US20070194146A1 - A liquid atomizing nozzle - Google Patents

A liquid atomizing nozzle Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070194146A1
US20070194146A1 US11/466,965 US46696506A US2007194146A1 US 20070194146 A1 US20070194146 A1 US 20070194146A1 US 46696506 A US46696506 A US 46696506A US 2007194146 A1 US2007194146 A1 US 2007194146A1
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fluid
nozzle
fluid flow
chamber
formed
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US11/466,965
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Bruce Dorendorf
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Advanced Specialized Tech Inc
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Advanced Specialized Tech Inc
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Priority to US11/466,965 priority patent/US20070194146A1/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/10Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space the spraying being induced by a gaseous medium, e.g. water vapour
    • F23D11/101Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space the spraying being induced by a gaseous medium, e.g. water vapour medium and fuel meeting before the burner outlet
    • F23D11/102Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space the spraying being induced by a gaseous medium, e.g. water vapour medium and fuel meeting before the burner outlet in an internal mixing chamber
    • F23D11/103Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space the spraying being induced by a gaseous medium, e.g. water vapour medium and fuel meeting before the burner outlet in an internal mixing chamber with means creating a swirl inside the mixing chamber
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G2209/00Specific waste
    • F23G2209/10Liquid waste

Abstract

The present invention provides a nozzle capable of multiple atomizing steps of a liquid. In one configuration the nozzle provides atomization of a liquid fluid in a first direction and subsequent post atomization of the same liquid in a second direction to form a counter-flow nozzle. Accordingly, the liquid fluid to be dispensed is atomized in at least two separate stages causing improved atomization and the creation of particulate matter size of the liquid within a specified droplet spectrum. Furthermore, the present invention provides these features through an improved and simplified design providing potential cost savings to the end user due to the more effective operation of the nozzle and more efficient dispensing of fluid agents.

Description

    PRIORITY
  • The present invention claim priority to provisional patent application 60/710,934, filed on Aug. 24, 2005, the contents of which are entirely incorporated by reference for all purposes.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to an improved nozzle for atomization and to dispensing of fluids.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Fluid dispensing systems often utilizes nozzles to control the dispensing of fluid for a particular use. As the application of fluid dispensing devices has increased, so has that of available nozzles for controlling the pattern size and amount of fluids being dispensed. Accordingly, the fluid dispensing industry has developed nozzles for use with different applications. These nozzles include high pressure and low pressure nozzles. These nozzles also include high volume and low volume nozzle. However, certain nozzles have been designed to function properly under high or low pressure and/or high or low volume range.
  • In addition to being designed based upon the volume and pressure of fluids to be dispensed, nozzles may also be configured to control the droplet size or the droplet spectrum of fluid. In doing so, a designer may control not only the size of droplets being dispensed, but also the amount of liquid volume being dispensed from the nozzle. Furthermore, a designer can create a droplet spectrum to be dispensed (e.g., the percentage of droplets within a particular droplet size). The creation and modification of droplet size is commonly referred to as liquid atomization or under certain circumstances nebulization. The control of droplet size is particularly advantageous when dispensing fluids over a specific area and/or where a specific droplet size is required or preferred.
  • Applications of dispensed atomized fluids may include: insect control/eradication, pesticide applications, medicinal or medical product spraying applications, including spraying antibiotics among livestock, chickens, pigs, etc. and antidotes for potential terrorist activities, herbicide applications, insecticide applications, paint applications, pipe coating, misting applications, cooling applications, water applications, fertilizer applications, horticultural applications, solid-stream applications, and application of cleaning/stripping/degreasing solutions for household and industrial uses. Still other examples include pollution control, waste water treatment, humidification, food reprocessing odor control, environmental scenarios, any structures that requires coating on exterior or interior surfaces or in the application of fluids to other agriculture sectors.
  • In designing nozzles to control the particulate size of the fluid being dispensed, the nozzles are configured to cause pressurized gaseous fluid to mix with pressurized liquid fluid. During this mixing, the gas breaks up the larger molecules of liquid fluid into smaller particles or droplets. While the industry has provided certain nozzles for the dispensing of fluid liquids across regions, in this manner, these nozzles have failed to atomize the dispensed fluids in an effective and efficient manner (e.g., more energy is required to create a droplet of a specific size than is necessary) for proper dispensing, Accordingly, the fluids are not dispensed in small enough particulate matter to cover a specific area or the amount of liquid fluid being dispensed is disproportionate to the amount required for the given application or droplet size does not afford for uniform coverage or coating (e.g., the mill thickness created by the coating is not consistent or nonexistent) to be sufficiently effective.
