US20070265048A1 - Sports trading card game system and method - Google Patents

Sports trading card game system and method Download PDF

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US20070265048A1
US20070265048A1 US11/697,953 US69795307A US2007265048A1 US 20070265048 A1 US20070265048 A1 US 20070265048A1 US 69795307 A US69795307 A US 69795307A US 2007265048 A1 US2007265048 A1 US 2007265048A1
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game component
game
group
fields
further comprises
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Brian Winsick
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Brian Winsick
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • G07F17/3223Architectural aspects of a gaming system, e.g. internal configuration, master/slave, wireless communication

Abstract

A game which utilizes a series of game components. The game components each have an element representing a player. The player plays in a gaming event such as a sport contest. The game component has a first group of performance fields and a second group of performance fields. Each group of performance fields has at least one percentage field. The percentage field is a statistical representation of a performance outcome based on the player's performance in the gaming event. The event can be an actual game, a series of games within a season, the entire season, or the entire career of the player. A random number generator produces a variable. The variable has the potential outcome of ranging from 0% to 100%. A variable is correlated to either the first group of performance fields or the second group of performance fields. A player element outcome is determined based on the correlation.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority benefit of U.S. Ser. No. 60/744,501, filed Apr. 8, 2006 and according to 35 U.S.C. §119 (e)(3), with a priority date of Apr. 8, 2007, falling on a Sunday, thus extending the period of pendency of the above priority application to the next succeeding secular or business day being Apr. 9, 2007.
  • BACKGROUND
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,626,434 discloses a baseball card game, where a player card is disposed on a card disposition area of a batting side, a sum total value of batting force indicated by a batting force indication portion of a batter card and batting force indicated by a batting force indication portion of the player card is derived.
  • In the Summary of the Invention section, in col. 1 around line 40, “one aspect of the present invention of [the baseball card game] includes: player cards and a pair of field sheets for disposing the player cards thereon, Each of the player cards includes: a batting force indication portion for giving a sum total value of a batting side when each of the player cards is disposed on a card disposition area of a batting side field, in conjunction with a batter card disposed on a pitcher and batter area of the batting side field, the batter card being a kind of the player cards; a fielding force indication portion for giving a sum total value of a fielding side when each of the player cards is disposed on a card disposition area of a fielding side field, in conjunction with a pitcher card disposed on a pitcher and batter area of the fielding side field, the pitcher card being a kind of the player cards; and a game advance content indication portion for indicating a game advance content for each of values derived from the sum total value of the batting side and the sum total value of the fielding side.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,412,780 discloses a statistically enhanced sport game apparatus where a table game provides for realistic simulation of known athletes' performance in the context of a virtual game predicated upon the career statistics of those athletes.
  • In the Summary of the Invention section, in col. 1 around line 50, “[the] objects are achieved by the use of individual player cards bearing career statistics in the form of zones representing all the possible outcomes of a move. The zones are sized in proportion to the percentage of occurrence of each outcome during the player's career. A display of discrete locations individually selectable by a random number generator are juxtaposed or laid under the card zones, the randomly selected number combines with the size-proportional zone to provide an accurate rendition of the outcome of each selected move as if had been performed by the chosen athlete.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,152 discloses a collectible elements and game method using indicia of occurrence where the elements each have a frequency of occurrence related to the number of occurrences of the collectible element with respect to the number of occurrences of other collectible elements of the plurality of collectible elements is disclosed.
  • Referring to the Background section in col. 2 around line 46, “It is an object of the present invention to provide a card game and a card element wherein the value of the card element as a collector item corresponds to the value of the card element within the card game.”
  • Now referring to the Summary of the Invention section, in col. 3 around line 11, “The collectible element includes indicia of the frequency of occurrence of the collectible element disposed upon the collectible element. The collectible elements can be cards and a play of a card game can obtain credit in accordance with the frequency of occurrence including in accordance with skill. Furthermore, the collectible element can set forth a character and a player of the game can obtain credit in accordance with skill in identifying the character. The frequency of occurrence of a collectible element is related to the amount of skill required to identify the character set forth on the collectible element.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,098,323 disclose a sports trading card where the sports trading card that has a picture of an athlete on one side and statistics for the athlete on a reverse side. As seen in the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 26, “The present invention is directed to a sports trading card that has a picture of an athlete on one side and statistics for the athlete on the reverse side. The picture and the statistics are secured to layers on opposite sides of the card by means of static cling.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,012,721 discloses a basketball card game where in the preferred embodiment, the apparatus comprises a basketball card game with a plurality of basketball play action events distributed to two players as a hand of cards and dice for generating random numbers. As seen in the Summary of the Invention section in col. 4 around line 21, “The game of the present invention includes play action events that a player may strategically select for entry into play and a random character generator for determining possession of a scoring opportunity and partially determining success of a scoring opportunity.”
  • Further down at line 29, “Each card describes one event and the recurrence of one event on multiple cards is similar to the regularity with which the event occurs in a real basketball game. For example, four Slam Dunk Cards might be present among a total of sixty cards indicating that in real basketball about four plays out of every sixty result in a slam dunk.” Further at line 39, “The probability of rolling a number that results in a score corresponds to the nominal field goal percentage for a typical, real game of professional basketball. ”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,411,259 discloses a video sports game system using trading cards where the system includes a control system which carries out the performance of a video sports game, such as a baseball game, and controls the display on a video monitor. As seen in the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 50, “The invention is a video game system which comprises: an electronic game system which includes a video monitor for display of a video game, wherein the players in the video game are representative of actual people; software control means for carrying out a video game and controlling the display on the monitor in accordance with a software program stored therein and in accordance with certain input data supplied by trading card elements.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,407,204 discloses a baseball card board game for simulating the game of baseball in which baseball trading cards are utilized as playing pieces. As seen in the Summary of the Invention section in col. 2 around line 17, “The present invention generally comprises a board game for simulating the game of baseball in which baseball trading cards are utilized as playing pieces. The game includes a board having a baseball diamond pictured thereon and a plurality of card holders into which baseball trading cards may be positioned. A deck of pitcher cards provides a random pitch to a player at bat, such as a strike, ball, or hit, and a deck of action cards provides a random result of the batter's action, such as a hit, out or homerun. The game pieces are then moved in accordance with the rules of conventional baseball. The game board and the card holders may be provided with illumination means for enhancing appearance and facilitating nighttime play.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,201,525 discloses a card game utilizing baseball trading cards which consists of a plurality of trading cards or the like. A mechanism is provided for converting the trading cards into at least two sets of playing cards, so that the playing cards can be utilized in the improved card game.
