US20070248411A1 - Concrete template and method of use - Google Patents

Concrete template and method of use Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070248411A1
US20070248411A1 US11/820,896 US82089607A US2007248411A1 US 20070248411 A1 US20070248411 A1 US 20070248411A1 US 82089607 A US82089607 A US 82089607A US 2007248411 A1 US2007248411 A1 US 2007248411A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
surface
method
template
regions
aggregate
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/820,896
Inventor
Lee Shaw
Ronald Shaw
Original Assignee
Shaw Lee A
Shaw Ronald D
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/252,078 priority Critical patent/US20070086860A1/en
Application filed by Shaw Lee A, Shaw Ronald D filed Critical Shaw Lee A
Priority to US11/820,896 priority patent/US20070248411A1/en
Publication of US20070248411A1 publication Critical patent/US20070248411A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01CCONSTRUCTION OF, OR SURFACES FOR, ROADS, SPORTS GROUNDS, OR THE LIKE; MACHINES OR AUXILIARY TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
    • E01C19/00Machines, tools or auxiliary devices for preparing or distributing paving materials, for working the placed materials, or for forming, consolidating, or finishing the paving
    • E01C19/22Machines, tools or auxiliary devices for preparing or distributing paving materials, for working the placed materials, or for forming, consolidating, or finishing the paving for consolidating or finishing laid-down unset materials
    • E01C19/44Hand-actuated tools other than rollers, tampers, or vibrators, specially adapted for imparting a required finish to freshly-laid paving courses

