US20070234592A1 - Orthotic for cleat - Google Patents

Orthotic for cleat Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070234592A1
US20070234592A1 US11/696,317 US69631707A US2007234592A1 US 20070234592 A1 US20070234592 A1 US 20070234592A1 US 69631707 A US69631707 A US 69631707A US 2007234592 A1 US2007234592 A1 US 2007234592A1
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US
United States
Prior art keywords
layer
support
foot
orthotic insert
wearer
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/696,317
Inventor
John Crates
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS LP
Original Assignee
CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS LP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US78986706P priority Critical
Application filed by CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS LP filed Critical CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS LP
Priority to US11/696,317 priority patent/US20070234592A1/en
Assigned to CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS, L.P. reassignment CHEETAH FEET PRODUCTS, L.P. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CRATES, JOHN M.
Publication of US20070234592A1 publication Critical patent/US20070234592A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/02Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material
    • A43B13/026Composites, e.g. carbon fibre or aramid fibre; the sole, one or more sole layers or sole part being made of a composite
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B1/00Footwear characterised by the material
    • A43B1/0045Footwear made at least partially of deodorant means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/02Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material
    • A43B13/12Soles with several layers of different materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B17/00Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined
    • A43B17/02Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined wedge-like or resilient
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/141Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form having an anatomical or curved form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1455Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties
    • A43B7/147Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties for sick or disabled persons, e.g. persons having osteoarthritis or diabetes