  • As seen in the Summary of the invention section in col. 1 around line 24, “[An] object is to provide an improved card game in which protective cover holders will convert trading cards and the like inserted therein into playing cards, so that they can be used in the improved card game.”
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,145,173 disclosed a baseball game using baseball type player trading cards requiring only the baseball cards, a die and a deck of standard playing cards. As seen in the Summary of the Invention section in col. 1 around line 25, “The purpose of the present invention is to provide a baseball game to be played, usually by two persons, using special baseball player cards in a quick convenient yet realistic manner. Play is begun as a batter card and a pitcher card are selected from each team. A card is then drawn from a standard deck of cards; a die is tossed. If the die shows an even number, the matrix on the back of the batter's card is used. If an odd number shows, the matrix on the back of the pitcher's card is used as follows . . . ”
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of the sports component game system;
  • FIG. 1A is a plan view of the scoreboard;
  • FIG. 1B is a schematic view of the overall game system;
  • FIG. 1C is a plan view of a game tournament;
  • FIG. 1D is a schematic view of the game system;
  • FIG. 1E is a schematic flowchart of the game method;
  • FIG. 2 is a detail plan view of the offensive and defensive teams;
  • FIG. 3 is a detail of the player component;
  • FIG. 4 is a detail view of an actual player component;
  • FIG. 4A is a detail view of an alternative embodiment of a player component;
  • FIG. 4B is a detail view of an alternative embodiment of a player component;
  • FIG. 5 is a detail view of the offensive play cards;
  • FIG. 6 is a detail of view of the defensive play cards;
  • FIG. 6A is a detail view of an alternative set of defensive play cards;
  • FIG. 7 is a detail view of a playbook card;
  • FIG. 8 is a detail view of the rebound guide;
  • FIG. 9 is a detail view of a block guide card;
  • FIG. 10 is a detail view of a rebound guide card;
  • FIG. 11 is a flowchart of the startup game method;
  • FIG. 12 is a flowchart of an advanced game method;
  • FIG. 13 is a plan view of a game play;
  • FIG. 14 is a plan view of a game play.
  • EMBODIMENTS
  • Throughout the lifetime of modern competitive sporting, there have been statistics generated which have been kept track of by the associations which govern the sporting events. In tandem with the existence of these statistics, fans and persons which have interest in the individual players or the teams themselves have created, bought and sold player memorabilia such as baseball trading cards and basketball trading cards.
  • The following system and method utilizes a plurality of past and current players within a sports association such as college or professional basketball, minor-league or major-league baseball, minor-league or major-league hockey, soccer and other similar type team sports where the individual performance of the player on a team can be tracked and recorded on a season by season, or even game by game interval.
  • The current system and method can be implemented utilizing a card game type apparatus or can be implemented using a computer program or software type apparatus. The present embodiment discloses the use of the system and method utilizing a plurality of player cards or components in a sports component system 10 as seen in FIG. 1.
  • A gaming event can be a soccer event, baseball event, basketball event, or other type of sporting event, either professional, amateur, or collegiate as well as other nontraditional gaming events for example, the X games etc.
  • Furthermore, gaming events include multi-player online games where players are playing games within say for example a virtual-reality type of environment such as Second Life.
  • By way of example, the present embodiment utilizes the sports component game system 10 for a basketball game which is represented in this particular embodiment on a basketball court 11 with a first team 20 and a second team 22 opposing one another at the center line 13 of the basketball court 11. In this current embodiment, the basketball 32 is a single cylindrical shaped disk with a number two on one face and a number three on the opposing face to indicate a two-point shot and a three-point shot respectively. The basketball court 11 is implemented on a mat in this particular embodiment and the baskets 34, the three-point line, the key and free-throw line are all graphically represented.
  • Now discussing the teams in more particular detail, each team such as the first team 20 and the second team 22 has 12 players which can be played during a game. The number of turns that a player can be in the game depends on the average number of minutes that the player plays in the game during a regular-season from his or her statistics. This will be discussed further below when discussing the player component or player cards.
  • Each opponent will line up his chosen player cards 38 in the proper positions. As a standard, only five players from each team can be on the court at one time. The remaining seven players must sit on the players bench 28 until they are brought into the game or substituted based on the decision making of the individual owning the cards.
  • Each opponent who owns a team has a series of offensive play cards 24 and a series of defensive play cards 26. These correspond to the posture that the opponent is playing, either offense or defense depending on the game play sequence.
  • The team is one instance of what can be generally called the game library. The game library is assembled by the game owner and is made of a plurality of game components. In this particular situation, the game components as previously discussed can be physical or digital card components, miniatures, virtual-reality type avatars, or other representative gameplay elements.
  • In addition to the player component cards 38, the offensive play cards 24 and defensive play cards 26, a variable number generator 30, which in this form is a plurality of percent dice, either a one's dice or ten's dice are used to determine the outcome of play situations.
  • As players score for the teams, it is reflected on the scoreboard 36. In an alternative embodiment, the scoreboard 36, as seen in FIG. 1A, is a card with a pinwheel 33 having 26 equal slices 37 of points 35 centered around the pinwheel so that the opponents can track their team scores. In the current embodiment, the basketball game goes to 25 points; at that time the first player to reach 25 wins. Other scoring and winning situations can obviously be utilized to determine the winning outcome.
  • Discussing in more detail the offensive and defensive teams for this current embodiment which is a basketball trading card game, and referring to FIG. 2, the second team 22 has five player components or cards 38 which are placed in the standard basketball positions, the power forward position 40A, the shooting guard position 42A, the center position 44A, the point guard position 46A, and the small forward position 48A. Similarly the first team 20 also has a plurality of player component cards 38 including a card
  • Discussion will now be provided on the arrangement and orientation of a player component or player card 38 as seen in FIG. 3. The player component 38 has a player name field 50 as well as a position field 56. The player name field 50 corresponds to an existing or historical player who has verifiable official statistics within his sports Association and has been part of the team. While players may change positions, players generally don't change positions when they are on a specific team, therefore for that particular position as recorded in the position field 56, players statistics will relate to the position accordingly.
  • In the game of basketball, as in most to team games, there is an offensive portion of the game and a defensive portion of game. Thus the player component 38 has an offensive column 52 and a defensive column 54. Within the offensive column there are a plurality of statistically relevant fields. These offensive statistics relate to the offensive actions of the player within his position and only during the time that he played in that position during a game. For example, there is a two point shot field 58 which is the player's actual two point shooting percentage for the season. In other words, the shooting percentages in the shooting percentages fields shown represent what the player would have completed if that player attempted 100 shots of that kind. For example, a player that shoots 45% for 2-point shots in the 2-point shot field 58 has made statistically 45 shots out of 100 two-point shots during that particular season.