Abstract

A method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a poured concrete mixture is provided. The method comprises the steps of: (a) placing a releasable template onto the surface to define exposed and covered regions; (b) manipulating the exposed regions corresponding to the design; (c) removing the template to reveal the covered regions; and (d) finishing the surface. The template may be variously configured and may incorporate positive and negative portions, which may be alternatively utilized to transfer the design to respective positive and negative regions of the surface. The template may preferably be fabricated from visquene, craft paper, or other suitable material. In addition, implementations of the present invention may be utilized with surface seeded exposed aggregate, troweling, or other surface finishing processes.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT RE: FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH/DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present invention relates generally to concrete products, and more particularly, to a method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a concrete mixture utilizing a releasable template.
  • As is well known in the building and construction trade, concrete is extensively utilized as a building material for industrial, commercial and residential applications. Due to its durability, water resistance, and cost economy, concrete has gained wide spread use in flooring applications. With this wide spread use, the public is currently demanding variations in color, surface texture and overall appearance of concrete so that the concrete possesses improved aesthetics similar to more conventional and costly flooring surfaces such as marble, stone and granite.
  • In order to meet this demand, the concrete trade has developed various coloring and surface finishing techniques to enhance the aesthetics of concrete. Examples of such finishing techniques include salt finish, multiple broom finish, form press finish (e.g. stamped concrete), and exposed aggregate finish.
  • With particular regard to exposed aggregate finishes, one of two different production methods or techniques are typically utilized to form the same. The first is the “integrally exposed aggregate” method, which is the more conventional of the two techniques. The integrally exposed aggregate method entails washing or removing surface cement and fines from the concrete while the concrete surface is still plastic (i.e., prior to full curing) such that the aggregate (which is normally rock or gravel) is left exposed on the surface of the concrete. Due to the fact that the concrete aggregate is relatively large in size (i.e., approximately one-half inch to one inch in mean diameter), as well as the fact that the washing process is not uniform in nature, the resultant concrete surface produced via the integrally exposed aggregate method is often extremely rough and jagged. This characteristic limits wide spread use of the integrally exposed aggregate method in flooring applications. Further, the rough and jagged appearance also fails to create the aesthetic appearance of stone or marble that is desired.
  • The second method is the “surface seeded exposed” method, which has recently been introduced into the trade. In this particular method, subsequent to pouring the concrete, rock or gravel aggregate is scattered (i.e. broadcasted or seeded) over the top surface of the concrete and subsequently troweled into the same. As the concrete cures, the aggregate becomes adhered to the top surface of the concrete and is thus exposed. Although various sizes of aggregate can be broadcast over the top surface of the concrete in this method, such aggregate is normally of about three-eighths inch diameter or greater in size, and has sheared or jagged edges. The size and shape of the aggregate allows it to be worked into the top surface of the concrete and adequately adhered thereto. However, although the resultant concrete surface produced through the surface seeded exposed aggregate method is flatter than the surface produced through the integrally exposed aggregate method, neither surface is free of irregularities, and both surfaces still posses an extremely rough surface finishes which limit their wide spread use in flooring applications. In particular, neither method produces a surface finish comparable to that of marble, stone, or granite.
  • In order to overcome the above-mentioned deficiencies of the prior art, methods have been developed to enhance the surface finish of concrete by reducing the size of the aggregate exposed on the surface of the concrete. However, as the aggregate decreases in size, other challenges develop due to the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR is a chemical process through which alkalis from cement and silica from aggregate, combine to form a gel that expands in the presence of moisture and causes cracking in concrete and disrupts the adhesion of aggregate to the top surface of the concrete.
  • In response the challenges that ASR presents, other methods have been developed to obtain sufficient surface flatness while substantially eliminating the effects of ASR. In particular, several of these methods are described in Applicant's U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,748,788, 6,016,635, and 6,033,146, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. Applicant's techniques as described in the above-mentioned patents overcame many of the deficiencies of the prior art and produced improved surface finishes on surface seeded exposed aggregate concrete. In particular, the concrete resultant from practice of the above-mentioned patents exhibits an extremely flat exposed aggregate surface suitable for extremely high traffic flooring applications. However, the surface seeded exposed aggregate method has only hitherto been refined to produce surfaces that assimilate stone, marble, or granite. No process has been developed that makes it possible to combine multiple variations of aggregate, designs, or textural effects onto a single cement surface. Typically, such modifications have been limited to the use of concrete stamps or concrete saws.
  • Therefore, there is a need in the art for a surface seeded exposed aggregate method and product that facilitates the creation of surfaces which incorporate various design patterns and multiple textural effects. Further, there is a need in the art for a method of producing designs on concrete that is simple and effective. Indeed, there is a need in the art for a surface seeded exposed aggregate method that allows flexibility in creating multiple unique and separate designs in a single concrete surface, shielding certain areas while allowing other areas to be finished.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a poured concrete mixture is provided. The method comprises: (a) placing a releasable template onto the surface to define exposed and covered regions; (b) manipulating the exposed regions corresponding to the design; (c) removing the template to reveal the covered regions; and (d) finishing the surface. The releasable template may be fabricated from visquene, craft paper, or other materials known in the art. In addition, the releasable template may be precut corresponding to the exposed and covered regions.
  • After placing the template onto the surface, the method may include the step of troweling the template into the surface to secure the template thereto. Additionally, the exposed regions may be manipulated by broadcasting aggregate onto the surface at the exposed regions thereof and finishing the surface seeding of the aggregate corresponding to the exposed regions. Prior to broadcasting the aggregate, the surface may be finished to dispose a quantity of cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture at the surface thereof. Further, subsequent to broadcasting the aggregate, the aggregate may be mixed into the cement/fines paste. The step of manipulating the exposed regions may also include manipulating the shape of the concrete surface of the exposed regions. In this regard, a troweling device may be utilized to manipulate the shape of the concrete surface. Finally, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the surface may be finished by applying a surface retarder to the surface and massaging the surface retarder into the surface.
  • According to another aspect of the present invention, a surface seeded exposed particulate concrete product formed by the methods herein disclosed is also provided. The concrete product may be variously configured and prepared, as is apparent to one of skill in the art given the disclosure provided herein.
  • In accordance with another implementation of the present invention, a method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a concrete mixture utilizing a releasable template, the template including positive and negative portions is provided. The method comprises: (a) transferring the design corresponding to the positive portion through the steps of: (i) placing the positive portion onto the surface, the positive portion defining positive regions on the surface; (ii) manipulating the positive regions thereof; and (iii) removing the positive portion from the surface; and (b) finishing the surface. The releasable template may be fabricated from visquene, craft paper, or other materials known in the art.
