US20070210023A1 - Peg board - Google Patents

Peg board Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070210023A1
US20070210023A1 US11565483 US56548306A US2007210023A1 US 20070210023 A1 US20070210023 A1 US 20070210023A1 US 11565483 US11565483 US 11565483 US 56548306 A US56548306 A US 56548306A US 2007210023 A1 US2007210023 A1 US 2007210023A1
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Prior art keywords
peg
board
portion
sized
attachment
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11565483
Inventor
Barry Mower
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Lifetime Products Inc
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Lifetime Products Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25HWORKSHOP EQUIPMENT, e.g. FOR MARKING-OUT WORK; STORAGE MEANS FOR WORKSHOPS
    • B25H3/00Storage means or arrangements for workshops facilitating access to, or handling of, work tools or instruments
    • B25H3/04Racks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47FSPECIAL FURNITURE, FITTINGS, OR ACCESSORIES FOR SHOPS, STOREHOUSES, BARS, RESTAURANTS OR THE LIKE; PAYING COUNTERS
    • A47F5/00Show stands, hangers, or shelves characterised by their constructional features
    • A47F5/08Show stands, hangers, or shelves characterised by their constructional features secured to the wall, ceiling, or the like; Wall-bracket display devices
    • A47F5/0807Display panels, grids or rods used for suspending merchandise or cards supporting articles; Movable brackets therefor
    • A47F5/0815Panel constructions with apertures for article supports, e.g. hooks

Abstract

A peg board may be used to store and/or organize various items. The peg board may include one or more openings sized and configured to receive attachment members. The peg board may also include receiving portions that are sized and configured to receive a portion of an attachment member inserted through the openings. The receiving portions may restrict the rotational movement of the attachment members within the openings. The peg board also may have an elongated, strip-like configuration and that may increase the possible uses and functionality of the peg board.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/749,969, filed Dec. 12, 2005 and entitled PEG BOARD.
  • [0002]
    This application is a continuation-in-part of United States design patent application Ser. No. 29/244,612, filed Dec. 12, 2005 and entitled PEG BOARD.
  • [0003]
    The disclosures of each of these applications are incorporated by reference in their entireties.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0005]
    The present invention generally relates to peg boards and, in particular, to peg boards with particular configurations and/or constructions.
  • [0006]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0007]
    Conventional peg boards are often used in a variety of locations, such as workspaces, shops and garages, to allow a variety of types of tools and objects to be stored and easily accessed. Conventional peg boards are typically constructed from wooden sheets, such as particle board or pressed wood, with a thickness of about ⅛ of an inch (3.2 millimeters). These wooden sheets normally have a planar front surface, a planar rear surface, a constant thickness and a number of openings or holes that extend through the peg board. The holes are usually spaced one inch (2.5 centimeters) apart and are sized and configured to receive various types of hooks or brackets to allow tools and other items to be hung from or suspended by the peg board.
  • [0008]
    Known peg boards are typically constructed from large panels or sheets of wood. For example, many conventional peg boards are two feet by four feet (0.61 meters by 1.22 meters) or four feet by eight feet (1.22 meters by 2.44 meters). Unfortunately, these large peg boards may be awkward or impossible to install in many locations. These large peg boards may also be bulky and heavy, which may increase shipping costs and make them more difficult to install. Further, when tools and other objects are attached to the peg board, the tools and other objects may block or prevent other portions of the peg board from being used. Thus, many conventional peg boards are not efficiently used because large portions of the peg board are blocked and not usable.
  • [0009]
    It is also known to construct peg boards from metal. Metal peg boards, however, may be susceptible to rust or other damage. Consequently, metal peg boards typically require protective coatings that can increase manufacturing costs. In addition, metal peg boards may be heavy, difficult to handle and have sharp edges and corners. Further, because metal peg boards are generally constructed from large metal sheets, metal peg boards may be expensive to ship, require a large storage area and large portions of the peg board may not be usable.
  • [0010]
    Various types of hooks and brackets may be attached to conventional peg boards to allow tools and other objects to be held and stored in the desired positions. To allow hooks or brackets to be attached to the peg board, the peg board must be spaced apart from the wall or mounting surface. Many times spacers, such as washers, are positioned between the peg board and the wall to help create the desired separation. Unfortunately, the spacers are additional components which may increase costs and be difficult to install. Moreover, because the spacers are typically aligned with the openings, that may limit the number of hooks or brackets that can be attached to the peg board. Further, because the large sheets of material are typically attached to the wall or mounting surface by numerous fasteners, such as screws or bolts, a large number of spacers and openings in the peg board must be used to secure the peg board in position.
  • [0011]
    Conventional peg boards either include larger-sized holes or smaller-sized holes and the hooks and brackets used in connection with the peg board are dependent upon the size of the holes in the peg board. The larger-sized holes have a diameter of about 5/16 of an inch (7.9 millimeters) to receive hooks with a diameter of ¼ of an inch (6.4 millimeters). The smaller-sized holes have a diameter of about 3/16 of an inch (4.8 millimeters) to receive hooks with a diameter of ⅛ of an inch (3.2 millimeters). Disadvantageously, the larger-sized hooks cannot be used with the smaller-sized holes. In addition, while the smaller-sized hooks are used with the larger-sized holes, the hooks may not be securely attached to the peg board and the hooks may fall out or be easily dislodged. Thus, conventional peg boards require the size of the hooks and the holes to match. If they do not match, then the peg board may be either unusable or the hooks may not be securely attached to the peg board.
