US20070245679A1 - Racking and load resistant ceiling and wall construction clip and method - Google Patents

Racking and load resistant ceiling and wall construction clip and method Download PDF

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US20070245679A1
US20070245679A1 US11/402,095 US40209506A US2007245679A1 US 20070245679 A1 US20070245679 A1 US 20070245679A1 US 40209506 A US40209506 A US 40209506A US 2007245679 A1 US2007245679 A1 US 2007245679A1
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Prior art keywords
clip
fingers
tab
ceiling
length
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US11/402,095
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David Conville
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Conlab Inc
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Conlab Inc
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Assigned to CONLAB, INC. reassignment CONLAB, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CONVILLE, DAVID
Publication of US20070245679A1 publication Critical patent/US20070245679A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/74Removable non-load-bearing partitions; Partitions with a free upper edge modular coordination
    • E04B2/7407Removable non-load-bearing partitions; Partitions with a free upper edge modular coordination assembled using frames with infill panels or coverings only; made-up of panels and a support structure incorporating posts
    • E04B2/7453Removable non-load-bearing partitions; Partitions with a free upper edge modular coordination assembled using frames with infill panels or coverings only; made-up of panels and a support structure incorporating posts with panels and support posts, extending from floor to ceiling
    • E04B2/7457Removable non-load-bearing partitions; Partitions with a free upper edge modular coordination assembled using frames with infill panels or coverings only; made-up of panels and a support structure incorporating posts with panels and support posts, extending from floor to ceiling with wallboards attached to the outer faces of the posts, parallel to the partition
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B9/00Ceilings; Construction of ceilings, e.g. false ceilings; Ceiling construction with regard to insulation
    • E04B9/30Ceilings; Construction of ceilings, e.g. false ceilings; Ceiling construction with regard to insulation characterised by edge details of the ceiling; e.g. securing to an adjacent wall
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F21/00Implements for finishing work on buildings
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/72Non-load-bearing walls of elements of relatively thin form with respect to the thickness of the wall
    • E04B2/723Non-load-bearing walls of elements of relatively thin form with respect to the thickness of the wall constituted of gypsum elements
    • E04B2002/725Corner or angle connection details

Abstract

A rigid, metallic clip and a method for providing hard fastened, anti-racking ceiling and wall construction. A flat, perforated body portion bordering an integral, perforated tab extends downwardly from a junction at the midpoint. A pair of spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly engage the top plate, snugly resting beneath insulation to temporarily retain clips for screwing. A pair of elongated, reinforcing grooves extending from the clip rear to the junction are convex, so the bottom of the clip flushly mates with the ceiling sheet. The rigid, integral tab projects downwardly at a preferred angle of eighty-seven degrees. Clips positioned on the top plate are fastened by screws that penetrate the tab. The horizontal ceiling sheet can then be screwed to adjoining clips. A sidewall sheet disposed substantially vertically is then screwed to framing. The sheets cover the clip body, and no jagged edges or sharp points remain visible.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • My invention relates generally to construction clips and methods for securing wall or ceiling panels such as sheet rock or wall board during construction. More particularly, the invention relates to metallic construction clips and methods for constructing ceilings in which a support is provided by the clips for edges of abutting panels. Known prior art is classified in U.S. Pat. No. Class 52, Subclasses 285.3, 489, 514, 712, 714, 715, 770, 771, and 777.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Wall board, sheet rock and gypsum drywall panels commonly used in construction are typically oriented with construction clips or stops and then secured with fasteners such as screws or nails. A wide variety of clips of various configurations and sizes are commercially available for such applications. Known clips are fabricated from metal, preferably steel, and plastic.
  • During ceiling construction, various clips or stops (i.e., “Gyp-clips”) are used to support drywall or wood paneling at corners and to replace traditional wood blocking at top plates, end walls, and corners. Many known clips attach at the edges of abutting wallboards, for example, to fasten and align the various pieces. Many clips attach directly to the framework such as studs, joists, ceiling headers, or top plates. The purpose of such clips is to facilitate the rapid and accurate assembly of walls and ceilings. Modern construction clips of this nature eliminate “U-Boxes”, partition tees, and backup lumber at ceiling joists, and make two-stud corners possible, replacing common three and four-stud corners. At top plates, drywall fasteners reduce call backs for ceiling and partition separating from the truss uplift. Manufacturers offer fasteners with different installation techniques, characteristics, and materials.
  • Drywall fasteners include both “clips” and “stops.” A drywall stop performs a backing function for abutting panels, but stops are not “hard fastened” to both panels. Stops traditionally produce “free floating” corners. In such an arrangement, edges of the horizontally oriented ceiling panel, for example, will rest upon vertical edges of horizontal panels, without being separately screwed or nailed to any adjacent structure. Clips, on the other hand, are usually mechanically secured to both the wallboard panels and the adjacent framework. Edges of ceiling panels are not left “free floating.” Floating corners are best avoided to maintain structural strength, especially in regions subject to earth quakes or hurricanes.