  • After placing the template onto the surface, the method may include the step of troweling the template into the surface to secure the template thereto. After transferring the design corresponding to the positive portion of the template, the method may also include transferring the design corresponding to the negative portion through the steps of: (a) placing the negative portion onto the surface, the negative portion defining negative regions on the surface; (b) manipulating the negative regions thereof; and (c) removing the negative portion.
  • The releasable template may be precut corresponding to the positive and negative regions. Further, the manipulating step of the method may include (a) finishing the surface to dispose a quantity of cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture at the surface thereof; (b) broadcasting aggregate onto the surface corresponding to at least one of the positive and negative regions thereof, and (c) mixing the aggregate into the cement/fines paste. Indeed, at least one of the manipulating steps may include manipulating of the concrete surface utilizing a troweling device and corresponding to at least one of the positive and negative regions. Finally, in accordance with another aspect of the present invention, the surface may be finished by applying a surface retarder to the surface and massaging the surface retarder into the surface.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • These and other features and advantages of the various embodiments disclosed herein will be better understood with respect to the following description and drawings, in which like numbers refer to like parts throughout, and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a method illustrating various steps which may be performed in transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a concrete mixture utilizing a releasable template in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2A is a perspective view of the template being placed upon the surface in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2B is a perspective view of the surface in which a region thereof has been manipulated in accordance with an aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2C is a perspective view of the template being removed from the surface after a region thereof has been manipulated in accordance with an aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2D is a perspective view of a negative portion of the template being placed upon the surface in preparation for manipulation of a negative region of the surface in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2E is a perspective view of the surface being troweled to incorporate the design in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3A is a perspective view of the template including positive and negative portions placed upon the surface in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3B is a perspective view of the positive portion placed upon the surface to define a positive region which has been manipulated in accordance with an aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3C is a perspective view of the negative portion placed upon the surface to define a negative region which has been manipulated in accordance with an aspect of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 3D is a perspective view of the surface wherein the positive and negative regions are exposed for collective manipulation thereof in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for purposes of illustrating the preferred embodiments of the invention only, and not for purposes of limiting the same, FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating a method of transferring a design 26 to an uncured surface of a poured concrete mixture 10. An implementation of the present invention may be performed after properly preparing a subgrade 12, which may be prepared in a variety of ways, utilizing a variety of tools, materials, and methods. As described in further detail below, implementations of the present invention provide for the combination of multiple designs or effects onto a single cement surface. In accordance with one implementation, a surface seeded exposed aggregate method is provided that facilitates the creation of surfaces which incorporate various design patterns, colors, and multiple textural effects. Other modifications and combinations are also provided and may be apparent to one of skill in the art.
  • One such conventional mode of preparation involves preparing the subgrade 12 to a desired elevation and blade and to compact the subgrade 12 preferably to ninety percent (90%) compaction. Subsequent to this preparation, the subgrade 12 is covered with a layer of clean, moist fill sand 14 which is preferably maintained at a minimum four (4) inch layer thickness. Although the fill sand 14 is not absolutely necessary, it is highly desirable to control the hydration process of the concrete. In order to increase the resultant strength of the concrete and to reduce subsequent cracking of the same, reinforcement members 16 such as a wire mesh or rebar may be positioned upon the layer of fill sand 14. The layer which includes the fill sand 14 and the reinforcement members 16 is often collectively referred to as the subgrade 12.
  • The concrete mixture 10 may be poured over the subgrade 12 such that the reinforcement members 16 are encapsulated within the concrete mixture 10. The concrete mixture 10 may be poured to approximately a three and one half (3½) inch to four (4) inch thickness. Although variations in the concrete mixture 10 are contemplated, a preferred concrete mixture 10 comprises seventy percent (70%) sand and thirty percent (30%) ⅜ inch mean diameter aggregate combined with six sack cement (2,000 pounds per square inch) or seven sack cement (2,000 pounds per square inch). Dependent on individual tastes, various color mixtures can be added to the concrete mixture 10.
  • After the concrete mixture 10 has been poured, the concrete mixture 10 is preferably screeded to a desired level plan or grade. The screeding of the concrete mixture 10 results in the same defining a generally level or planar upper surface. The concrete mixture 10 is preferably not tamped as is conventional in the art. In preferred implementations, tamping should be avoided so as not to bring up too much cement/fines in the concrete mixture 10 which would be prohibited for subsequent surface seeding of the exposed aggregate 24 thereupon. Rather, subsequent to screeding, the surface of the concrete mixture 10 is surfaced or finished to dispose a quantity of the cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture 10 to the surface thereof. This finishing is preferably done utilizing a bull float. The bull float is typically characterized by possessing an extremely smooth or polished surface which, in addition to bringing up the appropriate amount of cement/fines paste for the subsequent manipulative step, also tends to seal the surface of the concrete mixture 10. It is contemplated that this initial finishing step may be also completed through the use of a vibrating bull float, such as a vibrating magnesium bull float or a vibrating aluminum bull float. The preferred bull float is sold under the trademark HAL200 by the Lievers Holland Co.
  • As shown in FIG. 2A, according to an aspect of the present invention, a releasable template 18 may be placed onto the surface of the poured concrete mixture 10. The template 18 may be fabricated from visquene, craft paper, or other suitable materials. The template 18 defines exposed and covered regions 22, and when placed on the surface, protects the surface in the covered regions 22 from alteration and leaves the exposed regions 20 open to facilitate manipulation or finishing processes to be performed therein. As shown in FIGS. 2A-2E, the template 18 may be configured in accordance with a decorative design 26, as preferred by a user. In this regard, the shape and configuration of the exposed and covered regions 20, 22 is theoretically limitless, but should take into account any of the finishing processes that are to be performed in the respective exposed and covered regions 20, 22, and any limitations imposed thereby. Such planning and development may be variously performed by one of skill in the art.
  • Additionally, after placing the template 18 onto the surface, it is contemplated that the template 18 may be troweled into the surface in order to better secure the template 18 to the surface during subsequent steps. In this regard, although troweling is a preferred manner of securing the template 18 to the surface due to the facility of such procedure, other methods and procedures may be implemented in order to ensure that the template 18 retains its position and shape during subsequent steps. Such alterations and manipulations of embodiments of the present invention may be performed by one having skill in the art.
