US20070254742A1 - Gaming on demand system and methodology - Google Patents

Gaming on demand system and methodology Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070254742A1
US20070254742A1 US11/772,338 US77233807A US2007254742A1 US 20070254742 A1 US20070254742 A1 US 20070254742A1 US 77233807 A US77233807 A US 77233807A US 2007254742 A1 US2007254742 A1 US 2007254742A1
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Prior art keywords
level
client
play
gaming
asset
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Abandoned
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US11/772,338
Inventor
Royal O'Brien
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Digital Interactive Streams Inc
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Digital Interactive Streams Inc
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Publication date
Priority to US11/145,845 priority Critical patent/US20050282636A1/en
Application filed by Digital Interactive Streams Inc filed Critical Digital Interactive Streams Inc
Priority to US11/772,338 priority patent/US20070254742A1/en
Publication of US20070254742A1 publication Critical patent/US20070254742A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/77Game security or game management aspects involving data related to game devices or game servers, e.g. configuration data, software version or amount of memory
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/12Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions involving interaction between a plurality of game devices, e.g. transmisison or distribution systems
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/70Game security or game management aspects
    • A63F13/71Game security or game management aspects using secure communication between game devices and game servers, e.g. by encrypting game data or authenticating players
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3225Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users
    • G07F17/323Data transfer within a gaming system, e.g. data sent between gaming machines and users wherein the player is informed, e.g. advertisements, odds, instructions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/20Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterised by details of the game platform
    • A63F2300/209Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterised by details of the game platform characterized by low level software layer, relating to hardware management, e.g. Operating System, Application Programming Interface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/50Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by details of game servers
    • A63F2300/55Details of game data or player data management
    • A63F2300/552Details of game data or player data management for downloading to client devices, e.g. using OS version, hardware or software profile of the client device

Abstract

A system and method for gaming on demand in real time via a computer network indexes game segments and prioritizes segments of a game to be downloaded, such that segments of a game needed immediately to play at a current level are downloaded, and then portions which correspond to levels accessible from the current level are downloaded. Downloading of the portions corresponding to directly related levels, and then portions corresponding to other levels, may occur while the game is being played at a current level.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a continuation in part and claims priority to U.S. Non-Provisional application Ser. No. 11/145,845, filed Jun 6, 2005, the entire contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention relates to gaming on demand (GoD) and, more particularly, to a system and method for providing video games on demand in real time via a computer network.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Video games have become increasingly complex and extremely rich in multimedia content. With the proliferation of broadband connectivity, systems have evolved that allow users to download games over a network such as the Internet, instead of having to purchase them on media, such as a game cartridge, DVD or CD-ROM. Such online systems offer users the luxury of selecting from a vast library of games. Unfortunately, however, because sophisticated video games often consume many hundreds of megabytes of storage, downloading them using conventional broadband connections can require several hours. By way of example, a 600-megabyte game may require approximately three (3) hours or more to download using a conventional DSL connection, depending upon various factors such as network congestion.
  • Additionally, conventional online systems require a user to download a complete executable game before play may commence. Conventional video games are typically not created in small independently executable portions. Instead, a main executable file for a video game and the necessary multimedia and data files, all of which my be required for game play, may consume hundreds of megabytes in storage and take several hours to download, even with a broadband connection. Thus, a user of such systems cannot download and play a game, without a significant delay or planning far in advance. This deficiency severely compromises the utility of conventional download-and-store gaming systems.
  • In an attempt to address these deficiencies, systems have emerged that divide a game into downloadable executable portions. However, they are not configured to identify, isolate and transmit only the data needed to play a game at a certain level, when the data is needed. Thus, if a user playing at a first level moves to a tenth level in game play, such systems tend to download all data required for game play between the first and tenth levels, even though much of the data (i.e., data corresponding to levels nine through ten) are not immediately needed. Disadvantageously, a move far ahead using such systems may require a substantial download, halting play for considerable amount of time, possibly even hours.
  • The invention is directed to overcoming one or more of the problems as set forth above.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention solves the problems and/or overcomes the drawbacks and disadvantages of the prior art by providing a system and method for gaming on demand in real time via a computer network. An exemplary embodiment of the invention prioritizes the portions of a game that are downloaded, such that portions of a game needed immediately to play at a current level (i.e., a parent level) are downloaded, and then portions which correspond to levels accessible from the current level (i.e., descendant levels) are downloaded. Downloading of the portions corresponding to descendant levels may occur while the game is being played at a parent level.