  • [0012]
    Conventional hooks, whether the larger-sized or smaller-sized hooks, typically include a curved portion that allows a tool or other item to be hung from the peg board. In particular, the curved portion may be sized and configured to receive a portion of a tool such as a hammer. Thus, the hook may allow the hammer to be hung from the peg board. Known hooks may also include outwardly extending portions that are sized and configured to hold other tools such as shovels and rakes. These outwardly extending portions may extend a short distance or up to several inches from the peg board.
  • [0013]
    Known hooks may also include an attachment portion that is inserted through the hole in the peg board, and used to attach the hook to the peg board. In particular, the attachment portion may include a body that is disposed within the hole and an angled portion that engages the rear surface of the peg board to attach the hook to the peg board. Undesirably, these known hooks may easily rotate or move within the holes, which may make the hooks difficult to use. In addition, these known hooks may not securely hold the tools or other objects in a fixed location because the hooks are easily movable.
  • [0014]
    Many conventional hooks can also be inadvertently disconnected from the peg board when the tools or other objects are removed from the hooks, or when the hooks or tools are inadvertently bumped or moved. It is known to secure conventional peg board hooks with a strap that is connected to adjacent holes. In particular, the strap may be placed across the front of the hook with one end of the strap inserted into a hole on one side of the hook and the other end of the strap inserted into a hole on the other side of the hook. Unfortunately, these straps require additional time to install and take up additional space. The straps also may prevent hooks for being positioned next to each other. In addition, a person may loose the straps or run out of the straps, leaving some of the hooks more susceptible to being inadvertently disconnected. Further, the straps may increase manufacturing costs and the ultimate expense to the customer.
  • [0015]
    Some conventional hooks may include a leg or pin that is required to be inserted into a second hole to help position the hook in the desired location. In addition, the leg or pin may help prevent the hook from rotating or pivoting. The leg or pin is typically welded to the rear portion of the body of the hook. Undesirably, the leg or pin requires additional material to construct the hook and labor to attach, which may increase the costs of the hook. Conventional hooks with the leg or pin may also be more difficult and time consuming to install. Further, because these types of hooks require the use of at least two holes in the peg board, that may limit the potential uses of the peg board.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • [0016]
    A need therefore exists for peg board that eliminates or diminishes the disadvantages and problems described above.
  • [0017]
    One aspect of the invention is peg board that may be used to store and/or organize various items. For example, various types of hooks, supports, braces, brackets, racks and the like may be attached to the peg board, and these structures may be used to hold and/or position various items in desired locations. Advantageously, these structures may be selectively attached and/or removed from the peg board.
  • [0018]
    Another aspect is peg board that may include openings having a first size and a second size. In particular, the peg board preferably includes both larger-sized holes with a diameter of about 5/16 of an inch and smaller-sized holes with a diameter of about 3/16 of an inch. Preferably the holes alternate between the larger and smaller sizes. Advantageously, this may allow larger-sized and smaller-sized hooks, with diameters of ¼ inch and ⅛ inch respectively, to be securely used in connection with the peg board. This also allows both the larger-sized and smaller-sized hooks to be attached to the same peg board. Therefore, the pegboard may be used regardless of the size of the hooks used by the consumer.
  • [0019]
    Yet another aspect is peg board that may have an elongated, strip-like configuration. Advantageously, the peg board strip may allow the same number of tools to be stored as a conventional, larger-sized peg board, but it may require much less space. In addition, the peg board strip may require less material to construct than larger peg boards, which may help reduce material costs. The strip-like configuration may also allow these peg boards to be used in a wide variety of places including small spaces, various sized locations, awkwardly spaced locations and the like. Further, the peg board strip may be efficiently used because the hanging tools may not block or prevent other positions of the peg board from being used.
  • [0020]
    Significantly, the peg board strips may be aligned in rows and/or columns depending, for example, upon the intended use of the peg board. In particular, a first row of peg board strips may be attached to a wall or support structure to hold a first set of tools or objects. A second row of peg board strips may be placed above or below the first row of peg board strips to hold a second set of tools or objects. Advantageously, the peg boards may be spaced apart any desired distance, depending, for example, upon the size of the tools. Thus, the pegboards can be position in any desired arrangement and/or configuration.
  • [0021]
    Still another aspect is peg board that may include bosses that are sized and configured to allow the peg board to be attached to a support surface such as a wall. The bosses are preferably sized and configured to receive at least a portion of a fastener to allow the peg board to be mounted to the desired structure. One or more of the bosses are preferably spaced apart from each other different distances to allow the peg board to be attached to a variety of structures. For example, the bosses may be spaced apart to allow the peg board to be attached to walls, studs, blow-molded plastic panels, walls of a shed and the like. Advantageously, the bosses may be integrally formed as part of the peg board and the bosses may eliminate the need for spacers.