Abstract

An orthotic insert for use in a shoe to support a wearer's foot. The orthotic insert includes a cushion layer having a heel portion adapted to receive a heel of the foot and a toe portion adapted to receive a toe of the foot. A bottom layer extends substantially the length of the cushion layer. A support layer resides between the cushion layer and the bottom layer and extends from about the heel portion toward the toe portion of the cushion layer. The support layer ends in an edge that extends at least partially across a width of the cushion layer. The support layer includes a multilayer carbon fiber and polymer composite having a specified shape adapted to impart support to the foot. The bottom layer substantially covers the edge of the support layer.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/789,867 filed Apr. 6, 2006, the technical disclosures of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • THE NAMES OF THE PARTIES TO A JOINT RESEARCH AGREEMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • INCORPORATION-BY-REFERENCE OF MATERIAL SUBMITTED ON A COMPACT DISC
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present disclosure relates to orthotic devices, and more particularly to orthotic inserts for use within footwear.
  • An orthotic insert or insole may be used in controlling foot function within footwear, such as a wearer's footwear. The orthotic insert may adjust, for example, the angle, the position, the support, or other properties of the foot relative to the insole of the wearer's footwear. By adjusting the foot's angle or position within the footwear, the wearer may experience improved posture, a reduction in pain, or both. Further, when combined with a wearer's footwear, the orthotic insert may relieve pain and improve posture by supporting, for example, the ligaments, the joints, the muscles and the bones of the feet.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present disclosure relates to orthotic devices, and more particularly to orthotic inserts for use within footwear.
  • In one aspect, an orthotic insert is provided for use in a shoe to support a wearer's foot. The orthotic insert includes a cushion layer having a heel portion adapted to receive the heel of the foot and a toe portion adapted to receive a toe of the foot. A bottom layer extends substantially the length of the cushion layer. A support layer resides between the cushion layer and the bottom layer and extends from about the heel portion toward the toe portion of the cushion layer. The support layer ends in an edge that extends at least partially across a width of the cushion layer. The support layer includes a multilayer carbon fiber and polymer composite having a specified shape adapted to impart support to the foot. The bottom layer substantially covers the edge of the support layer.
  • The details of one or more embodiments of the invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A more complete understanding of the method and apparatus of the present invention may be had by reference to the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of an orthotic device in accordance with some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of the orthotic device in accordance with some embodiments.
  • FIG. 3 is a split perspective view of the orthotic device in accordance with some embodiments.
  • Where used in the various figures of the drawing, the same numerals designate the same or similar parts. Furthermore, when the terms “top,” “bottom,” “first,” “second,” “upper,” “lower,” “height,” “width,” “length,” “end,” “side,” “horizontal,” “vertical,” and similar terms are used herein, it should be understood that these terms have reference only to the structure shown in the drawing and are utilized only to facilitate describing the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an orthotic device 100 may be used in controlling foot function within footwear, such as athletic shoes. The orthotic device 100 may adjust, for example, the angle, the position, the support, or other properties of the foot relative to the insole of the wearer's footwear. The adjustment of the angle, the position, the support, or other foot properties may be provided by a material layer with variable degrees of rigidity and flexibility. A supportive material layer may be embedded as one or more of the layers that may comprise the inner construct of the orthotic device 100 (described in detail with reference to FIG. 3). By adjusting the foot's angle or position within the footwear, the wearer may experience improved posture, a reduction in pain, or both. Further, when combined with a wearer's footwear, the orthotic device 100 may relieve pain and improve posture by supporting, for example, the ligaments, the joints, the muscles and the bones of the feet.
  • Additionally, the orthotic device 100 may provide additional impact absorption and dampening to the wearer. The impact absorption and dampening may be provided by an elastic or viscoelastic material. The elastic or viscoelastic material layer may be embedded as one or more layers that may comprise the inner construct of the orthotic device 100 (described in detail with reference to FIG. 3). By improving or increasing the impact absorption, the wearer may experience decreased levels of, for example, fatigue, heel pain, calluses, arthritic pain, or the like. Further, the wearer may experience a reduction in athletic stress related injuries, for example, shin splints, stress fractures, or the like.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, the orthotic device 100 may be removably installed in a wearer's footwear, and in some instances, specifically an athletic shoe. In the installed position, the orthotic device 100 may substantially cover the insole of the shoe in an orientation that may be substantially longitudinally aligned with and substantially parallel to the upper surface of the insole of the shoe. A bottom surface 110 of the orthotic device 100 may have a shape that at least partially corresponds to that of the insole of the shoe. A top surface 120 of the orthotic device 100 may have a shape that is adapted to contact the sole of the wearer's foot.
  • The configuration of the orthotic device 100 may be further described by partitioning the orthotic device 100 into a front portion 130 and a rear portion 140. The front portion 130 of the orthotic device 100 typically comprises a flat, broad section 150. The rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100 typically comprises an elongated section 160 and an upturned section 170. The front and rear portions 130 and 140 may be further subdivided into sections that correspond to the different areas of the sole of the wearer's foot. The areas of the sole of the wearer's foot comprise the toes, the metatarsal heads, the ball, the midfoot, and the rearfoot. The front portion 130 of the orthotic device 100 may include a toe section 180, a metatarsal head section 190, and a ball section 200. The front portion 130 of the orthotic device 100 may provide support to the wearer's toes, metatarsal heads, and ball. The elongated section 160 and the upturned section 170 of the rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100 may include a midfoot section 210 and a rearfoot or heel section 220. The rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100 may provide support to the wearer's midfoot and rearfoot.
  • In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the orthotic device is a full foot device, and as such, includes the toe section 180, the metatarsal head section 190, the ball section 200, the midfoot section 210 and the rearfoot or heel section 120. Additionally, the front portion 130 of the orthotic device 100 in the current embodiment may be configured to support the wearer's toes, the metatarsal heads, and the ball of the foot. Further, the rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100 in the current embodiment may be configured to support the wearer's midfoot and the rearfoot. For example, the midfoot section 210 of the orthotic device 100 may be configured with a substantially axially extending arcuate medial arch 230 that may be configured to provide support to the medial arch 230 of the wearer's foot. Configured in this way, the arcuate medial arch 230 may provide relief to the wearer from the discomfort typically associated with the altered biomechanical condition known as flat feet.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, the orthotic device 100 may be elongated along an axis 240 so as to be longitudinally aligned to the insole of the wearer's footwear (not shown). The orthotic device 100 may be configured so as to be substantially axially and immovably bounded at the toe section 180 and the rearfoot section 220 by the front and rear portions 130 and 140, respectively, of the wearer's footwear. The orthotic device 100 may be further configured with a medial (inner) edge and a lateral (outer) edge so as to be substantially transversely and immovably bounded along axis 270 by the medial and lateral side edges, respectively, of the wearer's footwear.
  • As previously mentioned, the elongated and upturned sections 160 and 170 of the rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100 may be configured so as to provide support to the midfoot and the rearfoot sections of the wearer's foot. Combined, the elongated and upturned sections 160 and 170 may be configured so as to form a plurality of distinct support zones in the rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, four distinct support zones may be defined in the rear portion 140 of the orthotic device 100. The four zones comprise the arcuate medial arch 230, an arcuate rear arch (heel cup) 280, an axially-extending lateral arch 290, and a flat narrow rear portion 300.
