US20070186327A1 - Device and method for displaying insignia - Google Patents

Device and method for displaying insignia Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070186327A1
US20070186327A1 US11691265 US69126507A US2007186327A1 US 20070186327 A1 US20070186327 A1 US 20070186327A1 US 11691265 US11691265 US 11691265 US 69126507 A US69126507 A US 69126507A US 2007186327 A1 US2007186327 A1 US 2007186327A1
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
insignia
clothing
article
hook substrate
hook
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Abandoned
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US11691265
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Timothy Hall
Dwight Harms
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Hall Timothy F
Harms Dwight D
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/08Trimmings; Ornaments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B1/00Hats; Caps; Hoods
    • A42B1/24Hats; Caps; Hoods with means for attaching articles thereto, e.g. memorandum tablets, mirrors, lamps, insignia ; Head coverings with pockets
    • A42B1/248Insignia, logo emblems or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A44HABERDASHERY; JEWELLERY
    • A44BBUTTONS, PINS, BUCKLES, SLIDE FASTENERS, OR THE LIKE
    • A44B18/00Fasteners of the touch-and-close type; Making such fasteners

Abstract

A device for displaying insignia includes two parts. The first part includes an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate that is fastened to a surface of the insignia. The second part includes an article of clothing made of a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed and that engages and releases the flexible hooks when attaching and removing the insignia.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/449,149, filed May 31, 2003, which claims the benefit of Provisional Application No. 60/384,937, filed Jun. 1, 2002. This application claims the benefit of Provisional Application No. 60/384,937, filed Jun. 1, 2002. Each of the above applications is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention is directed to the field of removable insignia. More specifically, but without limitation thereto, the present invention is directed to a device for attaching and removing insignia to articles of clothing.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,339,866 granted to French for METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR A REMOVABLE NAMETAG AND INSIGNIA shows in FIG. 4 attaching an insignia such as a nametag on a uniform or other garment by a hook and loop fastener. Typically, the hook fastener is fastened to the insignia, and the loop fastener is sewn onto the garment. The insignia may then be attached to the garment by pressing the insignia onto the loop fastener and removed from the garment by pulling the insignia away from the loop fastener. Likewise, U.S. Pat. No. 4,776,043 granted to Coleman for HAT AND LOGO shows in FIG. 2 a hook and loop fastener for attaching and removing insignia for a cap. Because the loop fastener is added to the article of clothing and because the loop fastener is intermediate between the article of clothing and the insignia, this type of loop fastener is referred to herein as an intermediate loop fastener.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In one embodiment, a device for displaying insignia includes an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate. The hook substrate is fastened to a surface of the insignia. The device also includes an article of clothing made of a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed. The looped material engages the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the article of clothing and releases the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the article of clothing.
  • In another embodiment, a method of displaying insignia includes steps of providing an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate, fastening the hook substrate to a surface of the insignia; and making an article of clothing from a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed. The insignia is attached to the article of clothing by engaging the flexible hooks with the looped material. The insignia is removed from the article of clothing by releasing the flexible hooks from the looped material.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The above and other aspects, features and advantages will become more apparent from the description in conjunction with the following drawings presented by way of example and not limitation, wherein like references indicate similar elements throughout the several views of the drawings, and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of a flexible hook of the prior art that may be used to display insignia on an article of clothing;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a magnified side view of a looped material that may be used to engage the flexible hook of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a cap made of a looped material for displaying insignia;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a glove made of a looped material for displaying insignia;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an insignia sewn on the same looped material used to make the article of clothing to which the insignia is to be attached;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a perspective view of trimming thread ends from the back of the insignia of FIG. 5;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a perspective view of a vinyl hook substrate of the prior art for attaching the insignia of FIG. 6 to an article of clothing;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a perspective view of applying pressure to the hook fastener to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 7;
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a perspective view of applying pressure to the insignia to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 8;
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view of cutting the insignia assembly of FIG. 9 around the border of the insignia;
  • FIG. 11 illustrates applying pressure to the insignia with a press to remove any remaining air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 10;
  • FIG. 12 illustrates a perspective view of applying pressure to the hook substrate with a press to remove any remaining air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 11;
  • FIG. 13 illustrates laminating an insignia made of plastic;
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a perspective view of fastening the hook substrate to the back of the laminated insignia of FIG. 13;
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a perspective view of applying pressure to the insignia at an angle to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 14;
  • FIG. 16 illustrates a perspective view of applying pressure to the hook substrate at an angle to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 14;
  • FIG. 17 illustrates a perspective view of placing a die around the border of the insignia and the hook substrate assembly of FIG. 16;
  • FIG. 18 illustrates a perspective view of cutting the insignia and the hook substrate assembly with the die of FIG. 17;
  • FIG. 19 illustrates the completed insignia after cutting in FIG. 18; and
  • FIG. 20 illustrates a flow chart of a method of displaying insignia.