  • In a first aspect of the invention, a system analyzes a conventional multi-level video game to determine all segments of all files (i.e., the assets) accessed during game play at each level of the game. A list of indices is stored on a server to provide a record of the file segments accessed per level. Thus, the indices identify the portions of a game required for play at each level. A server may then make the list available to a client to enable the client to request delivery of assets needed for play at a level of the game.
  • In a second aspect of the invention, a client requests assets required for play at a current level. The assets are downloaded to (and stored by) the client upon which a user may play the game. An asset must be loaded only once for a game session. After segments required for game play at a current level are downloaded, assets related to levels of play that are accessible from the current level of play are downloaded if they have not been previously downloaded during the session. Downloading of such non-current assets may occur while the game is being played. After assets related to levels of play that are immediately accessible from the current level of play have been downloaded, downloading may continue with other assets in the hierarchy that have not been previously downloaded during the session.
  • In another aspect of the invention a gaming on demand method comprises steps of profiling a game having a plurality of levels including a first level and at least one other level of play. The step of profiling includes determining a chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play and a chunk of game data required for play at each of the at least one other level of play. Assets comprising one or more chunks to be delivered to a client are created. Each chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play is delivered in a first asset and chunks needed to play all other levels of play are delivered in other assets after the first asset.
  • The step of profiling includes running the game, performing moves at every level, intercepting all calls made by the game as each move is performed, and determining the data required in response to each call and the corresponding level. Each level corresponding to data required in response to each call is also determined. The step of determining the data required in response to each call includes retrieving a file name, some data identifier such as a start offset and an end offset or bytes read corresponding to each intercepted call. Information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level are saved in a container file, and then sorted and consolidated. The container file is then parsed to create chunks. Audit files are created to identify what part of a chunk corresponds to a determined level.
  • The first asset includes an audit file and chunk corresponding to a first level. Other assets include audit files and chunks corresponding to all other levels. The assets may be compressed and encrypted before delivery.
  • In another aspect of the invention, a driver is installed on a client to hook a file system. The first asset is also installed on the client. The driver intercepts each call by the installed first asset. If a call requires an asset on the client the asset may be accessed. If a call requires an asset that is not yet on the client, the asset that is required by the intercepted call but is not yet on the client is delivered.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The foregoing and other aspects, objects, features and advantages of the invention will become better understood with reference to the following description, appended claims, and accompanying drawings, where:
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 are server side flow charts of steps of an exemplary process according to principles of the invention;
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 are server side flow charts of steps of an exemplary process according to principles of the invention; and
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of modules of an exemplary system according to principles of the invention.
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the figures are not intended to illustrate every embodiment of the invention, all possible steps that may be added to the methodology, a required order of steps (unless specifically stated). The invention is not limited to the exemplary embodiments depicted in the figures or the steps or components shown in the figures.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A system in accordance with an exemplary implementation of the present invention includes a plurality of nodes (e.g., clients and server) communicatively connected via a network .
  • Clients may include one or more game consoles (or computers) with network connectivity means. Each client preferably includes a bus for communicating information, a central processing unit (CPU), a read only memory (ROM), and a random access memory (RAM). Additionally, a mass storage device such as a hard disk, volatile or non-volatile memory and/or other readable and writable storage means, a display device interface and an input device interface are provided. The input device may include a keyboard, pointing device, joystick, game controller and/or other means for inputting data. By way of example, a controller may be coupled to a client game console via a wire or wireless interface. Illustratively, the controller may be equipped with any of a wide variety of user interaction mechanisms, such as thumb sticks, directional pads, surface buttons and triggers. These mechanisms are merely representative, and other known gaming mechanisms may be substituted for or added to those discussed above. These elements of the client are typically included in most computer systems and the aforementioned system is intended to represent a broad category of systems supporting transmission, receipt, storage and processing of video game data in accordance with the present invention.