  • The shape of the four support zones 230, 280, 290, and 300 maybe determined by the support requirements needed to counteract and/or correct a biomechanical condition present in the wearer's foot. The shape of the four support zones 230, 280, 290, and 300 may then be transferred to a support layer 310 that may be configured to counteract or correct the biomechanical condition present in the wearer's foot. The degree of predetermined support and flexibility in the current embodiment of the support layer 310 may be selectively altered from one wearer to another. For example, flexibility and support provided by the support layer 310 may be selected for the wearer based on the wearer's weight, foot size, and the expected activity.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, the construct of the orthotic device 100 may include a plurality of stacked layers that may be laminated so as to be fixedly attached to one another. The layers of the orthotic device 100 may typically comprise, for example, a top covering layer, one or more inner layers, and a bottom covering layer. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the layers comprise a covering layer 320, cushion layer 330, a support layer 310, and a bottom layer 340.
  • The covering layer 320 comprises a flexible material layer that may substantially overlay the entire cushion layer 330 of the orthotic device 100. The covering layer 320 may be fixedly attached, for example, by lamination or adhesive to the cushion layer 330. The covering layer 320 material may comprise, for example, artificial leather as sold under the trademark NAUGAHYDE, neoprene, buff leather, nylon polyester, artificial suede as sold under the trademark ULTRASUEDE, or the like. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the covering layer 320 is comprised of a nylon polyester material. The covering layer 320 may be configured such that the amount, location, and type of material promotes the conduction of heat away from the wearer's foot, for example, when removably installed in athletic footwear typically worn in the summer. Alternatively, the covering layer 320 may be configured so as to reflect the heat emitted by the wearer's foot back towards the foot. For example, when removably installed in a snow boot worn in the winter for hiking, ice fishing, or skiing the reflective covering layer 320 would serve to maintain foot warmth. Additionally, the covering layer 320 may be configured so as to wick away moisture from the wearer's foot, for example, when the orthotic device is removably installed in conjunction with athletic footwear. Further, the covering layer 320 may comprise a material with anti-microbial, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, or other such properties or else may be sprayed with an anti-microbial coating. In still another embodiment, the covering layer 320 may be configured with a combination of static and dynamic coefficients of friction that substantially prevent the wearer's foot from moving or sliding within the footwear when walking, running and jumping, yet allow the wearer's foot to slide into and out of the footwear.
  • Still referring to FIG. 3, the cushion layer 330 comprises a material layer that may provide the orthotic device 100 with a combination of elastic and viscoelastic properties. The cushion layer 330 material may comprise, for example, polystyrene foam, ultra-thin cushioning material as sold under the trademark VYLYTE, microporous plastic material as sold under the trademark PORON, ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) foam, leather, or the like. As such, the cushion layer 330 may be configured so as to be compressible, flexible, and elastic while providing the user with predetermined degrees of vibration damping and/or impact absorption. The vibration damping and/or impact absorption properties of the cushion layer 330 may be configured to provide the wearer with increased isolation. For example, when engaging in athletic activities, the foot may often be subjected to the shock of impacting a paved, concrete, wooden, or other surface. Providing the wearer's foot with additional degrees of damping and/or impact absorption may lead to a reduction in athletic stress related injuries such as shin splints, stress fractures, or the like. Further, the wearer may experience decreased levels of fatigue, heel pain, calluses, arthritic pain, or the like.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, the support layer 310 comprises a material layer that has a specified shape adapted to impart support to the foot and provides the orthotic device 100 with a predetermined degree of rigidity. The support layer 310 extends from about the heel section 220 toward the toe section 180, and in the embodiment of FIG. 3 terminates just prior to the ball section 200 in a edge that extends across the width of the orthotic device 100. The support layer 310 may be fixedly attached, for example, by lamination or adhesive to the cushion layer 330. The support layer 310 may be formed from a multilayer composite, for example, carbon, carbon fiber, fiberglass, aramid fiber or other in a polymer composite. In the current embodiment, the support layer 310 is formed from a carbon fiber and polymer, such as epoxy resin, laminate. As such, the support layer 310 in the current embodiment may be tailored to the requirements of the wearer by providing a predetermined degree of support and flexibility. Because the composite material of the support layer 310 is typically much stiffer than that of the material of the other layers, the support layer 310 terminates about or just prior to the ball section 200 (FIG. 2) to enable the orthotic device 100 to be flexible for walking, running and jumping.
  • The support layer 310 may be formed by selectively angling the carbon fibers of one of the laminate layers in relationship to the orientation of the carbon fibers of one or more of the plurality of laminate layers. By layering multiple sheets of carbon fiber on top of one another at varying fiber orientations and angles (with respect to one another), the support layer 310 may be configured so as to provide flexibility in one area and rigidity in another area. For example, the support layer 310 may be configured such that the flexibility increases towards the front of the support layer 310, i.e. increasing in flexibility toward the ball 200 of the wearer's foot. The support layer may be further configured to be partially flexible in the zone surrounding the arcuate medial arch 230 and substantially rigid in the zone surrounding the axially-extending lateral arch 290. Additionally, the overall flexibility of the support layer 310 can be reduced (i.e. the support layer 310 generally stiffened) for heavier wearers or higher impact applications.
  • The bottom layer 340 comprises a flexible material layer that may substantially underlie the entire length of the orthotic device 100. The bottom layer 340 may be fixedly attached, for example, by lamination or adhesive to the support and cushion layers 310 and 330. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the bottom layer 340 substantially encases the support layer 310 and cushion layer 330 and is adhered to the bottom of the support layer 310, to the cushion layer 330 and about the perimeter of the orthotic device 100 to the cover layer 320. As such, the bottom layer 340 prevents contact of the cushion layer 330 and the support layer 310 with the wearer's footwear. The bottom layer 340 material may comprise vinyl, artificial leather as sold under the trademark NAUGAHYDE, neoprene, leather, artificial suede as sold under the trademark ULTRASUEDE, or the like. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the bottom layer 340 is comprised of a vinyl material. The bottom layer 340 may further be configured with a combination of static and dynamic coefficients of friction that substantially prevent the orthotic device 100 from moving or sliding within the footwear while the wearer is walking, running, or jumping, yet allow the orthotic device 100 to slide into and out of the footwear. The bottom layer 340 of the support layer may be embossed to allow varying static and dynamic coefficients of friction depending upon whether the orthotic device 100 is loaded by the weight of the wearer's foot. The bottom layer 340 may be configured so as provide the orthotic device with a low dynamic coefficient of friction when not weighted by the load of the wearer's foot allowing the orthotic device 100 to be easily and conveniently removed and installed from the footwear. Additionally, the embossing on the bottom layer 340 may provide the orthotic device 100 with an increased static coefficient of friction when weighted by the wearer's foot that may substantially prevent the orthotic device from moving within the footwear. Additionally, the material of the bottom layer 340 may be configured such that the orthotic device does not stick or adhere to the bottom of the footwear.
  • Although the invention hereof has been described by way of a preferred embodiment, it will be evident that other adaptations and modifications can be employed without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. For example, some of the steps in the system procedure could be conducted mechanically in addition to those conducted electrically. The terms and expressions employed herein have been used as terms of description and not of limitation; and thus, there is no intent of excluding equivalents, but on the contrary it is intended to cover any and all equivalents that may be employed without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (13)