  • After placing the template 18 onto the surface, as illustrated in FIG. 2B, the exposed regions 20 corresponding to the design 26 may be manipulated according to a given finishing process or operation. Although numerous finishing processes may be performed on the exposed regions 20, preferred embodiments of the present invention may utilize surface seeded exposed aggregate 24. Thus, aggregate 24 may be broadcast onto the surface at the exposed regions 20 and those exposed regions 20 may be finished according to various finishing steps in relation to surface seeding of the aggregate 24. For example, when the exposed regions 20 are still plastic, small size aggregate 24 may be broadcast over the exposed regions 20. The aggregate 24 may include silica sands, coarse sands, brass beads, organic materials, metals, fine sand, composite materials, or combinations thereof. In broadcasting the aggregate 24 onto the surface, it is contemplated that various patterns or visual effects may be created thereby, especially given the flexibility of utilizing several types of aggregate 24. It is contemplated that certain tools may be utilized to perform the broadcasting steps, such as pneumatic equipment or other spraying/spreading equipment.
  • After the aggregate 24 is broadcast upon the exposed regions 20, the aggregate 24 is preferably mixed or worked into the exposed regions 20 of the surface, and more particularly, is preferably mixed into the cement/fine paste of the surface. In implementations of the present invention, this step may be utilized to further enhance the physical placement of the aggregate 24 on the surface. It is contemplated that this step may be variously performed in order to create various effects such as simulating natural stone or other materials. This may be accomplished utilizing a power trowel. However, it is contemplated that the mixing may be accomplished utilizing other devices known in the art. This mixing of the aggregate 24 with the cement/fine paste at the surface is also critical to the process of the present invention because it ensures that the aggregate 24 is fully embedded into the cement/fine paste and thus thoroughly adhered or bonded to the surface of the concrete mixture 10 upon resultant curing.
  • After manipulating the exposed regions 20 corresponding to the design 26, the template 18 may be removed to reveal the covered regions 22, as illustrated in FIG. 2C. At this point, the covered regions 22 may then likewise be manipulated according to design 26 requirements, as shown in FIG. 2D. This manipulation may alter the exposed regions 20 together with the covered regions 22, or alternatively, may alter only the covered regions 22.
  • In addition, it is contemplated that the exposed regions 20 and/or the covered regions 22 may also be manipulated utilizing a troweling device as shown in FIG. 2E. The troweling device may be a trowel, a stamp, or other suitable tool. Thus, utilizing the troweling device, various designs 26 or patterns may be transferred to the exposed regions 20 of the surface utilizing the skill, taste, and design 26 as required by the user. Preferably, such manipulation of the surface utilizing the troweling device is performed when the concrete has partially set, but prior to full curing.
  • After the design 26 has been transferred to the exposed regions 20 (and perhaps the covered regions 22) of the surface, the entire surface (including the exposed regions 20 and the covered regions 22) may then be finished with a power trowel to properly level and finish the surface. Subsequent finishing steps, as detailed below, may then be performed.
  • According to another embodiment of the present invention, as illustrated in FIGS. 3A-3D, it is contemplated that the releasable template 18 may be divided into positive and negative portions 28, 30, which respectively define positive and negative regions 32, 34 when placed onto the surface. Referring to FIG. 3B, the positive portion 28 may be placed onto the surface to protect the covered regions 22 of the surface and to leave exposed the positive regions 32 of the surface for facilitating the transfer of the design 26 to the positive regions 32, in a manner as discussed above. After finishing the positive regions 32, the positive portion 28 may be removed from the surface. In addition, after removing the positive portion 28 from the surface, the negative portion 30 may then be placed onto the surface, as shown in FIG. 3C, thereby exposing negative regions 34 of the surface. Thereafter, the negative regions 34 of the surface may be finished according to at least one of a variety of finishing processes described above, such as with surface seeded exposed aggregate 24, or otherwise known in the art. Subsequent to completion of the negative regions 34 and transferal of the design 26 thereto, the negative portion 30 of the template 18 may be removed from the surface, as shown in FIG. 3D. At this point, both the positive and the negative regions 32, 34 of the surface may be finished utilizing the finishing steps described below.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, after transferring the design 26 to the surface, a chemical surface retarder may be sprayed upon the surface to uniformly cover the same. The chemical retarder slows down the hydration process of the concrete mixture 10. The application of the surface retarder to the surface may be followed by the step of finishing the surface of the concrete mixture 10 with the power trowel, for example, to massage the surface retarder into the cement/fines paste having the aggregate 24 mixed therein. This finishing step preferably results in the penetration of the surface retarder into the cement/fines paste at a distance below the maximum depth of the aggregate 24, which may be at least approximately ⅜ inch in some instances. Advantageously, this particular finishing step may eliminate hard spots in the resultant concrete by facilitating a full mix of the retarder and the cement/fines paste. The power trowel, preferably used in relation to both this and the previously mentioned step, finishes the surface of the concrete mixture 10 in a generally circular motion. Although various conventional surface retarders may be utilized, one superior surface retarder is designated as SPEC AE manufactured by E.L. Moore Co. of Costa Mesa, Calif.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, subsequent to the surface retarder being massaged into the cement/fine paste, a vapor barrier may be preferably formed on the surface of the concrete mixture 10. In the preferred embodiment, the formation of the vapor barrier is facilitated by the application of a liquid chemical evaporation reducer to the exposed surface of the concrete mixture 10. A preferred evaporation reducer is sold under the trademark CONFILM by the Concrete Tide Co. of Compton, Calif. An alternative vapor barrier may be formed by covering the surface with four (4) or six (6) millimeters of visquene. The vapor barrier is maintained upon the surface of the concrete mixture 10 for a prescribed period of time which may range from approximately two (2) to twenty-four (24) hours.
  • After the vapor barrier has remained upon the surface for a prescribed period of time, the surface of the concrete mixture 10 may be washed with water to remove any surface films therefrom. In this washing procedure, it may be preferable to lightly brush the surface with a bristle brush. This may be done in order to enhance or alter the design 26. The washing step, as described herein, may be done without excessive dislodgement and loss of the aggregate 24 due to the full mixture of the retarder and cement/fine paste performed during the power troweling of the surface. Additionally, the application of the liquid evaporation reducer to the surface may also reduce the rate of the evaporation of moisture from the surface and increase the ease at which the excess cement/fine paste and residual surface retarder are washed from the surface.
  • As illustrated in FIG. 1, subsequent to washing, the concrete mixture 10 may be cured utilizing water alone, as opposed to chemical curing agents in order to avoid staining of the surface. Such water curing may typically be facilitated through the use of a conventional fogger or soaker hose. After a prescribed period of time (e.g., 30 days after initiating the curing process) any surface residue present on the surface is removed by conventional power washing with a ninety percent (90%) steam and ten percent (10%) muriatic acid mixture which is applied by a power washer via a high pressure nozzle.
  • The resultant surface exhibits an appearance of various textures and patterns according to the complexity of the design 26. Further, as an extremely flat surface, even when surface seeded exposed aggregate 24 is utilized, it is also suitable for high pedestrian traffic. As described above, various modifications in the color, size, texture, and other characteristics of the aggregate 24 may be modified in order to produce numerous designs 26.
  • The above description is given by way of example, and not limitation. Given the above disclosure, one skilled in the art could devise variations that are within the scope of the invention disclosed herein, including various ways of creating different textures, colors, patterns, types of stone, etc. Further, the various features of the embodiments disclosed herein can be used alone, or in varying combinations with each other and are not intended to be limited to the specific combination described herein. Thus, the scope of the claims is not to be limited by the illustrated embodiments.