  • Elements in the figures are illustrated for simplicity and clarity and have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions, sizing, and/or relative placement of some of the elements in the figures may be exaggerated relative to other elements to clarify distinctive features of the illustrated embodiments. Also, common but well-understood elements that may be useful or necessary in a commercially feasible embodiment are often not depicted in order to facilitate a less obstructed view of the illustrated embodiments.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS
  • The following description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, rather for the purpose of describing by specific examples the general principles that are incorporated into the illustrated embodiments. For example, certain actions or steps may be described or depicted in a specific order to be performed. However, practitioners of the art will understand that the specific order is only given by way of example and that the specific order does not exclude performing the described steps in another order to achieve substantially the same result. Also, the terms and expressions used in the description have the ordinary meanings accorded to such terms and expressions in the corresponding respective areas of inquiry and study except where other meanings have been specifically set forth herein.
  • Elements in the figures are illustrated for simplicity and clarity and have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions, sizing, and/or relative placement of some of the elements in the figures may be exaggerated relative to other elements to clarify distinctive features of the illustrated embodiments. Also, common but well-understood elements that may be useful or necessary in a commercially feasible embodiment are often not depicted in order to facilitate a less obstructed view of the illustrated embodiments.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a side view 100 of a flexible hook of the prior art that may be used to display insignia on an article of clothing. Shown in FIG. 1 are a flexible hook 102, a hook substrate 104, a hook height 106, and a cusp depth 108.
  • The exemplary flexible hook 102 in FIG. 1 may be, for example, a Velcro™ model HTH833. In a preferred embodiment, the flexible hook 102 has a small hook height 106, for example, less than 0.5 mm, and a cusp depth 108 that is less than one-third of the hook height 106. An array of the flexible hooks 102 is typically formed in an array on the hook substrate 104 to make a hook fastener from a material such as vinyl. The hook fastener may be permanently attached to insignia, for example, by an adhesive applied to the back side of the hook substrate 104.
  • In one embodiment, a device for displaying insignia includes an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate. The hook substrate is fastened to a surface of the insignia. The device also includes an article of clothing made of a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed. The looped material engages the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the article of clothing and releases the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the article of clothing.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a magnified side view 200 of a looped material that may be used to engage the flexible hook of FIG. 1. In contrast to the prior art in which a separate loop fastener is sewn onto the article of clothing, the looped material 200 performs two functions: providing the desired look and feel of the article of clothing and providing a loop fastener for engaging a hook fastener. Not all fabrics used for making clothing may be used effectively as a loop fastener. The inventor has found that only certain materials, for example, polyester tricot and nylon tricot, can bond to a hook fastener securely enough to withstand vigorous movement of the article of clothing without separating from the hook fastener. The term “tricot” as used herein means a warp-knit fabric of a natural or a synthetic fiber having fine vertical ribs on the facing surface and horizontal ribs on the back surface.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a cap 300 made of a looped material for displaying insignia. Shown in FIG. 3 are a looped material 302 and insignia 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312.
  • In the embodiment of FIG. 3, multiple insignia 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312 are attached directly to the looped material 202. There are several advantages gained over the prior art by using the looped material 302 both to provide the desired look and feel of the article of clothing and to provide a loop fastener for attaching and removing the insignia 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312. In contrast to the looped material 302, an intermediate loop fastener attached to the article of clothing does not maintain the desired look and feel of the article of clothing where the insignia is removed. For example, a loop fastener typically has a rough, patchy appearance and is thicker and less flexible than the material to which it is attached. Also, an added loop fastener typically does not match the color of the article of clothing. However, the looped material 302 maintains the desired look and feel of the article of clothing where the insignia is removed, including the color, texture, and thickness. Also, an intermediate loop fastener may alter the shape, weight, and balance of the article of clothing, which may be especially noticeable and annoying in headgear.
  • Another advantage of the looped material 302 is that the insignia 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312 may be placed at different locations on the looped material 302 rather than only in a specific area as in the case of a separate loop fastener. For example, if the cap 300 is worn with the bill forward, the insignia 312 may be attached to the front of the cap 300. On the other hand, if the cap 300 is worn with the bill in the back, the insignia 308 may be attached to the back of the cap 300 so that the insignia 308 is in front of the wearer. A further advantage to the combination of the insignia 304, 306, 308, 310, and 312 and the looped material 302 is the elimination of the step of sewing a separate piece of loop material to the article of clothing at one or more locations to mate with the insignia. This is important from a manufacturing perspective not only because steps in the manufacturing process are eliminated, but also because the machine work and inventories required for maintaining a different shape of loop material for each shape used for insignia are also eliminated. Reducing the number of manufacturing steps and the number of pieces required to assemble the article of clothing advantageously results in improved quality and fewer manufacturing defects. Also, the article of clothing may be purchased in large quantities without risk of becoming obsolete when the insignia shape is changed.