  • [0022]
    Another aspect is peg board that may include one or more ribs. The ribs may be sized and configured to strengthen and/or reinforce the peg board and/or the bosses. Additionally, the ribs may engage the mounting surface to which the peg board is attached, which may further strengthen and/or reinforce the peg board and/or the bosses. Advantageously, the ribs may also space the peg board a desired distance away from the support surface so that spacers are not required.
  • [0023]
    Yet another aspect is peg board that may include receiving portions which are sized and configured to receive a portion of a hook or bracket. For example, when a hook is attached to the peg board, a portion of the hook may extend through a hole and an end of the hook may be disposed on the rear side of the peg board. This end of the hook is preferably disposed within one of the receiving portions. Significantly, the receiving portions may prevent the hooks from rotating within the openings. The receiving portions may also more securely attach the hooks to the peg board. Thus, the receiving portions may allow a hook to be disposed through a single opening in the peg board and the hook may be securely and non-rotatably attached to the peg board. Advantageously, the receiving portions do not require the use of any additional openings in the peg board and the receiving portions may allow hooks to be attached to adjacent openings in the peg board.
  • [0024]
    Still yet another aspect is peg board that may include sidewalls. For example, if the peg board has a strip-like configuration, then the peg board may include two rows of openings that extend along the length of the peg board and sidewalls that may extend along at least a portion of the length of the peg board. The sidewalls may be sized and configured to position the peg board a desired distance away from a support surface such as a wall. The sidewalls may also be sized and configured to form a section of the receiving portions and/or support the receiving portions. In particular, if the receiving portions include a pair of walls or engagement surfaces, then the sidewalls may support the walls or engagement surfaces of the receiving portions. The sidewalls may also allow hooks with an additional leg or pin to be attached to the peg board. For example, the leg or pin may contact or engage the sidewall. The sidewalls may also allow adjacent peg boards to be spaced apart a desired distance. Further, the sidewalls may help prevent debris or other objects from being inadvertently disposed between the peg board and the support surface. Additionally, the sidewalls may help increase the strength and rigidity of the peg board.
  • [0025]
    A further aspect is peg board that may include other components. For example, the peg board may include a shelf that is attached by a living hinge. Advantageously, the peg board, shelf and living hinge may be integrally formed as part of a unitary, one-piece structure. Integrally forming these components as part of unitary, one-piece structure may help reduce manufacturing time and, the costs associated with that manufacturing time. In addition, this may allow the shelf to be securely connected to the peg board. However, these components need not be integrally formed as part of a unitary, one-piece structure and may be separately formed as discrete components via a variety of manufacturing processes, if desired.
  • [0026]
    A still further aspect is peg board that may be constructed of a relatively lightweight material, such as plastic. Advantageously, the plastic may also allow a relatively strong, durable and resilient peg board to be constructed. In addition, the plastic may allow the peg board to be constructed with a variety of shapes, configurations, arrangements, textures, patterns and the like.
  • [0027]
    These and other aspects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0028]
    The appended drawings contain figures of preferred embodiments to further illustrate and clarify the above and other aspects, advantages and features of the present invention. It will be appreciated that these drawings depict only preferred embodiments of the invention and are not intended to limit its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0029]
    FIG. 1 is a front view of an exemplary peg board;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 2 is a side view of the peg board shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 3 is a rear view of the peg board shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 4 is an end view of the peg board shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of a portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 3;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 6 is an enlarged view of another portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 3;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 7 is a perspective view of still another portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 3;
  • [0036]
    FIG. 8 is a rear view of a portion of another exemplary peg board;
  • [0037]
    FIG. 9 is an enlarged view of a portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 8;
  • [0038]
    FIG. 10 is an enlarged view of another portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 8;
  • [0039]
    FIG. 11 is a perspective view of yet another exemplary peg board;
  • [0040]
    FIG. 12 is a front view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0041]
    FIG. 13 is a side view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0042]
    FIG. 14 is another side view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0043]
    FIG. 15 is an end view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0044]
    FIG. 16 is another end view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0045]
    FIG. 17 is a rear view of the peg board shown in FIG. 11;
  • [0046]
    FIG. 18 is an enlarged view of a portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 17;
  • [0047]
    FIG. 19 is an enlarged perspective view of another portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 17;
  • [0048]
    FIG. 20 is a perspective view of still another exemplary peg board;
  • [0049]
    FIG. 21 is a front view of the peg board shown in FIG. 20;
  • [0050]
    FIG. 22 is a rear view of the peg board shown in FIG. 20;
  • [0051]
    FIG. 23 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of the peg board shown in FIG. 22; and
  • [0052]
    FIG. 24 is an exemplary shelf that may be connected to an exemplary peg board.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0053]
    The present invention is generally directed towards a peg board. The principles of the present invention, however, are not limited to a peg board. It will be understood that, in light of the present disclosure, the peg board disclosed herein can be successfully used in connection with other types of structures and devices.
  • [0054]
    Additionally, to assist in the description of the peg board, words such as top, bottom, front, rear, right and left may be used to describe the accompanying figures. It will be appreciated, however, that the peg board can be located in a variety of desired positions—including various angles, sideways and even upside down. A detailed description of the peg board now follows.
  • [0055]
    Peg board may be used to store and/or organize various items. For example, peg board may be used to store and/or organize tools (such as wrenches, screwdrivers, pliers), janitorial tools (such as brooms, brushes), woodworking tools (such as saws, drills), landscaping tools (such as shovels, rakes) and/or other desired items.