  • Of course, the client may include fewer, different and/or additional elements, provided it is capable, when programmed, of performing functions in accordance with the invention. For example, it may be comprised of a digital signal processor (DSP), an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), discrete gate logic, or other hardware, firmware, or any conventional programmable software module and a microprocessor in addition to or in lieu of components described above. Client-side software modules could reside in ROM and/or RAM memory, flash memory, registers, or any other form of readable storage medium known in the art. Additionally, the client may either stand alone or operate in a distributed environment.
  • Each client is communicatively connected to a network such as global computer network (e.g., the Internet), a wide area network (WAN), a local are network (LAN), another network configuration that facilitates communications between the client and a server, or some combination of the foregoing. A network interface implemented on the client provides access to a network and may be any of a wide variety of various wired or wireless interface components including an Ethernet card, a modem, a wireless transceiver (e.g., 802.11) module, a cable or DSL modem, and the like. Clients may be adapted for single-player use, multi-player use, and as a node in a network gaming community.
  • Functions of a client preferably include communicating with the server and receiving, storing and processing video game data for game play. To perform these functions, clients preferably include an operating system and application software, i.e., one or more client-side programs, that enable users to play games on the client. The client-side programs are preferably adapted to perform client functions and processes as described herein. Among other things, the client-side programs preferably enable communication with a server using a determined protocol to receive video game data. The client-side programs may also manage the receipt, storage and playing of received video game data. Furthermore, the client-side programs may enable interactive functions required for game play.
  • Video game data may requested and received from the server via network transmission and stored on a hard disk drive in the client. During play, portions of the game data may be temporarily loaded into RAM and executed by a CPU.
  • One or more server computers (i.e., servers) are communicatively connected to the network via a transmission medium. Functions of a server preferably include processing client requests and transmitting video game data and/or segments thereof. Like the client, the server preferably includes a bus for communicating information, a central processing unit (CPU), a read only memory (ROM), and a random access memory (RAM). Additionally, a mass storage device, a display device and an input device may be provided. The storage device may include a hard disk, tape drive, memory and/or other readable and writable storage means. The input device may include a keyboard, pointing device and/or other means for inputting data. These elements are typically included in most computer systems and the aforementioned system is intended to represent a broad category of systems supporting transmission, receipt, storage and processing of video game data and client requests in accordance with the invention.
  • Of course, the computer system may include fewer, different and/or additional elements, provided it is capable, when programmed, of performing functions in accordance with the invention. For example, it may be comprised of a digital signal processor (DSP), an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), discrete gate logic, or other hardware, firmware, or any conventional programmable software module and a microprocessor in addition to or in lieu of components described above. Server software modules could reside in RAM memory, flash memory, registers, or any other form of readable storage medium known in the art.
  • Additionally, the server system may either stand alone or operate in a distributed environment. By way of illustration, to achieve a higher transmission capacity and lower long-haul transmission cost, a hierarchical server architecture may be used, in which a plurality of local servers are placed close to users and cache video game data dynamically accordingly to local demand. One or more master servers may provide video game data to the local servers as needed.
  • As used herein, a video game broadly refers to an interactive graphical computer game. Though a system and method according to the invention will be described with respect to an adventure game, it is to be understood that the invention may be applied to various game genres, including fighting, role-playing and sports games, and the like. Illustratively, an exemplary video game may feature a game character (e.g., a person) or object (e.g., an aircraft) that is maneuvered under the control of a player through scenes in a virtual environment that is displayed by the client on a display screen. Play may involve employing a variety of actions in an attempt to achieve an objective, such as finding an object, winning a race or defeating an opponent. The exemplary game may be configured to provide a player various options and settings, such as allowing a player to select from several different characters or objects, themes and scenery, stages of difficulty and available actions.
  • A video game, such as the game described above, typically includes a plurality of functionally separable components, meaning certain discrete identifiable portions of a video game program. The components, which may include coding and multimedia data, correspond to conceptually separable scenes, environments, sections, characters, objects, difficulty stages, events, actions, or other game features and elements. A plurality of components may share one or more of the same discrete portions of video program data. Such functionally separable components are referred to herein as assets. The conceptually separable scenes, environments, sections, characters, objects, difficulty stages, events, actions, and other game features and elements to which the assets correspond are referred to herein as “levels,” “program levels,” “game levels” or “levels of play” for reference convenience.