1. An orthotic insert for use in a shoe to support a wearer's foot, comprising:
a cushion layer having a heel portion adapted to receive a heel of the foot and a toe portion adapted to receive a toe of the foot;
a bottom layer extending substantially the length of the cushion layer; and
a support layer between the cushion layer and the bottom layer and extending from about the heel portion toward the toe portion of the cushion layer and ending in an edge that extends at least partially across a width of the cushion layer, the support layer having a specified shape adapted to impart support to the foot, the bottom layer substantially covering the edge of the support layer.
2. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the support layer comprises a multilayer carbon fiber and polymer composite.
3. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the bottom layer is adapted to resist sticking to the interior of the shoe.
4. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the bottom layer is adapted to substantially prevent contact of the support layer with the shoe.
5. The orthotic insert of claim 1 further comprising a covering layer adjacent the cushion layer and opposite the support layer.
6. The orthotic insert of claim 4 wherein the bottom layer is adhered to the covering layer.
7. The orthotic insert of claim 4 wherein the covering layer is antimicrobial, antibacterial, or antifungal.
8. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the bottom layer is selected from the group consisting of vinyl, leather, artificial leather, and neoprene.
9. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the cushion layer is selected from the group consisting of polystyrene foam, microporous plastic, ethyl vinyl acetate foam, and leather.
10. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the support layer comprises a multilayer polymer composite selected from the group consisting of carbon, carbon fiber, fiberglass, and aramid fiber.
11. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the cushion layer material is specifically chosen to provide predetermined degrees of vibration damping and impact absorption.
12. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the support layer material is specifically chosen to provide predetermined degrees of support and flexibility.
13. The orthotic insert of claim 1 wherein the bottom layer material has a predetermined combination of static and dynamic coefficients of friction such that friction between the bottom layer and the shoe increases with increased pressure applied by the wearer's foot, substantially preventing movement between the shoe and the insert.
US11/696,317 2006-04-06 2007-04-04 Orthotic for cleat Abandoned US20070234592A1 (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US78986706P true 2006-04-06 2006-04-06
US11/696,317 US20070234592A1 (en) 2006-04-06 2007-04-04 Orthotic for cleat