  • [0056]
    An exemplary embodiment of pegboard 10, such as shown in FIGS. 1-7, may allow one or more attachment members to be attached to help store and/or organize such items. For example, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, an attachment member 11, such as a hook, may be attached to the peg board 10. After being attached to the peg board 10, the attachment member 11 may be used to help hold and/or support items in a desired position. Exemplary attachment members 11 may include brackets, hooks, pegs, supports, races, racks and/or other suitable structures and devices.
  • [0057]
    As shown in FIGS. 1-6, the peg board 10 preferably includes a front portion 12, a rear portion 14, sidewalls 16 and one or more openings 18. The openings 18 are preferably sized and configured to allow one or more attachment members to be attached to the peg board 10. As discussed in greater detail below, the attachment members may include a body portion that is sized and configured to be disposed within an opening 18 and an end that is disposed in the rear portion 14 of the peg board 10.
  • [0058]
    Advantageously, the front portion 12 of the peg board 10 may be spaced apart from the mounting surface, such as a wall, to provide sufficient room for the openings 18 to receive the attachment members. Because the front portion 12 of the peg board 10 may be spaced apart from the mounting surface, the peg board 10 does not require any additional spacers or other components to space the peg board away from the mounting surface.
  • [0059]
    As shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, the openings 18 may be arranged into a predetermined pattern including one or more generally aligned rows and/or columns. The rows and columns preferably extend along the length and width of the peg board, and the openings 18 are preferably disposed proximate the edges of the peg board 10. For example, as shown in the accompanying figures, the openings 18 may be disposed into two rows that are generally parallel to each other. Advantageously, this may allow the peg board 10 to be used in connection with attachment members 11 that have an upper portion and a lower portion that is sized and configured to be attached to the peg board. The peg board 10 may also include a number of openings 18 disposed in columns. The columns preferably extend along the length of the peg board 10 and the number of columns may depend, for example, upon the length of the peg board.
  • [0060]
    The openings 18 may be disposed in a predetermined pattern of rows and columns to, for example, increase the potential uses of the peg board 10. For example, the peg board 10 may have a strip configuration with a length of about 15 inches (38 centimeters) and a width of about two inches (5 centimeters). The peg board 10 may include two rows of openings 18 that extend the length of the peg board and thirty-one columns of openings. It will be appreciated that the peg board 10 may include any suitable number of rows and columns of openings 18 depending, for example, upon the size or intended use of the peg board. It will also be appreciated that the peg board 10 may include various ratios or proportions of rows and columns. For instance, if the peg board 10 has an elongated strip-like configuration, then the peg board may include ten or more columns of openings 18 for each row of openings. Of course, the peg board 10 could include other ratios that are smaller (such as a ratio of rows to columns of six to one) or larger (such as a ratio of rows to columns of sixteen to one). Thus, the number of rows and columns may depend upon the size, configuration and/or intended use of the peg board 10. The openings 18, however, do not have to be arranged into either rows or columns and the openings could be disposed in any suitable arrangement, configuration, design and the like.
  • [0061]
    As shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, the openings 18 may have a first size and a second size. For example, the openings may have a first size of about 5/16 of an inch (6.4 millimeters) in diameter and a second size may be about 3/16 of an inch (4.8 millimeters) in diameter. The differently sized openings may allow attachment members of different sizes to be attached to the peg board 10. Thus, the peg board 10 may be used with both attachment members having a smaller-size diameter and a larger-sized diameter. Of course, the peg board 10 may include openings 18 that all have the same size or other desired sizes.
  • [0062]
    The openings 18 having the first size are preferably spaced apart at a generally constant distance, such as about 1 inch (2.5 centimeters). The openings 18 having the second size are also preferably spaced apart at a generally constant distance, such as about 1 inch (2.5 centimeters). Significantly, the different sized openings may be arranged into various suitable patterns or arrangements. For example, the larger- and smaller-sized openings may alternate and be spaced approximately one-half inch apart. This may allow the peg board to be used with larger-sized hooks, smaller-sized hooks or both larger- and smaller-sized hooks. On the other hand, the openings 18 having the same size may be disposed in the same column and/or row. It will be appreciated that the openings 18 could be spaced apart any desired distances, such as about ½ inch (1.25 centimeters), and the openings do not have to be spaced at a generally constant distance. It will also be appreciated that the openings 18 may have the same size or other suitable shapes and sizes.
  • [0063]
    As mentioned above, the peg board 10 may have an elongated, strip-like configuration. For example, the peg board 10 may have a width between about 1 to 4 inches, such as about 1 inch (2.5 centimeters), 2.1 inches (5.3 centimeters) or 2.25 inches (5.7 centimeters). The peg board 10 may have a length between about 6 to 24 inches (15.2 to 61 centimeters), such as about 6 inches (15.2 centimeters), 12 inches (30.5 centimeters), 16 inches (40.6 centimeters), 18 inches (45.7 centimeters) or 24 inches (61 centimeters). Thus, if desired, the peg board 10 may have a relatively narrow width compared to the length of the peg board. For example, the peg board 10 may have a length that is at least about 6 times its width. It will be appreciated, however, that the peg board 10 does not require an elongated, strip-like configuration and may have any other configurations and dimensions including larger or smaller lengths and widths.