  • Two-stud corners not only help plumbers and electricians to snake wires and pipes, they can also contribute to the proper insulation of the structure. Properly configured clips are designed to minimize interference with insulation, so their use reduces thermal energy losses. Clips should not mechanically interfere with uncut insulation behind the studding or top plate regions, and the risk of bare cavities and cold corners must be reduced.
  • At least one prior art metal clip is typically fitted onto drywall edges by hand prior to drywall installation. The preinstalled clips aid positioning and manipulation of drywall panels as they are installed over wood or steel framing studs. Because drywall clips are installed to the drywall beforehand, they are said to complicate and change the drywallers' work routine, and therefore they have not been popular, except for drywall repair applications. Clips and plastic stops can be used in conjunction with steel studs, unlike the sheet metal and metal wire drywall stops.
  • Stops, like wood blocking, are fastened to structural members before drywall installation. Drywall stops are available in galvanized or sheet metal forms. Plastic and metal wire stops offer several advantages over some sheet metal stops. Noncorrosive plastic stops are usually stapled or nailed to structural wood members like the top plate during ceiling installation. Sharp talons of some metal stops grip the wood and forcibly penetrate it, eliminating the need for a separate screwing step. At two-stud corners, metal and plastic drywall stops are typically installed sixteen inches on center (o.c.) at the top and bottom of the wall. Then the first sheet of drywall is hung against the stops. Plastic stops allow the corners to be hard fastened but some manufacturers recommend leaving the corners floating to accommodate thermally induced expansion and contraction. The second sheet is installed against the first. At top plates, the stops are installed sixteen inches (o.c.) and at all corners and intersections. The drywall is installed with the ceiling panels first, as usual. The metal wire stops are usually installed by hand. However, known stops have several problems. For example, when a stud has a rounded corner, it is difficult to properly install and align the fastener.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,881,293 issued May 6, 1975 discloses a metallic clip for the construction of wall panels. Inner and outer flanges extending perpendicularly from the body form a receptive channel that embraces the edge of a first panel. The clip has a portion secured to a corner stud. Proper orientation and alignment of a second, perpendicular wall panel secured to a stud is encouraged by the clip.
  • Many prior art construction clip designs include parallel, spaced apart portions between which edges of panels are grasped. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 2,351,525 issued Jun. 13, 1944 discloses a clip with which adjoining horizontal and vertical wallboards can be secured that has receptive channels between which panel edges are sandwiched.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 2,831,222 issued Apr. 22, 1958 discloses a metal fastener clip whose body forms a tongue-and-groove joint into which a wallboard edge is fastened.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,881,293 issued May 6, 1975 has integral, spaced apart flanges between which a panel edge is grasped.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,221,095 issued Sep. 9, 1980 discloses a wall constructed from edge-abutting wallboard panels secured with concealed fasteners that are screwed to adjacent framing elements. U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,725,619 and 6,209,277 form similar channel portions for grasping panel edges.
  • Many clips have impaling prongs or projections that forcibly engage and at least penetrate panels or studs. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,127,975 issued Dec. 5, 1978 shows a system employing clips for securing sheet rock or gypsum board to the framework. The clips have pointed, piercing elements that forcibly engage panel edges.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,901,471 issued Aug. 26, 1975 discloses a wallboard bracket with similar projecting prongs for securing the bracket to a support, and a tab bendable to engage the side surface of the wallboard.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,000,596 issued Jan. 4, 1977 discloses a T-shaped clip for securing wall panels to adjacent frame members that comprises a rigid, pointed tang forced between adjacent frame members, and a spaced-apart, toothed edge that forcibly engages abutting panel edges.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,467,579 issued Aug. 28, 1984 discloses panel fastener clips for the construction of various panel structures having side-abutting panels, such as wallboards, that include integral penetrating tabs.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,249,405 issued Oct. 5, 1993 discloses a drywall clip for ceiling construction comprising a piercing end that is driven perpendicularly into a ceiling joist, a supporting tongue, and a striking end.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,844,651 issued Jul. 4, 1989 discloses a fastening clip having a perpendicular shank terminating in an end that pierces the edge of a wooden panel. U.S. Pat. No. 4,498,272 issued Feb. 12, 1985 discloses a fastener for securing panels comprising a planar base with an impaling flange that extends perpendicularly outwardly and penetrates wallboard panel edges.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,448,007 issued May 15, 1984 shows a wallboard fastener comprising a flat base, an elongated tongue, and a pair of impaling flanges extending from opposite sides of the tongue that forcibly engage panels during construction.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,991,373 issued Feb. 12, 1991 discloses a clip for supporting ceiling panels in a suspended ceiling that includes a pair of rearwardly extending prongs for insertion into an edge of frame elements, and an integral bared portion that forcibly penetrates wallboard edges.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,831,808 issued May 23, 1989 discloses a construction clip for securing wallboard panels to framing members that has integral impaling points that forcibly engage wallboard edges.