  • So continuing the discussion of the offensive fields, within the offense of column 52 there is also a three point shooting percentage field 60 which represents the player's actual three-point shooting percentage for that particular season. Similarly, the free-throw percentage field 62 is the player's actual free-throw shooting percentage for that particular season.
  • When not shooting, the player is on the court and may be blocking, assisting, rebounding, stealing etc. These actions occur either on offensive or defensive positions. In general, the non-shooting actions are converted to a piece of time the player owes on the court. It is assumed the player splits this time equally between offensive and defensive positions 50/50, but actual accounting or other splits are easily envisioned.
  • The assists field 64 is determined by summing the number of assists that the player had in a season and dividing it by the total game minutes played by the player per season. After dividing by the game minutes in the season, the value is converted to a percentile. This percentile is then divided by two to give an assist number which can be added to the two-point percentage field 58 or the three-point percentage field 60 increasing the odds of scoring that particular shot.
  • In other words, say for example the player played 100 game minutes in a season. The player was successful in 34 offensive assists. Therefore, the player during 100 minutes of play time had 34 successful offensive assists. Completing the formula, dividing the 34 assists by 100 minutes leads a number of assists per game minutes played of 0.34. Converting this decimal number directly over to percentage value of 34% and dividing it by 2 gives the number of assist points of 17 in this case. The small forward has a two-point percentage field 58 of 41%. Adding the 17% points of the point guards assist points to the 41% increases the shot percentage to 58%, thus the player has to roll a 58% or less to score the two points.
  • In the defensive column 54 of the player component card 38, are a plurality of statistical fields which show the relative success of the player on defense during a particular season. The steal's field 66 is determined from the total number of steals a player had during the season and dividing it by one half of the total minutes the player had played during that season. This number is then converted to a percentage. This percentage is then added to the bottom range of a 1-100 point scale range of the various defensive statistical fields.
  • Similarly, the block field 68 is determined by dividing the number of blocks the player had during a season by one half his minutes played or the total defensive minutes he played. This number is then converted to percentage which is then added on top the number range of the steal percentage to give the block percentage range field 68.
  • The free range field 70 is a number determined by the percent of time on defense the player did not complete a steal, a block, or a foul.
  • The personal foul field 72 is determined by dividing the number of fouls a player had while on defense during a season and dividing it by one half his total minutes played for the season. As before, multiplying this number by 100 to convert it to a percentile and adding it on top of the previous field ranges completes the total defensive range of points from 1 to 100.
  • The rebound fields for both offense and defense including the offensive rebound field 74 and the defensive rebound field 76 are determined as follows. The offensive rebound field 74 is determined by dividing the total number of offensive rebounds a player had during a season by one half of the number of minutes played by the player during a season. This becomes the offensive rebounds per offensive minutes. Similarly, the defensive rebound field 76 is determined by dividing the total number of the defensive rebounds a player had a season by one half of the number of minutes the player played during the season. This becomes the players defensive rebounds per defensive minute.
  • An example of an actual player component card 82 is shown in FIG. 4. Here the player name field 50 is Jason Kidd. During the regular season, this player played a position as indicated in the position field 56 of guard. Within the offensive column 52 during the season, Jason Kidd and a two-point percentage shot of 41% as indicated in field 58. He also had a three-point percentage shot of 34% as indicated in field 60. Mr. Kidd's free-throw attempts averaged 84% as indicated in field 62. The player's assist value is plus 12 points as indicated in assist field 64. As guard, Mr. Kidd's offensive rebounds averaged 7% of time he played on offense as indicated rebound offensive field 74.
  • On defense, Mr. Kidd had a steal average of 12% as indicated in field 66. Mr. Kidd's blocking average was low with only a one point differential as indicated in field 68. The free time where Mr. Kidd did not perform much in the way of defensive maneuvering ranged from 15 percentage points to 92 percentage points for a differential of 77% of his time as indicated in field 70. 7% of the time Mr. Kidd performed a personal foul as indicated in personal foul field 72. Mr. Kidd rebounded on defense 26% of the time as indicated in rebound field 76.
  • Referring back to FIG. 3, the playing time field 78 is the number of point intervals a player may stay in a game before having to substitute out with another player. The play time field 78 is calculated from the total number of minutes in a season divided by the number of games in a season resulting in the average number of minutes a player plays during a game.
  • The salary field 80 is the estimated worth of the player to the team in the league at the time that he played based on a scale of 1-10. The salary field 80 is used to help card owners or game component owners value their cards during trading and to budget under a salary cap, the cap imposed to create parity between different seasons and/or eras.
  • In addition to the basketball game embodiment, an alternative embodiment which utilizes the same game method is designed for baseball. Referring to FIGS. 4A and 4B, discussion of the game component 38 as implemented for baseball game scenarios as representing baseball players will now be provided.
  • The game components fall into two general categories, including the game components for general fielding players and the game components for players who will also pitch.
  • Discussing first the game component 38 as seen in FIG. 4A for general ball players who bat and field, the component is similar to the basketball game components 38, which has a player name field 50 and position field 56. Within the first performance percentage fields 702 which in this case are offensive performance fields, batting percentages are provided.
  • The percentages are based on the actual statistics a player created in games during a particular season. The exception is, the percentile fields for ground outs 714 and the percent fields for fly outs 716.
  • The homerun percentage field 704 is based on the player's total number of homeruns to at-bat percentages. Here, the homerun percentage field equals the total number of home runs divided by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • Similarly, the triples percentage field 706 is based on the player's ability to successfully complete a triple as compared to his total at-bats. In other words, triple percentage field is calculated by taking the number of triples successfully completed and dividing them by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • The doubles percentage field 708 is based on the player's ability to successfully complete a double as compared to his total at-bats. In other words, a doubles percentage field is calculated by taking the number of doubles successfully completed and dividing them by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • The singles percentage field 710 is based on the player's ability to successfully complete a single as compared to his total at-bats. In other words, the singles percentage field is calculated by taking the number of singles successfully completed and dividing them by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • The base-on balls percentage field 712 represents the players average walks to his at-bats percentage. In other words, the base on balls percentage field or walk percentage field is equal to the total number walks divided by the sum of at-bats and base-on balls.