  • [0064]
    The peg board 10 may be sized and configured to be attached to support surfaces or structures such as walls. Advantageously, the walls may be part of various types of structures or enclosures such as sheds, houses, garages and the like. The peg board 10 may be mounted to such structures using fasteners, adhesives, a snap fit, a friction fit, an interference fit and/or other suitable structures or means. Advantageously, the peg board 10 may be mounted to blow-molded plastic panels, drywall panels (such as SHEETROCK® panels), and other structures constructed from plastic, wood, resin, and/or other materials. The peg board 10 may be mounted horizontally, vertically, or in other suitable orientations.
  • [0065]
    As shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, the peg board 10 may include one or more bosses 20 that are sized and configured to receive at least a portion of a fastener used to mount the peg board to a desired structure. Exemplary fasteners include, but are not limited to, screws, nails, bolts, staples, rivets and the like. If desired, the fasteners may be used with an anchor to attach the peg board to a structure. For example, a drywall anchor may be connected to a drywall panel and a fastener may be connected to the anchor.
  • [0066]
    The bosses 20 may be relatively strong and durable, which may facilitate attaching the pegboard to the support surface. For example, the bosses 20 may be thicker than other portions of the peg board to provide additional strength and durability. The 3 bosses 20 may also include one or more slots (not shown) to provide the bosses with a slotted configuration. As discussed in more detail below, the bosses 20 may be integrally formed as a unitary part of the peg board 10, which may increase the strength and durability of the bosses.
  • [0067]
    As shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, the bosses 20 are preferably spaced apart from the openings 18. For example, the bosses 20 may be disposed between two or more openings 18 and/or the bosses could be offset or aligned in a different row or column than the openings. Thus, for instance, the bosses 20 may have a center that is offset from the centers adjacent openings 18. The bosses 20 may also have a center that is positioned in between the centers of adjacent openings 18. While the bosses 20 are preferably distinct from the openings 18, the bosses could also form at least a portion of an opening. The boss 20 could also be used as an opening and/or an opening could be used as a boss, if desired. In addition, the bosses 20 are preferably spaced apart by different distances. For example, two bosses may be spaced apart a first distance and two other bosses may be spaced apart a second distance. The different distances may facilitate attaching the peg board 10 to different structures such as walls, studs, plastic panels, interior portions of a shed and the like.
  • [0068]
    In greater detail, the bosses 20 may be positioned in a generally central portion of the peg board 10. For example, the peg board 10 may include a row of bosses 20 that are positioned in a generally symmetrical arrangement along the length of the peg board, which may allow the peg board 10 to be positioned in a variety of orientations. As mentioned above, at least some of the bosses 20 are preferably spaced apart at different distances to allow the peg board to be attached to various structures. For example, the outermost pair of bosses 20 may be spaced about 4 inches (10.2 centimeters) from the next outermost pair of bosses, which may be spaced about 3.5 inches (8.9 centimeters) from the innermost pair of bosses; and the innermost pair of bosses may be spaced about 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters) apart from each other. Of course, the bosses 20 may be spaced apart at other suitable distances.
  • [0069]
    While the peg board 10 shown in the accompanying figures has a single row of bosses 20 that are disposed generally parallel to and between the openings 18, the peg board 10 could include any number of rows of bosses. It will be appreciated that the bosses 20 need not be positioned in rows and may be positioned in other suitable arrangements. It will also be appreciated that the peg board 10 does not require any bosses 20. For example, one or more of the openings 18 may receive at least a portion of a fastener used to mount the peg board 10 to a desired structure.
  • [0070]
    As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5-7, the peg board 10 may include one or more ribs 22 that may be sized and configured to strengthen and/or reinforce the peg board 10, the openings 18 and/or the bosses 20. Additionally, the ribs 22 may be used to contact, abut and/or engage the mounting surface to which the peg board 10 is attached, which may help the ribs brace against the mounting surface to strengthen and reinforce the peg board 10 and/or the bosses 20. Further, because the ribs 22 may contact, abut and/or engage the mounting surface, the peg board 10 does not require any additional spacers. It will be understood, however, the ribs may be spaced apart from the mounting surface and that the peg board 10 may be attached to the mounting surface using spacers, if desired.
  • [0071]
    As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, one or more ribs 22 may be connected to and extend from a particular boss 20. For example, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, at least one pair of ribs 22 may be connected to and extend from a boss 20. In addition, a rib 22 may extend between and interconnect a pair of bosses 20.
  • [0072]
    As shown in FIGS. 2-6, the ribs 22 also may be connected to the sides 16 of the peg board 10. For example, a rib 22 may extend from and interconnect a pair of generally opposing sides 16 of the peg board 10. Also, for example, a rib 22 may extend from and interconnect a side 16 of the peg board 10 and a boss 20. It will be understood that the ribs 22 may be connected to other suitable portions of the peg board 10, such as the openings 18.