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/696,317 US20070234592A1 (en) 2006-04-06 2007-04-04 Orthotic for cleat

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US20070234592A1 true US20070234592A1 (en) 2007-10-11

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100218399A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2010-09-02 Yong Chae Jeong Structure of multi-elastic insole for shoes
US20100269375A1 (en) * 2009-04-24 2010-10-28 Nine West Development Corporation Footbed system and footwear construction
US20110192050A1 (en) * 2010-02-10 2011-08-11 Jorge Hane Insole for Shoe
US20140245631A1 (en) * 2013-03-04 2014-09-04 Lfrj, Llc Shoe insert and method for using same
EP2944211A1 (en) * 2014-05-12 2015-11-18 Peacocks Medical Group Limited Orthotic insert
DE102015106874A1 (en) * 2015-03-06 2016-09-08 Franz Fischer Shoe insert and method for making a shoe insert
WO2017007536A1 (en) * 2015-07-07 2017-01-12 Roar Licensing, Llc Force delivery in orthotic, orthotic inserts and ankle foot orthosis products and systems
US20170273397A1 (en) * 2013-09-20 2017-09-28 Vertical Foot Alignment Systems Pty Limited Castless stance corrected prostetic & method of forming same
WO2017196876A1 (en) * 2016-05-09 2017-11-16 Storelli Sports, Inc. Shoe insole and grip material affixable thereto
USD818686S1 (en) 2017-01-19 2018-05-29 Storelli Sports, Inc. Insole
US10076153B2 (en) 2015-08-10 2018-09-18 Kassel Llc Thermal protection system and related compositions of matter
USD858968S1 (en) 2017-01-19 2019-09-10 Storelli Sports, Inc. Insole