  • The ground out percentage field 714 is based on the player's actual ground outs as compared to at-bat percentages. For example, the ground out percentage field is calculated by totaling the number of ground outs a player had in the season and dividing them by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • The fly out percentage field 716 is based on the player's actual fly outs as compared to at-bat percentages. For example, the fly out percentage field is calculated by totaling the number of fly outs a player had in the season and dividing them by the sum of at-bats and base on balls.
  • The strikeout percentage field 718 represents the total number of strikeouts a player had as compared to his at-bats percentage. In other words, the strikeout percentage is calculated by taking the total number of strikeouts and dividing them by the sum of at-bats plus base on balls.
  • The stealing base percentage field 720 represents the total number of bases the player has actually stolen as compared to the totaling number of attempted base steals. In other words, the stolen base percentage field is calculated by dividing the total number of stolen bases by the sum of the stolen bases and unsuccessful stolen base attempts.
  • Within the second performance percentage fields 724, which in this case are defensive performance percentage fields, a fielding percentage field and a stolen bases percentage field are shown.
  • The percent range for fielding is based on the actual statistics a player creates in games during a particular season. The fielding percentage field 720 represents the number of times a player successfully completed a put out attempt or the player did not commit an error. In other words, the fielding percentage field 720 is calculated by taking the sum of the put outs plus number of assists and dividing them by the sum of the put outs, total number of assists, and total number of errors.
  • While the majority of the player component cards 38 only have a few percentage fields in the defensive performance field group 724, the players who fill the pitching position 56, represents a large number of the statistics for the teams when the teams are in the fielding position.
  • The additional defensive performance fields will now be provided with discussion of pitching statistics. Referring to FIG. 4B, in this present embodiment, the pitching statistics are calculated from actual statistics a player creates in games during a particular season; with the exception of an “even strength” pitch 728.
  • The strike out percentage field 726 is the percent of times a pitcher successfully struck out a batter. The strike out percentage field is calculated by taking the total number strikeouts and dividing it by the total number of batters the pitcher faced either in a season, game, or however the percentage is calculated.
  • The even strength percentage field 728 is a remainder percentage field which represents the pitcher not getting a strike out, not hitting a batter, not throwing a wild pitch, not balking, not walking a batter, nor giving up any kind of a hit.
  • The hit batters or walking batters percentage field 730 represents the number of times a pitcher hit a batter or threw a wild pitch or balked. The hit batters percentage is calculated by taking the number of batters hit and dividing it by the total number of batters faced. The wild pitch balk percentage field is calculated by taking the number of wild pitches plus balks and dividing them by the total number of batters faced.
  • The base on balls percentage field 732 represents the number of times a pitcher threw ball outside the strike zone. In other words, it is the number of times a pitcher gave up a walk during a season. The base on balls percentage field is calculated by taking the total number of base on balls allowed and dividing them by the total number of batters faced.
  • The hittable pitch percentage field 734 simulates or represents the number of times a pitcher made a pitch which increased the batters probability getting a hit. In other words, it is the number of times a pitcher gave up a hit in a game which was not homerun. The hittable pitch percentage field is calculated by taking the total number minus the total number of home runs and dividing this sum by the total number of batters faced.
  • The rippable pitch percentage field 736 represents the highest probability of a batter getting a hit. In other words, it is the percentage of times a pitcher gave up homerun in an actual major-league baseball game. The rippable pitch percentage field is calculated by taking the total number of home runs and dividing it by the total number of batters faced.
  • To help dictate play and guide players who are less familiar with the game of basketball for example, a plurality of offensive and defensive play card guides have been provided. While the game itself can be played utilizing the player cards and the random number generator or dice, to help the opponents resolve any conflicts or misunderstandings during the game play, the offensive and defensive cards are provided as an alternative set of rules for setting up the defensive and offensive scenarios.
  • With this in mind and referring to FIG. 5, a plurality of offensive play card components 90 are shown. These include a high screen offensive play card 92, a post up offensive play card 100, a pick and roll offensive play card 102, a penetrate and create offensive play card 104, and a give-n-go offensive play card 106. Each offensive play card has three various shot attempts depending upon the defensive scenario played by the opponent. These shot attempts are represented by the zone 3-2 defensive field 94, zone 2-3 defensive field 96, and the man on man defensive field 98.
  • Because each offensive play is different, enabling different players to conceivably take the shot or assist the shot or open up for shot, the players on the court will be engaged depending on the offensive play card used and the set up defensive posture by the opponents. Shot rules by the designated offensive players in the offensive play card for example high screen offensive play card 92, determine which offensive player can either take the shot or assist in taking the shot.
  • For example, the high screen card 92 enables a strong guard or small forward attempt 100 to be made with no assist advantage if the zone 3-2 defensive scenario 94 is played. Similarly, an open look play to a strong guard or small forward with an assist advantage from any player attempt 110 if a zone 2-3 defensive scenario 96 is played. And the last offensive play which can be made utilizing the high screen card 92 is a strong guard or small forward shot attempt 112 with an assist advantage from any player on offense when a defensive man on man scenario 98 is provided.
  • The other offensive cards in the offensive play card component set 90 also have similar offensive shot attempts based on the defensive posture of the opponent and the chosen offensive play which enables offensive players to attempt shots or assist on shot taking.
  • On the defensive side, while the following cards are shown, it is conceived that other play cards can be provided in addition to the following defensive play card components 140 as seen in FIG. 6. These include a zone 2-3 defensive play card component 142, a man to man defensive play card component 144, and a zone 3-2 defensive play card component 146. Each has specific pros and cons for defensive posture against potential offensive plays. For example, the zone 3-2 card 142 provides pressure in the low post but is vulnerable to outside attacks.
  • An alternative to allowing the defensive player to choose which player component cards 38 are engaged during a defensive maneuver is seen in FIG. 6A where the defensive play card components 140 include predetermined player positions within the defensive plays as shown on the played card component face. For example, the zone 2-3 defensive play card with determined player positions 170 has the point guard 150 and the strong guard 152 in the front positions. The small forward 154 is in the low left-hand post, the center 156 is in the center position around the key, and the power forward 158 is in the low right hand post.
  • These predetermined defensive player positions dictate which defensive player will be engaged in the statistical defensive play during the game play turn as they guard their zones.
  • Discussion will now be made with regard to the process or method of the play utilizing the system. During this discussion reference will be made to all figures. In discussion of the simplified start up rules or startup game process will be provided followed by a more detailed discussion of an advanced game play process or method.