  • [0073]
    The peg board 10 may also include one or more flanges or walls, which are preferably sized and configured to at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of any attachment members attached to the peg board. For example, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 5-7, the peg board 10 may include flanges 24 and a receiving portion 26 may be formed by the flanges 24. The receiving portion 26 is preferably sized and configured to receive a portion of the attachment member and at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of the attachment member. Thus, the flanges 24 and/or the receiving portions 26 may advantageously help maintain the attachment member in the desired location. If desired, the flanges 24 may be sized and configured to deform and/or deflect to help retain the attachment member in the desired position using a snap fit, a friction fit and/or an interference fit.
  • [0074]
    The flanges 24 may extend rearward from the front portion 12 of the peg board 10 and toward a mounting surface to which the peg board is attached. At least a portion of the flanges 24 may be sized and configured to contact, abut and/or engage the mounting surface; but the flanges may be spaced apart from the mounting surface, if desired. For example, as best seen in FIG. 7, the flanges 24 may be spaced apart from a rear portion 14 of the peg board 10. Consequently, the rear portion 14 may contact, abut and/or engage the mounting surface while the flanges 24 may be spaced apart from and do not contact, abut or engage the mounting surface. The mounting surface to which the peg board 10 is attached may cooperate with the flanges 24 to help restrict the movement of the attachment member depending upon a variety of factors including, but not limited to, the depth (or thickness) of the peg board, the sizes of the flanges, the size of the receiving portion formed by the flanges, the distance between the mounting surface and the flanges, the distance between the mounting surface and the receiving portion, and the size, shape and/or configuration of the attachment member. For example, to help restrict the movement of the attachment members, the peg board 10 may have a thickness between about ½ of an inch (1.3 centimeters) and ¾ of an inch (1.9 centimeters). It will be understood, however, that the peg board 10; the flanges 24; the receiving portions 26; etc. may have any of a variety of suitable shapes, sizes and dimensions depending, for example, upon the intended use of the peg board.
  • [0075]
    As shown in FIGS. 3 and 5-7, the receiving portions 26 may advantageously allow the peg board 10 to be used in a variety of orientations and/or with a variety of different types of attachment members. For example, a first pair of flanges 24 may be positioned above an opening 18 to form a first receiving portion 26 positioned above the opening and a second pair of flanges 24 may be positioned below the opening to form a second receiving portion 26 positioned below the opening. It will be appreciated that one or more flanges 24 may be positioned above the opening 18, below the opening, to the right of the opening, to the left of the opening, and/or in other suitable locations relative to the opening to form correspondingly located receiving portions 26. It will also be appreciated that the flanges 24 may contact, abut and/or engage a portion of the opening 18 or may be spaced apart from the opening.
  • [0076]
    The flanges 24 and/or the receiving portions 26 may advantageously save time and money. For example, as mentioned above, some conventional hooks include a first portion that is inserted into a first opening of the peg board and a second portion that is inserted into a second opening of the peg board to prevent rotational movement of the hooks. As mentioned above, this second portion, which may be a welded leg or pin, may undesirably increase the cost of the hooks. Advantageously, an attachment member used with the peg boards 10 does not require use of a second portion and a second opening because the flanges 24 and/or the receiving portions 26 may at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of the attachment member. Also, because the flanges 24 and/or the receiving portions 26 may at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of the hooks, the hooks do not require any additional straps to secure them to the peg boards 10. However, the flanges 24 and/or receiving portions 26 can, if desired, be used in connection with hooks that have a second portion that is attached to a second opening and/or straps to secure the hooks in the desired position.
  • [0077]
    As shown in FIGS. 6-7, the flanges 24 may include a body 28 with a first surface 30 and a second surface 32. At least a portion of the surface 30 may contact, abut and/or engage at least a portion of an attachment member, which may at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of the attachment member and may help maintain the attachment member in a desired location. In addition, the surface 30 may be sized and configured to help retain the attachment member in the desired position using a snap fit, a friction fit and/or an interference fit. In particular, the first surface 30 of a first flange 24 may contact, abut and/or engage a first portion of the attachment member and the first surface 30 of a second flange 24 may contact, abut and/or engage a second portion of the attachment member. For instance, the first surfaces 30 of the first and second flanges 24 may contact, abut and/or engage generally opposing portions of the attachment member.
  • [0078]
    The surfaces 30, 32 of the body 28 of a flange 24 may be separated by a generally constant distance, which may provide the body with a generally constant thickness that may be more easily manufactured using, for example, a molding process. In addition, the surfaces 30, 32 may be generally smooth and generally planar. It will be appreciated, however, that the surfaces 30, 32 need not be generally smooth or generally planar.
  • [0079]
    As shown in further detail below, the flanges and/or other portions of peg boards may have a variety of suitable designs. For example, the exemplary peg board 34 shown in FIGS. 8-10 may include flanges 36, which may help define receiving portions 38, 40. Advantageously, the receiving portions 38, 40 may be sized and configured to receive at least a portion of an attachment member when the peg board 34 is arranged in multiple orientations. In this configuration, the receiving portions 38 may be sized and configured to receive a portion of an attachment member when the peg board 34 is positioned horizontally and the receiving portions 40 may be sized and configured to receive a portion of the attachment member when the peg board 34 is positioned vertically.