  • A prior art, metallic drywall stop formerly made by the Simpson Strong Tie Company Inc. has a horizontal portion that engages the top plate in ceiling construction, and an integral, downwardly projecting middle that abuts the top plate sides. A channel separates halves of the upper portion, and in cross section, the device is generally T-shaped. However, there are reinforcement grooves disposed atop the device, that overly, at least in part, the top plate. This can interfere with insulation. Further, the clip is not designed to receive a screw to aid in fastening the ceiling panels; instead, the device encourages the use of floating corners.
  • Another stop, formerly marketed by United Steel Products of Minnesota under the trademark “KANT-SAG,” has been in widespread use since the 1980's. This metallic design includes a solid metallic top terminating in a central tab, and an integral, downwardly extending middle. A pair of sharp prongs projecting from the middle forcibly engage the wood. During initial dry walling stages, these clips can fall out if inadvertently bumped. Further, with the passage of several years, these clips can be slowly forced out of the wood, weakening the structure. Another disadvantage is that the single, upper tab presents minimal surface area to the top plate, so clip alignment and thus panel “squareness” can be difficult. It is difficult to force the latter clip into flush abutment around the corner region, a factor that is enhanced by the fact that two-by-four's used in common construction are non-standard, and have rounded edges that do not present a ninety-degree corner. Finally, like other clips discussed above, the “KANT-SAG”design cannot receive a screw to fasten horizontally positioned ceiling panels. Instead, floating corners are used.
  • The TECO-brand back-up clip has also been popular since the 1980's. It has a pair of short forwardly projecting tabs and a pair of rearwardly projecting tabs. These tabs are too short and they are inappropriately positioned to center and align the clips properly. Further, there is no screw-receptive surface for ceiling panels, and floating corner construction must be employed with such clips.
  • There are several disadvantages associated with prior art, metallic ceiling clip designs discussed above. For example, exposed, sharp edges can cause injury to the installers. In some case, portions of conventional clips bend and stick out from the wall, snagging the taping machines. Therefore it should be a design goal for modem clips to remain totally hidden after installation. In many cases, the clip tab is too short for ceiling work; such clips are unsuitable for single top plate ceilings and large truss camber applications.
  • Another disadvantage with known designs is that the clips cannot be stacked. Jumbled, irregular packaging means that the clips must be manually removed one at a time from a container, delaying the installer. A modem design criterion requires that suitable construction clips stack neatly and compactly, allowing the drywall hanger to work out of an apron during installation, saving time, reducing costs, and minimizing frustration.
  • A plastic clip that is currently used to some extent in the construction industry is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,581,964, issued Dec. 10, 1996, entitled “Wall Panel Support And Securement Combination.” The invention is described as a nailer device for securing abutting edges of construction panels to a support timber or top plate. An upper, horizontal planar member overlies a portion the top plate. An integral, vertical planar member projects from the horizontal member in the same configuration as the TECO or KANT-SAG clips discussed above. There are contiguous, gapless, elongated corner recesses defined on both sides of the junction between the vertical and horizontal portions. Abutting edges of panels are disposed within the recesses. According to the reference, the clip is fastened to the top plate with nails that penetrate the vertical portion that abuts the top plate side. While the horizontal portion is adapted to receive screws for fastening ceiling panels, the vertical portion must be nailed. Most installers prefer to use relatively high power automatic screw guns during drywall installation. High torque drywall screws often deform plastic clips, and the screw heads can pull through the plastic material. It is easier for installers to carry a minimum of tools, such as their screw guns and the requirement for nailing is burdensome. Further, plastic clips such as the latter require significant reinforcement ribs, and these can physically interfere with insulation bats.
  • There are also analogous clips in this art that are used for repairs rather than for original construction. Some clips enable wall boards to be assembled notwithstanding the lack of aligned or abutting wall frame studs. My prior U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,782,642 and 4,995,605 describe systems for repairing holes in wallboard in regions that do not border frame studs. Adjoining wall panels are secured together with a plurality of spaced-apart, metallic clips that provide an edgewise mechanical bond between adjacent panel edges. Installed clips provide a secure mechanical union between the original panel and the repair piece. Each clip has pair of spaced apart, prong-like spring tabs formed on opposite sides to grasp panel edges. Each spring tab includes an integral, upwardly extending vertical portion disposed substantially perpendicularly to the body and an integral, outwardly curved substantially horizontal flange portion. The horizontal flange portion is separated from its vertical companion by a weakened, scored tear edge which permits manual removal of the flange by appropriate bending after clip installation.
  • What is needed for ceiling construction is a metal clip that firmly and squarely engages the top plate during ceiling construction, notwithstanding irregularities in the dimensions of two-by-four's and other frame parts. An ideal clip must firmly seat drywall screws without degradation or breakage. It must be capable of quick installation, while maintaining squareness and proper alignment. After installation, it must not degrade or pull out from the wood over time.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention provides an improved, metallic ceiling clip and related methods for assembling wall panels, primarily for ceiling construction.