  • In the initial game startup, the players will choose five starters as seen in FIG. 13 and place them on the side of the court that their team is defending. The opponents will place the various player component cards 38 in their proper position boxes which correspond to the position field 56 as seen in FIG. 4 on the card 38. As previously mentioned the remaining 7 of the 12 players are placed on the player's bench 20 and seen in FIG. 1. To start the game, the center players 44A and 44B as seen in FIG. 2 will jump for the ball based on each side rolling a tens die and adding this roll result to the center's defensive rebound number field 76 as perversely mentioned in FIG. 3. The highest total wins the jump ball. The ball 32 is placed on that team's point guard player 46A or 46B.
  • Referring to FIG. 11, the sports component startup game method 200 is shown. After the players have set up the game and tip-off has been determined as previously discussed, the offense rolls the play die or dice 32 to determine the play from the playbook at step 210. In this startup scenario, a series of play sequences are provided as seen in FIGS. 7 and 8 in a playbook starting game sequence card 400. The playbook sequence fields correspond to value ranges which may be scored through the casting of the percentage dice 32. The zero symbol 420 denotes an offensive move and the X symbol 422 denotes a defensive move.
  • For example, if the offensive player rolls the percent dice 32 and scores a number in the range of between 40 and 49, then the game play sequence includes two outside offensive players and two inside defensive players as seen in field 408. Thus for example, referring to FIG. 13, the offensive team would choose strong guard 42A and strong forward 48A, the defensive team would choose center 44B and point guard 46B.
  • The offense and defense move their cards to the sequence at step 220 as seen in FIG. 11, and in this particular scenario, the offense adds an assist number for the total shot number at step 230 to the chosen two point or three-point shot percentage.
  • At step 240, the defense rolls on the defenders numbers. Based on the defensive column 54 of the defensive card covering the shooting card, the defender may roll a steal at step 242, may roll a block at step 244, may roll a free play at step 246, or may roll a foul at step 248. If the defender rolls a steal at step 242 then a turnover scenario occurs at step 250. Also if they defender rolls a block at step 244 then a turnover scenario has occurred at step 252. If neither steal nor block is rolled, then the defense likely has rolled either a foul at step 248 or a free at step 246. If a free field is rolled at step 246 then the offense rolls on the shot number at step 254. Similarly, if a foul is rolled at step 248 then the offense rolls a shot at step 256.
  • Depending on the likely outcome of the offensive rolls, if the shot is no good from the foul offensive shot scenario, at step 264, then the offensive player attempts a foul shot at step 272. If the offensive roll on a free shot is no good at step 260 then the players roll the ones die for a rebound type situation at step 268.
  • The offensive rolls at step 254; step 256 may also score, if the offensive roll from step 256 on a foul scenario is good at step 262 then the offensive player records two points and then can attempt one foul shot at step 270. If the offensive roll from a free scenario at step 254 is good at step 258, then the offensive player records two or three-points at step 266. The ball is then turned over to the defensive team for their chance at offense.
  • Discussing the rebound step that 268 and referring to FIG. 8, the rebound guide 430 is used for the startup game method 200 and guides the players in a rebound scenario by rolling the ones percentage dice to determine which player from either team will rebound the ball to either take a shot or recover the ball for defense. If for example, the dice is rolled and a number two comes up, at row 434, then the offense recovers the ball and the small forward or power forward can take a shot. If on the other hand say for example a five is rolled from the ones die at row 440, then the defense recovers the ball and the shooting guard takes the ball down the court.
  • A detailed discussion of the defense casting at step 240 will now be discussed. Before the offense can take a shot, the defensive team rolls the percent dice 32 for the player who is guarding the shooter. If the roll lands within the range of a steal or block, it is a turnover and the defensive team gets the ball. If a roll lands in the free range there is no steal, block or foul then play continues. If the roll lands within the range of a foul, the official NBA rules are in effect. If the shot is good, the offensive team can take one free-throw shot. If the shot is no good, the offensive team can take two or three foul shots depending on if the original shot was a two point shot or three-point shot.
  • A detailed discussion of the offensive rolls at step 254 and step 256 will now be discussed. The impact of a player's ability to pass on two or three-point plays is determined by using in this particular embodiment, NBA assist numbers. By being able to add the assist number field 64 as previously discussed in FIG. 3, of the player card 38 to the shooting player's shot percentage field either two point percentage field 58 or the three-point percentage field 60, increases the probability of hitting the shot, and determines the total shot number.
  • The offensive player rolls the percent dice 32. If the roll outcome is equal to or below the shot number, the shot is good. If the roll is above the shot number, shot is no good. Two point, three-point and foul shots are determined to be good using the same calculation process by way of rolling underneath the shot number field in either two point field 58, three-point field 60, or free-throw field 62. As general matter, the roll doubles zero and zero on the percent dice is a roll of 100.
  • While the previous sports component game startup method 200 utilizes some of the main components of the current embodiment, more detailed play scenarios can be implemented through alternative embodiments.
  • A detailed sports component advanced game method 300 will now be discussed. After the game set up and tip-off has occurred as previously discussed in the beginning of the startup method 200, the offense and defense players choose plays from their respective playbooks at step 310. This includes choosing if the player is an offensive player, the offensive play from a set of offensive play card components 90 as previously discussed in FIG. 5 or choosing if the player is on defense, a defensive card from the set of defensive play cards 140 as seen in FIG. 6 or FIG. 6A.
  • As previously discussed, each team has five offensive plays and three defensive plays. The offensive team chooses say for example an offensive card such as give-n-go offensive card 106 as seen in FIG. 14. The offensive player places an offensive card on the court face down so that the defensive player cannot see the play. The defense player chooses a defensive card such as zone 3-2 defensive play card 146 as seen in FIG. 14 and lays it on the court face down. After both cards are chosen, both the teams turn the cards over to review the play match up.
  • When the play match up is determined, the defense moves its cards into position and the offense chooses its shooter and moves its cards into position including the assist man across the midcourt and sets the shot ball 32 for either a two or three-point shot on the shooting card which in this case is point guard 46A. To explain in further detail, the offense was able to use an assist card and a shooting card because the defense chose a zone 3-2 defensive scenario card 146.
  • This defensive posture corresponded to the offensive play cards shooting option in the give-n-go offensive card 106, or in other words corresponded to the offensive play 94 corresponding to a zone 3-2 defense, the offensive play allowing a point guard or a strong guard to shoot in point attempt 132 with an assist advantage from any player. Thus the offensive side chose the strong forward 48A to be the assist in the point guard 46A to be the two point shooter.
  • Returning back to FIG. 12, the defense rolls on the defenders numbers at step 340 and the defense thus attempts a stop. Thus discussing in more detail, before the offense can shoot, the defensive team rolls the percent dice 32 for the player who has been assigned to guard the shooter. In this case, the player assigned to guard the point guard 46A is the small forward 40B. If the percent dice 32 rolls within the range of a steal at step 342 of the strong forward card 40B, then the turnover starts a fast-break attempt. This creates a dunk attempt at the other end in this scenario, by the small forward 40B.