  • [0080]
    As shown in FIGS. 8-10, the flanges 36 may have an elongated shape. At least a portion of the ends 42 of the elongated flanges 36 may contact, abut and/or engage at least a portion of the attachment member. If desired, the flanges 36 may include a first end 42 that is sized and configured to contact, abut and/or engage at least a portion of a first attachment member, and a second end that is sized and configured to contact, abut and/or engage at least a portion of a second attachment member. This may advantageously allow an individual flange 36 to help maintain multiple attachment members in desired locations, which may help reduce the number of required flanges. Reducing the number of required flanges may help reduce manufacturing costs by requiring less material to manufacture the peg board 34.
  • [0081]
    As shown in FIGS. 9-10, the ends 42 of the elongated flanges 36 may include rounded portions, which may be sized and configured to retain the attachment member in the desired position using a snap fit, a friction fit and/or an interference fit. In addition, the rounded portions may advantageously facilitate manufacturing the peg board 34 using, for example, a molding process. The flanges 36 preferably have a generally curved, non-linear shape, which may help the flanges deform and/or deflect to help retain the attachment member in the desired position. It will be appreciated, however, that the flanges 36 do not require any rounded portions or a generally elongated or curved shape and may have other suitable features, shapes and/or configurations.
  • [0082]
    As shown in FIGS. 11-19, another exemplary peg board 44 may include flanges 46 with a body 48 and one or more projections, protrusions or extensions 50. At least a portion of the projections 50 may contact, abut and/or engage at least a portion of an attachment member, which may at least substantially prevent the rotational movement of the attachment member and may advantageously help maintain the attachment member in a desired location. In addition, the projections 50 may be sized and configured to retain the attachment member in the desired position using a snap fit, a friction fit and/or an interference fit.
  • [0083]
    As shown in FIG. 19, the peg board 44 may include one or more guides 52 that may be positioned proximate a portion of the openings 18. The interior surfaces of the guides 52 may form a generally square or rectangular shaped configuration that has a substantially larger cross sectional area than the circular cross sectional area of the openings 18. This larger cross sectional area may help reduce the friction that may result when inserting attachment members into and removing attachments members from the openings 18. The guides 52 are preferably spaced apart from a rear portion 14 of the peg board 44. Consequently, the rear portion 14 may contact, abut and/or engage the mounting surface while the guides 52 are spaced apart from and preferably do not contact, abut or engage the mounting surface.
  • [0084]
    As shown in FIGS. 20-23, still another exemplary peg board 54 may include flanges 56 with bodies 58 that may have rounded or beveled corners 60. The rounded or beveled corners 60 may advantageously facilitate manufacturing the peg board 54 using, for example, a molding process. It will be appreciated, however, that the bodies 58 of the flanges 56 do not require any rounded or beveled corners 60.
  • [0085]
    The peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 can also be used in connection with other components or structures such as a shelf. For example, as shown in FIG. 24, the peg board 10 may be used in connection with a shelf 62. One or more shelf brackets may be attached to the peg board 10 and the shelf brackets may be attached to and/or support the shelf 62. The shelf brackets may, for example, be connected to a single peg board 10 or multiple peg boards. Advantageously, the shelf brackets may be attached to a single opening 18 or a plurality of openings, if desired. When the peg board 10 and the shelf brackets are used to install the shelf 62, the peg board may be used to provide other features or aspects. For example, the peg board 10 may provide additional storage below the brackets, below the shelf 62 and the like. The peg board 10 may also allow other attachment members to be attached.
  • [0086]
    As shown in FIG. 24, the shelf 62 may be connected to the peg board 10 by a living hinge 64. Advantageously, the living hinge 64 may be integrally formed with the peg board 10 and the shelf 62 as part of a unitary, one-piece structure during a molding process (such as injection molding) or another suitable manufacturing process. Desirably, the unitary, one-piece structure may help to more quickly and easily install the shelf 62 because the shelf and the peg board 10 are already aligned. In addition, the unitary, one-piece structure may help more securely install the shelf 62 because the shelf is connected to the peg board 10 and the peg board is connected to the mounting surface. The shelf 62, however, may be connected to the peg board 10 may other suitable mechanisms and structures.
  • [0087]
    The peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 are preferably constructed of plastic (such as polycarbonate), which may allow a relatively lightweight and durable structure to be created. The plastic peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 may also be quickly and easily formed into a desired shape, size, arrangement and configuration. In addition, the plastic peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 may have a variety of textures and/or patterns (such as a wood pattern). Moreover, the plastic peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 and their features may be integrally formed as part of a unitary, one-piece structure during a manufacturing process, such as an injection molding process or other molding process. The plastic peg boards 10, 34, 44, 54 are preferably formed from injection molded plastic, but they could also be constructed from other suitable materials and/or processes.
  • [0088]
    Although this invention has been described in terms of certain preferred embodiments, other embodiments apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art are also within the scope of this invention. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is intended to be defined only by the claims which follow.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A peg board comprising:
    an elongated structure constructed from plastic, the elongated structure having a unitary, one-piece configuration formed during a molding process, the elongated structure including:
    a front portion integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the front portion including a plurality of openings, the plurality of openings including a first opening sized and configured to receive a portion of a first attachment member;
    a plurality of sidewalls integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the plurality of sidewalls being disposed proximate the front portion, each of the plurality of sidewalls including a rear portion sized and configured to abut a mounting surface;
    a first wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process; and
    a second wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the first and second walls forming at least a part of a first receiving portion sized and configured to receive a portion of the first attachment member and restrict the rotational movement of the first attachment member, the first and second walls being spaced apart from the rear portions of the plurality of sidewalls to space the first and second walls apart from the mounting surface.