  • The clip preferred clip has a main body portion and a downwardly depending tab, establishing a generally T-shaped profile, both of which are perforated to blindly receive screws. A pair of spaced apart and parallel fingers project forwardly, coplanar with the horizontal clip midsection. The length of these fingers is approximately the same as the clip width. During construction, clips are initially placed upon the framework top plate, with the fingers sliding over the top plate's upper surface, beneath the insulation layer, to temporarily retain clips in position for subsequent screwing. The geometry of the clip compensates for irregularities in the dimensions of the top plate. A physical gap exists between the fingers. To prevent damage and avoid snags, ends of the fingers, and all corners of the clip body are gently radiused.
  • A pair of elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves separate rear side portions of the clip body from a central, perforated portion. The numerous orifices in the central portion enable drywall screws to threadably mount or penetrate the clip. The reinforcement grooves are oriented such that they are convex at the top of the clip, so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with the horizontally oriented ceiling sheet that physically contacts it in accordance with the construction method.
  • The rigid, integral tab projects substantially perpendicularly downwardly from the clip midsection. In the best mode the tab is angled approximately eighty-seven degrees from the body, rather than being perfectly square. As a result, when the clips are screwed into place against the top plate side, either before or after ceiling sheet installation, clip flexing results in a flush, preferably square abutment with the top plate, notwithstanding the latter's possible structural irregularities.
  • The tab is perforated so fasteners can easily penetrate it. All end corners are radiused and unpointed, and there are no sharp or jagged edges that can interfere with installation or degrade insulation. Furthermore, the preferred configuration makes the clips stackable to minimize shipping and storage volume.
  • The preferred ceiling construction method begins by initially placing one or more clips atop the top plate, with the forwardly projecting fingers snugly received beneath the insulation layer. A drywall screw is installed, penetrating the perforated tab to firmly secure the clip to the top plate side. Multiple spaced-apart clips can be installed at selected intervals, usually from sixteen to twenty four inches. When horizontally placed, the ceiling drywall sheet will contact multiple clips. At spaced apart intervals the ceiling sheet can be fastened to the horizontal portions of the multiple clips. Although these clips will be obscured from view by placement of the ceiling sheet, rapid installation is insured by the fact that blind screwing is possible through the clip design. The drywall screws forcibly penetrate the ceiling sheet and further anchor the clips.
  • After the ceiling panel is secured at spaced apart intervals to several clips, the sidewall sheet may be moved into a substantially vertical position, perpendicular to the ceiling panel. The vertical wall sheet may then be screwed to the top plate or to various vertical frame members. When properly installed, the clip tab is covered, and no clips remain visible. In other words, with the wall and ceiling sheets properly positioned and securely fastened, the clips will be covered, and no jagged edges or sharp points will be exposed. Conventional drywall finishing steps can then follow, and no portions of the clips must sanded, broken away, or otherwise treated.
  • Thus, a basic object of my invention is to provide an improved ceiling panel construction clip and an improved method for constructing ceilings.
  • Another basic object is to provide a method and a clip fastener apparatus of the nature described for hard fastening horizontal ceiling panels and abutting wall panels.
  • It is also an important object to provide an anti racking system for ceiling and wall construction.
  • Another basic object is to provide an improved ceiling clip and method for quickly joining wall and ceiling elements to simplify and speed-up construction.
  • A related object is to provide a highly dexterous ceiling clip that can be quickly installed in numerous varieties of construction configurations.
  • A related object is to provide a construction clip of the character described whose unique construction adapts it for flush fitting against irregularly shaped top plates or two-by-fours 's used in construction.
  • Another fundamental object is to provide a clip of the character described that fits all wall board sizes, i.e., one-half inch wallboard for residential construction, and five-eights inch wallboard code-specified for commercial construction.
  • Yet another object is to provide a ceiling construction clip design that eliminates the need for conventional back-up lumber.
  • Another important object is to securely hard fasten the corner region of abutting, orthogonal panels during construction, to create a unitized structural corner.
  • Thus avoiding floating corners is an important object of my invention.
  • Another important object is to provide a metallic ceiling construction clip that conforms to modern building and construction codes and that satisfies state and Federal regulations.
  • A further object of my invention is to provide a ceiling construction clip of the character described that temporarily supports the orientation of wallboard as panels are manipulated into position and subsequently oriented prior to screwing during ceiling construction.
  • A further object of the present invention is to provide a small and compact clip of unitary construction which is easy, safe, and economical to use.
  • A related object is to provide a ceiling construction clip that may be either affixed to the top plate first or ceiling panels first.
  • Another basic object is to provide a clip of the character described which is stackable. It is an important feature of my invention that a plurality of clips may be stacked together to minimize volume, which is an important consideration in shipping.