  • Yet another shortcoming of prior art dispensing nozzles is the intricate and/or costly nozzle designs created to form a specific droplet size. In such systems, numerous components are typically utilized and assembled to form these nozzles. In doing so, seals or gaskets are typically used to prevent unwanted leakage of the pressured fluid through nozzle. Unfortunately, gaskets can degrade over time, which reduces the internal tolerances built into the nozzle. Furthermore, these gaskets must be replaced to prevent fluid leakage.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for a nozzle which adequately atomizes liquid in order to cause dispensing of the same over an area or volume of space, and preferably within a specific droplet spectrum and size. Furthermore, there is a need for a nozzle having a simplified design available at a potential lower cost of the nozzle and/or reduces the amount of material required to effectively treat or coat a specific area, volume or region. Furthermore, there is need for a nozzle which minimizes or eliminates the need for gaskets.
  • SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention overcomes the prior nozzle designs by providing a nozzle, and a method of dispensing fluids, which provides multiple atomizing steps of a liquid to be dispensed. In doing so, the nozzle provides for the atomization of a liquid fluid in a first direction and subsequent post atomization of the same liquid in a second direction. Accordingly, the liquid fluid to be dispensed is atomized in two separate stages causing improved atomization and the creation of particulate matter size of the liquid within a specified droplet spectrum. Furthermore, the present invention provides these features through an improved and simplified design providing potential cost savings to the end user due to the more effective operation of the nozzle and more efficient dispensing of fluid agents.
  • As should be appreciated, the present invention provides the ability to formulate droplets of a specific size or range of size (e.g., a droplet spectrum) for a specific application. Furthermore, as another benefit, with smaller droplet size, the dispensed liquid is capable of being airborne for a longer period of time thereby resulting in a larger or more effective application area. The formulation of a droplet spectrum is particularly important in the dispensing of fluid droplets for insect control where a specific amount of liquid fluid is required to affect the specific type insect. Alternatively, this is also important for medicinal applications where specific droplet size is desired for optimum application (e.g. nebulization or otherwise). Accordingly, with the creation of a specific range of droplet size, it is possible to reduce the amount of liquid agents used for a given application since over and/or under application of the liquid agent may be reduced.
  • In one aspect, the present invention provides a low or high pressure liquid atomizing nozzle (e.g. counter-flow or otherwise). The nozzle comprises a first member extending along an axis and having a first fluid connector for receiving a first fluid from a first fluid supply and a second fluid connector for receiving a second fluid from a second fluid supply. The first member includes a first mating surface for joining with a corresponding component through an attachment feature. The first member defines: i) a first fluid flow formed by a plurality openings formed through the first member which are in fluid connection with the first fluid supply means and configured for directing the first fluid at an angle with respect to the first axis, ii) a second fluid flow formed along the axis for directing the second fluid and iii) a third fluid formed by a plurality openings formed through the first member, the plurality of openings being in fluid connection with the first fluid supply means and configured for directing the first fluid at an angle with respect the axis. The second fluid flow path merges with the first fluid flow path to cause atomization of the second fluid and wherein the second fluid flow merges with the third fluid flow path to cause further atomization of the second fluid. The nozzle further includes a second member attached to the first member along the first axis, the second member defining a portion of the second fluid flow path.
  • In another aspect, the present invention provides an air liquid atomizing nozzle. The nozzle includes a first member extending along an axis and having a first fluid connector for receiving a first fluid from a first fluid supply and a second fluid connector for receiving a second fluid from a second fluid supply. The nozzle also includes a second member attached to the first member, wherein the first and second members defines: a first fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply, a second fluid flow formed from the second fluid supply, and a third fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply. The second fluid flow path merges with the first fluid flow to cause atomization of the second fluid and wherein the second fluid flow merges with the third fluid flow to cause further atomization of the second fluid.
  • In yet another aspect, the present invention provides a low pressure air liquid atomizing nozzle. The nozzle includes a housing member extending along an axis. The member includes a first fluid connector for receiving a first fluid from a first fluid supply and a second fluid connector for receiving a second fluid from a second fluid supply. The housing member defines a first fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply, a second fluid flow formed from the second fluid supply, and a third fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply. The second fluid flow path merges with the first fluid flow to cause atomization of the second fluid and wherein the second fluid flow merges with the third fluid flow to cause further atomization of the second fluid. The first fluid flow path may rotate in a first direction and the second fluid flow path rotates in a second direction.
  • It should be appreciated that any of the above features may be combined to form yet additional unique aspects or configurations of the present invention. Similarly, it should be appreciated that other unique aspects of the present invention exists as shown and described herein.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of one embodiment of a nozzle of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates another perspective view of the embodiment of the nozzle shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a side view of the nozzle shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an end view of the nozzle shown in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a cross sectional view of the nozzle shown in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5A illustrates an alternate configuration of the nozzle shown in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates and alternate configuration of the nozzle shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a nozzle of the present invention in one of many application of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides a method and apparatus for improved dispensing and atomization of fluid. In one aspect, the invention provides a nozzle for dispensing liquid wherein the liquid to be dispensed undergoes more than one atomization stage. In another aspect, the nozzle of the present invention may comprise two or more components, which during assembly do not require the use of gasket material to prevent leakage of fluid through the nozzle. Other features should be appreciated as described herein.