Claims (26)

1. A method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a poured concrete mixture, the method comprising:
a) placing a releasable template onto the surface to temporarily define exposed and covered regions;
b) manipulating the exposed regions of the surface corresponding to the design;
c) removing the template to reveal the covered regions; and
d) finishing the surface without the template disposed therein.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the releasable template is fabricated from visquene.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the releasable template is fabricated from craft paper.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein the releasable template is precut corresponding to the exposed and covered regions.
5. The method of claim 1 further including the step of troweling the template into the surface to secure the template thereto.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) includes:
a) broadcasting aggregate onto the surface at the exposed regions thereof; and
b) finishing the surface seeding of the aggregate corresponding to the exposed regions.
7. The method of claim 6 further including:
a) prior to broadcasting the aggregate, finishing the surface to dispose a quantity of cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture at the surface thereof; and
b) subsequent to broadcasting the aggregate, mixing the aggregate into the cement/fines paste.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein step (b) includes manipulating the shape of the concrete surface of the exposed regions.
9. The method of claim 8 wherein a troweling device is utilized to manipulate the shape of the concrete surface.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein step (d) further includes:
a) applying a surface retarder to the surface; and
b) massaging the surface retarder into the surface.
11. A surface seeded exposed particulate concrete product having a surface and a design formed in the surface by a method comprising the steps of:
a) placing a releasable template onto the surface to temporarily define exposed and covered regions;
b) manipulating the exposed regions corresponding to the design;
c) removing the template to reveal the covered regions; and
d) finishing the surface without the template disposed therein.
12. A method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a concrete mixture utilizing a releasable template, the template including positive and negative portions, the method comprising:
a) transferring the design corresponding to the positive portion through the steps of:
i) temporarily placing the positive portion onto the surface, the positive portion defining positive regions on the surface;
ii) manipulating the positive regions of the surface; and
iii) removing the positive portion from the surface; and
b) finishing the surface without the template disposed therein.
13. The method of claim 12 wherein the releasable template is fabricated from visquene.
14. The method of claim 12 wherein the releasable template is fabricated from craft paper.
15. The method of claim 12 further including the step of troweling the template into the surface to secure the template thereto.
16. The method of claim 12 further including the step of transferring the design corresponding to the negative portion through the steps of:
a) placing the negative portion onto the surface, the negative portion defining negative regions on the surface;
b) manipulating the negative regions thereof; and
c) removing the negative portion.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein the releasable template is precut corresponding to the positive and negative regions.
18. The method of claim 16 wherein the manipulating steps include:
a) finishing the surface to dispose a quantity of cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture at the surface thereof;
b) broadcasting aggregate onto the surface corresponding to at least one of the positive and negative regions thereof; and
c) mixing the aggregate into the cement/fines paste.
19. The method of claim 12 wherein at least one of the manipulating steps includes manipulating of the concrete surface utilizing a troweling device and corresponding to at least one of the positive and negative regions.
20. The method of claim 12 wherein step (b) further includes:
a) applying a surface retarder to the surface; and
b) massaging the surface retarder into the surface.
21. A method of transferring a design to an uncured concrete surface of a poured concrete mixture, the method comprising:
a) placing a releasable template onto the surface to temporarily define exposed and covered regions;
b) manipulating the exposed regions corresponding to the design;
c) removing the template to reveal the covered regions; and
d) finishing the surface without the template disposed therein, the surface being finished by broadcasting aggregate onto the surface at the exposed regions wherein the aggregate is comprised of at least one of the following materials: silica sands, coarse sands, brass beads, organic materials, metals, fine sand, composite materials.
22. The method of claim 21 wherein step (d) further includes working the aggregate into the exposed regions.
23. The method of claim 21 further including:
a) prior to broadcasting the aggregate, finishing the surface to dispose a quantity of cement/fines paste derived from the concrete mixture at the surface thereof; and
b) subsequent to broadcasting the aggregate, mixing the aggregate into the cement/fines paste.
24. The method of claim 21 wherein step (b) includes manipulating the shape of the concrete surface of the exposed regions.
25. The method of claim 24 wherein a troweling device is utilized to manipulate the shape of the concrete surface.
26. The method of claim 21 wherein step (d) further includes:
a) applying a surface retarder to the surface; and
b) massaging the surface retarder into the surface.
US11/820,896 2005-10-17 2007-06-21 Concrete template and method of use Abandoned US20070248411A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/252,078 US20070086860A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2005-10-17 Concrete template and method of use
US11/820,896 US20070248411A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2007-06-21 Concrete template and method of use

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/820,896 US20070248411A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2007-06-21 Concrete template and method of use

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/252,078 Continuation US20070086860A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2005-10-17 Concrete template and method of use

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070248411A1 true US20070248411A1 (en) 2007-10-25

Family

ID=37948305

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/252,078 Abandoned US20070086860A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2005-10-17 Concrete template and method of use
US11/820,896 Abandoned US20070248411A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2007-06-21 Concrete template and method of use

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/252,078 Abandoned US20070086860A1 (en) 2005-10-17 2005-10-17 Concrete template and method of use