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USRE32698E (en) * 1982-02-26 1988-06-21 Northwest Podiatric Laboratories, Inc. Orthotic insert
US5401564A (en) * 1993-03-23 1995-03-28 Hexcel Corporation Materials and processes for fabricating formed composite articles and use in shoe arch
US5529826A (en) * 1994-02-15 1996-06-25 Tailor; Dilip K. Fabric-faced thermoplastic composite panel
US5778562A (en) * 1994-10-18 1998-07-14 Lory Orthopadie Schuhtechnik Gesundheitsforum Service Und Handels Insert for a shoe
US6195917B1 (en) * 1998-07-10 2001-03-06 Walk Easy Manufacturing, Inc. Footwear insole insert
US20030009915A1 (en) * 2001-07-11 2003-01-16 Bacon Perry Higginson Balance stabilizing foot orthotic
US6560902B1 (en) * 1999-10-08 2003-05-13 Globus Berkemann Gmbh & Co. Kg Orthopaedic insole

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE32698E (en) * 1982-02-26 1988-06-21 Northwest Podiatric Laboratories, Inc. Orthotic insert
US5401564A (en) * 1993-03-23 1995-03-28 Hexcel Corporation Materials and processes for fabricating formed composite articles and use in shoe arch
US5529826A (en) * 1994-02-15 1996-06-25 Tailor; Dilip K. Fabric-faced thermoplastic composite panel
US5778562A (en) * 1994-10-18 1998-07-14 Lory Orthopadie Schuhtechnik Gesundheitsforum Service Und Handels Insert for a shoe
US6195917B1 (en) * 1998-07-10 2001-03-06 Walk Easy Manufacturing, Inc. Footwear insole insert
US6560902B1 (en) * 1999-10-08 2003-05-13 Globus Berkemann Gmbh & Co. Kg Orthopaedic insole
US20030009915A1 (en) * 2001-07-11 2003-01-16 Bacon Perry Higginson Balance stabilizing foot orthotic

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100218399A1 (en) * 2007-05-07 2010-09-02 Yong Chae Jeong Structure of multi-elastic insole for shoes
US8272147B2 (en) * 2007-05-07 2012-09-25 I-Masti Co., Ltd Structure of multi-elastic insole for shoes
US20100269375A1 (en) * 2009-04-24 2010-10-28 Nine West Development Corporation Footbed system and footwear construction
US8393092B2 (en) * 2009-04-24 2013-03-12 Nine West Development Corporation Footbed system and footwear construction
US20110192050A1 (en) * 2010-02-10 2011-08-11 Jorge Hane Insole for Shoe
US9565888B2 (en) * 2013-03-04 2017-02-14 Lfrj, Llc Shoe insert and method for using same
US20140245631A1 (en) * 2013-03-04 2014-09-04 Lfrj, Llc Shoe insert and method for using same
US20170273397A1 (en) * 2013-09-20 2017-09-28 Vertical Foot Alignment Systems Pty Limited Castless stance corrected prostetic & method of forming same
EP2944211A1 (en) * 2014-05-12 2015-11-18 Peacocks Medical Group Limited Orthotic insert
DE102015106874A1 (en) * 2015-03-06 2016-09-08 Franz Fischer Shoe insert and method for making a shoe insert
EP3078289A1 (en) 2015-03-06 2016-10-12 Franz Fischer Shoe insert and method for producing a shoe insert
WO2017007536A1 (en) * 2015-07-07 2017-01-12 Roar Licensing, Llc Force delivery in orthotic, orthotic inserts and ankle foot orthosis products and systems
US10076153B2 (en) 2015-08-10 2018-09-18 Kassel Llc Thermal protection system and related compositions of matter
WO2017196876A1 (en) * 2016-05-09 2017-11-16 Storelli Sports, Inc. Shoe insole and grip material affixable thereto
USD818686S1 (en) 2017-01-19 2018-05-29 Storelli Sports, Inc. Insole
USD858968S1 (en) 2017-01-19 2019-09-10 Storelli Sports, Inc. Insole

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Effective date: 20070418

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