  2. 2. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein at least one of the plurality of sidewalls of the elongated structure forms at least a part of the first receiving portion.
  3. 3. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein the first wall is connected to and extends away from at least one of the plurality of sidewalls of the elongated structure.
  4. 4. The peg board as in claim 3, wherein the second wall is connected to and extends away from at least one of the plurality of sidewalls of the elongated structure.
  5. 5. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein the first wall is connected to and extends away from the front portion of the elongated structure.
  6. 6. The peg board as in claim 5, wherein the second wall is connected to and extends away from the front portion of the elongated structure.
  7. 7. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein the first receiving portion is sized and configured to receive a portion of the first attachment member using at least one of a snap fit, a friction fit or an interference fit.
  8. 8. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein the first wall is sized and configured to deform or deflect as the first receiving portion receives a portion of the first attachment member.
  9. 9. The peg board as in claim 1, wherein the elongated structure further includes a rib integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process; wherein the rib extends rearwardly from the front portion of the elongated structure; wherein the rib includes a rear portion sized and configured to abut a mounting surface; and wherein the rib forms at least a part of the first receiving portion.
  10. 10. A peg board comprising:
    an elongated structure constructed from plastic, the elongated structure having a unitary, one piece configuration formed during a molding process, the elongated structure including:
    a front portion integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the front portion including a plurality of openings, the plurality of openings including a first opening sized and configured to receive a portion of a first attachment member;
    a first wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process;
    a second wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the first and second walls forming at least a part of a first receiving portion sized and configured to receive a portion of the first attachment member and restrict the rotational movement of the first attachment member, at least a portion of the first receiving portion being disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in a first position, at least a portion of the first receiving portion being disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in a second position;
    a third wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process;
    a fourth wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one piece configuration during the molding process, the third and fourth walls forming at least a part of a second receiving portion sized and configured to receive a portion of the first attachment member and restrict the rotational movement of the first attachment member, at least a portion of the second receiving portion being disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in the first position, at least a portion of the second receiving portion being disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in the second position.
  11. 11. The peg board as in claim 10, wherein the first receiving portion is disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in the first position; wherein the second receiving portion is disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in the first position; wherein the first receiving portion is disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in the second position; and wherein the second receiving portion is disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in the second position.
  12. 12. The peg board as in claim 10, wherein the first and second walls are disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in the first position; wherein the third and fourth walls are disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in the first position; wherein the first and second walls are disposed below the first opening when the elongated structure is in the second position; and wherein the third and fourth walls are disposed above the first opening when the elongated structure is in the second position.
  13. 13. A peg board comprising:
    a unitary, one-piece structure constructed from plastic, the unitary, one-piece structure including:
    a front portion integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during a molding process, the front portion including a row of at least two openings sized and configured to receive a portion of an attachment member, the row including a first opening sized and configured to receive a portion of a first attachment member;
    an elongated upper sidewall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process, the upper sidewall extending rearwardly from the front portion;
    a elongated lower sidewall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process, the lower sidewall extending rearwardly from the front portion;
    a left sidewall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process, the left sidewall extending rearwardly from the front portion;
    a right sidewall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process, the right sidewall extending rearwardly from the front portion;
    a first wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process; and
    a second wall integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process, the first and second walls forming at least a part of a first receiving portion sized and configured to receive a portion of the first attachment member and restrict the rotational movement of the first attachment member, the first and second walls being spaced apart from the left and right sidewalls of the unitary, one-piece structure.
  14. 14. The peg board as in claim 13, wherein the elongated upper sidewall forms at least a part of the first receiving portion.
  15. 15. The peg board as in claim 13, wherein the first wall is connected to and extends away from the elongated upper sidewall.
  16. 16. The peg board as in claim 15, wherein the second wall is connected to and extends away from the elongated upper sidewall.
  17. 17. The peg board as in claim 13, wherein the first wall is connected to and extends away from the front portion of the unitary, one-piece structure.
  18. 18. The peg board as in claim 17, wherein the second wall is connected to and extends away from the front portion of the unitary, one-piece structure.
  19. 19. The peg board as in claim 17, wherein the unitary, one-piece structure further includes a rib integrally formed as part of the unitary, one-piece structure during the molding process; wherein the rib extends rearwardly from the front portion of the unitary, one piece structure; wherein the rib includes a rear portion sized and configured to abut a mounting surface; and wherein the rib forms at least a part of the first receiving portion.
US11565483 2005-12-12 2006-11-30 Peg board Abandoned US20070210023A1 (en)

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US74996905 true 2005-12-12 2005-12-12
US29244612 USD572064S1 (en) 2005-12-12 2005-12-12 Pegboard
US11565483 US20070210023A1 (en) 2005-12-12 2006-11-30 Peg board

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Owner name: LIFETIME PRODUCTS, INC., UTAH

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MOWER, BARRY D.;REEL/FRAME:019128/0523

Effective date: 20070404