  • Another object is to provide a method for fastening ceiling panels which avoids the use of prongs or piercing points that might interfere with or deform insulation.
  • A related object to provide a clip that, after installation, has no exposed metal parts. It is a feature of my new clip design that no portions of the clip are exposed after installation, so it is easier for the drywall finisher to complete the job. For example, since there are no exposed metal surfaces, there will be no snagging on the taping machine during finishing.
  • A related object is to provide a ceiling construction clip of the character described whose structure avoids sharp prongs or edges, to minimize the chance that installers will be cut or injured.
  • These and other objects and advantages of the present invention, along with features of novelty appurtenant thereto, will appear or become apparent in the course of the following descriptive sections.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • In the following drawings, which form a part of the specification and which are to be construed in conjunction therewith, and in which like reference numerals have been employed throughout wherever possible to indicate like parts in the various views:
  • FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, isometric assembly view illustrating my new ceiling clip and the associated installation method, with portions thereof broken away or shown in section for clarity;
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, isometric assembly view similar to FIG. 1, with portions thereof broken away or shown in section for clarity or omitted for brevity;
  • FIG. 3 is an upper rear isometric view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 4 is a bottom rear isometric view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 5 is a frontal top isometric view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 6 is an frontal bottom isometric view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 7 is a top plan view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 8 is a bottom plan view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 9 is a rear elevational view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 10 is an enlarged, front elevational view of the preferred clip;
  • FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of the preferred clip, the opposite side comprising a mirror image; and,
  • FIG. 12 is an isometric view of a plurality of clips constructed in accordance with the best mode of the invention, showing how they stack for shipping and storage.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • With reference now directed to the appended drawings, my new ceiling construction clip has been generally designated by the reference numeral 20. Clip 20 is primarily designed for use in conjunction with ceiling construction, but it can be used to hard fasten any junction of orthogonal panels. The primary and preferred purpose of clip 20 is to hard fasten vertical wall panels with horizontal ceiling panels adjacent construction framework (i.e., the ceiling top plate).
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate an installation example. In the illustrated application, clip 20 is shown installed upon a horizontally extending double top plate 22, being secured by a conventional faster comprising a drywall screw 23 that penetrates suitable perforations formed in the clip 20. Top plate 22 horizontally overlies a plurality of conventional, vertically oriented framing studs 24 that are typically spaced apart at sixteen or twenty-four inch intervals. The exposed sides 22A of the top plate 22 are flushly parallel with the flat, coextensive side surfaces 24A of the various frame studs 24. The uppermost flat, horizontal surface of the top plate 22 has been designated by the reference numeral 25. During construction, there will usually be a sheet of insulation (not shown) disposed over surface 25. It should be appreciated that outside edges 22E (FIGS. 1,2) of the top plate, and construction two-by-fours in general, are neither perfectly square nor uniformly dimensioned.
  • A drywall sheet 28 disposed horizontally to form the ceiling abuts clip 20 at its underside, being fastened with suitable fasteners, such as a conventional drywall screw 30 that engages and seats within suitable perforations in the clip 20. It should be recognized that the clip and the described method may be utilized in conjunction with planar sheets comprising gypsum board, sheet rock, masonite, insulation board, plywood or the like. The flat upper surface 29 of sheet 28 contacts the underside of clip 20, and is generally parallel and coplanar with the upper surface 25 of the top plate 22.
  • A vertically oriented drywall sheet 32 forming a sidewall flatly lies upon the exposed sides 22A of the top plate 22 and the side surfaces 24A of the studs 24. Sidewall sheet 32 perpendicularly intersects the underside of ceiling sheet 28 and abuts and overlies a portion of clip 20, concealing drywall screws 23 after proper installation in accordance with the invention. Fasteners, such as drywall screws 34, conventionally secure sheet 32 at periodic, regularly spaced apart intervals. Through the installation and use of clip 20, that is constructed and installed as hereinafter described, the proper orientation and alignment of sheet rock panels such as sheets 28 and 32 is facilitated. Moreover, it can be seen that after installation, no part of the clip 20 can be seen, as sheets 28 and 32 completely cover each and every clip. This means that no exposed rough metal pieces or portions are in the way to snag, for example, during the subsequent sheet rock finishing process. Further, when screws 23 are forcibly installed, flexing of the clip from its normal eighty-seven degree configuration (as explained below) enables the clip to conform to irregular corners 22E and to establish and preserve a substantially square, hard fastened construction.
  • With primary reference directed now to FIGS. 3-11, clip 20 comprises a rigid, preferably stamped metallic body having a generally T-shaped side profile (i.e., as seen in FIG. 11). Clip 20 comprises a front 40, a rear 42 (i.e., FIGS. 5, 6), and a pair of spaced-apart sides 44 and 45 (i.e., FIGS. 7, 8). The upper region of a preferred clip 20 is best seen in FIGS. 3, 5, and 7. The underside of the clip 20 is best seen in FIGS. 4, 6, and 8. The steel clip 20 is preferably stamped in multiple stages during the manufacturing process, and the preferred thickness is 0.036 inches.