  • In a preferred implementation of the invention, the server is configured to analyze a conventional multi-level video game to determine the assets required for game play at each level of the game. A list of indices and asset contents is stored in a container on the server to provide a record of the file segments accessed per level. The indices identify the level of play corresponding to each asset. The indices may also identify levels of play accessible from a current level. The server may then make the list available to a client to enable the client to request delivery of assets needed for play at a level of the game.
  • In an exemplary implementation, a shim is provided on the server to facilitate creation of the list of indices and asset contents for a video game. The shim is preferably adapted to analyze file activity as the video game is executed on the server. By intercepting and distinguishing service requests before they reach the operating system, the shim identifies and associate assets of the video game with levels of play. The service requests specify parameters that enable identification of the assets initiating the requests. A record is created as data structure, using, for example, a pointer and a sequence of bits included in each asset. Thus, the shim converts the video game into a container of discrete assets indexed to levels of play. Using the resulting the container of a plurality of discrete assets and associated indices, video game portions may be identified and transmitted to a client upon request.
  • A hierarchical relationship may be used to conceptually identify various levels of a multi-level game and the interrelationships between levels. A game level that is currently being used during game play may be considered a current level. A current level may have one or more child levels accessible from the current level. A current level may also have one or more parents from which the current level stemmed. Additionally, a current level may have sibling levels, which share one or more common parents with the current level. If one level may be accessed from another level, the levels are considered directly related. One example of movement from one level to another level during game play is movement from a first room, in which a player is performing actions, into one of possibly several rooms that are directly accessible from the first room. New assets may be required for play in the new room.
  • During game play, a master list is downloaded to the client from the server. The master list identifies each level, assets corresponding to each level and directly related levels for each level. The master level may also include an end offset of the video game data file. Assets for a first level are also downloaded from the server to a client to commence game play. While the first level is being played, assets corresponding to directly related levels may be downloaded, if they have not already been received. One of the directly related levels is a level for which assets are likely to be needed next to continue game play. An asset is downloaded to the client only once during a game play session. After assets for directly related levels are downloaded, assets for other levels may be downloaded.
  • An exemplary implementation of the present invention enables archiving and playing downloaded video game data assets while additional assets are being transmitted to the client for archiving and playing. Thus, for example, while received assets are being played by the client, assets that have not yet been received are requested by and transmitted to the client. To enable such functionality, the server preferably receives and processes instructions or commands (i.e., asset requests) sent by the client and responds accordingly.
  • In an exemplary implementation, a client may maintain two distinct data channels (i.e., separate logical and/or physical communication paths) with a server, such as (1) a COM channel for communicating requests and responses between the server and client and (2) a media channel for receiving assets from the server. Each channel preferably maintains a Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) connection with the server. The TCP layer manages the disassembling of a data unit (e.g., a message, asset) into smaller packets (or datagrams) that are efficiently transmitted and routed over the network and the reassembling of received packets into the original data unit. The IP layer handles the address part of each packet so that it reaches the intended destination. Use of the TCP/IP protocol helps to ensure that every packet sent by the server is received by the client. The client may use another protocol to interface with a network access provider as an intermediary. For example, the client may use a Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) or Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) to encapsulate IP packets so that they can be sent over a transmission medium to a network access provider's system without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • Initially, an authorized (e.g., authenticated) client may send a request for a master list and first asset to a server via the COM channel. If the master list and asset is available, the server may begin sending (i.e., downloading to the client) them via the media channel. Upon receiving the master list and first asset, the client may begin playing the game and send a request to the server via the COM channel for an asset directly related to the first asset.
  • Based upon an end offset of the asset received with the master list via the media channel, the client preferably creates a video game data file of the video game data file size, as conceptually shown in FIG. 3. The first asset (X) may be stored at the beginning of the video game data file, leaving enough storage space for succeeding assets. The remainder of the file may then be filled up with zeros, as shown in FIG. 3, specifying empty data chunks for which assets may eventually be requested.
  • The client preferably maintains a global list that tracks available assets (e.g., A, X and Z in FIGS. 3 and 4) and empty data (e.g., zeros in FIGS. 3 and 4) chunks. Items of the global list may be structures defined as follows:
    struct {
     long lFromOffsetId ; // defines the Offset from which the data is
     available
     long lToOffsetId ;  // defines the Offset to which the data is available
    };
  • When the client receives a first asset, it may enter into the global list a ‘from offset id’ as zero and a number of bytes received as ‘to offset id’. This entry indicates that the asset from ‘from offset id’ to ‘to offset id’ is available at the client (in the video game data file). The client updates the ‘to offset id’ entry in the list as additional assets are received. Until the video game data file is full, the client transmits, via the COM channel, requests to the server to send assets that have not yet been received, as discussed above.
  • An important advantage of the present invention is that it allows a user to jump to any level in a game irrespective of whether the required asset is available at the client or not for that level. If a user jumps to level for which an asset is unavailable, the client transmits, via the COM channel, a request to the server to begin sending the asset and then waits for the requested asset to arrive to resume play. The delay in play is minimized, because the system waits only for the required asset to arrive to resume play. When the data for the new asset arrives, a new entry may be created in the global list specifying the ‘from offset id’ and ‘to offset id’ and playback may resume. As additional assets are received for other levels, the ‘to offset id’ is updated.
  • In sum, the client is configured to manage the storage of assets and the master list, requests for needed assets that have not been received, and identification of needed assets that are currently available. While an exemplary implementation for performing these functions is described herein, those skilled in the art will appreciate that other steps may be performed to achieve the same objectives without departing from the scope of the invention.
  • The client preferably also tracks the merger of new available data with old available data. As new data is received, filling up previously empty chunks, the global list may be updated with each ‘from offset id’ and corresponding ‘to offset id’ entry representing a continuous range of available assets 0. Entries in the global list may be added in an ascending sorted order of ‘from offset id’ 0.
  • As a user jumps from one level to another level, data may be avail form of discontinuous chunks. To avoid problems caused by a discontinuity (i.e., encountering an unavailable asset in the video game data file), the client application may check for asset continuity from the video game data file current level onwards. If the available assets are not continuous, the client may sends a request, via the COM channel, to the server to send data for the missing assets required for continuity.
  • A user can jump to a position in the video game data file such as by maneuvering game play t a new level. The client determines if the targeted data is available (e.g., by checking the global list) before jumping to the new level in the video game data file. Next, the global list is searched to find out whether the data offset for the new level corresponds to an available asset 0-0. If the targeted asset is not available, the client will send a request to the server to begin sending the asset corresponding to a the new level 0. The client then waits for the targeted asset to arrive, and resumes playback 0. In this manner, the system waits only for the assets immediately needed to resume playback. Thus, other assets that are unnecessary for playback will not delay playback.
  • Those skilled in the art will appreciate that maneuvering of player action through various levels is conducive to formation of discontinuities. The methodology described above directs the server to provide assets to fill empty chunks on a prioritized basis (i.e., assets corresponding to directly related levels are requested first) in the video game data file and facilitate continuous playing from any level in the video game data file, with minimized delay.
  • When assets for a current level and all directly related levels, the client-side monitoring thread preferably checks the global list to determine if any zeros (unavailable asset) remain. If zeros remain, the client will send a request to the server to begin sending missing assets. For example, the client may send a request, via the COM channel, to the server to send assets corresponding to a next generation of descendant levels of game play, and so on. This process may repeat until the entire video game data file is stored in the video game data file.
  • The methodology of the present invention reduces (or eliminates) the need for retransmission of available data. The monitoring thread does not request the server to send data that is already available in the video game data file. If assets are available in the video game data file for a selected level, but other data is unavailable, the client will request the unavailable assets from the server. Until the video game data file is full, the client will request unavailable assets by reference to the global list and communication with the server via the COM channel.
  • By employing two channels for communication with the server, the present invention facilitates a steady stream of video game assets over the dedicated media channel, until the video game data file is full. Requests sent to the server via the COM channel will not interfere with asset downloading.
  • An important advantage of the present invention is that it accommodates both playback of downloaded video game data on demand in real time and playback of downloaded and stored video. If a user pauses or stops playback of downloading video, the client continues to request, via the COM channel, unavailable data from the server, until the video game data file is full. To illustrate, a user may pause playback by selecting the pause control on a player. Playback will cease. However, the client may continue to request unavailable assets (via the COM channel) and the server will continue to send unavailable assets (via the media channel) until the video game data file is full. The video game data file may then be saved and played at a time convenient to the user. Play may start at any available level.
  • Another advantage of the present invention is that it preserves the video game data file in the event a connection is lost or terminated. Upon reestablishing a network connection downloading may resume via the media channel and communications may resume via the COM channel.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, server side flow charts of steps of an exemplary process according to principles of the invention are shown. Profiling, i.e., preparing game data for delivery using a system according to principles of the invention, entails hooking the file system for the game application, as in step 100. A driver (i.e., shim) sits atop the file system. All calls pass through driver. The driver collects data (e.g., filename, start and end offsets).
  • Next, the game application being profiled is run, as in step 105. Every move is performed, e.g., manually performed, at every level. However, automated performance of the moves is contemplated and comes within the scope of the invention. All calls made by the Gaming application to the file system or redirector, e.g., CreateFile( ) and ReadFile( ) are intercepted, as each move is performed, as in step 110. The name of the file, its start offset and end offset, or bytes read requested by the gaming application, are retrieved. The information is marked automatically or manually with a marker as gameplay moves from one area or level to another, as in step 115. The information recorded about each file requested by a gaming application is saved into a container file, as in step 120. The container file preferably contains at least the file name, start offset and the end offset or read size for each requested file. Finally, the data in the container file is sorted and consolidated to reduce the number of overlapped or consecutive entries, thereby eliminating redundant data, as in step 125.
  • Next, the sorted and consolidated data is parsed and chunk files are created for each level or area of game play, as in step 200. A chunk file represents chunk of data that are relevant to one particular level or are of play. Next, an audit file is created for each file that a gaming application uses, as in step 205. The audit file identifies what part of actual file belongs to a level. The audit file is sent to a client as part of the first asset (i.e., packet of delivered data). All data not included in chunk files may be included in the first asset.
  • Next, using the chunk files and the audit files, assets are created in a determined order of the levels/areas of the game (e.g., level 1 chunk file(s), level 2 chunk file(s), . . . ), as in step 210. Audit files may also be combined, and any remaining duplicates may be removed from assets and audit chunk files. The first asset preferably contains all the combined audit files and relevant chunks files for level 1 or the initial startup assets to begin game play, as in step 215. Remaining assets contain chunk files corresponding to levels or areas, with progression information for expected continual requests from a level/area, as in step 220. All assets are compressed (e.g., zipped) and encrypted for delivery to a client using a server-side application configured to deliver the assets in response to compatible client-side requests, as in step 225.
  • Referring Now to FIGS. 3 and 4, server side flow charts of step exemplary process according to principles of the invention are shown. A client application installs a driver (shim) to hook the file system for the gaming application that a user has requested, as in step 300. Before running the gaming application, the client application downloads the first asset containing a script file for the game installation, all audit files and relevant chunks for the initial game level, as in step 305. The client application then decompresses (e.g., unzips) and decrypts the asset and then parses through each chunk file. Once the chunk files are parsed, the client application has the information in memory regarding the available data for each file that the game uses, as in step 310.
  • A driver (shim) essentially monitors game play to facilitate determining which assets are needed. By way of example, the driver(shim) intercepts each CreateFile( ) and ReadFile( ) call made by gaming application, as in step 315. When the driver(shim) intercepts a ReadFile( ) call, it sends a message to the client application to determine whether the data is available or not, as in step 320. The client application then checks the memory to determine if the requested data is available, as in step 405.
  • If the requested data is available, the data is accessed and the client application sends a response back to the driver to continue reading the file, as in step 410. However, if required data is not available, the client application holds the driver and then checks the relevant audit file to find the asset to which the data belongs, as in step 410. The client application then requests the server to deliver (e.g., stream) the corresponding asset. Once the asset is completely downloaded, the driver continues reading the file.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of components (e.g., modules) of an exemplary system according to principles of the invention is conceptually shown. The User Mode includes an application, possibly a game, as in 500, and intermediate modules provided by the operational system, as in 505.
  • The kernel manages the system's resources and the communication between hardware and software components. The kernel provides abstraction layers for hardware, especially for memory, processors and I/O that allows hardware and software to communicate. It also makes these facilities available to the user and applications through inter-process communication mechanisms and system calls.
  • In an exemplary implementation, the Kernel Mode includes intermediate modules of the operational system, as in 510; a shim, as in 515; and other filter drivers, file system drivers, and disk drivers. The Kernel Mode also includes access to physical media (e.g., hard disk, etc.), as in 520.
  • While the invention has been described in terms of exemplary embodiments, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention can be practiced with modifications within the spirit and scope of the foregoing detailed description. Such alternative embodiments and implementations are intended to come within the scope of the present invention.

Claims (20)

1. A gaming on demand method comprising steps of profiling a game having a plurality of levels including a first level and at least one other level of play,
said step of profiling including determining a chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play and a chunk of game data required for play at each of the at least one other level of play,
creating assets comprising one or more chunks to be delivered to a client, such that the each chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play is delivered in a first asset and chunks needed to play all other levels of play are delivered in other assets after the first asset.
2. A gaming on demand method according to claim 1, wherein the step of profiling includes running the game, performing moves at every level, intercepting all calls made by the game as each move is performed, and determining the data required in response to each call and the corresponding level.
3. A gaming on demand method according to claim 2, wherein the step of determining the data required in response to each call includes retrieving a file name, a start offset and an end offset corresponding to each intercepted call.
4. A gaming on demand method according to claim 2, wherein the step of determining the data required in response to each call includes retrieving a file name and bytes read corresponding to each intercepted call.
5. A gaming on demand method according to claim 2, wherein the step of profiling further includes identifying each level corresponding to data required in response to each call.
6. A gaming on demand method according to claim 2, wherein the step of profiling further includes saving into a container file the information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level.
7. A gaming on demand method according to claim 6, wherein the step of profiling further includes sorting and consolidating information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level in the container file.
8. A gaming on demand method according to claim 6, further comprising parsing the container file containing information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level, and creating a chunk for each level.
9. A gaming on demand method according to claim 6, further comprising creating audit files that identify what part of a chunk corresponds to a determined level, and sending the audit file to a client.
10. A gaming on demand method according to claim 9, wherein the first asset includes an audit file and chunk corresponding to a first level.
11. A gaming on demand method according to claim 10, wherein the other assets include audit files and chunks corresponding to all other levels.
12. A gaming on demand method according to claim 11, further comprising compressing the assets before delivery to a client.
13. A gaming on demand method according to claim 12, further comprising encrypting the assets before delivery to a client.
14. A gaming on demand method according to claim 11, further comprising installing a driver on a client to hook a file system.
15. A gaming on demand method according to claim 14, further comprising installing the first asset on the client.
16. A gaming on demand method according to claim 15, further comprising using the driver to intercept each call by the first asset.
17. A gaming on demand method according to claim 16, further comprising determining whether each intercepted call requires an asset on the client or an asset that is not yet on the client.
18. A gaming on demand method according to claim 17, further comprising delivering to the client each asset that is required by an intercepted call but is not yet on the client.
19. A gaming on demand method comprising steps of profiling a game having a plurality of levels including a first level and at least one other level of play,
said step of profiling including determining a chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play and a chunk of game data required for play at each of the at least one other level of play,
creating assets comprising one or more chunks to be delivered to a client, such that the each chunk of game data required for play at the first level of play is delivered in a first asset and chunks needed to play all other levels of play are delivered in other assets after the first asset,
wherein the step of profiling includes running the game, performing moves at every level, intercepting all calls made by the game as each move is performed, and determining the data required in response to each call and the corresponding level, and the step of determining the data required in response to each call includes retrieving a file name data identifier corresponding to each intercepted call, identifying each level corresponding to data required in response to each call., saving into a container file the information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level, sorting and consolidating information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level in the container file, parsing the container file containing information identifying data required in response to each call and the corresponding level, and creating a chunk for each level, creating audit files that identify what part of a chunk corresponds to a determined level,
wherein the first asset includes an audit file and chunk corresponding to a first level.
20. A gaming on demand method according to claim 19, further comprising installing a driver on a client to hook a file system, installing the first asset on the client, using the driver to intercept each call by the first asset, determining whether each intercepted call requires an asset on the client or an asset that is not yet on the client, and delivering to the client each asset that is required by an intercepted call but is not yet on the client.
US11/772,338 2004-06-04 2007-07-02 Gaming on demand system and methodology Abandoned US20070254742A1 (en)

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