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20070086860A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080173787A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2008-07-24 Jonathan Nasvik Imprinting pattern mat
US20100180528A1 (en) * 2009-01-21 2010-07-22 Shaw Ronald D Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US20110008594A1 (en) * 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Shaw Lee A Concrete template and method of use
US20140133908A1 (en) * 2012-04-06 2014-05-15 Lithocrete, Inc. Method of reducing alkali-silica reaction for embedding aggregate in concrete and mitigating detrimental effects of freeze-thaw in concrete

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7781019B2 (en) * 2007-03-15 2010-08-24 Lithocrete, Inc. Uniform texture for cast in place walls
US20140245694A1 (en) 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Shaw & Sons, Inc. Architectural concrete wall and method of forming the same
US8962088B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-02-24 Lithocrete, Inc. Method and finish for concrete walls
US20150052842A1 (en) 2013-08-20 2015-02-26 Shaw & Sons, Inc. Architectural concrete and method of forming the same

Citations (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1728936A (en) * 1926-08-25 1929-09-24 Nathan C Johnson Concrete construction
US2200433A (en) * 1940-05-14 Method of dressing concrete
US2275272A (en) * 1938-12-12 1942-03-03 Jr Edward W Scripture Method of curing concrete
US2277203A (en) * 1938-07-01 1942-03-24 Boult Louise Gertrude Method of constructing concrete flooring and like surfaces
US2296453A (en) * 1941-04-16 1942-09-22 George J Saffert Method of molding concrete products
US2595142A (en) * 1949-02-12 1952-04-29 Ce Brick Corp Method for producing designs on building walls
US2746365A (en) * 1951-11-16 1956-05-22 Joseph A Darneille Road construction
US3334555A (en) * 1964-04-29 1967-08-08 Reliance Steel Prod Co Paving utilizing epoxy resin
US3595143A (en) * 1970-04-13 1971-07-27 Salvatore Polselli Scoring tool
US3737511A (en) * 1972-01-11 1973-06-05 T Dillon Method of producing an ornamental concrete surface
US3832079A (en) * 1972-08-10 1974-08-27 W Moorhead Concrete forming apparatus and process
US3901615A (en) * 1974-05-24 1975-08-26 Routiere Et D Entreprise Gener Surface layer for roadways and a process for preparing said layer
US3910711A (en) * 1972-08-10 1975-10-07 William V Moorhead Concrete forming apparatus
US4115976A (en) * 1977-03-21 1978-09-26 John Rohrer Contracting Company Method for screeding cement
US4146599A (en) * 1976-10-14 1979-03-27 Lanzetta John B Device for applying exposed aggregate and method of applying said aggregate
US4231677A (en) * 1978-08-28 1980-11-04 International Design Systems, Ltd. Process and apparatus for forming concrete
US4281496A (en) * 1979-07-06 1981-08-04 Danielsson Jan O Method of forming concrete floors and product of the method
US4443496A (en) * 1981-07-30 1984-04-17 Nissan Chemical Industries, Ltd. Agent and method for modifying surface layer of cement structures
US4496504A (en) * 1983-06-29 1985-01-29 Steenson Thomas W Method of exposing aggregate in a poured concrete panel
US4662972A (en) * 1984-02-16 1987-05-05 Thompson Thomas L Method of forming a non-skid surfaced structure
US4714507A (en) * 1982-03-01 1987-12-22 Ogushi Yoshuki Surface coating agent and method for using the same in civil and construction engineering
US4748788A (en) * 1987-07-01 1988-06-07 Shaw Ronald D Surface seeded exposed aggregate concrete and method of producing same
US4776723A (en) * 1987-06-02 1988-10-11 Brimo Elias J Concrete stamping tool
US4838728A (en) * 1988-01-04 1989-06-13 Mckeever Michael J Kit of hand-held tools for making a patterned impression in a cementitious material
US5114475A (en) * 1989-10-13 1992-05-19 Mannesmann Aktiengesellschaft Method for the preparation of a fine-grained mixture having hydrophobic properties
US5215402A (en) * 1991-11-01 1993-06-01 Integrated Paving Concepts, Inc. Asphalt imprinting method and apparatus
US5226279A (en) * 1992-03-09 1993-07-13 Rendon Herrero Oswald Sealing method for the treatment of portland cement concrete
US5244304A (en) * 1991-03-13 1993-09-14 American Stone-Mix, Inc. Cement based patching composition for asphalt pavement
US5243905A (en) * 1992-04-09 1993-09-14 Webber Ronald E Stencil system for applying a decorative coating atop a substrate and process
US5246650A (en) * 1991-06-03 1993-09-21 Clark Richard C Method of applying aggregate surface finish
US5395673A (en) * 1992-04-23 1995-03-07 Hunt; Gary B. Non-slip surface
US5441677A (en) * 1993-09-01 1995-08-15 Hi-Tech Floors, Inc. Method of making high gloss, hardened concrete floors
US5447752A (en) * 1993-01-08 1995-09-05 Cobb; Clyde T. Method for making a decorative cementitous pattern on a surface
US5487526A (en) * 1992-06-16 1996-01-30 Hupp; Jack T. Mold device for forming concrete pathways
US5494729A (en) * 1992-05-20 1996-02-27 Impact Coatings, Inc. Non-slip, non-abrasive coated surface
US5502941A (en) * 1994-01-03 1996-04-02 Ultra-Tex Surfaces, Inc. Method and apparatus for producing an ornamental concrete surface
US5645664A (en) * 1996-03-21 1997-07-08 Floor Seal Technology, Inc. High moisture emission concrete floor covering and method
US5733470A (en) * 1993-09-24 1998-03-31 Siroflex Of America, Inc. Mold for casting ground covering
US5794401A (en) * 1997-06-03 1998-08-18 Shaw; Lee A. Durable architectural flooring and method of fabricating the same
US5947635A (en) * 1997-11-03 1999-09-07 Wilson, Sr.; Jack H. Method for sealing and marking pavement with recognizable indicia
US6016635A (en) * 1999-03-23 2000-01-25 Shaw; Lee A. Surface seeded aggregate and method of forming the same
US6024511A (en) * 1998-06-05 2000-02-15 Ross; Guy Asphalt imprinting apparatus
US6033146A (en) * 1955-06-23 2000-03-07 Shaw; Lee A. Glass chip lithocrete and method of use of same
US6382871B1 (en) * 2000-07-19 2002-05-07 Guy Ross Asphalt molding system
US6390801B1 (en) * 1998-01-06 2002-05-21 Steven Dale Smith Texturing tool
US6528120B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2003-03-04 Anthony S Brown Process for applying a decorative coating to a concrete surface
US6588975B2 (en) * 2000-12-19 2003-07-08 Guy Ross Molded asphalt surfacing system
US6620464B2 (en) * 2001-07-25 2003-09-16 Vincor Coated construction substrates
US6652907B1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-11-25 Leslie J. Stever Method of coloring and masking concrete using peelable adhesive
US6820383B2 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-11-23 Terrance D. Vos Mosaic-like brick and mosaic-like surfaces made using such bricks
US7066680B2 (en) * 2001-12-04 2006-06-27 Integrated Paving Concepts Inc. Method of forming an inlaid pattern in an asphalt surface

