispensing conveyor belt (125) moves at a greater speed than the collecting conveyor belt (124) which further amplifies the pill separation achieved so far. The dispensing conveyor belt (125) transfers the pills (121) into the outlet bay. The photoelectric sensors (129) count the pills (121) as they fall from the dispensing conveyor belt (125) into the outlet bay and relay this data to the processor and memory chip in the control unit. The dispensing conveyor belt (125) stops once the processor signals that desired quantity of pills (121) have been dispensed. In effect, the entire pill dispensing assembly of the smart medicine container is inactivated at this time. Alternatively, in situations where a fixed number of pills is to be dispensed in multiple pill bottles, the filled pill bottle (132) is replaced by an empty pill bottle at the outlet door (133). The removal of the pill bottle (132) from the outlet door (133) is captured by a photoelectric sensor (130), which relays this information to the processor which keeps a count of the number of pill bottles that have been removed. The replacement of pill bottles at the outlet door (133) can be done manually or can be done automatically using a conveyor assembly.

Claims (22)

1. A method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine, comprising the steps of:
providing a medicine container for housing at least one dosage of medicine therein, the medicine container including a control circuit;
interconnecting the control circuit to a communications network; and
receiving data transmitted over communications network with the control circuit.
2. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional steps of:
distributing at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container;
monitoring the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container; and
transmitting predetermined information corresponding to the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container to a central server over the communications network.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the control circuit performs the additional steps of:
determining a number of dosages of medicine in the medicine container; and
transmitting data corresponding to the number of dosages to a central server over the communications network.
4. The method of claim 3 comprising the additional step of storing the number of dosages in the medicine container on a central server.
5. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional step of providing a visual display in response the data received by the control circuit.
6. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional step of distributing a dosage of medicine in response to the data received by the control circuit.
7. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional step of distributing a predetermined number of dosages of medicine from the medicine container in response to the data received by the control circuit.
8. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional step of preventing the distribution of the at least one of medicine in response to the data received by the control circuit.
9. The method of claim 1 comprising the additional steps of:
interconnecting a central server to the communications network; and
synchronizing the control circuit to the central server at predetermined time intervals.
10. A method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine, comprising the steps of:
providing a medicine container for receiving at least one dosage of medicine therein;
providing a control circuit for controlling distribution of a dosage of medicine from the medicine container;
interconnecting the control circuit to a communications network; and
transmitted instructions over the communications network to the control circuit.
11. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional steps of:
distributing at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container;
monitoring the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container; and
transmitting predetermined information corresponding to the distribution of the at least one dosage of medicine from the medicine container to a central server over the communications network.
12. The method of claim 10 wherein the control circuit performs the additional steps of:
determining a number of dosages of medicine in the medicine container; and
transmitting data corresponding to the number of dosages to a central server over the communications network.
13. The method of claim 12 comprising the additional step of storing the number of dosages in the medicine container on a central server.
14. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional step of providing a visual display in response the instructions received by the control circuit.
15. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional step of distributing a dosage of medicine in response to the instructions received by the control circuit.
16. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional step of distributing a predetermined number of dosages of medicine from the medicine container in response to the instructions received by the control circuit.
17. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional step of preventing distribution of the at least one of medicine in response to the instructions received by the control circuit.
18. The method of claim 10 comprising the additional steps of:
interconnecting a central server to the communications network; and
synchronizing the control circuit to the central server at predetermined time intervals.
19. A method of remotely managing the distribution of medicine, comprising the steps of:
providing a plurality of medicine containers, each medicine container receiving at least one dosage of medicine therein;
providing each medicine container with a control circuit, each control circuit controlling distribution of a dosage of medicine from a corresponding medicine container;
interconnecting the control circuits to a communications network; and
transmitted instructions over the communications network to the control circuits.
20. The method of claim 19 comprising the additional step of interconnecting a central server to the communications network so as to allow the central server to communicate with the control circuits.
21. The method of claim 19 comprising the additional step of each of the plurality of medicine containers providing a visual display in response the instructions received by the control circuit.
22. The method of claim 19 wherein each control circuit controls the distribution of a dosage of medicine in response to the instructions received by the control circuit.
US11/775,611 2004-12-11 2007-07-10 Method of remotely managaing the distribution of medicine Abandoned US20070271001A1 (en)

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US11/775,611 US20070271001A1 (en) 2004-12-11 2007-07-10 Method of remotely managaing the distribution of medicine
US12/611,912 US8483872B2 (en) 2004-12-11 2009-11-03 Smart medicine container
US12/613,520 US20100100237A1 (en) 2004-12-11 2009-11-05 Smart Medicine Container
US12/613,528 US20100096399A1 (en) 2004-12-11 2009-11-05 Smart Medicine Container
US13/915,237 US20130304255A1 (en) 2004-12-11 2013-06-11 System and apparatus for displaying drug interactions on drug storage containers
US14/338,337 US9492355B2 (en) 2004-12-11 2014-07-22 Smart medicine container
US15/144,710 US20160247345A1 (en) 2004-12-11 2016-05-02 System and apparatus for displaying drug interactions on drug storage containers

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