  • A rear body portion, generally designated by the reference numeral 27 (i.e. FIGS. 5-8), has a length 55 (i.e., FIGS. 7, 8) extending generally from the clip rear 42 to the clip middle 61, A junction 63 formed between downwardly projecting tab 70 and the rear body portion 27 is seen in FIG. 11. A central perforated region 58 of the clip rear body portion 27 is bordered by elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves 60, 62. Preferably central region 58 is perforated, comprising numerous orifices 59 (FIGS. 3, 4) so that fasteners 30 (FIGS. 1, 2) can easily penetrate it. The positioning of central region 58 facilitates blind penetration so screw assembly is eased.
  • A pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers 50 and 52 project forwardly from the clip. The length of the fingers is generally designated by the reference numeral 67 (FIG. 7). Fingers 50, 52 are integral and coplanar with central rear body portion 27 and its rear side portions 54, 56 respectively. These non-perforated sides 54, 56 form contiguous sides of the rear body portion 27 adjacent the reinforcement grooves 60, 62 and preferably they are nonperforated. Referencing FIG. 1, when a clip 20 is first installed, fingers 50 and 52 glide upon the top plate surface 25, nondestructively extending beneath any insulation layer 49, and temporarily retaining the clip on the top plate 22. The reduced finger profile, and the lack of projecting reinforcements, minimizes interference. As seen in FIGS. 3 and 6, the ends 51 of the fingers 50, 52 are radiused or curved, since clip 20 does not require the forcible penetration of any panels or frame structure. Rear side portions 54, 56 also have radiused end corners 57 (i.e., FIGS. 3, 6). These rounded or radiused ends and corners prevent injuries to installers, and since there are no pointed corners or ends, the clips 20 will not degrade or tear the insulation 49 (FIG. 1) or provide a snagging point that interferes with subsequent drywall finishing.
  • The parallel pair of elongated, parallel, reinforcement grooves 60, 62 separate side portions 54, 56 of the rear central region 58 of the clip body from the central perforated region 58. Rear central region 58 is perforated, comprising numerous orifices 59 (FIGS. 3, 4) so that fasteners 30 (FIGS. 1, 2) can easily penetrate it. Because of the configuration adopted, blind fastening is enabled. For example, when a panel 28 is lifted into place (as in FIG. 1) the clip 20 will be visibly obscured, but an approximate alignment by the installer will insure correct penetration of the clip and proper seating by the screw 30. Referencing particularly FIGS. 5 and 9, the reinforcement grooves 60, 62 are convex at the top 21 (FIG. 5) of the clip 20; in other words, the grooves project upwardly, such that the concave bottom projects downwardly relative to the clip body. This preferred groove orientation insures that the bottom 26 (FIG. 6) of the clip 20 rests substantially flatly on the top surface 29 (i.e., FIG. 1) of the horizontally oriented ceiling sheet 28 that the clip physically contacts when installed.
  • Central rear body region 58 is integral with rigid, perforated tab 70 that projects substantially perpendicular downwardly from the clip 20 at the clip middle, which has been generally designated by the reference numeral 61 (i.e., FIGS. 7, 8). There are radiused stress relief notches 81 (FIG. 3, 7,8) that occupy middle 61 along the junction between the tab and the body rear portion. The illustrated construction enables the to flex slightly in response to screw pressure, enabling a square fitting.
  • A gap 53 (FIG. 6) exists between fingers 50 and 52 in that region that would otherwise be substantially occupied by the smaller tab 70 prior to its bending during the preferred manufacturing stamping process. The gap width is designated by the reference numeral 69 (FIGS. 6, 8). The perforated tab 70 has a plurality of orifices 71 similar to orifices 59 already discussed that enable the ready application of fasteners, such as sheetrock screws 23 (FIG. 2). The tab width is indicated by reference numeral 72 in FIG. 7. The tab length 73 is seen in FIGS. 9 and 10.
  • There is a centered indexing hole 74 at the clip middle 61 between the rear central region 58 and tab 70 that is utilized by the tooling during manufacture.
  • As best seen in FIG. 11, in the best mode tab 70 forms an angle of less than ninety degrees with respect to the grooves 60, 62 and the rear central region 58. This angle is preferably between eighty and eighty-nine degrees, and most preferably is eighty seven degrees. Because of this angular construction, the clip can deform slightly when; pressed up against a top plate in response to screwing so it flushly abuts the structure, notwithstanding irregularities in the dimensions or shape of the framework. Further, it is preferred that the end corners 76 of tab 70 are radiused and unpointed. Referencing FIG. 12, the aforementioned construction makes it possible to form stacks 87. In other words, numerous clips 20 can be nested on top of one another to form a stack 87, thereby minimizing volume for shipping and packaging.