  • The nozzle of the present invention is particularly useful with the dispensing of liquid fluids in conjunction with gaseous fluids. For example a first fluid may comprise a gaseous fluid (such as air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, or any other gas capable of use with an atomization process), and the second fluid may comprise a liquid fluid (such as water, oil, chemical composition or otherwise). While it should be appreciated that the numerous gases and liquids may be used with the nozzle of the present invention, from here forth, the first fluid will be generically termed air and the second fluid generically termed liquid.
  • In the dispensing of fluids through the nozzle, air is used to atomize the molecules of liquid. This is advantageous as the atomization process of the present invention is capable of achieving a droplet spectrum within a predetermined range. For example, in the application of insecticide, only specific amounts of liquid agent are required to terminally affect a specific insect. In such an application, a droplet spectrum of between 5-30 microns is formed through the nozzle. In contrast, the prior art nozzles fail to provide such a spectrum but instead dispense liquid in a much larger spectrum or none at all. This leads to excessive dispensing of liquid agent due to excessive amount of large or ineffectively small droplets. Furthermore, the prior art nozzles do not provide efficient dispensing of a droplet spectrum as they require excessive energy to formulate droplet between 5-30 microns, or otherwise. Still further, the prior art nozzles are unnecessarily complex in design, thereby increasing the cost of forming the nozzle.
  • In a most preferred embodiment, after the initial atomization of the liquid, the liquid is again atomized with a second application of air to further reduce the dispensed droplet size. Still further, it is contemplated with the nozzle of the present invention that more than two atomization stages may be utilized to achieve the desired droplet spectrum.
  • The atomization of the liquid may be achieved by a first and second application of air in a first direction. In such a configuration, it is contemplated that the direction of the first and second application may be clockwise, counterclockwise, or at some angle with respect to the axis of the nozzle. However, it is contemplated that the direction of the application of air may be different between the first and second application. In otherwise, the first application of air generated may be clockwise and the second application of air may be counterclockwise. Other configurations are available.
  • In one preferred embodiment, the application of air with respect to the liquid is in a direction different from the motion of the fluid. Upon impact of the air with the liquid fluid, the liquid particles are atomized and follow the path of the air, e.g. first airflow path. Thereafter, another application of air is applied to the mixture of the air and liquid in a direction different from the motion direction of the mixture. In one preferred configuration, the direction of the first application of air is opposite the application of the second air. For example, it is contemplated that the direction of the first application of air may be in a clockwise direction, which may be straight, arcuate or even helical flow path, while the second application of air is in a counterclockwise direction, which may be straight, arcuate or even helical flow path, or vise versa. Furthermore, the direction of the holes may correspond to the naturally occurring air flow of the nozzle to achieve improved efficiency.
  • Referring to FIGS. 1-5, one embodiment of the nozzle 10 of the present invention is illustrated. The nozzle provides a dual stage atomization of a liquid fluid. The nozzle includes a first member 12 and a second member 14. The first and second members extend along axis A. The first and second members are attached together using a suitable attachment feature such as a threaded fastener 16 or otherwise. In a preferred embodiment, the first and second member includes a first and second mating surface 18, 20, respectively. In one preferred embodiment, the first and second mating surfaces are formed, such as through machining or otherwise, with high tolerances such that upon joining of the first and second mating surfaces no appreciable gap exists through the width of the joint. Such tolerances are preferably in the range of 1/1000- 1/10,000. It should be appreciated that the tolerance requirements are dependent upon the pressure and fluid type (e.g. air, water, oil, or otherwise). Accordingly, by the resulting joint the nozzle of the present invention does not require a use of a seal or gasket between the first and second members to prevent leakage of fluid. However, the nozzle of the present invention still may use a gasket between the first and second component or otherwise, particularly during dispensing of high pressure fluids.
  • As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the first member 12 of the nozzle provides a first chamber 22 configured for receiving a first fluid and directing the fluid tangential with respect to axis A, thereby forming a rotational or even a helical or vortex current within the chamber. The first chamber is defined by a base portion 24 and a first wall 26 located radially from the nozzle axis A. The first wall extends from the base portion at a distance from the nozzle axis. Preferably, the distance between the wall portion and the nozzle axis increases as the first chamber extends away from the base portion. This allows the air flow path to have an increasing radius as it moves along axis A. It should be appreciated that given the increasing radius and speed of the air flow along the exterior walls forming the first chamber, a vacuum is formed in a central portion of the first chamber, which generally as a center along the nozzle axis.
  • The first chamber 22 is configured for receiving a first fluid through a plurality of first openings 28. The plurality of openings extends through the first member to a first fluid supply 30. The openings are located radially from the nozzle axis and extend to the first supply at an angle with respect to the axis of the nozzle. Preferably, the axis of the holes and the nozzle are non-parallel. More preferably, the axis of the openings intersect wall 26 such that any fluid exiting the openings impacts and deflects thereby causing the fluid to circulate about the wall to form a rotational, helical or vortex air flow current. As such, it is contemplated that the axis of the openings do not intersect the axis of the nozzle. Furthermore, the openings may be equally spaced about the nozzle axis and the axis of the openings are formed in an array about the nozzle axis.
  • The nozzle is also configured to receive a second fluid into the first chamber. The second fluid enters the first chamber through a central opening 32 formed in the base portion 24 and extending through the first member 12 to a second fluid supply means 34. Preferably, the opening 32 is located in a central portion of the base portion and more preferably substantially along the axis of the nozzle. Accordingly, as a result of a vacuum being formed by the rotational movement of the air within the first chamber, the second fluid is equally dispersed into the first air flow. In one preferred embodiment, the axis of opening 32 coexists with the axis of the nozzle.
  • The first fluid enters the first chamber at a first end 36, rotates about the chamber, and exits a second end 38 of the chamber along a first flow path F1. The first flow path is generally conically shaped between the first and second ends of the chamber, wherein the central portion is generally hollow. In a preferred embodiment, the first wall forming the chamber extends 360 degrees about an axis of the first member. More preferably, the first chamber comprises a conical shape or even more preferably, a frustoconical shape, wherein the first end nearer the base portion is narrower than the second end or exit portion of the chamber.
  • In operation, the first fluid enters through the plurality of openings 38 and collides with the first wall portion 26 causing an angular impact and the first fluid to circulate about the first chamber as it first from the first end to the second end of the chamber. This circulating movement causes a helical or vortex current and creates a negative pressure (e.g. vacuum) in the center of the first chamber. During the rotational movement of the first fluid, a second fluid enters the first chamber through the opening 32. As the fluid enters the chamber, it is drawn to the first wall due to the negative pressure created through the movement of the first fluid along the first fluid path F1. Upon the second fluid entering the flow of the first fluid, the first fluid collides with the second fluid causing the second fluid to break up into droplets, commonly referred to as atomization. Upon collision, the second fluid follows the first fluid path F1 and exits the first chamber at the second end 38.
  • In one configuration, it is contemplated that the first chamber may include one or more features for disrupting the fluid flow along the first flow path to create a more turbulent airflow, or otherwise, for the purposes of further atomizing the second fluid. For example, in one configuration, it is contemplated that the first air flow path may be partially or even completely laminar at one or more portions of the air flow path, particularly at the second end of the nozzle. In order to create further atomization, it is contemplated that the one or more features may be added along the wall portions forming the first air flow. This may include projections, recesses or other contoured surface. In one particular configuration, referring to FIG. 5A, it is contemplated that one or more rings 56 may be formed one the first wall at the second end of the nozzle, which extends about the nozzle axis. As a result of such rings, it is contemplated that the air flow would cross over the rings and be drawn outwardly to collide with yet another airflow path, as described herein. Other configurations are available.
  • Optionally, the second fluid may be pre-atomized prior to entering the first chamber. In such a configuration, the second fluid is already in a combination liquid-gaseous state as it travels along opening 32 and into the first chamber. Alternatively in another embodiment, or in conjunction with the previous embodiment, an additional chamber may be included with the nozzle to pre-atomize or atomize the second fluid prior to entering the first chamber. Such a chamber may be located between the second fluid supply means and the first chamber.
  • For example, referring to FIG. 5, one example of a pre-atomizing chamber 40 is illustrated in phantom. In this configuration, the pre-atomizing chamber is configured for hydraulic shearing of the second fluid prior to entering the first chamber. As shown, the chamber is attached to the nozzle via an attachment feature 42 such as a snap fit, threaded configuration or otherwise. In this configuration, the second fluid traveling along opening 32 exits the opening and enters the pre-atomizing chamber. The pre-atomizing chamber is shaped to cause dispersion of the liquid fluid into smaller droplets through hydraulic shearing. The second fluid then exits the pre-atomizing chamber and enters the first chamber as described above. However, in this configuration, the second fluid now entering the first chamber comprises a liquid-gaseous mixture as oppose to a substantially liquid fluid. It should be appreciated that one or more pre-atomization chambers may be used either before or after the second liquid fluid enters the nozzle. Also, it should be appreciated that the pre-atomizing chamber may be further configured with additional features to control the fluid flow characteristic (e.g., velocity, direction, laminar or turbulent fluid flow, or otherwise). Such features include the same features as discussed with the openings of the nozzle as discussed herein.
  • The nozzle of the present invention further includes a second chamber 44 configured for forming a second fluid flow path F2 and providing an additional atomization step to the fluid exiting the first chamber. The second chamber is defined by a base portion 24 and a second wall 46 located radially from the axis of the nozzle and extending from the base portion. The second chamber is also defined by an interior wall 48 of the second member 14. As with the first chamber, the interior wall of the second member and the second wall portion extending radially about the nozzle axis. However, in contrast to the first chamber, as the interior wall of the second member and the second wall extends to the exit portion of the second chamber, the distance to the wall portions decrease thereby causing divergence of the second fluid flow path F2 towards the nozzle axis.
  • Similar to the first chamber, the first fluid enters the second chamber through a plurality of openings 50 formed in the base portion 24 and extending through the first member to the first fluid supply means 30. The openings are located radially from the axis of the nozzle “A” and extend to the first supply means at an angle with respect to the axis of the nozzle. Preferably, the axis of the holes and the nozzle are non-parallel. More preferably, the axis of the openings intersects the interior wall 48 of the second member 14 such that any fluid exiting the openings deflect and circulate about the wall to form a rotational, helical or vortex current. As such, in a preferred embodiment the axis of the openings do not intersect the axis of the nozzle. Furthermore, preferably the openings are equally spaced about the nozzle axis and the axis of the openings are formed in an array about the nozzle axis.
  • As with the first chamber, as the first fluid enters the second chamber at a first end 52, rotates about the chamber, and exits a second end 54 of the chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the interior sidewalls of the second member extend 360 degrees about an axis of the first member. The first chamber may comprise a conical shape or even a frustoconical shape, wherein the first end nearer the base portion is narrower than the second end or exit portion of the chamber. As shown in the drawings, the first chamber may be located within the second chamber.
  • In operation, the first fluid enters through the plurality of openings and collides with the interior wall portion 48 at an angle causing the first fluid to rotate about the second chamber, along the interior wall 48 from the first end of the nozzle to the second end. This rotational movement causes a rotational, helical or vortex current and creates a negative pressure in the central portion of the first chamber.
  • Optionally, it is contemplated that the second chamber may include one or more features for disrupting the fluid flow along the first flow path to create a more turbulent airflow, or otherwise, for the purposes of further atomizing the second fluid. For example, in one configuration, it is contemplated that the second air flow path may be partially or even completely laminar at one or more portions of the air flow path, particularly at the second end of the nozzle. In order to create further atomization, it is contemplated that the one or more features may be added along the wall portions forming the second air flow. This may include projections, recesses or other contoured surface. In one particular configuration, referring to FIG. 5A, it is contemplated that one or more rings 56 may be formed one the wall at the second end of the nozzle, which extends about the nozzle axis. As a result of such rings, it is contemplated that the air flow would cross over the rings and be drawn outwardly to collide with yet another airflow path, as described herein. Other configurations are available.
  • As previously mentioned, the flow direction (e.g. clockwise, counterclockwise, or otherwise) of the first fluid flow and the second fluid flow may be the same or different. This may include a difference in angular direction and/or rotation about the axis of the nozzle, or may include no angular rotation at all with respect to one of the fluid flow paths. However, in one preferred embodiment, the rotation of the first fluid flow F1 and the second fluid flow F2 are in opposite directions. Accordingly, it is contemplated that the first fluid flow may move in a clockwise or counterclockwise manner about the axis of the nozzle while the second fluid flow moves in an opposite direction, or vice versa.
  • The difference in angular rotation and/or direction causes a greater collision of the first fluid flow exiting the second chamber 44 with the mixed first and second fluid flow exiting the first chamber 22. This collision causes the droplets of the second liquid fluid to break up into smaller droplets through atomization, as discussed herein.
  • As previously mentioned already, openings 28, 32 and 50 may be configured to provide desired fluid flow characteristics for optimum atomization of the liquid fluid to be dispensed through the nozzle. Such characteristics may include velocity, direction, whether the fluid flow is laminar or turbulent, or otherwise, Accordingly, it is contemplated that the openings may be machined with high tolerances, polished, coated, or otherwise configured to improved fluid flow velocity. The opening may also include texturing, cross hatching, embedded material, threads or other features configured to cause a turbulent fluid flow. The opening may also include lands (e.g., raised portions such as rings 56), grooves, inserts or other features to control the fluid flow direction. It should be appreciated that any of the above combination of opening features may be combined.
  • Also, in another optionally feature, the central opening 32 may be configured with a spiral grooved configuration adapted to form a helical airflow within the central opening, which is opposite the helical air flow formed in the first air chamber. Accordingly, the fluid exiting the central opening may rotate in a clockwise manner while the fluid in the first chamber is rotating in a counterclockwise manner, or vise versa. Advantageously, this will provide increased impact force between the first and second fluid.
  • One unique aspect of the present invention is the nozzles ability to atomize the fluid exiting the second portion. In doing so, the first chamber and the second chamber may include side walls (e.g., 26, 46 and 48) that are configured to further cause collision between the fluids exiting the first and second chambers. For example, the first walls portions 26 of the first chamber 22 may be configured to cause divergence of the fluid flow path with respect to the axis of the nozzle. Accordingly, as the mixed first and second fluid moves from the first to the second end 36 of the first chamber 38, the radius of the helical or vortex path increases. This continues upon exiting the first chamber due to the mass momentum of the mixed fluid flow and upon exiting the first chamber collides with the fluid exiting the second chamber.
  • In contrast, the interior walls of the second chamber may be configured to cause convergence of the second fluid flow. As shown in the drawings, this can be achieved by a reduction in the radius of the interior wall 48 of the second member 14. Accordingly, as the first fluid travels along the interior wall of the second member, the fluid flow converges towards the axis of the nozzle and hence the fluid exiting the first chamber. This is the result of the interior walls of the second member having a decreasing radius from the first end to the second end of the second chamber. As should be appreciated, the divergence and convergence of the first and second chambers, respectively, further causes the mixed first and second fluid to collide with the first fluid flow of the second chamber.
  • The nozzle may be further configured to effectuate the property (e.g. velocity or otherwise) of the fluid flow exiting the first or second chamber. This may include angular momentum as with the converging or diverging fluid flow, velocity of the fluid flow or otherwise. For example, the velocity of the first fluid exiting the second chamber may be controlled by the configuration of the exit portion of the second chamber. For example, the total area formed by the openings 50 in the first member for providing a conduit for the first fluid to enter the second chamber 44, may be larger than the area provided for the fluid to exit the second chamber. This may be advantageous as smaller exit area increases the velocity of the first fluid and increases the impact energy against the liquid-gaseous mixture exiting the first chamber to increase atomization efficiency. Accordingly, the first fluid is traveling faster as it exits the second chamber as compared to when it enters the second chamber. Also, due to the angular impact of the first fluid against the walls of the first or second chamber, the airspeed increases through the chamber.
  • The walls forming the first and second chambers may be further configured to effectuate the flow of the fluid through the chamber. For example, as with the openings and the pre-atomization chamber, the first and second chamber may include features for controlling the velocity of the fluid direction of the fluid, whether the fluid flow is laminar or turbulent, or otherwise.
  • In one alternate configuration, referring to FIG. 5, the first and/or second chambers may include grooves 58 on the outer (or inner) walls to assist in forming the rotational or helical air flow about the chamber. In doing so, the grooves may be aligned with openings 28 of 50 such that upon exiting the openings the fluid flow is guided about the first or second chamber through the grooves. Other configurations should be appreciated.
  • The materials forming the components of the present invention include any materials that are commonly or uniquely used for forming a nozzle for either low or high pressure fluid dispensing. These material used to form the various components (e.g., first and second component pre-atomization chamber, or otherwise) and may be similar or dissimilar. Suitable materials include metals, plastics, ceramics, or other similar materials. However, a preferred material comprises a material configured for machining. A more preferred material comprises a material that is corrosion resistance to fluids. Specific examples of suitable materials that may be used to form the nozzle of the present invention include stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, plastics (such as propylene, nylons, Teflon™), carbon, ceramics, or otherwise. It should be appreciated, as previously discussed, that materials may be selected to optimize fluid flow through the chamber (e.g., velocity of fluid, direction of fluid, whether the fluid is laminar or turbulent, or otherwise).
  • As previously mentioned, the nozzle of the present invention may be used in various industries, particularly industries desiring controlled pattern spraying of liquid or gaseous fluids. Such application are particularly advantageous when a specific range of particulate size, or droplets, of dispense fluid is desired. For example, these applications may include dispensing of insecticide, application of paint products, treatment of patients with medicinal products, metal coating or otherwise as described herein.
  • Yet another advantageous feature of the present invention is the design capability to control the particulate size of the liquid fluid. Accordingly, it is contemplated that the nozzle of the present invention may be configured to reduce the particulate size of a liquid, or the droplet spectrum, to such an extent that a substantial portion of the liquid becomes vaporized. In one configuration the nozzle may be configured to reduce the particulate size of liquid droplets between 5-150 microns, or perhaps more preferably between 20-100 microns. In another preferred configuration the size of the liquid droplets is between 5-30 microns. Still in another preferred embodiment, particularly with nebulization applications, the droplet size may be between 1-5 microns or less than 5 microns. It should be appreciated that the droplet size is dependent upon the application of the liquid being dispensed. Also, the droplet size of the liquid is dependent upon the type of liquid being dispensed and the amount of energy being used (e.g., fluid pressure) to form the droplet spectrum. In view of the forgoing, it would be possible to utilize the nozzle as a device for the separation of suspended solid particles from a liquid. Alternatively, the nozzle may be utilized for air drying.
  • In yet another particularly useful application, it is contemplate that the nozzle of the present invention may be used to purify water and/or remove foreign matter such as salt or other contaminants. In doing so, the nozzle would cause vaporization of water in an area, preferably controlled, and then recollected the liquid without the impurities originally located therein. In another configuration, the nozzle may be used for purification of water. In such a configuration, the first fluid may comprise a purifying gas, such as ozone (O3), and the second fluid comprises liquid water, Upon dispensing of the liquid through the nozzle the water is purified by the ozone gas.
  • Referring to FIG. 7, one application of the nozzle of the present invention is shown. In this application, the nozzle is attached to a spraying system (e.g., an air compressor and liquid supply means) and is configured to atomize the liquid for application over an area. In this particular application, the nozzle forms a droplet spectrum in the range of 5-30 microns which is particularly effective for the elimination of insects, such as mosquitoes, Such systems can be found in commonly owned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/318,827, filed on Dec. 13, 2002, herein incorporated by references for all purposes. However, it should be appreciated as this is but one application of the nozzle of the present invention and the nozzle can be used in numerous applications such as insect control/eradication, pesticide applications, medicinal or medical product spraying applications (e.g., nebulization or otherwise), including spraying antibiotics among livestock, chickens, pigs, etc. and antidotes for potential terrorist activities, herbicide applications, insecticide applications, paint applications, pipe coating, misting applications, cooling applications, water applications, fertilizer applications, horticultural applications, solid-stream applications, and application of cleaning/stripping/degreasing solutions for household and industrial uses. Still other examples include pollution control, waste water treatment, humidification, food reprocessing odor control, environmental scenarios, any structure that requires coating on exterior or interior surfaces or in the application of fluids to agriculture.
  • Furthermore, it should be appreciated that the nozzle of the present invention is capable of use in both high pressure systems (e.g., approximately 100 psi or greater) and in low pressure systems (e.g., approximately 100 psi or less). In one application, the pressure of the first fluid supply may be between 2 to 20 psi. In yet another application, the pressure of the first fluid supply is between 5 to 7 psi. Of course other supply pressure configurations are available and may be dependent upon the type of fluid being dispensed and the design of the nozzle as described herein.
  • The pressure of the second fluid entering the chamber is dependent upon the characteristics of the nozzle and first fluid entering the nozzle. For example, the pressure of the second fluid may be based upon the viscosity of the second fluid, the flow rate of the second fluid through the fixed opening of the nozzle, the flow rate of the first fluid through the nozzle, or otherwise. Accordingly, the pressure of the second fluid through the central opening of the nozzle can range between 0 to 100 psi, or greater. Other ranges are available.
  • Unless stated otherwise, dimensions and geometries of the various structures depicted herein are not intended to be restrictive of the invention, and other dimensions or geometries are possible. Plural structural components can be provided by a single integrated structure. Alternatively, a single integrated structure might be divided into separate plural components. In addition, while a feature of the present invention may have been described in the context of only three of the illustrated embodiments, such feature may be combined with one or more other features of other embodiments, for any given application. It will also be appreciated from the above that the fabrication of the unique structures herein and the operation thereof also constitute methods in accordance with the present invention.
  • The preferred embodiment of the present invention has been disclosed. A person of ordinary skill in the art would realize however, that certain modifications would come within the teachings of this invention. Therefore, the following claims should be studied to determine the true scope and content of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. An air liquid atomizing nozzle, the nozzle comprising:
a first member extending along an axis and having a first fluid connector for receiving a first fluid from a first fluid supply and a second fluid connector for receiving a second fluid from a second fluid supply; and
a second member attached to the first member, the first and second members defining:
a first fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply,
a second fluid flow formed from the second fluid supply,
a third fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply, and
wherein the second fluid flow path merges with the first fluid flow to cause atomization of the second fluid and wherein the second fluid flow merges with the third fluid flow to cause further atomization of the second fluid.
2. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the first fluid flow and the third fluid flow rotate in opposite directions.
3. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the first fluid flow is defined by a first chamber and the third fluid flow is defined by a second chamber.
4. The nozzle of claim 3, further comprising a wall separating the first and second chamber, wherein the wall includes grooves formed therein for directing the first fluid flow or the second fluid flow within the nozzle.
5. The nozzle of claim 3, further comprising a pre-atomization chamber for atomizing the second fluid flow.
6. The nozzle of claim 3, further comprising one or more feature located at the end of the first or second chamber for effecting the direction of the fluid flow exiting the chamber.
7. The nozzle of claim 6, wherein the second fluid flow rotates in a direction opposite the first fluid flow.
8. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the first fluid comprises a gas and the second fluid comprises a liquid.
9. The nozzle of claim 8, wherein first fluid comprises substantially of air and the second fluid comprises an insecticide.
10. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein upon exiting the nozzle, a droplet spectrum is formed.
11. The nozzle of claim 10, wherein the droplet spectrum comprises droplet between 5-30 microns.
12. The nozzle of claim 10, wherein the droplet spectrum comprises droplets less than 5 microns.
13. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein a seal is formed between the first and second member.
14. The nozzle of claim 13, wherein the nozzle is substantially free of a gasket.
15. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the first fluid flow is formed by a first set of openings formed through the first member and the third fluid flow is formed by a second set of openings formed through the first member.
16. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the nozzle is configured to direct the first and second fluid flow at an angle with respect the nozzle axis.
17. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the nozzle is a low pressure nozzle dispensing fluid between 2 to 20 psi.
18. The nozzle of claim 1, wherein the nozzle is a high pressure nozzle dispensing fluid greater than 100 psi.
19. A low pressure air liquid atomizing nozzle, the nozzle comprising:
a housing member extending along an axis, the member having a first fluid connector for receiving a first fluid from a first fluid supply and a second fluid connector for receiving a second fluid from a second fluid supply,
wherein the housing member defines a first fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply, a second fluid flow formed from the second fluid supply, and a third fluid flow formed from the first fluid supply,
wherein the second fluid flow path merges with the first fluid flow to cause atomization of the second fluid and wherein the second fluid flow merges with the third fluid flow to cause further atomization of the second fluid, and
wherein the first fluid flow path rotates in a first direction and the second fluid flow path rotates in a second direction.
20. The nozzle of claim 19, wherein the first and second fluid flow paths rotate in opposite directions with respect to the nozzle axis.
US11/466,965 2005-08-24 2006-08-24 A liquid atomizing nozzle Abandoned US20070194146A1 (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US20080067265A1 (en) * 2005-05-18 2008-03-20 Jean-Pierre Songbe Nozzle Comprising a Swirl Chamber
US20080262650A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2008-10-23 Adapco, Inc. Ultra low volume chemical delivery system and method
US20090025794A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2009-01-29 Bruce Dorendorf Ultra low volume fluid delivery system using a centrifugal radial compressor and method thereof
US20100276516A1 (en) * 2007-12-27 2010-11-04 E.I. Du Pont De Nemourds And Company Device for introducing catalyst into atomized coating composition
US20110303768A1 (en) * 2010-06-14 2011-12-15 Valois S.A.S. Fluid dispenser head
US8157191B1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2012-04-17 Vonbampus Ray Nozzle for drywall mud spray gun
WO2013007673A1 (en) 2011-07-11 2013-01-17 Omya Development Ag Atomizing nozzle device, atomizing process and use
US20140001277A1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2014-01-02 James R. Arnold Grove sprayer

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080067265A1 (en) * 2005-05-18 2008-03-20 Jean-Pierre Songbe Nozzle Comprising a Swirl Chamber
US20080262650A1 (en) * 2007-04-20 2008-10-23 Adapco, Inc. Ultra low volume chemical delivery system and method
US7572107B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2009-08-11 Adapco, Inc. Ultra low volume chemical delivery system and method
US20090025794A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2009-01-29 Bruce Dorendorf Ultra low volume fluid delivery system using a centrifugal radial compressor and method thereof
US8157191B1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2012-04-17 Vonbampus Ray Nozzle for drywall mud spray gun
US20100276516A1 (en) * 2007-12-27 2010-11-04 E.I. Du Pont De Nemourds And Company Device for introducing catalyst into atomized coating composition
US8210452B2 (en) * 2007-12-27 2012-07-03 E I Du Pont De Nemours And Company Device for introducing catalyst into atomized coating composition
US20110303768A1 (en) * 2010-06-14 2011-12-15 Valois S.A.S. Fluid dispenser head
US8690081B2 (en) * 2010-06-14 2014-04-08 Aptar France Sas Fluid dispenser head
US20140001277A1 (en) * 2010-11-09 2014-01-02 James R. Arnold Grove sprayer
US9266129B2 (en) * 2010-11-09 2016-02-23 James R. Arnold Grove sprayer
US20150013769A1 (en) * 2011-02-08 2015-01-15 George Saunders Atomizing nozzle device, atomizing process and use
WO2013007673A1 (en) 2011-07-11 2013-01-17 Omya Development Ag Atomizing nozzle device, atomizing process and use
US10220398B2 (en) * 2011-07-11 2019-03-05 Omya International Ag Atomizing nozzle device, atomizing process and use
EP2554273A1 (en) 2011-08-02 2013-02-06 Omya Development AG Atomizing nozzle device and use of the same

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