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Snowboards and the like having integrated dynamic light displays related to snowboard motion

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Publication number
US20070194558A1
US20070194558A1 US11358491 US35849106A US2007194558A1 US 20070194558 A1 US20070194558 A1 US 20070194558A1 US 11358491 US11358491 US 11358491 US 35849106 A US35849106 A US 35849106A US 2007194558 A1 US2007194558 A1 US 2007194558A1
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spin
moving
around
tail
forward
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US11358491
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Christopher Stone
Robert Schaefer
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Stone Christopher A
Schaefer Robert J
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C5/00Skis or snowboards
    • A63C5/003Structure, covering or decoration of the upper ski surface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C17/00Roller skates; Skate-boards
    • A63C17/26Roller skates; Skate-boards with special auxiliary arrangements, e.g. illuminating, marking, or push-off devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C17/00Roller skates; Skate-boards
    • A63C17/01Skateboards
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C2203/00Special features of skates, skis, roller-skates, snowboards and courts
    • A63C2203/14Lighting means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C2203/00Special features of skates, skis, roller-skates, snowboards and courts
    • A63C2203/18Measuring a physical parameter, e.g. speed, distance

Abstract

Selected patterns of lights are displayed on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard according to the motion of the board. A selection of patterns is stored in a processor memory, the motion of the board is measured (for example with accelerometers) and a pattern is selected from memory based on the measured motion. Then lights on the board are blinked on and off in the selected pattern. Accelerometer inputs are analyzed and a series of states is derived for each accelerometer axis. A series of states can be analyzed as a set to select a different pattern. Also, the magnitude of the states (such as duration, speed, or intensity) may affect the pattern selected. The process may be adaptive, so that the analyzing step further analyzes user weight or past snowboarding style to set adaptive thresholds for selecting patterns.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to a snowboard or the like having a programmable display of lights which is responsive to the motion of the board. More particularly, the present invention relates to a dynamic snowboard, ski, skateboard, or helmet whereby detection of combinations of velocity, acceleration, impact, shock and or surface flexure and strain, control and initiate a programmable display of lights and sound that is integrated into the snowboard, skateboard, skis and helmet.
  • [0003]
    2. Discussion of Background Art
  • [0004]
    Owners of snowboards, skateboards, skis, and the like have long decorated their recreational conveyances with eye-catching elements. These decorative elements also serve a safety purpose as they make the rider more visible. Hence, fluorescent colors, reflectors, and lights have all been used to decorate these sorts of recreational conveyances. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,802,636 describes a skateboard having light recessed into the sides of the board. The lights are illuminated in one of a predetermined set of patterns, such as flashing, strobing, twinkling, and solid sequences. The user selects the light sequence by setting the position of a switch.
  • [0005]
    However, thus far, there has not been a way to generate light patterns from the recreational conveyance that are dependent upon the movement of the recreational conveyance—speed, landing, turning and the like. A need remains in the art for methods and apparatus for snowboards and the like having integrated programmable display of lights which is responsive to the motion of the board.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0006]
    It is an object of the present invention to provide snowboards and the like having integrated programmable display of lights which is responsive to the motion of the board. This object is accomplished by providing an integrated visual display of lights or light emitting diodes (LEDs) that when triggered by any of several motion-related inputs shall provide a programmed display that produces light patterns based upon the sensor responses from the snowboard, skateboard, skis or helmet.
  • [0007]
    Additionally the output may consist of an audible or audio output, that when triggered by any of the motion-related inputs shall provide a programmed audio sequence that follows or produces patterns based upon the sensor responses from the snowboard skis, skateboard or helmet. The audio and visual outputs may be combined or operate independently.
  • [0008]
    For example a rider hits a jump and the various sensors determine that the snowboard, skateboard or skis are in free space. The proposed system shall detect this condition and trigger a programmed audio and or visual display. Upon contacting the surface again the system shall detect the impact and trigger a new and different display of audio and or visual content.
  • [0009]
    The device is capable of detecting such data as velocity from sensors placed on the snowboard, skateboard, and skis or via an input from a Global Positioning System (GPS) or the like, and generating a visual display that is functionally related and dynamically adjusts to the sensed velocity. For example two strings of sequential lights located longitudinally along the board surface may flash in sequence down the length of the board and increase in frequency as the speed of the board increases.
  • [0010]
    A method of displaying selected patterns of lights on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard includes the steps of:
  • [0000]
    (a) loading a processor memory on the recreational conveyance with a selection of patterns
  • [0000]
    (b) measuring the motion of the recreational conveyance;
  • [0000]
    (c) selecting a pattern from processor memory based upon measured motion; and
  • [0000]
    (d) selectively lighting lights on the recreational conveyance according to the selected pattern.
  • [0011]
    The measuring step may be performed by two accelerometers.
  • [0012]
    Generally the selecting step includes analyzing the accelerometer inputs and deriving a series of states for each accelerometer axis, and performing a matching step which analyzes the derived states and selecting patterns in a lookup table according to the analysis results. analyzing step may further analyzes series of states as a set, for example to determine that the snowboard is performing a spin.
  • [0013]
    The analyzing step my further analyze the magnitude of states, wherein the magnitude of a state includes duration, speed (or rate), and intensity.
  • [0014]
    Preferably the analyzing step includes self-learning. It further analyzes adaptive attributes (such as user weight and style of snowboarding over time) and accordingly sets adaptive thresholds for selecting patterns.
  • [0015]
    The step of selectively lighting the LEDs includes converting the selected pattern into serial data, conveying the serial data to an LED decoder and power driver, decoding the serial data, and alternatively powering and unpowering selected LEDs in LED arrays according to the decoded data.
  • [0016]
    Preferably, the invention includes a sleep mode. Thus, steps (c) and (d) are suspended and no patterns are displayed if nothing is happening and hence step (b) indicates activity below a predetermined level.
  • [0017]
    The lighting step may also select the brightness of lighted lights, or a clock rate for patterns
  • [0018]
    Apparatus for selectively displaying light patterns on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard comprises a memory for storing a set of lighting patterns, an array of lights affixed to the recreational conveyance, sensors for determining the motion of the recreational conveyance and providing sensor output, input circuitry for generating data signals based upon the sensor output, a processor for decoding the data signals and for retrieving patterns from the memory based upon the decoded data signals; and an LED driver circuit for alternatively lighting and extinguishing lights in the array according to the retrieved patterns.