Patent Citations (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2200433A (en) * 1940-05-14 Method of dressing concrete
US1728936A (en) * 1926-08-25 1929-09-24 Nathan C Johnson Concrete construction
US2277203A (en) * 1938-07-01 1942-03-24 Boult Louise Gertrude Method of constructing concrete flooring and like surfaces
US2275272A (en) * 1938-12-12 1942-03-03 Jr Edward W Scripture Method of curing concrete
US2296453A (en) * 1941-04-16 1942-09-22 George J Saffert Method of molding concrete products
US2595142A (en) * 1949-02-12 1952-04-29 Ce Brick Corp Method for producing designs on building walls
US2746365A (en) * 1951-11-16 1956-05-22 Joseph A Darneille Road construction
US6033146A (en) * 1955-06-23 2000-03-07 Shaw; Lee A. Glass chip lithocrete and method of use of same
US3334555A (en) * 1964-04-29 1967-08-08 Reliance Steel Prod Co Paving utilizing epoxy resin
US3595143A (en) * 1970-04-13 1971-07-27 Salvatore Polselli Scoring tool
US3737511A (en) * 1972-01-11 1973-06-05 T Dillon Method of producing an ornamental concrete surface
US3832079A (en) * 1972-08-10 1974-08-27 W Moorhead Concrete forming apparatus and process
US3910711A (en) * 1972-08-10 1975-10-07 William V Moorhead Concrete forming apparatus
US3901615A (en) * 1974-05-24 1975-08-26 Routiere Et D Entreprise Gener Surface layer for roadways and a process for preparing said layer
US4146599A (en) * 1976-10-14 1979-03-27 Lanzetta John B Device for applying exposed aggregate and method of applying said aggregate
US4115976A (en) * 1977-03-21 1978-09-26 John Rohrer Contracting Company Method for screeding cement
US4231677A (en) * 1978-08-28 1980-11-04 International Design Systems, Ltd. Process and apparatus for forming concrete
US4281496A (en) * 1979-07-06 1981-08-04 Danielsson Jan O Method of forming concrete floors and product of the method
US4443496A (en) * 1981-07-30 1984-04-17 Nissan Chemical Industries, Ltd. Agent and method for modifying surface layer of cement structures
US4714507A (en) * 1982-03-01 1987-12-22 Ogushi Yoshuki Surface coating agent and method for using the same in civil and construction engineering
US4496504A (en) * 1983-06-29 1985-01-29 Steenson Thomas W Method of exposing aggregate in a poured concrete panel
US4662972A (en) * 1984-02-16 1987-05-05 Thompson Thomas L Method of forming a non-skid surfaced structure
US4776723A (en) * 1987-06-02 1988-10-11 Brimo Elias J Concrete stamping tool
US4748788A (en) * 1987-07-01 1988-06-07 Shaw Ronald D Surface seeded exposed aggregate concrete and method of producing same
US4838728A (en) * 1988-01-04 1989-06-13 Mckeever Michael J Kit of hand-held tools for making a patterned impression in a cementitious material
US5114475A (en) * 1989-10-13 1992-05-19 Mannesmann Aktiengesellschaft Method for the preparation of a fine-grained mixture having hydrophobic properties
US5244304A (en) * 1991-03-13 1993-09-14 American Stone-Mix, Inc. Cement based patching composition for asphalt pavement
US5246650A (en) * 1991-06-03 1993-09-21 Clark Richard C Method of applying aggregate surface finish
US5215402A (en) * 1991-11-01 1993-06-01 Integrated Paving Concepts, Inc. Asphalt imprinting method and apparatus
US5226279A (en) * 1992-03-09 1993-07-13 Rendon Herrero Oswald Sealing method for the treatment of portland cement concrete
US5243905A (en) * 1992-04-09 1993-09-14 Webber Ronald E Stencil system for applying a decorative coating atop a substrate and process
US5395673A (en) * 1992-04-23 1995-03-07 Hunt; Gary B. Non-slip surface
US5494729A (en) * 1992-05-20 1996-02-27 Impact Coatings, Inc. Non-slip, non-abrasive coated surface
US5487526A (en) * 1992-06-16 1996-01-30 Hupp; Jack T. Mold device for forming concrete pathways
US5447752A (en) * 1993-01-08 1995-09-05 Cobb; Clyde T. Method for making a decorative cementitous pattern on a surface
US5441677A (en) * 1993-09-01 1995-08-15 Hi-Tech Floors, Inc. Method of making high gloss, hardened concrete floors
US5733470A (en) * 1993-09-24 1998-03-31 Siroflex Of America, Inc. Mold for casting ground covering
US5502941A (en) * 1994-01-03 1996-04-02 Ultra-Tex Surfaces, Inc. Method and apparatus for producing an ornamental concrete surface
US5645664A (en) * 1996-03-21 1997-07-08 Floor Seal Technology, Inc. High moisture emission concrete floor covering and method
US5794401A (en) * 1997-06-03 1998-08-18 Shaw; Lee A. Durable architectural flooring and method of fabricating the same
US5947635A (en) * 1997-11-03 1999-09-07 Wilson, Sr.; Jack H. Method for sealing and marking pavement with recognizable indicia
US6390801B1 (en) * 1998-01-06 2002-05-21 Steven Dale Smith Texturing tool
US6024511A (en) * 1998-06-05 2000-02-15 Ross; Guy Asphalt imprinting apparatus
US6016635A (en) * 1999-03-23 2000-01-25 Shaw; Lee A. Surface seeded aggregate and method of forming the same
US6382871B1 (en) * 2000-07-19 2002-05-07 Guy Ross Asphalt molding system
US6820383B2 (en) * 2000-11-02 2004-11-23 Terrance D. Vos Mosaic-like brick and mosaic-like surfaces made using such bricks
US6528120B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2003-03-04 Anthony S Brown Process for applying a decorative coating to a concrete surface
US6588975B2 (en) * 2000-12-19 2003-07-08 Guy Ross Molded asphalt surfacing system
US6620464B2 (en) * 2001-07-25 2003-09-16 Vincor Coated construction substrates
US7066680B2 (en) * 2001-12-04 2006-06-27 Integrated Paving Concepts Inc. Method of forming an inlaid pattern in an asphalt surface
US6652907B1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-11-25 Leslie J. Stever Method of coloring and masking concrete using peelable adhesive