  • Installation:
  • Initially a clip 20 is placed as in FIG. 1, with the forwardly projecting fingers 50,52 overlying the top plate 22. Rear spears slide under insulation wrap and support clip before screw or nail is installed.
  • A drywall screw 23 is then screwed through the perforated bottom tab 70 into the top plate 22 securing the clip 20. Multiple clips 20 may be spaced apart at distances of from sixteen to twenty four inches.
  • The drywall sheet 28 that forms the ceiling is secured to the intermediate portion 58 of the clip 20 by blindly screwing through the perforations 59. Screws 30 (FIG. 1) secure the ceiling sheet 28.
  • Afterwards, the drywall sidewall sheet 32 is secured or screwed to the top plate 22 with numerous screws 34 (FIG. 1). When sheet 32 is positioned and secured, all clips 20 will be covered, and no portions of metal will be exposed. This means that drywall finishing can progress easily without sanding or grinding exposed clip ends or edges, and there will be no exposed points or jagged edges to interfere with the drywall finishing tools.
  • From the foregoing, it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to obtain all the ends and objects herein set forth, together with other advantages which are inherent to the structure.
  • It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.
  • As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Claims (33)

1-17. (canceled)
18. A metallic construction clip for hard fastening abutting panels adjacent construction framework, the clip comprising:
a front, a rear and a top;
a rear body portion that in use is oriented substantially horizontally, the rear body portion comprising:
a length;
a central, perforated region for blindly receiving screws to fasten a ceiling panel; and,
integral, adjoining sides adjacent to said perforated region;
an integral, perforated tab projecting downwardly from said rear body portion, the tab having a width and a length, said tab length substantially equal to said rear body portion length;
a pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly from said clip for engaging framework such as a top plate, the fingers coplanar with the clip rear body portion, and the fingers having a length approximately equal to the length of said rear body portion;
a gap between the fingers, the gap having a width that is larger than the width of the tab; and,
wherein the length of the fingers is greater than the width of said tab.
19. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 18 wherein said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar and coextensive with said fingers.
20. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 19 wherein said clip comprises a junction formed between the tab and said rear body portion and radiused stress relief notches formed at said junction.
21. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 20 further comprising an indexing hole defined within said junction.
22. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 18 wherein the fingers have ends that are gently radiused to enable them to smoothly slide beneath layers of insulation disposed atop the top plate.
23. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 18 further comprising a pair of elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves defined in said clip adjacent said perforated region, said grooves extending from said clip rear towards said clip front.
24. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 23 wherein the reinforcement grooves are convex at the top of the clip so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with a ceiling panel fastened to the clip.
25. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 24 wherein said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar and coextensive with said fingers.
26. A metallic construction clip for hard fastening abutting panels adjacent construction framework, the clip comprising:
a front, a middle, a top, a bottom, and a rear;
a rear body portion that in use is oriented substantially horizontally, the rear body portion comprising:
a length;
a central, perforated region for blindly receiving screws to fasten a ceiling panel; and,
integral, adjoining sides adjacent to the perforated region;
an integral, perforated tab projecting downwardly from said rear body portion, the tab having a width and a length, said tab length substantially equal to said rear body portion length;
a junction formed between the tab and said rear body portion at the clip middle;
a pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly from said clip for engaging framework such as a top plate, the fingers coplanar with the clip rear body portion, and the fingers having a length approximately equal to the length of said rear body portion;
a gap between the fingers, the gap having a predetermined width, and the gap width being larger than the width of the tab;
a pair of elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves for reinforcing said clip.
27. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 26 wherein said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar and coextensive with said fingers.
28. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 27 wherein said clip comprises radiused stress relief notches formed at said junction.
29. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 28 wherein the length of the fingers is greater than the width of said tab.
30. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 26 wherein the reinforcement grooves are convex at the top of the clip so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with a ceiling panel fastened to the clip.
31. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 30 wherein the fingers have ends that are gently radiused to enable them to smoothly slide beneath layers of insulation disposed atop the top plate.
32. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 26 wherein multiple clips are stackable to minimize shipping and storage volume.
33. A metallic ceiling construction clip for hard fastening abutting panels adjacent construction framework, the clip comprising:
a middle, a top and bottom, and a rear;
a rear body portion that in use is oriented substantially horizontally, the rear body portion comprising:
a length;
a central, perforated region for blindly receiving screws to fasten a ceiling panel; and,
integral, adjoining nonperforated sides adjacent to the reinforcement grooves;
a perforated tab projecting downwardly from said rear body portion that is adapted to be attached to the framework, the tab having a length substantially equal to the length of the rear body portion, and the tab having a width;
a junction formed between the tab and said rear body portion at the clip middle;
a pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly from said clip for engaging framework such as a top plate, the fingers coplanar with the clip rear body portion, and the fingers having a length;
a gap between the fingers, the gap having a width greater than the width of the tab but smaller than the length of the fingers; and,
a pair of elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves defined in said clip, the grooves extending from said clip rear towards said clip front, the grooves convex at the top of the clip so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with the ceiling panel fastened to the clip.
34. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 33 wherein said clip comprises radiused stress relief notches and an indexing hole defined at said junction.
35. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 34 wherein the fingers have ends that are gently radiused to enable them to smoothly slide beneath layers of insulation disposed atop the top plate.
36. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 33 wherein multiple clips can be nested together to minimize shipping and storage volume.
37. A metallic construction clip for hard fastening abutting panels adjacent construction framework, the clip comprising:
a middle, a top and bottom, and a rear;
a rear body portion that in use is oriented substantially horizontally, the rear body portion comprising:
a length;
a central, perforated region for receiving fasteners to secure a ceiling panel; and, integral, adjoining sides;
an integral, perforated tab projecting downwardly from said rear body portion, the tab having a width and a length, said tab length substantially equal to said rear body portion length;
a junction formed between the tab and said rear body portion at the clip middle;
a pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly from said clip for engaging framework such as a top plate, the fingers coplanar with the clip rear body portion, and the fingers having a length approximately equal to the length of said rear body portion;
wherein said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar with said fingers;
a gap between the fingers, the gap having a predetermined width, the gap width being larger than the width of the tab; and,
a pair of elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves defined in said rear body portion, the grooves parallel with said fingers and extending from said clip rear towards said clip front, the grooves convex at the top of the clip so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with the ceiling panel fastened to the clip.
38. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 37 wherein the tab has a width and length of the fingers is greater than the width of said tab.
39. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 38 wherein the fingers have ends that are gently radiused to enable them to smoothly slide beneath layers of insulation disposed atop the top plate.
40. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 39 wherein said clip comprises:
radiused stress relief notches formed at said junction between said tab and rear body portion; and,
an indexing hole defined within said junction to facilitate manufacturing.
41. The ceiling clip as defined in claim 40 wherein multiple clips can be nested together to minimize shipping and storage volume. providing a plurality of ceiling clips, each clip comprising: integral, adjoining sides adjacent to the perforated region.
42. A method for hard fastening abutting panels adjacent construction framework, the method comprising the steps of:
locating framework comprising a horizontal top plate and a plurality of spaced apart vertical studs that are perpendicular to said top plate;
securing a plurality of ceiling clips to a top plate, each clip comprising:
a front, a rear and a top;
a rear body portion that in use is oriented substantially horizontally, the rear body portion comprising:
a length;
a central, perforated region for blindly receiving screws to fasten a ceiling panel; and,
integral, adjoining sides adjacent to said perforated region;
an integral, perforated tab projecting downwardly from said rear body portion, the tab having a width and a length, said tab length substantially equal to said rear body portion length;
a pair of integral, spaced apart and parallel fingers projecting forwardly from said clip for engaging framework such as a top plate, the fingers coplanar with the clip rear body portion, and the fingers having a length approximately equal to the length of said rear body portion;
a gap between the fingers, the gap having a width that is larger than the width of the tab; and,
wherein the length of the fingers is greater than the width of said tab; and,
Screw fastening the clips to the top plate through their tabs; and,
Screw fastening a horizontal panel to the rear body portion of multiple tabs.
43. The method as defined in claim 42 said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar and coextensive with said fingers.
44. The method as defined in claim 42 wherein said clip comprises a junction formed between the tab and said rear body portion and radiused stress relief notches formed at said junction.
45. The method as defined in claim 42 wherein said clip comprises an indexing hole defined within said junction.
46. The method as defined in claim 42 wherein the fingers have ends that are gently radiused to enable them to smoothly slide beneath layers of insulation disposed atop the top plate.
47. The method as defined in claim 42 including the step of reinforcing the clips with elongated, parallel reinforcement grooves defined in said clip adjacent said perforated region, said grooves extending from said clip rear towards said clip front.
48. The method as defined in claim 42 including the step of reducing interference by making the reinforcement grooves convex at the top of the clip so that the bottom of the clip can flushly mate with a ceiling panel fastened to the clip.
49. The method as defined in claim 42 wherein said sides of said rear body portion are coplanar and coextensive with said fingers.
US11/402,095 2006-04-11 2006-04-11 Racking and load resistant ceiling and wall construction clip and method Abandoned US20070245679A1 (en)

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US20070220824A1 (en) * 2004-04-28 2007-09-27 Tomoya Hasegawa Board Building Material, Board Building Material Producing Method, Board Building Material Installation Method
US20150083873A1 (en) * 2013-09-26 2015-03-26 William Garpow Drywall attachment device
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USD861467S1 (en) * 2018-03-15 2019-10-01 Flint Group IP Holdings Limited Hook
USD867114S1 (en) * 2018-03-15 2019-11-19 Flint Group IP Holdings Limited Hook base

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