  • [0019]
    Generally, the sensor output is analog and the input circuitry includes a low pass filter for filtering the sensor output and an analog to digital converter for converting filtered data into digital data. As a feature, an input port may be provided for downloading patterns into the memory from an external device. Also, an output port may be included for uploading data based upon the sensor output for external processing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1 is a side schematic drawing of a snowboard having a dynamic light display according to the present invention.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 2 is a plan schematic view of the snowboard of FIG. 1.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 3 is a side schematic drawing of a skateboard having a dynamic light display according to the present invention, having top side graphics.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 4 is a plan schematic view of the skateboard of FIG. 3.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 5 is a side schematic drawing of a second embodiment of skateboard having a dynamic light display according to the present invention, having bottom side graphics.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 6 is a plan schematic view of the skateboard of FIG. 5.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 7 is a side schematic drawing of a ski having a dynamic light display according to the present invention.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 8 is a plan schematic view of the ski of FIG. 7.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 9 is a block diagram illustrating the elements of a first embodiment of the dynamic light system of the present invention, as used with a snowboard.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 10 is a block diagram illustrating the elements of a second embodiment of the dynamic light system of the present invention, as used with a skateboard or ski.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 11 is a side schematic drawing of a snowboard or the like, showing accelerations derived from system sensors visible form the side.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 12 is a plan schematic view of the snowboard or the like of FIG. 11, visible from the top (or bottom).
  • [0032]
    FIG. 13 is a block diagram illustrating example of the processor, display controller, and LED display module elements of FIGS. 9 and 10.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 14 is a flow diagram showing the broad software operations performed in the dynamic light display or the present invention.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 15 is a flow diagram showing the interrupt handler operations associated with the sample process and LED process of FIG. 14.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 16 is a state diagram illustrating the process of categorizing each accelerometer axis into one of six states.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0036]
    The following reference numbers used in the Figures are associated with the following elements of the invention:
      • 1 Snowboard
      • 2 Flexible printed circuit layer
      • 3 Color graphic layer
      • 4 Board binding sub-plate for electronics and batteries
      • 5 Multi color LEDs
      • 6 Self adhesive laminate comprising 2+3+5
      • 7 Three-axis accelerometer
      • 8 Skateboard
      • 9 Ski
      • 10 Truck housing for batteries and electronics
      • 20, 40 Strain gage signals
      • 22, 34, 122 Accelerometer signals
      • 24, 36, 124 Filters
      • 26, 30, 38, 126, 130 Signal processing
      • 28, 128 Audio input
      • 32, 132 A/D converters
      • 42, 142 External program input
      • 44, 144 Memory
      • 46, 146 Processors
      • 48, 148 Software
      • 50, 150 Power drivers
      • 52, 54, 152, 154 LEDs
      • 55, 155 LED signal decode
      • 58 Batteries
      • 60, 160 Control circuitry
      • 62 Programmer interface
      • 64 External programming
      • 202-226 Software processes
  • [0065]
    FIGS. 1-8 show a variety of recreational conveyances having light displays according to the present invention. Generally, the display of lights 5 is triggered by the detected acceleration and velocity of the device. One or more 2 axis or 3 axis accelerometer circuits 7 powered by a battery (not shown) may be used to measure the motion of the recreational conveyances. The accelerations derived from accelerometers 7 are shown in FIGS. 11 and 12. The output from the accelerometers 7 is processed electronically via circuitry shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, which is built into the recreational conveyance, such as snowboard 1, ski 9, skateboard 8, or helmet. Accelerometers 7 provide acceleration, velocity, and/or distance data that are used to control lighting displays on the recreational conveyance. Software algorithms illustrated in FIGS. 13-16 are used to determine the pattern response of the light emitting devices based upon the detected motion of the recreational conveyance.
  • [0066]
    FIGS. 1-8 are very similar and are described together, with differences between the recreational conveyances delineated after the general description. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate a snowboard 1, FIGS. 2 and 4 illustrate a skateboard 8A, FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a second embodiment of a skateboard 8B, and FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate a ski 9. The snowboard 1 preferably includes two accelerometers, one in front and one in back. The skis 9 and skateboards 8 will generally include only one accelerometer each (though they could use two if desired).
  • [0067]
    All of the recreational conveyances include at least one sensor, usually an accelerometer 7, which is placed on the conveyance. Sensors placed on the conveyance detect the normal loaded condition, which is the steady state condition of the conveyance with a rider in a static state. These sensors might be accelerometers 7 mounted on the surface of the conveyance such that they differentially measure the movement of the conveyance. As an alternative, the sensors could comprise strain gages, or GPS receivers, or other detectors capable of determining motion of the conveyance. When a change is a detected in the state of the conveyance, a programmable display sequence is initiated where a sequence of lights and is triggered that will flash according to the programmed sequence.
  • [0068]
    The entire system can be manufactured using a multi layer flexible sheet. The sheet consists of multiple layers with adhesive between them. The layers comprise one or more flexible printed circuit layers that utilize a silkscreen technology to create the circuit traces. These printed circuit layers may contain all or some of the electronics components used in the system. The electronic components including the light emitting diodes are surface mount devices that can be attached directly to the printed circuit layers. A plastic top protective layer is back screen printed with a graphic overlay that provides protection for the printed circuit layer and has clear areas for the LEDs to shine through. The graphic screened layer is easily changed to accommodate different graphics in production. Additionally users can design custom graphics displays for their personal system.
  • [0069]
    The entire system can be assembled onto a snowboard, skateboard, or pair of skis at the time of manufacture, or can be manufactured as an aftermarket kit that can be easily applied to an existing snowboard, skateboard or pair of skis. Some additional of the product are for bicycles, motorcycles, snowmobiles and automobiles.
  • [0070]
    In the preferred embodiments, the graphics portion of the device consists of a plastic layer 3 including a graphic design that is screen printed, painted or the like, and is illuminated by a series of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) 5 of sufficient brightness to be seen clearly in daylight and bright sunshine. The series of LEDs can be mounted on a surface of the conveyance using a plastic and metal flexible circuit 2 or by embedding in the physical material of the conveyance. The color graphic layer 3, flexible printed circuit layer 2, and multicolor LEDs 5 can be combined in a complete self adhesive laminate 6 that can be applied to existing or new snowboards, skis, skateboards and helmets. This may be applied on the top or bottom surface of the snowboard, ski, or skateboard. The graphic can form a backdrop for the illuminating light system. For example the graphic may portray a pinball machine, and the LEDs fire off in sequences to simulate a pinball bouncing from bumper to bumper. Audio output could be generated in synchronization with the visual display to simulate a pinball machine.