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080173787A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2008-07-24 Jonathan Nasvik Imprinting pattern mat
US20100180528A1 (en) * 2009-01-21 2010-07-22 Shaw Ronald D Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US20120317912A1 (en) * 2009-01-21 2012-12-20 Shaw Ronald D Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US8684627B2 (en) * 2009-01-21 2014-04-01 Lithocrete, Inc. Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US9267284B2 (en) 2009-01-21 2016-02-23 Lithocrete, Inc. Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US9580915B2 (en) 2009-01-21 2017-02-28 Lithocrete, Inc. Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US20110008594A1 (en) * 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Shaw Lee A Concrete template and method of use
US20140133908A1 (en) * 2012-04-06 2014-05-15 Lithocrete, Inc. Method of reducing alkali-silica reaction for embedding aggregate in concrete and mitigating detrimental effects of freeze-thaw in concrete

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20070086860A1 (en) 2007-04-19

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2296453A (en) Method of molding concrete products
US2595142A (en) Method for producing designs on building walls
US5447752A (en) Method for making a decorative cementitous pattern on a surface
CA2370902C (en) Processes for producing monolithic architectural cementitious structures having decorative aggregate-containing cementitious surfaces
US1596482A (en) Method of producing cement tiles, slabs, and like products
US5637236A (en) Method for producing a wall, roadway, sidewalk or floor of cementitious material
US1534353A (en) Fractured block and method of making the same
CA2086687C (en) Asphalt imprinting method and apparatus
US5735094A (en) Method for producing an ornamental concrete surface
US5167991A (en) Method for producing a replicated stone surface
US4146599A (en) Device for applying exposed aggregate and method of applying said aggregate
US5794401A (en) Durable architectural flooring and method of fabricating the same
US20040048025A1 (en) Composite tile
CA2170775C (en) High gloss, hardened concrete floors and method
US3406618A (en) Method of manufacturing bricks, tiles, cobblestones and the like directly on the gorund to be covered
US20060107610A1 (en) Methods for making composite tiles
US4915888A (en) Method of manufacturing a concrete block having decorative stones embedded in a surface thereof
US5792511A (en) Grid and method for producing a pattern on a surface
US7591967B2 (en) Method for the aesthetic surface treatment of a monolithic concrete floor and product of the method
US20020059776A1 (en) Method of manufacturing decorative cementuous floor surface
US3378617A (en) Method of facing building products with exposed mineral granules
CN1067205A (en) Method of producing patterned shaped article
CN104526887B (en) A kind of method adopting marble leftover pieces to realize Marble processing
US20040182026A1 (en) Brick and stone facings
EP0479512B1 (en) Method of producing patterned shaped article

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION