US20070186334A1 - Ventilating apparatus for a toilet - Google Patents

Ventilating apparatus for a toilet Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070186334A1
US20070186334A1 US11/354,197 US35419706A US2007186334A1 US 20070186334 A1 US20070186334 A1 US 20070186334A1 US 35419706 A US35419706 A US 35419706A US 2007186334 A1 US2007186334 A1 US 2007186334A1
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Prior art keywords
toilet seat
opposing
primary channel
toilet
inlet channels
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Abandoned
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US11/354,197
Inventor
Wilbert Carter
Lee Carter
George Carter
Original Assignee
Carter Wilbert L
Carter Lee R
Carter George J
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Application filed by Carter Wilbert L, Carter Lee R, Carter George J filed Critical Carter Wilbert L
Priority to US11/354,197 priority Critical patent/US20070186334A1/en
Publication of US20070186334A1 publication Critical patent/US20070186334A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D9/00Sanitary or other accessories for lavatories ; Devices for cleaning or disinfecting the toilet room or the toilet bowl; Devices for eliminating smells
    • E03D9/04Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices
    • E03D9/05Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl
    • E03D9/052Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl using incorporated fans
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47KSANITARY EQUIPMENT NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; TOILET ACCESSORIES
    • A47K13/00Seats or covers for all kinds of closets
    • A47K13/24Parts or details not covered in, or of interest apart from, groups A47K13/02 - A47K13/22, e.g. devices imparting a swinging or vibrating motion to the seats
    • A47K13/30Seats having provisions for heating, deodorising or the like, e.g. ventilating, noise-damping or cleaning devices
    • A47K13/307Seats with ventilating devices

Abstract

Ventilating apparatuses for a toilet remove objectionable odors. Instead of allowing toilet odors to diffuse into the bathroom atmosphere, the ventilating apparatus for a toilet draws toilet odors out of the toilet bowl and exhausts them outside of the house. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet has first inlet channels piercing the interior surface of the toilet seat and second inlet channels piercing the bottom surface of the toilet seat. The opposite ends of the first inlet channels and the second inlet channels protrude into a primary channel, thereby creating a partial air blockage and an enhanced vacuum effect through the first inlet channels and the second inlet channels. A vacuum motor controlled by a pressure-activated switch on the bottom of the toilet seat extracts air from the toilet through the first inlet channels and second inlet channels and exhausts it through a ceiling fan vent.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to a ventilating apparatus for a toilet for use in connection with toilets. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet have particular utility in connection with removing objectionable odors.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • Ventilating apparatuses for a toilet are desirable for removing objectionable odors. Instead of allowing toilet odors to diffuse into the bathroom atmosphere, the ventilating apparatus for a toilet draws toilet odors out of the toilet bowl and exhausts them outside of the house. This device reduces the time needed to remove the odor from the room as well as being more effective than a ceiling exhaust fan alone. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet is an effective alternative to using air freshening sprays, solids or candles, opening windows or using a ceiling exhaust fan.
  • The use of ventilated toilet seats is known in the prior art. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,167,576 to Sollami discloses a ventilated toilet seat. However, the Sollami '576 patent does not have inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel and has a further drawback of lacking a pressure-sensitive switch.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 1,972,076 to Cross discloses a ventilating device that ventilates a toilet bowl. However, the Cross '076 patent does not have inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel and additionally does not have a pressure-sensitive switch.
  • Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 4,402,091 to Ellis, et al., discloses a toilet evacuation device that evacuates toilet odors. However, the Ellis, et al., '091 patent does not have inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel and cannot automatically activate when the toilet seat is in use.
  • In addition, U.S. Pat. No. Des. 328,340 to Bolduc discloses a combined seat and odor removal unit for a water closet. However, the Bolduc '340 patent does not have a primary channel and also does not automatically activate when the toilet seat is in use.
  • Furthermore, U.S. Pat. No. 4,726,078 to Carballo, et al., discloses a toilet ventilation system that includes a water bleed-off means. However, the Carballo, et al., '078 patent does not have inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel and further lacks a pressure-sensitive switch.
  • Lastly, U.S. Pat. No. 3,600,724 to Stamper, et al., discloses a toilet bowl ventilation that removes odors from toilet bowls. However, the Stamper, et al., '724 patent does not have inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel and has the additional deficiency of lacking inlet channels that pierce the bottom surface of the toilet seat.
  • While the above-described devices fulfill their respective, particular objectives and requirements, the aforementioned patents do not describe a ventilating apparatus for a toilet that allows removing objectionable odors. The Sollami '576 patent, the Cross '076 patent, the Ellis, et al., '091 patent, the Carballo, et al., '078 patent and the Stamper, et al., '724 patent make no provision for inlet channels partially obstructing the primary channel. The Sollami '576 patent, the Cross '076 patent, the Ellis, et al., '091 patent, the Bolduc '340 patent and the Carballo, et al., '078 patent do not have a pressure-sensitive switch. The Bolduc '340 patent lacks a primary channel. The Stamper, et al., '724 patent does not have inlet channels that pierce the bottom surface of the toilet seat.
  • Therefore, a need exists for a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet that can be used for removing objectionable odors. In this regard, the present invention substantially fulfills this need. In this respect, the ventilating apparatus for a toilet according to the present invention substantially departs from the conventional concepts and designs of the prior art and, in doing so, provides an apparatus primarily developed for the purpose of removing objectionable odors.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In view of the foregoing disadvantages inherent in the known types of ventilated toilet seats now present in the prior art, the present invention provides an improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet and overcomes the above-mentioned disadvantages and drawbacks of the prior art. As such, the general purpose of the present invention, which will be described subsequently in greater detail, is to provide a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet that has all the advantages of the prior art mentioned heretofore and many novel features that result in a ventilating apparatus for a toilet that is not anticipated, rendered obvious, suggested or even implied by the prior art, either alone or in any combination thereof.
  • To attain this, the present invention essentially comprises a vacuum system connected to a toilet seat having a hollow primary channel in the interior of the toilet seat. Connecting to the primary channel are hollow first inlet channels with one end piercing the interior surface of the toilet seat and the other end protruding into the primary channel. By protruding into the primary channel, the first inlet channels create a partial air blockage in the primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through the first inlet channels.
  • There has thus been outlined, rather broadly, the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated.
  • The invention may also include second inlet channels with one end piercing the bottom surface of the toilet seat and the other end protruding into the primary channel. The vacuum system may comprise a hose fitting with one end connected to the primary channel and the other connected to a hose. The other end of the hose may be connected to a vacuum motor, which in turn may be connected to an exhaust hose connected to a ceiling fan vent. A pressure switch may be attached to the bottom surface of the toilet seat and connected to the vacuum motor by a wire. The vacuum motor may have a power cord plugged into a switch-controlled electrical outlet. The hose fitting may be made of copper. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject matter of the claims attached.
  • Numerous objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon a reading of the following detailed description of presently current, but nonetheless illustrative, embodiments of the present invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. In this respect, before explaining the current embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of descriptions and should not be regarded as limiting.
  • As such, those skilled in this art will appreciate that the conception upon which this disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet that has all of the advantages of the prior art ventilated toilet seats and none of the disadvantages.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet that may be easily and efficiently manufactured and marketed.
  • An even further object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet that has a low cost of manufacture with regard to both materials and labor, and which accordingly is then susceptible of low prices of sale to the consuming public, thereby making such ventilating apparatus for a toilet economically available to the buying public.
  • Still another object of the present invention is to provide a new ventilating apparatus for a toilet that provides in the apparatuses and methods of the prior art some of the advantages thereof while simultaneously overcoming some of the disadvantages normally associated therewith.
  • Even still another object of the present invention is to provide a ventilating apparatus for a toilet for removing objectionable odors. This allows objectionable odors to be evacuated from a toilet bowl before they diffuse into the bathroom environment.
  • Still yet another object of the present invention is to provide a ventilating apparatus for a toilet for removing objectionable odors. This makes it possible to automatically activate the vacuum system when the toilet seat is in use.
  • An additional object of the present invention is to provide a ventilating apparatus for a toilet for removing objectionable odors. This increases the speed of odor removal compared with simply using a vented ceiling fan.
  • A further object of the present invention is to provide a ventilating apparatus for a toilet seat for removing objectionable odors. This allows the user to reduce or eliminate the use of air freshening sprays, solids or candles.
  • Lastly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet for removing objectionable odors.
  • These, together with other objects of the invention, along with the various features of novelty that characterize the invention, are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and the specific objects attained by its uses, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there is illustrated current embodiments of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of the current embodiment of the ventilating apparatus for a toilet constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a left side view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a top sectional view of the toilet seat ventilation ducts of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a side sectional view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is a side sectional view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a top side view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a side sectional view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 8 is a top side sectional view of the toilet seat of the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 is a
  • FIG. 10 is a
  • FIG. 11 is a
  • The same reference numerals refer to the same parts throughout the various figures.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • The following detailed description is of the best presently contemplated mode of carrying out the invention. This description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, but is made merely for the purpose of illustrating general principles of embodiments of the invention.
  • Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1-8, a current embodiment of the ventilating apparatus for a toilet of the present invention is shown and generally designated by the reference numeral 10. Alternate embodiments are shown in FIGS. 9-11.
  • In FIG. 1, a new and improved ventilating apparatus for a toilet 10 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the ventilating apparatus for a toilet 10 has a toilet seat 12 hingedly mounted on toilet 38. First inlet channels 14 pierce the interior surface of toilet seat 12. Hose fitting 16 connects to the exterior surface of toilet seat 12. Hose 18 has one end connected to hose fitting 16 and the other end connected to vacuum motor 22. Power cord 24 has one end connected to vacuum motor 22 and the opposite end plugged into electrical outlet 28 controlled by switch 30. Exhaust hose 26 has one end connected to vacuum motor 22 and the opposite end connected to ceiling fan vent 32. In the current embodiment, hose fitting 16 is made of copper and hose 18 and exhaust hose 26 are made of rubber. First inlet channels 14 are 3/32 of an inch in diameter in the current embodiment. Note that the broken lines illustrating toilet seat cover 36, toilet 38, switch 30, electrical outlet 28, ceiling fan vent 32, ceiling fan 34 and bathroom 40 are for illustrative purposes only and are not part of the current invention.
  • FIG. 9 shows an alternate embodiment in which hose 18 leads from bathroom 40 through the floor or wall and connects to a vacuum motor 22 in a remote location, either outside or in a remote area of the building in which toilet 10 is installed. In this embodiment, a wet-dry vacuum or a central vacuum system can be used to provide the vacuum necessary to operate the invention. The vacuum motor 22 is preferably operated by a switch or a timer, both indicated at 30. If desired, the timer 30 can be automatic in a manner similar to automatic flushing systems currently in use.
  • Moving on to FIG. 2, a new and improved toilet seat 12 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has a primary channel 42 piercing its exterior surface. In the current embodiment, primary channel 42 has a diameter of one-half of an inch. Attached to the bottom surface of toilet seat 12 is pressure-activated switch 46. Connected to pressure-activated switch 46 is wire 20. Toilet seat 12 is hingedly attached to toilet 38 and toilet seat cover 36 is hingedly attached to toilet 38 above toilet seat 12. Note that the broken lines illustrating toilet seat cover 36 and toilet 38 are for illustrative purposes only and are not part of the current invention. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the toilet seat 12 includes one or more spacers 52 which act to raise the toilet seat 12 above the lower portion of the toilet 10 (see FIG. 10). By providing a space below the toilet seat 12, any overflow leaks out below the toilet seat 12 and does not enter the ventilation system.
  • Continuing with FIG. 3, new and improved toilet seat ventilation ducts 44 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors are illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat ventilation ducts 44 have a primary channel 42 in the interior of toilet seat 12. First inlet channels 14 have one end piercing the interior of toilet seat 12 and the opposite end protruding into primary channel 42. By protruding into primary channel 42, first inlet channels 14 produce an enhanced Venturi effect by creating a partial air blockage that causes accelerated airflow over the first inlet channels 14, thereby creating an enhanced vacuum effect in first inlet channels 14.
  • In FIG. 4, a new and improved toilet seat 12 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has a primary channel 42 in the interior of toilet seat 12. First inlet channel 14 has one end piercing the interior surface of toilet seat 12 and the other end protruding into primary channel 42. Pressure-activated switch 46 is visible attached to the bottom surface of toilet seat 12. Wire 20 has one end connected to pressure-activated switch 46. Note that the broken lines illustrating toilet seat cover 36 and toilet 38 are for illustrative purposes only and are not part of the current invention.
  • Furthermore, in FIG. 5, a new and improved toilet seat 12 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has a primary channel 42 in the interior of toilet seat 12. Second inlet channel 48 has one end piercing the bottom surface of toilet seat 12 and the opposite end protruding into primary channel 42. Second inlet channel 48 protrudes into primary channel 42 to create an enhanced Venturi effect in the same fashion as that associated with first inlet channel 14 presented in the discussion of FIG. 3. In the current embodiment, second inlet channel 48 has a diameter of 3/32 of an inch. Pressure-activated switch 46 and wire 20 are also shown. Note that the broken lines illustrating toilet seat cover 36 and toilet 38 are for illustrative purposes only and are not part of the current invention.
  • Additionally, in FIG. 6, a new and improved toilet seat of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has hose fitting 16 attached to its exterior surface.
  • In FIG. 7, a new and improved toilet seat 12 of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has a primary channel 42 in the interior of toilet seat 12. Hose fitting 16 has one end inserted into primary channel 42. Openings for first inlet channels 14 are visible. Pressure-activated switch 46 with wire 20 are also shown.
  • Concluding with FIG. 8, a new and improved toilet seat of the present invention for removing objectionable odors is illustrated and will be described. More particularly, the toilet seat 12 has a primary channel 42. First inlet channel 14 has one end protruding into primary channel 42 and the other end piercing the interior surface of toilet seat 12. The partial air blockage resulting from the protrusion of first channel 14 into primary channel 42 is illustrated.
  • In use, it can now be understood that pressure placed on toilet seat 12 when it is in use causes it to flex, thereby closing pressure-sensitive switch 46. An electrical signal is conducted by wire 20 to vacuum motor 22, causing vacuum motor 22 to activate. Vacuum motor 22 draws air from toilet 38 through first inlet channels 14 and second inlet channels 48 into primary channel 42. From there, air is drawn into hose fitting 16 and hose 18. The air is then evacuated from bathroom 40 through exhaust hose 26 into ceiling fan vent 32. Operation of vacuum motor 22 can also be initiated through the use of switch 30.
  • In an alternate embodiment shown in FIGS. 10-13, the invention is designed to retrofit to existing toilet seats. In this embodiment, the ventilating apparatus 50 is attached to the bottom surface of the pre-existing toilet seat 12′. If required by the pre-existing toilet seat installation, height adjusters 54 can be used to provide the clearance necessary to add the ventilating apparatus 50. As described above, spacers 52 are preferably used to prevent overflow from entering the ventilation system. In this embodiment, the hose fitting is preferably an elbow shaped element 56 for connecting channel 42 to exit hose 18. This embodiment functions substantially as described above. It can be used with a vacuum motor located in the bathroom 40 or in a location remote from the bathroom as shown in FIG. 9. It can be activated by a switch or a manual or automatic timer 30. When activated, the vacuum 22 draws air from the toilet 10 through hose 18 and expels it through exhaust fan 34 or, when a remote vacuum is used, to a remote location where the fumes will not be a problem.
  • While a current embodiment of the ventilating apparatus for a toilet has been described in detail, it should be apparent that modifications and variations thereto are possible, all of which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. With respect to the above description, then, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention. For example, any suitable sturdy material such as steel, plastic, aluminum or titanium may be used in stead of the copper hose fitting described. Also, the rubber hose and exhaust hose may also be made of polyurethane, PVC, plastic or metal pipes. Furthermore, a wide variety of dimensions may be used instead of the 3/32 of an inch in diameter first inlet channels and second inlet channels and one-half of an inch in diameter primary channel described.
  • Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not designed to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described and, accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.
  • Many improvements, modifications, and additions will be apparent to the skilled artisan without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as described herein and defined in the following claims.

Claims (32)

1. A ventilating apparatus for a toilet comprising:
a vacuum system;
a toilet seat having an interior, a bottom surface, an exterior surface and an interior surface connected to said vacuum system;
a primary channel, wherein said interior of said toilet seat comprises a hollow therein to comprise said primary channel; and
first inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said interior surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said first inlet channels.
2. The vacuum system as defined in claim 1, wherein said vacuum system comprises:
a hose fitting having opposing ends with one end attached to said exterior surface of said toilet seat so as to join with said primary channel;
a hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said hose fitting;
a vacuum motor connected to said opposing end of said hose;
an exhaust hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor; and
a power cord having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor.
3. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet as defined in claim 1, further comprising second inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said bottom surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said second inlet channels.
4. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet as defined in claim 1, further comprising:
an activation means for activating the apparatus selected from the group consisting of a pressure-activated switch, a manual timer and an automatic timer; and
a wire having opposing ends with one end connected to said activation means switch and said opposing end connected to said vacuum motor.
5. The hose fitting as defined in claim 2, wherein said hose fitting is selected from the group consisting of plastic, steel, aluminum, titanium, polyurethane or copper.
6. The first inlet channels as defined in claim 1, wherein said first inlet channels have a diameter of 3/32 of an inch.
7. The second inlet channels as defined in claim 3, wherein said second inlet channels have a diameter of 3/32 of an inch.
8. The primary channel as defined in claim 1, wherein said primary channel has a diameter of one-half of an inch.
9. The primary channel as defined in claim 1, wherein said primary channel is essentially oval in shape.
10. The ventilating apparatus as defined in claim 1, further comprising at least one spacer element attached to the bottom of the toilet seat to create an opening between the bottom of the toilet seat and a toilet bowl located below the toilet seat.
11. A ventilating apparatus for a toilet comprising:
a toilet seat having an interior, a bottom surface, an exterior surface and an interior surface;
a pressure-activated switch connected to said bottom surface of said toilet seat;
a wire having opposing ends with one end connected to said pressure-activated switch;
a vacuum system connected to said toilet seat; and
toilet seat ventilation ducts wherein said interior of said toilet seat comprises hollows therein to comprise said toilet seat ventilation ducts.
12. The toilet seat ventilation ducts as defined in claim 11, wherein said toilet seat ventilation ducts comprise:
a primary channel; and
second inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said bottom surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said second inlet channels.
13. The vacuum system as defined in claim 11, wherein said vacuum system comprises:
a hose fitting having opposing ends with one end attached to said exterior surface of said toilet seat so as to join with said primary channel;
a hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said hose fitting;
a vacuum motor connected to said opposing end of said hose and said opposing end of said wire;
an exhaust hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor; and
a power cord having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor.
14. The toilet seat ventilation ducts as defined in claim 12, further comprising first inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said interior surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said first inlet channels.
15. The exhaust hose as defined in claim 13, wherein said opposing end of said exhaust hose is connected to an exhaust element selected from the group consisting of a ceiling fan vent and an exhaust hose venting to a remote location.
16. The power cord as defined in claim 13, wherein said opposing end of said power cord is plugged into a switch-controlled electrical outlet.
17. In combination with a toilet, including a toilet seat having an interior, a bottom surface, an exterior surface and an interior surface, the improvement which comprises:
a pressure-activated switch connected to said bottom surface of said toilet seat;
a wire having opposing ends with one end connected to said pressure-activated switch;
a vacuum system connected to said toilet seat; and
toilet seat ventilation ducts wherein said interior of said toilet seat comprises hollows therein to comprise said toilet seat ventilation ducts.
18. The toilet seat ventilation ducts as defined in claim 17, wherein said toilet seat ventilation ducts comprise:
a primary channel; and
second inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said bottom surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said first second channels.
19. The vacuum system as defined in claim 17, wherein said vacuum system comprises:
a hose fitting having opposing ends with one end attached to said exterior surface of said toilet seat so as to join with said primary channel;
a hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said hose fitting;
a vacuum motor connected to said opposing end of said hose;
an exhaust hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor; and
a power cord having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor.
20. The toilet seat ventilation ducts as defined in claim 18, further comprising first inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said interior surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said first inlet channels.
21. The wire as defined in claim 17, wherein said opposing end of said wire is connected to said vacuum motor.
22. A ventilating apparatus for a toilet comprising:
a vacuum system;
a toilet seat attachment element having an interior, a bottom surface, an exterior surface; an interior surface connected to said vacuum system and an attachment means for attaching the toilet seat attachment element to a toilet seat;
a primary channel, wherein said interior of said toilet seat attachment element comprises a hollow therein to comprise said primary channel; and
first inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said interior surface of said toilet seat attachment element and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said first inlet channels.
23. The ventilating apparatus of claim 22 in which the attachment means for attaching the toilet seat attachment element to a toilet seat is selected from the group consisting of adhesive, at least one screw, and at least one nail.
24. The vacuum system as defined in claim 22, wherein said vacuum system comprises:
a hose fitting having opposing ends with one end attached to said exterior surface of said toilet seat so as to join with said primary channel;
a hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said hose fitting;
a vacuum motor connected to said opposing end of said hose;
an exhaust hose having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor; and
a power cord having opposing ends with one end connected to said vacuum motor.
25. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet as defined in claim 22, further comprising second inlet channels having opposing ends with one end piercing said bottom surface of said toilet seat and said opposing end protruding into said primary channel so as to create a partial air blockage in said primary channel, resulting in an enhanced vacuum effect through said second inlet channels.
26. The ventilating apparatus for a toilet as defined in claim 22, further comprising:
an activation means for activating the apparatus selected from the group consisting of a pressure-activated switch, a manual timer and an automatic timer; and
a wire having opposing ends with one end connected to said activation means switch and said opposing end connected to said vacuum motor.
27. The hose fitting as defined in claim 24, wherein said hose fitting is selected from the group consisting of plastic, steel, aluminum, titanium, polyurethane or copper.
28. The first inlet channels as defined in claim 22, wherein said first inlet channels have a diameter of 3/32 of an inch.
29. The second inlet channels as defined in claim 25, wherein said second inlet channels have a diameter of 3/32 of an inch.
30. The primary channel as defined in claim 22, wherein said primary channel has a diameter of one-half of an inch.
31. The primary channel as defined in claim 22, wherein said primary channel is essentially oval in shape.
32. The ventilating apparatus as defined in claim 22, further comprising at least one spacer element attached to the bottom of the toilet seat to create an opening between the bottom of the toilet seat and a toilet bowl located below the toilet seat.
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Cited By (14)

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US20090158515A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 Steve Bruno Odor removal and air freshener system
US20090229045A1 (en) * 2008-03-11 2009-09-17 Ramon Ramos Toilet seat ventilation system
ITBO20080491A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-02 Enrico Gambetti Cover-water extractor
US8434170B1 (en) * 2009-03-04 2013-05-07 Ramon Ramos Toilet ventilation system
CN105421556A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-03-23 温玉友 Clean type flush toilet bowl
CN105569153A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-11 温玉友 Multifunctional water closet pan
CN105569154A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-11 温玉友 Novel water flushing closestool
CN105604157A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-25 温玉友 Multifunctional water pumping closestool
CN105604159A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-25 温玉友 Flush toilet bowl
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WO2016189517A1 (en) * 2015-05-28 2016-12-01 Bou Ajram Razane Nazih Suction mechanism for a toilet
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US9924841B1 (en) 2015-09-01 2018-03-27 Oscar Luquin Ventilated toilet seat
US10168679B2 (en) 2016-12-09 2019-01-01 Darrin P. Tyson Toilet ventilation system and device

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US20090158515A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 Steve Bruno Odor removal and air freshener system
US20090229045A1 (en) * 2008-03-11 2009-09-17 Ramon Ramos Toilet seat ventilation system
ITBO20080491A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-02 Enrico Gambetti Cover-water extractor
US8434170B1 (en) * 2009-03-04 2013-05-07 Ramon Ramos Toilet ventilation system
WO2016189517A1 (en) * 2015-05-28 2016-12-01 Bou Ajram Razane Nazih Suction mechanism for a toilet
US9924841B1 (en) 2015-09-01 2018-03-27 Oscar Luquin Ventilated toilet seat
CN105604157A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-25 温玉友 Multifunctional water pumping closestool
CN105569154A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-11 温玉友 Novel water flushing closestool
CN105604159A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-25 温玉友 Flush toilet bowl
CN105604158A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-25 温玉友 Flush toilet bowl
CN105569153A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-05-11 温玉友 Multifunctional water closet pan
CN105421556A (en) * 2015-12-17 2016-03-23 温玉友 Clean type flush toilet bowl
US9756996B1 (en) 2016-02-09 2017-09-12 Hernaldo Ruiz Ventilated toilet seat
US10168679B2 (en) 2016-12-09 2019-01-01 Darrin P. Tyson Toilet ventilation system and device

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