  • [0071]
    Due to the flexible properties of the self-adhesive laminate this system can be readily adapted to operate in a similar fashion on other moving devices such as bicycles, motorcycles and automobiles.
  • [0072]
    The flexible sheet 6 that comprises the upper surface mounting system can be applied (retrofitted) to existing snowboards, skis or skateboards in addition to being applied by a manufacturer of said devices. The unit power may be provided by a rechargeable battery system of sufficient power to last a minimum of 8 hours of operation. This battery may be enclosed in a waterproof enclosure that is part of the flexible membrane system.
  • [0073]
    FIG. 1 is a side schematic drawing of a snowboard 1 having a dynamic light display on its top surface. FIG. 2 is a plan schematic view of the snowboard of 1. In the preferred embodiment, snowboard 1 includes two 3-axis accelerometers 7, one in the front and one in the rear. This allows detection of not just speed, direction, and overall acceleration, but also the characteristics of flips, turns, and jumps. Table 1 illustrates the state descriptions possible with the use of two 3-axis accelerometers. Each state may be assigned its own light display pattern, if desired. In addition, the displays may vary according to the magnitude of the response (e.g. speed, duration, and/or intensity) and/or the order in which different states occur. For example, a faster turn might trigger a brighter pattern, or a left turn pattern might be ignored if it is determined to be part of a spin. A simple microprocessor device (See FIG. 9) processes the data obtained from the accelerometer devices 7 and calculates the effective motions of the board. Using a set of pre-programmed conditions that can be stored in the microprocessor memory, the appropriate light and sound pattern is set in motion. For a snowboard 1 the battery compartment 4 can readily double as the stomp pad or as part of the bindings.
  • [0074]
    Another important feature of the present invention is its ability to automatically adapt to the user. For example, a light user who snowboards slowly and carefully needs different thresholds for setting off patterns than a heavy, intense boarder. The present invention self calibrates such that over time each user will see a similar range of patterns. A user switch may also be provided to allow the user to bias the self calibration, for example to require that the board motion reach a certain level of intensity to set off patterns.
  • [0075]
    The signal /display controller module and LED display modules are mounted on a snow board providing daylight viewable entertaining light patterns on the board in response to actions the snow boarder takes. As an example, a snow boarder does a flip, the LEDs illuminate in a dancing pattern indicating the flip to the viewing audience. If the snow boarder wipes out and crashes, then the lights perform a different pattern representing the accident (yard sale). The pattern, the speed the pattern changes and length of the pattern is varied to match the intensity of the action. The invention is not limited in the application for a snowboard—it may be used for entertainment or scientific purposes in a variety of other applications.
  • [0076]
    FIG. 3 is a side schematic drawing of a skateboard 8A having a top side dynamic light display according to the present invention. FIG. 4 is a plan schematic view of skateboard 8A. For a skateboard 8, the battery compartment 10 may be incorporated as part of the truck wheel assembly.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 5 is a side schematic drawing of a second embodiment of a skateboard 8B having a bottom side dynamic light display. FIG. 6 is a plan schematic view of skateboard 8B. For skateboards 8B where the self adhesive laminate layer 6 is applied to the lower surface of the skateboard, replaceable grinding/rubbing strips 11 may be used to protect the laminate layer.
  • [0078]
    FIG. 7 is a side schematic drawing of a ski 9 having a top-side dynamic light display according to the present invention. FIG. 8 is a plan schematic view of ski 9.
  • [0079]
    FIG. 9 is a block diagram illustrating the elements of a first embodiment of the dynamic light system of the present invention, as used with a snowboard or other conveyance utilizing two accelerometers 7. Accelerometer front signals 22 and accelerometer back signals 34 are provided to circuitry 60, which controls LED arrays 52, 54 via signal decoder 55 and power driver 50. Accelerometer signals 22, 34 are provided to signal processing units 26, 38 via filters 24, 36. An A/D converter 32 converts the analogue signals into digital signals for use by processor 46. Processor 46 utilizes stored software algorithms 46 to select patterns from memory 44, based upon the accelerometer inputs 22, 34.
  • [0080]
    The prototype LED arrays 52, 54 are 10-inch by 10-inch assemblies that hold 32 LEDs 5 each. The LEDs are sunlight visible. Two LED Display modules 52, 54 are used on snowboard 1—one on the front (designated Front Flip) and one on the back (Back Flip). LED selection is critical to achieve the conflicting goals of visibility in sunlight and low power. These display modules may be built entirely on a flexible printed circuit card that is part of the entire graphics circuit assembly.
  • [0081]
    The system may be personalized through the use of a personal computer software program via interface 42. This software program allows individual users to program the threshold levels, intensity and sequence of the light display patterns. The software program permits the user to “dry run” the light display programs on the computer monitor prior to transferring it to the recreational conveyance. Multiple custom sequences may be programmed and stored in the system memory 44. For example a rider may run one sequence for downhill riding and a different sequence for the snowboard park that involves different motions and threshold levels.
  • [0082]
    FIG. 9 shows several optional features with dotted line borders. For example, strain gage signals 20, 40 or audio input signals 28 (via signal processor 30) might also be provided to circuitry 60 and be taken into account in selecting light patterns.
  • [0083]
    FIG. 10 is a block diagram illustrating the elements of a second embodiment of the dynamic light system of the present invention, as used with a skateboard 8 or ski 9, or other conveyance using only one accelerometer 7. Since it is very similar to FIG. 9, similar elements are similarly numbered, and much of the description is the same.
  • [0084]
    FIG. 11 is a side schematic drawing of a snowboard or the like, showing accelerations derived from system sensors 7. FIG. 12 is a plan schematic view of the snowboard or the like of FIG. 11, viewed from the top (or bottom). In the embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12, two 3-axis accelerometers are used, providing sets of signals in the x, y, and z axes (horizontal, longitudinal, and vertical). These signals are used to derive the relative position, velocity and acceleration of the snowboard. Signal processing resolves acceleration data into velocities, and subsequently distance. Through the use of a look-up table it is possible to determine what activities are being performed on the snowboard, when acceleration data is matched to time information. See Table 1, for an example of how this is done. Certain sequences of accelerations within a timeframe can signal a specific action and the on-board electronics processing can be programmed to output a specific pattern relative to this sequence of events.
  • [0085]
    For example a rider is accelerating downhill in a normal left-right motion, the accelerometers will produce continuous positive vertical and a positive longitudinal component on both front and rear devices while alternate positive and negative horizontal components that are relatively slow in changing will be observed from the 2 measuring devices. The “set of events” can be then used to trigger a specific light pattern. If the rider for example during a normal descent rotates the snowboard around an axis at the rear end of the board the sequence set will change accordingly and a different pattern of lights will be triggered.
  • [0086]
    If we examine the accelerations generated from a normal descent there is an initial condition setting where we will see a positive vertical acceleration (due to gravity) vectored with a longitudinal positive acceleration as the board points down the hill. As speed increases the longitudinal accelerations will increase and at some point the rider will make either a heel or toe turn (left hand or right hand motion) generating a horizontal acceleration. This will then be followed by a short vertical descent and then transition into a horizontal component of the opposite direction.
  • [0087]
    Using the acceleration notation as shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, a typical equation for this action would be:
    {Yf+&Yb+&Zf+&Zb+} then t1+{>Yf+&>Yb+&Zf+&Zb+}
    then t2+{<Yf+&<Yb+&<Zf+&<Zb+&>Xf−&>Xb+}
    then t3+{>Yf+&>Yb+&>Zf+&>Zb+}
    then t4+{<Yf+&<Yb+&<Zf+&<Zb+&>Xf+&>Xb−}
  • [0088]
    Where t1, t2, t3, and t4 are time intervals between the detected accelerations.
  • [0089]
    FIG. 13 is a block diagram illustrating a specific hardware example of the control circuitry 60, display controller 50, and LED display module elements 52, 54 of FIGS. 9 and 10. The prototype electronics unit is a 12 inch by 1 inch assembly that holds microprocessor circuitry 60 (for example a PIC), two accelerometers 7 to sense motion, as well as interface and diagnostic circuitry 62. It operates from three or four AA battery cells 58 with an expected life of at least 8 hours per battery set. It can run from −40 degrees F. to 100 degrees F. Production versions of the controller assembly can be built entirely on a flexible printed circuit card 2 that is part of the entire graphics/circuitry assembly, or built into structures such as the base of snowboard 4 or ski bindings or the truck wheels assembly 10 of a skateboard.
  • [0090]
    In one embodiment, controller 60 is programmed in the ‘C’ programming. The Controller provides debug capability without adding hardware in the form of an In Circuit Debugger (ICD). In Circuit Debugging capability is built into every Signal Processor and Display Controller. This also enables the product to be programmed after it is assembled. The user of this system is able to input to programs of different patterns and levels of sensitivity into the system by a simple electronic connection from a computer or other electronic device such as a PDA or a memory chip similar to those used in digital cameras and USB memory devices. These patterns can be pre-programmed using a personal computer program and demonstrated on a computer screen to simulate the real time responses of the system. Then this data set is exported to the system on the recreational conveyance.
  • [0091]
    Controller circuitry 60 has a micro controller that interprets the output of two three-axis accelerometers 7. Depending on the accelerations detected, the micro controller selects a display pattern. This pattern is output to the LED Display modules 52, 54 over a four-wire interface. The LED Display module consists of a 32 bit serial shift register, one register bit per LED, one drive transistor per LED and 32 sunlight visible LEDs 5. Each LED has a single dropping resistor from the positive supply voltage. For debug purposes, the Controller has an RS232 interface and an ICD interface. Both may be accessed simultaneously. In normal use, neither is required. The RS232 interface continuously outputs accelerometer and status information during normal operation.
  • [0092]
    A second software program 64 for the personal computer allows the user to playback logged data from the system. The system controller logs all of the state changes detected by the system during operation. This log may be transferred out of the system via a memory device or computer interface and replayed out on the computer using playback software. This software program when used with a ski area map or skateboard park layout can overlay the motion, and path of the snowboard, skis or skateboard and show the resulting display on the computer monitor.
  • [0093]
    FIG. 14 is a flow diagram showing the broad software operations performed in the dynamic light display or the present invention. The software periodically digitizes the accelerometer outputs, interprets the digitized values and outputs the appropriate pattern of lights. The raw A/D values and the detected Pattern are simultaneously output on the RS-232 interface for debug and data logging purposes. This enables applications reaching far beyond the initial targeted entertainment purposes.
  • [0094]
    The Initialization Process configures internal micro controller peripherals to:
      • 1. Setup the master oscillator to be the internal RC at 4 MHz
      • 2. Setup the A/D inputs, set the A/D range and converter clock
      • 3. Setup the periodic interrupt rate for the Sample and Output processes
      • 4. Setup the serial interface to the board LEDs
      • 5. Turn on the interrupts!
      • 6. Signal “Ready” over the serial interface.
  • [0101]
    After initialization, five processes are at work in the software—digitizing accelerometer 7 outputs 22, 34 every 100 msec in Accelerometer Sampling step 202, analyzing the accelerometer outputs to determine states in State Process step 204 (see FIG. 16), matching the states to events, and thence to associated patterns in Event Matching step 206, outputting the selected patterns as serial data in Serial Process step 208, and enabling the LEDs according to the serial data, in LED Process step 210.
  • [0102]
    The State process is shown in FIG. 16. The output states are inputs to Event Matching step 206. The event matching process (step 206) is the most complex part of the software.
  • [0103]
    The Pattern Match process takes the output of the state analyzer, matches these inputs to “events”, and sets Pattern, Pattern Speed and Pattern Length values to match the intensity of the event. The speed of the LED pattern is proportional to the maximum velocity that the state analyzer reports. The duration of the LED pattern is proportional to the maximum velocity*elapsed time that the state analyzer reports. This corresponds to distance. These parameters are converted to LED driving signals by the Output Process.
  • [0104]
    The pattern matcher overwrites patterns, so the last pattern matched is displayed. Consequently, the lowest priority states are analyzed first. If they have a match and a higher priority state also has a match, the higher priority state over writes the lower priority state. The following states are listed in order of priority, lowest first:
      • Axes are showing<1 g
      • An axis is in takeoff TKOFF (2) state
      • An axis is in landing LNDNG (5) state
  • [0108]
    The Match process initiates a new LED pattern if we have a takeoff or a landing, LNDNG or TKOFF states. To do this, it must first generate an integer that uniquely represents the board state. Then, this integer indexes into a list that maps unique board state to a LED pattern. Finally, Pattern Speed and Length are calculated based on maximum velocity and elapsed time.
  • [0109]
    To generate the integer we analyze the state, per axis. We define a threshold below which we consider the axis to be not accelerating. Assign ‘0’ to mean no acceleration above the threshold, ‘−’ to mean negative acceleration above the threshold and ‘+’ to mean a positive acceleration above the threshold. In the board long axis Y, there are only three states the board can be in:
      • not accelerating (0)
      • accelerating forward (+)
      • accelerating backward (−)
  • [0113]
    In the vertical Z and cross X axes, there are two independent accelerometers to detect motion. In these axes, there are nine acceleration states
      • none (0/0)
      • “front up” with “back up” (+/+)
      • “front up” with “back pivot” (+/0)
      • “front pivot” with “back up” (0/+)
      • “front down” with “back down” (−/−)
      • “front down” with “back pivot” (−/0)
      • “front pivot” with “back down” (0/−)
      • Counter Clock Wise rotation (+/−)
      • Clock Wise rotation (−/+).
  • [0123]
    We can summarize the states as:
      • 0, +, −; The 3 linear accelerations states (Y)
      • 0/0, +/+, −/−, +/−, −/+, +/0, 0/+, −/0, 0/−; The 9 linear and rotary acceleration states (X and Z)
  • [0126]
    There are 243 states as a result (9*3*9 states). Assign a value of 0 to ‘0’, 1 to ‘+’ and 2 to ‘−’ for the Y axis. Assign a value of 0 to (0/0), 1 to (+/+), 2 to (−/−), 3 to (+/−), 4 to (−/+), 5 to (+/0), 6 to (0/+), 7 to (−/0) and 8 to (0/−) for the X and Z Axes. The unique integer=27*X_Value+9*Y_Value+Z_Value. It is easy to see that all states are decoded and that different patterns may be displayed on the front and back of the board. The states the Match Process can detect are shown in Table 1.
  • [0127]
    FIG. 15 is a flow diagram showing the interrupt handler operations associated with the software process of FIG. 14. The Timer 2 interrupt handler performs two processes—The Sample Process 202 and the LED Output Process 210. These processes operate independently of each other. This interrupt handler is called one hundred times per second at 10 mS intervals in step 220. Firmware counters increase the interval between when the processes run.
  • [0128]
    The Sample Process 202 digitizes the accelerometers ten times per second. It uses a firmware divide-by-ten counter to increase the interval between accelerometer digitization to 100 mS, a ten times per second rate. After the accelerometers are digitized, a global flag is set in step 222 to signal the Match Process 206 in the main body of the code that new accelerometer values are available for pattern matching. Digitized Accelerometer values are passed as globals.
  • [0129]
    Two independent but identical output processes run—one for the Front and one for the Back LED flip boards. The LED Processes 210 use separate firmware divide-by-N counters to set the interval between when the output processes run to be longer than the 10 mS one-hundred times per second rate, in step 224. The interval multipliers, NFront and NBack, are set in the main body of the code by the Match Process. Low values of N means the process runs more often. This process calculates the next set of LEDs 5 to illuminate and instructs the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) to output that stream to the Front Flip and Back Flip boards. In addition to the interval counter, the LED Process 210 also is instructed how many times it is to run before turning off the LEDs 5. This sets the length of the displayed pattern.
  • [0130]
    After the hardware setup is complete and the interrupts are enabled, the timer 2 interrupt occurs, the Sample Process occurs, accelerometer data is digitized and the “System Ready” pattern of LEDs is output. The final act of the interrupt is to signal to the software operation that new samples are ready for interpretation. Step 226 causes the process to pause or sleep until the 10 mSec interval is over.
  • [0131]
    FIG. 16 is a state diagram illustrating the process of categorizing accelerometer outputs into states. The State Process of FIG. 16 categorizes data related to each accelerometer axis into one of six states. These states correspond to the acceleration to start a body in motion to the acceleration to return the body to its original velocity. For skiers and snowboarders, these accelerations appear as pulses whose areas are equal and opposite.
  • [0132]
    We can describe these six states as:
    • S0 REST—no velocity, no acceleration, initial resting condition
    • S1 ACCEL—during this time, the velocity is increasing. Upon entry the time and initial acceleration is stored. Upon exit, store max velocity.
    • S2 TKOFF—signal to the Pattern Match process acceleration is done, do takeoff pattern match
    • S3 COAST—during this time, the velocity is constant, coasting
    • S4 DECEL—during this time, the velocity decreases to zero
    • S5 LNDNG—signal to the pattern match section deceleration is done, do landing pattern match
  • [0139]
    States S2 and S5 are transient; they signal the Pattern Match process to analyze the state and output a pattern if there is a match. State S2 corresponds to takeoff. State S5 corresponds to landing.
  • [0140]
    Match process 206 plugs the output of the State Analyzer of FIG. 16 into a lookup table like Table 1 in order to determine desired patterns based on accelerometer data.
  • [0141]
    Match Process
    TABLE 1
    State Table of Accelerations vs Activity
    Front/Back Front/Back
    # X Y Z Acceleration State Description
    0 0/0 0 0/0 None
    1 0/0 0 0/+ Tip press
    2 0/0 0 0/− Tail drop
    3 0/0 0 +/0 Tail press
    4 0/0 0 +/+ Upward
    5 0/0 0 +/− Back Flip
    6 0/0 0 −/0 Tip drop
    7 0/0 0 −/+ Front Flip
    8 0/0 0 −/− Downward
    9 0/0 + 0/0 moving Forward
    10 0/0 + 0/+ moving Forward Tip press
    11 0/0 + 0/− moving Forward Tail drop
    12 0/0 + +/0 moving Forward Tail press
    13 0/0 + +/+ moving Forward Upward
    14 0/0 + +/− moving Forward Back Flip
    15 0/0 + −/0 moving Forward Tip drop
    16 0/0 + −/+ moving Forward Front Flip
    17 0/0 + −/− moving Forward Downward
    18 0/0 0/0 moving Backward
    19 0/0 0/+ moving Backward Tip press
    20 0/0 0/− moving Backward Tail drop
    21 0/0 +/0 moving Backward Tail press
    22 0/0 +/+ moving Backward Upward
    23 0/0 +/− moving Backward Back Flip
    24 0/0 −/0 moving Backward Tip drop
    25 0/0 −/+ moving Backward Front Flip
    26 0/0 −/− moving Backward Downward
    27 0/+ 0 0/0 CCW spin around Nose
    28 0/+ 0 0/+ CCW spin around Nose Tip press
    29 0/+ 0 0/− CCW spin around Nose Tail drop
    30 0/+ 0 +/0 CCW spin around Nose Tail press
    31 0/+ 0 +/+ CCW spin around Nose Upward
    32 0/+ 0 +/− CCW spin around Nose Back Flip
    33 0/+ 0 −/0 CCW spin around Nose Tip drop
    34 0/+ 0 −/+ CCW spin around Nose Front Flip
    35 0/+ 0 −/− CCW spin around Nose Downward
    36 0/+ + 0/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Forward
    37 0/+ + 0/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Tip press
    38 0/+ + 0/− CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Tail drop
    39 0/+ + +/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Tail press
    40 0/+ + +/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Upward
    41 0/+ + +/− CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Back Flip
    42 0/+ + −/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Tip drop
    43 0/+ + −/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Front Flip
    44 0/+ + −/− CCW spin around Nose moving Forward Downward
    45 0/+ 0/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Backward
    46 0/+ 0/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Tip press
    47 0/+ 0/− CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Tail drop
    48 0/+ +/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Tail press
    49 0/+ +/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Upward
    50 0/+ +/− CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Back Flip
    51 0/+ −/0 CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Tip drop
    52 0/+ −/+ CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Front Flip
    53 0/+ −/− CCW spin around Nose moving Backward Downward
    54 0/− 0 0/0 CW spin around Nose
    55 0/− 0 0/+ CW spin around Nose Tip press
    56 0/− 0 0/− CW spin around Nose Tail drop
    57 0/− 0 +/0 CW spin around Nose Tail press
    58 0/− 0 +/+ CW spin around Nose Upward
    59 0/− 0 +/− CW spin around Nose Back Flip
    60 0/− 0 −/0 CW spin around Nose Tip drop
    61 0/− 0 −/+ CW spin around Nose Front Flip
    62 0/− 0 −/− CW spin around Nose Downward
    63 0/− + 0/0 CW spin around Nose moving Forward
    64 0/− + 0/+ CW spin around Nose moving Forward Tip press
    65 0/− + 0/− CW spin around Nose moving Forward Tail drop
    66 0/− + +/0 CW spin around Nose moving Forward Tail press
    67 0/− + +/+ CW spin around Nose moving Forward Upward
    68 0/− + +/− CW spin around Nose moving Forward Back Flip
    69 0/− + −/0 CW spin around Nose moving Forward Tip drop
    70 0/− + −/+ CW spin around Nose moving Forward Front Flip
    71 0/− + −/− CW spin around Nose moving Forward Downward
    72 0/− 0/0 CW spin around Nose moving Backward
    73 0/− 0/+ CW spin around Nose moving Backward Tip press
    74 0/− 0/− CW spin around Nose moving Backward Tail drop
    75 0/− +/0 CW spin around Nose moving Backward Tail press
    76 0/− +/+ CW spin around Nose moving Backward Upward
    77 0/− +/− CW spin around Nose moving Backward Back Flip
    78 0/− −/0 CW spin around Nose moving Backward Tip drop
    79 0/− −/+ CW spin around Nose moving Backward Front Flip
    80 0/− −/− CW spin around Nose moving Backward Downward
    81 +/0 0 0/0 CW spin around Tail
    82 +/0 0 0/+ CW spin around Tail Tip press
    83 +/0 0 0/− CW spin around Tail Tail drop
    84 +/0 0 +/0 CW spin around Tail Tail press
    85 +/0 0 +/+ CW spin around Tail Upward
    86 +/0 0 +/− CW spin around Tail Back Flip
    87 +/0 0 −/0 CW spin around Tail Tip drop
    88 +/0 0 −/+ CW spin around Tail Front Flip
    89 +/0 0 −/− CW spin around Tail Downward
    90 +/0 + 0/0 CW spin around Tail moving Forward
    91 +/0 + 0/+ CW spin around Tail moving Forward Tip press
    92 +/0 + 0/− CW spin around Tail moving Forward Tail drop
    93 +/0 + +/0 CW spin around Tail moving Forward Tail press
    94 +/0 + +/+ CW spin around Tail moving Forward Upward
    95 +/0 + +/− CW spin around Tail moving Forward Back Flip
    96 +/0 + −/0 CW spin around Tail moving Forward Tip drop
    97 +/0 + −/+ CW spin around Tail moving Forward Front Flip
    98 +/0 + −/− CW spin around Tail moving Forward Downward
    99 +/0 0/0 CW spin around Tail moving Backward
    100 +/0 0/+ CW spin around Tail moving Backward Tip press
    101 +/0 0/− CW spin around Tail moving Backward Tail drop
    102 +/0 +/0 CW spin around Tail moving Backward Tail press
    103 +/0 +/+ CW spin around Tail moving Backward Upward
    104 +/0 +/− CW spin around Tail moving Backward Back Flip
    105 +/0 −/0 CW spin around Tail moving Backward Tip drop
    106 +/0 −/+ CW spin around Tail moving Backward Front Flip
    107 +/0 −/− CW spin around Tail moving Backward Downward
    108 +/+ 0 0/0 Right
    109 +/+ 0 0/+ Right Tip press
    110 +/+ 0 0/− Right Tail drop
    111 +/+ 0 +/0 Right Tail press
    112 +/+ 0 +/+ Right Upward
    113 +/+ 0 +/− Right Back Flip
    114 +/+ 0 −/0 Right Tip drop
    115 +/+ 0 −/+ Right Front Flip
    116 +/+ 0 −/− Right Downward
    117 +/+ + 0/0 Right moving Forward
    118 +/+ + 0/+ Right moving Forward Tip press
    119 +/+ + 0/− Right moving Forward Tail drop
    120 +/+ + +/0 Right moving Forward Tail press
    121 +/+ + +/+ Right moving Forward Upward
    122 +/+ + +/− Right moving Forward Back Flip
    123 +/+ + −/0 Right moving Forward Tip drop
    124 +/+ + −/+ Right moving Forward Front Flip
    125 +/+ + −/− Right moving Forward Downward
    126 +/+ 0/0 Right moving Backward
    127 +/+ 0/+ Right moving Backward Tip press
    128 +/+ 0/− Right moving Backward Tail drop
    129 +/+ +/0 Right moving Backward Tail press
    130 +/+ +/+ Right moving Backward Upward
    131 +/+ +/− Right moving Backward Back Flip
    132 +/+ −/0 Right moving Backward Tip drop
    133 +/+ −/+ Right moving Backward Front Flip
    134 +/+ −/− Right moving Backward Downward
    135 +/− 0 0/0 CW spin
    136 +/− 0 0/+ CW spin Tip press
    137 +/− 0 0/− CW spin Tail drop
    138 +/− 0 +/0 CW spin Tail press
    139 +/− 0 +/+ CW spin Upward
    140 +/− 0 +/− CW spin Back Flip
    141 +/− 0 −/0 CW spin Tip drop
    142 +/− 0 −/+ CW spin Front Flip
    143 +/− 0 −/− CW spin Downward
    144 +/− + 0/0 CW spin moving Forward
    145 +/− + 0/+ CW spin moving Forward Tip press
    146 +/− + 0/− CW spin moving Forward Tail drop
    147 +/− + +/0 CW spin moving Forward Tail press
    148 +/− + +/+ CW spin moving Forward Upward
    149 +/− + +/− CW spin moving Forward Back Flip
    150 +/− + −/0 CW spin moving Forward Tip drop
    151 +/− + −/+ CW spin moving Forward Front Flip
    152 +/− + −/− CW spin moving Forward Downward
    153 +/− 0/0 CW spin moving Backward
    154 +/− 0/+ CW spin moving Backward Tip press
    155 +/− 0/− CW spin moving Backward Tail drop
    156 +/− +/0 CW spin moving Backward Tail press
    157 +/− +/+ CW spin moving Backward Upward
    158 +/− +/− CW spin moving Backward Back Flip
    159 +/− −/0 CW spin moving Backward Tip drop
    160 +/− −/+ CW spin moving Backward Front Flip
    161 +/− −/− CW spin moving Backward Downward
    162 −/0 0 0/0 CCW spin around Tail
    163 −/0 0 0/+ CCW spin around Tail Tip press
    164 −/0 0 0/− CCW spin around Tail Tail drop
    165 −/0 0 +/0 CCW spin around Tail Tail press
    166 −/0 0 +/+ CCW spin around Tail Upward
    167 −/0 0 +/− CCW spin around Tail Back Flip
    168 −/0 0 −/0 CCW spin around Tail Tip drop
    169 −/0 0 −/+ CCW spin around Tail Front Flip
    170 −/0 0 −/− CCW spin around Tail Downward
    171 −/0 + 0/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Forward
    172 −/0 + 0/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Tip press
    173 −/0 + 0/− CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Tail drop
    174 −/0 + +/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Tail press
    175 −/0 + +/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Upward
    176 −/0 + +/− CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Back Flip
    177 −/0 + −/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Tip drop
    178 −/0 + −/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Front Flip
    179 −/0 + −/− CCW spin around Tail moving Forward Downward
    180 −/0 0/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Backward
    181 −/0 0/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Tip press
    182 −/0 0/− CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Tail drop
    183 −/0 +/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Tail press
    184 −/0 +/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Upward
    185 −/0 +/− CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Back Flip
    186 −/0 −/0 CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Tip drop
    187 −/0 −/+ CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Front Flip
    188 −/0 −/− CCW spin around Tail moving Backward Downward
    189 −/+ 0 0/0 CCW spin
    190 −/+ 0 0/+ CCW spin Tip press
    191 −/+ 0 0/− CCW spin Tail drop
    192 −/+ 0 +/0 CCW spin Tail press
    193 −/+ 0 +/+ CCW spin Upward
    194 −/+ 0 +/− CCW spin Back Flip
    195 −/+ 0 −/0 CCW spin Tip drop
    196 −/+ 0 −/+ CCW spin Front Flip
    197 −/+ 0 −/− CCW spin Downward
    198 −/+ + 0/0 CCW spin moving Forward
    199 −/+ + 0/+ CCW spin moving Forward Tip press
    200 −/+ + 0/− CCW spin moving Forward Tail drop
    201 −/+ + +/0 CCW spin moving Forward Tail press
    202 −/+ + +/+ CCW spin moving Forward Upward
    203 −/+ + +/− CCW spin moving Forward Back Flip
    204 −/+ + −/0 CCW spin moving Forward Tip drop
    205 −/+ + −/+ CCW spin moving Forward Front Flip
    206 −/+ + −/− CCW spin moving Forward Downward
    207 −/+ 0/0 CCW spin moving Backward
    208 −/+ 0/+ CCW spin moving Backward Tip press
    209 −/+ 0/− CCW spin moving Backward Tail drop
    210 −/+ +/0 CCW spin moving Backward Tail press
    211 −/+ +/+ CCW spin moving Backward Upward
    212 −/+ +/− CCW spin moving Backward Back Flip
    213 −/+ −/0 CCW spin moving Backward Tip drop
    214 −/+ −/+ CCW spin moving Backward Front Flip
    215 −/+ −/− CCW spin moving Backward Downward
    216 −/− 0 0/0 Left
    217 −/− 0 0/+ Left Tip press
    218 −/− 0 0/− Left Tail drop
    219 −/− 0 +/0 Left Tail press
    220 −/− 0 +/+ Left Upward
    221 −/− 0 +/− Left Back Flip
    222 −/− 0 −/0 Left Tip drop
    223 −/− 0 −/+ Left Front Flip
    224 −/− 0 −/− Left Downward
    225 −/− + 0/0 Left moving Forward
    226 −/− + 0/+ Left moving Forward Tip press
    227 −/− + 0/− Left moving Forward Tail drop
    228 −/− + +/0 Left moving Forward Tail press
    229 −/− + +/+ Left moving Forward Upward
    230 −/− + +/− Left moving Forward Back Flip
    231 −/− + −/0 Left moving Forward Tip drop
    232 −/− + −/+ Left moving Forward Front Flip
    233 −/− + −/− Left moving Forward Downward
    234 −/− 0/0 Left moving Backward
    235 −/− 0/+ Left moving Backward Tip press
    236 −/− 0/− Left moving Backward Tail drop
    237 −/− +/0 Left moving Backward Tail press
    238 −/− +/+ Left moving Backward Upward
    239 −/− +/− Left moving Backward Back Flip
    240 −/− −/0 Left moving Backward Tip drop
    241 −/− −/+ Left moving Backward Front Flip
    242 −/− −/− Left moving Backward Downward
  • [0142]
    These patterns may correspond to the more familiar terms: Buying Lift ticket, Standing in line, Getting on lift, Getting off lift, Start a run, Going fast, Grinding, Wipe out, Yard sale, Weightless, Hard impact, Stopping, Carving, Spinning, Flips, Misty, Tree bashing, Grabs, Bumping, Transporting board, Wake Up . . .
  • [0143]
    There is no reason to limit the application to a fixed threshold in the state detector. Variable acceleration thresholds may be used to ensure that riders experiencing lower g-loads experience the same range of visual effects as riders taking high g-loads. To do this, the maximum detected acceleration is low pass filtered with a slow decay. As the time between events passes, this value drops. A fixed percentage of this value is then used to set the acceleration thresholds described above. This sets the rate of visual effects to be based on the tricks thrown, not the weight of the rider. This also calibrates out short and long term drift of the sensing components.
  • [0144]
    While the present invention has been shown and described in the context of specific examples and embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that numerous changes in the form and details may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as encompassed in the appended claims.
  • [0145]
    Some alternative embodiments include the following. The system may also be programmed either automatically, if serious and dangerous conditions occur, or manually to display an “emergency” or help mode. For example if the light display is set to repetitively and alternately flash Red circles at each end of a snowboard this can signal to other skiers and the ski patrol that the rider is in trouble. Additionally the audio output can be made to generate continuous emergency alternating tones to attract attention This will aid in saving lives on the ski slopes by attracting immediate attention to the rider in trouble. This feature is of particular benefit in backcountry snowboarding or skiing where there is considerable risk of avalanches.
  • [0146]
    The system can also be used as a training device for people learning to snowboard and ski. The system can determine through the use of the sensors the relative position of the board to the snow surface and indicate that position through the illumination of the appropriate lights or LEDs. An example of this is a snowboarder learning to set a toe or heel edge on the snowboard. The system can detect when the board has been angled correctly and illuminate the appropriate edge side of the board. So for example if the rider makes a correct edge the lights along the side of that edge will illuminate correctly allowing the instructor to determine if the rider has achieved the correct action. Alternatively the snowboard can intelligently determine when a change in position or direction is needed and output an audible tone to aid the beginner snowboarder or skier in learning to correctly operate the board or skis.

Claims (19)

1. A method of displaying selected patterns of lights on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard comprising the steps of:
(a) loading a processor memory on the recreational conveyance with a selection of patterns
(b) measuring the motion of the recreational conveyance;
(c) selecting a pattern from processor memory based upon measured motion;
(d) selectively lighting lights on the recreational conveyance according to the selected pattern.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the measuring step is performed by two accelerometers.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the selecting step includes the substeps of:
analyzing the accelerometer inputs and deriving a series of states for each accelerometer axis;
a matching step for analyzing the derived states and selecting patterns in a lookup table according to the analysis results.
4. The method of claim 3, wherein the analyzing step further analyzes series of states as a set.
5. The method of claim 3, wherein the analyzing step further analyzes the magnitude of states, and wherein the magnitude of a state includes one or more of the following magnitude attributes:
duration;
speed;
intensity.
6. The method of claim 5, further wherein the analyzing step further analyzes one or more of the following adaptive attributes and sets adaptive thresholds for selecting patterns based upon analysis of adaptive attributes:
user weight;
past history of motion;
a user defined style setting.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein the step of selectively lighting comprises the steps of:
converting the selected pattern into serial data;
conveying the serial data to an LED decoder and power driver;
decoding the serial data
alternatively powering and unpowering selected LEDs in LED arrays according to the decoded data.
8. The method of claim 1, further including the step of suspending steps (c) and (d) if step (b) indicates activity below a predetermined level.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein the lighting step further includes the step of selecting the brightness of lighted lights.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein the lighting step further includes the step of selecting a clock rate for patterns.
11. Apparatus for selectively displaying light patterns on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard comprising:
a memory for storing a set of lighting patterns;
an array of lights affixed to the recreational conveyance;
sensors for determining the motion of the recreational conveyance and providing sensor output;
input circuitry for generating data signals based upon the sensor output;
a processor for decoding the data signals and for retrieving patterns from the memory based upon the decoded data signals;
a driver circuit for alternatively lighting and extinguishing lights in the array according to the retrieved patterns.
12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein the sensor output is analog and wherein the input circuitry includes a low pass filter for filtering the sensor output and an analog to digital converter for converting filtered data into digital data.
13. The apparatus of claim 11, further including an input port for downloading patterns into the memory from an external device.
14. The apparatus of claim 11, further including an output port for uploading data based upon the sensor output for external processing.
15. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein the lights are LEDs.
16. A kit for displaying patterns of lights on a recreational conveyance such as a snowboard comprising:
a memory for storing a set of lighting patterns;
an array of lights to be affixed to the recreational conveyance;
sensors for determining the motion of the recreational conveyance and providing sensor output;
input circuitry for generating data signals based upon the sensor output;
a processor for decoding the data signals and for retrieving patterns from the memory based upon the decoded data signals;
an LED driver circuit for alternatively lighting and extinguishing lights in the array according to the retrieved patterns.
17. The kit of claim 16 wherein the sensors comprise a 3-axis accelerometer.
18. The kit of claim 16 wherein the kit is contained in a multilayer flexible sheet for adhesion to the board.
19. The kit of claim 18 wherein the sensor, circuitry, processor, and driver comprise a flexible printed circuit board.
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