  • The dunk attempt may also be made by any player on the court against the player who lost the ball in this case the point guard 46A. In order to determine if the point guard blocks the dunk attempt, the turnover team chooses its offensive player, and the point guard 46A gets to roll for a potential defensive move. If the point guard in this particular scenario does not score a defensive round, then the dunk attempt is made by any of the players on the court by rolling the percent dice less than 90.
  • If the defense rolls a block at step 344, the offensive player must still roll for the shot. In other words, if the defensive player rolls a block at step 344 then the offensive player must refer to the block guide 450 in FIG. 9. By rolling the ones dice, the offensive player determines whether or not the ball is retained either by the offensive position, the ball is hit into the seats, or the ball is recovered by the defense as a turnover. For example, if the offensive player rolls a one, corresponding to row 452, the offense retains the ball and returns it to back to the shooter.
  • If the offense rolls a number 2 at row 454, then the offense retains the ball but it goes to the point guard or the strong guard, either one who is not play. If the offense rolls a 3, at row 456, then the offense keeps the ball and it goes to the power forward or center. If the offense rolls a 4 or 5 in row 458, the ball goes into the seats and the offense takes it in bounds. In rows 460-468, if the offense rolls either a 6 through a 9 or 0, then the defense retains the ball and distributes it based on the block guide 450. In other words, a roll of a 1, 2, or 3 is a block in which the offense retains position.
  • A roll for 4 or 5 is a block into the seats and the offense then takes the ball in bounds. When the offense takes the ball in bounds after a block in the seats, 10 points is subtracted from the next shot number to simulate a rush to beat the 24 second clock before it runs out. A roll of a 6, 7 or 8 is a block in which the defense retains position of a ball and in one embodiment, a roll of a 9 or 0 starts a fast-break. On the fast-break, after a block any player may attempt a dunk as previously discussed, on the player who originally to the shot.
  • As previously discussed, if the defensive roll lands in the free range field 70 as seen in FIG. 3, and there is no steal, block or foul and then play continues for the offense to see if the shot is made.
  • If the roll lands within the range of a foul field 72 at step 348, the official NBA foul rules are in effect, but when the shooter takes a shot he must subtract 20 points from the shot number. If the shot is good, the shooter can take one free-throw shot after recording two or three-points at step 370. If the shot is no good at step 364, the shooter can take two or three foul shots at step 372 depending on the original shot attempt.
  • As previously mentioned at step's 254 and 256 of the startup method 200 and FIG. 11, the offensive shot attempts at step 354 and 356 and FIG. 12 are the same. If the shot is no good at step 360, then the offensive player needs to determine whether or not a rebound has occurred at step 368.
  • The rebound scenario in the advanced game method 300 utilizes a rebound guide 470 as seen in FIG. 10. The ones dice from the shot attempt will determine which player will fight for a rebound. If for example, a one was rolled corresponding to rule 472 then the point guard's will compete for the ball. A number 2 corresponds the shooting guards, a number 3 corresponds to the small forwards, a number 4 corresponds to the power forwards, a number 5 corresponds to the centers, a number 6 corresponds to the shooter versus the defensive power forward, a number 7 or 8 corresponds to a shooter versus the defensive center as seen in row 484, a 9 or a 0 corresponds to allowing the teams to choose any player for the rebound similar to a jump ball.
  • When the players fight for rebounds in the advanced game 300, the tens die is used. The offensive player rolls his tens die and adds the number to the offensive rebound number field 74 as seen in FIG. 3. The player on defense rolls his tens die and adds the number to the defensive rebound field 76 as seen in FIG. 3 of his player. The player card component 38 with the highest total recovers the rebound ball.
  • If they total number by either player card 38 fighting for a rebound falls within his personal foul range 72, then that player gets a foul. The foul is recorded on a scorecard and the other team can have the ball. If both players roll a foul, then each records a foul and the possession goes to the team playing defense.
  • If a player card component 38 grabs an offensive rebound he may attempt a quick put back or he may pass it back out to set up another play. A quick put back attempt allows a plus 20 to the shot attempts number.
  • Further playing time rules include substitutions and timeouts and follow various association games for more detailed game play. For example, during the basketball rules, in a pro game or advanced game as previously discussed in FIG. 12, players must be substituted. The substitutions must occur based on the playing time field 70.
  • Thus the number of point intervals a player card component 38 may be in the game is determined by the number of minutes per game the player averages for that particular season as previously discussed. Each time the player card component 38 comes into the game, the number of times he has already played a point interval must be reviewed and updated.
  • Substitutions may be made at the end of any point interval or when the team chooses to use a timeout. When play resumes after a timeout, the defense chooses a defensive play and places it on the court. One of the 2 remaining plays the defense did not use must be revealed. The offense then chooses a play and play resumes normally.
  • This is to simulate any advantage the offense might have during a timeout. Timeouts may be called at any time but only by a team that has possession of the ball. If a player plays in any point interval he is considered playing that entire interval even if it is only for two points.
  • In the advanced game method 300, the first team to reach 100 points wins. If a team gets to 100 or above and if the other team has the final shot, that team gets to take the final shot for an attempt to either tie or win, sending the game into overtime.
  • In the advanced game method 300, each game is played by quarters, and the quarter ends when the first team goes over the multiple of 25 on the scoreboard. The second quarter is over when 50 points is reached by one of teams, the third quarter is over one either team reaches 75. Overtime begins with a jump ball, similar to the NBA rules, and each overtime is 10 points long. The team that wins jump ball at the beginning of an overtime gets to take the final shot at the end of that overtime.
  • While the present game can be played utilizing playing card components such as a traditional sports trading card set, the game is also portable to a software embodiment. For example, the game can be run on the game system 640 as seen in FIG. 1B. The game system 640 may be executed on a single client computer 644 or may be run through a server 650 and executed on remote client computers 644, cell phones 646, PDAs 648 etc . . . The information hosted on the server 650 can be transferred via the Internet 641 to the various game locations such as a school 652, or tournament site 654.
  • The game locations can include tournament environments 670 as seen on FIG. 1C. Here the game is hosted on the server 650 in a physical embodiment and is played on game tables 672 by tournament entrants 668. In this tournament environment 670, the game is also hosted on the server 650. A local area network (LAN) connection 660 enables players in the tournament environment 670 to play multiplayer online versions of the game through the station 661. Additionally, a wireless local area network (WLAN) 662 with the stations having wireless connectivity to the server 650 which hosts a wireless hub for interaction between the client/server computers.
  • The game system 680 as previously mentioned, has a server 650 which enables the client computer 644 or 661 to run the game application 682. The game application can be hosted fully on the client computer 644 and executed once the game application has been installed on the client computer, or the game application can be run off the main server 650 and the client computer 644 can download only they thin client interface applications (such as a browser applet), taking advantage of high-speed data connections over a network or the Internet.
  • The game application 682 calls and records information to and from the game database 684. The game database maintains several callable game objects 686. These include the actual physical objects 688 which provide for physical modeling of the various game objects. These game objects include the environmental game object 690. The environmental game object can represent a virtual-reality based multiplayer online game, and also represent simple two-dimensional games which are executable on various software platforms.
  • Discussing in more detail the various objects maintained in the application database, the game component object 692 is in one form the game component card as previously discussed, which maintains the player elements etc. The game component object 692 can also be represented as a two-dimensional figure in a multiplayer online game.
  • The percent field objects 694 are the percentage fields for the particular players represented by the game component object 692 where the percent field objects 694 are updateable by real-time statistic objects 652. As previously discussed, the percent field objects as mentioned in FIGS. 3-4B represent the percentage statistics of the players during either their career, a particular season, or a particular game.
  • The individuals playing the game may build or develop their teams from a historical collection of players who played for a team. But, no matter how the teams are built, the player will maintain a team object 696 which affiliates the game component objects 692 and the component's various percent field objects 694.
  • Additionally, a player guide object 698 can be an online help guide or other type of play card components for inexperienced players. In the alternative, experienced team owners can build play guides based on strategic responses to team play situations faced by an opposing team, during a game.
  • Lastly, the above objects are all executable and modifiable based on sports game objects 754. These objects include a basketball object 756, a baseball object 758, a hockey object 760 and so on. These objects are essentially online variations or software variations of the previously mentioned game's which can be played utilizing the below method.
  • In order to play the game, a method must call various gameplay objects 762. These include a start game object 764, a first game component object 766, an opposing game component object 768, and a recordation object 770. A method utilizing the above game objects will now be discussed as seen in FIG. 1B.
  • The method for playing the game 600 and seen in FIG. 1E for basketball games, baseball games, hockey games, soccer games, football games and like, is executable from the previously mentioned game application or can be used in a physical playing card scenario.
  • The game is started at step 602 and the players choose sides at step 604. In order to choose sides, a first game component at step 618 is chosen and a second game component or opposing game component at step 620 is chosen. The first game component at step 618 in this particular embodiment will be the defensive game component and the opposing game component at step 620 will be the offensive game component.
  • The players position their game components at step 606. This is done in the gaming environment either on the gameplay field on a table, within a digital gaming environment, etc.
  • The first game component turn is taken at step 608. Here the defensive game component player generates a variable at step 622 from a random number generator. The player then correlates at step 624 the variable to a percentage field of the first game component performance field group, or in other words the defensive game components performance field group. The player determines an outcome based on the role at step 626.
  • If the successful role or attempt was made at step 610, then the opposing game component player may take a turn at step 612. If the attempt was unsuccessful at step 610, then the players switch positions and return to step 606. In other words, the defensive game components become the offensive game components and the offensive game components become the defensive game components because of the changing gameplay circumstances.
  • Returning to the opposing game component turn at step 612, or the offensive game component has an opportunity to “score”, the player will generate a variable from a random number generator at step 628. The offensive player will then correlate the variable at step 630 to a percentage field on the offensive game component performance field group. The offensive player will then determine the game components outcome at step 632. If the outcome is a successful attempt to score at step 614, then the score is recorded at step 616. If not, then the score is not recorded and the players switch positions or continue the game based on the rules.
  • While the present invention is illustrated by description of several embodiments and while the illustrative embodiments are described in detail, it is not the intention of the applicants to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications within the scope of the appended claims will readily appear to those sufficed in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is therefore not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and methods, and illustrative examples shown and described. Accordingly, departures may be made from such details without departing from the spirit or scope of applicant's general concept.

Claims (67)

1. A game component, said game component comprising:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a first group of performance fields, a second group of performance fields; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field;
c. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance;
d. a variable produced by a random number generator, said random number generator comprising a plurality of variables ranging from 0% to 100%, said variable correlating to either said first group of performance fields or said second group of performance fields to determine a player element outcome.
2. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player's performance further comprises an offensive performance.
3. The game component according to claim 2 wherein said player element outcome further comprises: a successful offensive event.
4. The game component according to claim 2 wherein said player element outcome further comprises: an unsuccessful offensive event.
5. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player's performance further comprises a defensive performance.
6. The game component according to claim 5 wherein said player element outcome further comprises: a successful defensive event.
7. The game component according to claim 5 wherein said player element outcome further comprises: an unsuccessful defensive event.
8. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises a second percentage field.
9. The game component according to claim 8 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises a series of intermediate percentage fields ranging from a low-end intermediate percentage field to a high-end intermediate percentage field.
10. The game component according to claim 9 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises said first percentage field comprising a range from about 0% to about just less than said low-end intermediate percentage field of said series of intermediate percentage fields.
11. The game component according to claim 10 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises said second percentage field comprising a range from about 100% to about just greater than said high-end intermediate percentage field of said intermediate percentage fields.
12. The game component according to claim 11 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises a first group of defensive fields; said first group of defensive fields representing defensive statistics for basketball players.
13. The game component according to claim 12 wherein said first group of defensive fields further comprises:
a. said first percentage field further comprising a steals percentage field;
b. said second percentage field further comprising a personal fouls percentage field;
c. said intermediate percentage fields further comprising: a blocks percentage field, a free time percentage field.
14. The game component according to claim 13 wherein said game component further comprises a defensive rebound percentage field.
15. The game component according to claim 13 wherein said game component further comprises a salary field.
16. The game component according to claim 11 wherein said first group of performance fields further comprises a first group of defensive fields; said first group of defensive fields representing defensive statistics for baseball players.
17. The game component according to claim 16 wherein said first group of defensive fields further comprises said second percentage field comprising a fielding percentage field.
18. The game component according to claim 17 wherein said first group of defensive fields further comprises:
a. said first percentage field comprising a strike out percentage field;
b. said intermediate percentage fields further comprising: an even strike percentage field, a hit batters percentage field, a wild pitch balk percentage field, a base on balls percentage field, a hittable pitch percentage field, a rippable pitch percentage field.
19. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises a second percentage field.
20. The game component according to claim 19 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises a series of intermediate percentage fields ranging from a low-end intermediate percentage field to a high-end intermediate percentage field.
21. The game component according to claim 20 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises said first percentage field comprising a range from about 0% to about just less than said low-end intermediate percentage field of said series of intermediate percentage fields.
22. The game component according to claim 21 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises said second percentage field comprising a range from about 100% to about just greater than said high-end intermediate percentage field of said series of intermediate percentage fields.
23. The game component according to claim 22 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises a second group of offensive fields; said second group of offensive fields representing offensive statistics for basketball players.
24. The game component according to claim 23 wherein said second group of offensive fields further comprises:
a. said first percentage field further comprising a two point attempts percentage field;
b. said second percentage field further comprising an assists percentage field;
c. said intermediate percentage fields further comprising: a three point attempts percentage field, a free throw attempts percentage field.
25. The game component according to claim 24 wherein said game component further comprises an offensive rebound percentage field.
26. The game component according to claim 25 wherein said game component further comprises a playing time field.
27. The game component according to claim 22 wherein said second group of performance fields further comprises a second group of offensive fields; said second group of offensive fields representing offensive statistics for baseball players.
28. The game component according to claim 27 wherein said second group of offensive fields further comprises;
a. said first percentage field further comprising a homeruns percentage field;
b. said second percentage field further comprising a strikeouts percentage field;
c. said intermediate percentage fields further comprising: a triples percentage field, a doubles percentage field, a singles percentage field, a walks percentage field, a ground outs percentage field, a fly outs percentage field.
29. The game component according to claim 28 above weren't said game component further comprises a stolen bases percentage field.
30. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a minute by minute representation based on the actual number of minutes said player played.
31. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a minute by minute representation based on the actual number of minutes said player played in a game.
32. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a minute by minute representation based on the actual number of minutes said player played in a season.
33. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a minute by minute representation based on the actual number of minutes said player played in a career.
34. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a minute by minute representation based on the actual number of minutes said player played to date.
35. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a real time statistic.
36. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a career statistic.
37. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a game statistic.
38. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a season statistic.
39. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a season to date statistic.
40. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a game to date statistic.
41. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said statistical representation further comprises: a career to date statistic.
42. The game component according to claim 1 for in said random number generator further comprises one or more of the following: a spinner; a ball tumbler; a roulette wheel; a grid system; and electronic random number generator; a random ticket drawing; dice; an algorithm maintained within a software component.
43. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said game component further comprises: a card component.
44. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said card component further comprises: a sports trading card.
45. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said card component further comprises: a card component object for use in digital format.
46. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player element further comprises: a graphic representation of a sports player.
47. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said gaming event further comprises: a sporting event.
48. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a basketball game.
49. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a baseball game.
50. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a hockey game.
51. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a soccer game.
52. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a football game.
53. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a rugby game.
54. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said sporting event further comprises: a cricket game.
55. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player further comprises: a professional sports player.
56. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player further comprises: an amateur sports player.
57. The game component according to claim 1 wherein said player further comprises: a fictional sports player.
58. A game system comprising:
a. a first group of game components configured to interoperate with a second group of game components, said interoperation between said first group of game components and said second group of game components occurring within a gaming environment;
b. said first group of game components and said second group of game components each comprising at least one game component, said game component comprising:
i. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
ii. a first group of performance fields, a second group of performance fields; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field;
iii. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance;
iv. a variable produced by a random number generator, said random number generator comprising a plurality of variables ranging from 0% to 100%, said variable correlating to either said first group of performance fields or said second group of performance fields to determine a player element outcome.
59. The method of playing a game, said method comprising:
a. starting a game by choosing sides;
b. positioning a first game component and an opposing game component within a gaming environment;
c. attempting a successful first game components outcome by;
i. generating a first variable from a random number generator;
ii. correlating said first variable to a first performance field group of said first game component to determine a successful first game component outcome or unsuccessful first game component outcome;
d. providing an opportunity if said first game component outcome is successful, for said opposing game component to attempt a successful opposing outcome by:
i. generating a second variable from said random number generator;
ii. correlating said second variable to a second performance field group of said opposing game component to determine a successful opposing game component outcome or unsuccessful opposing game component outcome;
e. continuing the game until one side wins.
60. The method according to claim 59 wherein said first game component further comprises:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a second group of performance fields of said first game component; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field of said first game component;
c. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance.
61. The method according to claim 59 wherein said opposing game component further comprises:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a first group of performance fields of said opposing game component; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field of said opposing game component;
c. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance.
62. The method according to claim 59 wherein said method further comprises: said random number generator comprising a plurality of variables ranging from 0% to 100%.
63. A system for playing a game, said system comprising:
a. means for starting a game by choosing sides;
b. means for positioning a first game component and an opposing game component within a gaming environment;
c. means for attempting a successful first game components outcome by using;
i. means for generating a first variable from a random number generator;
ii. means for correlating said first variable to a first performance field group of said first game component to determine a successful first game component outcome or unsuccessful first game component outcome;
d. means for providing an opportunity if said first game component outcome is successful, for said opposing game component to attempt a successful opposing outcome by using:
i. means for generating a second variable from said random number generator;
ii. means for correlating said second variable to a second performance field group of said opposing game component to determine a successful opposing game component outcome or unsuccessful opposing game component outcome;
e. means for continuing the game until one side wins.
64. The system according to claim 63 wherein said first game component further comprises:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a second group of performance fields of said first game component; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field of said first game component;
c. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance.
65. The system according to claim 63 wherein said opposing game component further comprises:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a first group of performance fields of said opposing game component; said first group of performance fields and said second group of performance fields each comprising a first percentage field of said opposing game component;
c. said first percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a performance outcome correlated to said player's performance.
66. The method according to claim 63 wherein said method further comprises: said random number generator comprising a plurality of variables ranging from 0% to 100%.
67. A game component, said game component comprising:
a. a player element representing a player in a gaming event;
b. a first group of offensive fields, a first group of defensive fields; said first group of offensive fields comprising a first offensive percentage field; said first group of defensive fields comprising a first defensive percentage field;
c. said first offensive percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a first offensive field outcome correlated to said player's performance in a first offensive position;
d. said first defensive percentage field comprising a statistical representation of a first defensive field outcome correlated to said player performance in a first defensive position;
e. said first group of offensive fields and said first group of defensive fields correlating to an action outcome produced by a random number generator, said random number generator comprising a plurality of action outcome variables ranging from 0% to 100%.
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