  • In addition to the cap 300 illustrated in FIG. 3, other articles of clothing and personal accessories used to display insignia may be made in the same manner to practice various embodiments within the scope of the appended claims. Accordingly, the term “article of clothing” is intended to include everything that may be used to display insignia, including but not limited to hats, shirts, shorts, pants, shoes, purses, handbags, backpacks, tote bags, and gloves. Also included are sporting goods such as caps, baseball gloves, golf gloves, jerseys, team uniforms, equipment bags, duffel bags, visors, and pennants. The insignia may serve as a billboard for advertising and may also be used to display corporate logos and photographs.
  • In another embodiment, a calendar is made of the looped material and used with insignia having the shapes of pieces of clothing to assist autistic children in learning to dress themselves. As each piece of clothing is put on, the corresponding insignia is moved to the next day on the calendar until the space for the current date is cleared. In other embodiments, game boards for games such as tic-tac-toe are made by adhering the looped material to a rigid surface such as plastic, wood, or cardboard and played on with insignia having the shape, for example, of X's and O's and other playing tokens.
  • In a further embodiment, the looped material may be a fabric used, for example, for a surface such as a liner inside automobiles, buses, trains, aircraft, and other vehicles. The insignia may be used to display instructions, safety warnings, and advertisements as well as various visual effects inside a vehicle from the roof or other surfaces inside the vehicle without adding a separate piece of looped material in the areas where the insignia are attached. As a result, the appearance and texture of the surface is maintained uniform over an area that includes and extends beyond an area from which the insignia is removed. For example, an insignia may be placed in various locations on the roof inside an automobile without requiring a different material from the liner in the area where the insignia is attached. When the insignia is removed, the area from which the insignia is removed has the same appearance and texture as the rest of the surface outside the insignia.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a glove 400 made of a looped material for displaying insignia. Shown in FIG. 4 are an insignia 402 and a looped material 404. The insignia 402 may be made, for example, of embroidered cloth, leather, plastic, or metal. The insignia 402 may be used to display a name brand, a company logo, personalized artwork, a photograph, a team logo, or other verbal and pictorial content. The looped material 404 allows the insignia 402 to be placed at a various locations on the looped material 404, and the insignia 402 may be removed while maintaining the same look and feel of the glove 400.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a top view 500 of an insignia sewn on the same looped material used to make the article of clothing to which the insignia is to be attached. Shown in FIG. 5 are a looped material 502 and an embroidered insignia 504. The looped material 502 is embroidered according to well-known techniques to make the embroidered insignia 504. In other embodiments, other fabrics of various textures and colors may be used to make the embroidered insignia 504.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a perspective view 600 of trimming thread ends from the back of the insignia of FIG. 5. Shown in FIG. 6 are a looped material 502, an embroidered insignia 504, thread ends 602, and scissors 604. The thread ends 602 are cut as closely as possible to the looped material 502 with the scissors 604.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a perspective view 700 of a vinyl hook substrate of the prior art for attaching the insignia of FIG. 6 to an article of clothing. Shown in FIG. 7 are an adhesive surface 702, an array of flexible hooks 704, and a peel-away backing 706.
  • In the example of FIG. 7, the array of flexible hooks 702 is Velcro™ HTH-833 supplied with a type 99 vinyl binder on a 6-inch wide roll. The adhesive is Velcro™ type 75, which is preferred for vinyl hook substrates and can withstand temperatures in the range between (−30) and (+110) degrees centigrade without delaminating from the insignia. The adhesive surface 702 is protected by the peel-away backing 706 until the insignia is ready to be bonded to the adhesive surface 702.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a perspective view 800 of applying pressure to the hook fastener to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 7. Shown in FIG. 8 are embroidered insignia 504, an array of flexible hooks 704, and a squeegee 802.
  • In FIG. 8, the array of flexible hooks 704 is pressed onto the embroidered insignia 504. Air pockets between the embroidered insignia 504 and the array of flexible hooks 704 are removed by drawing the squeegee 802 across the top of the array of flexible hooks 704 under pressure, preferably at an angle less than 90 degrees with respect to the plane of the embroidered insignia 504 and the array of flexible hooks 704 in the direction of motion of the squeegee 802. The squeegee angle may be, for example, between 45 and 75 degrees.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a perspective view 900 of applying pressure to the insignia to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 8. Shown in FIG. 9 are a looped material 502, an embroidered insignia 504, an adhesive surface 702, and a squeegee 802.
  • In FIG. 9, the embroidered insignia 504 and the hook substrate assembly is turned over, and air pockets between the embroidered insignia 504 and the hook substrate are further removed by drawing the squeegee 802 across the top of the embroidered insignia 504 under pressure, preferably at an angle less than 90 degrees with respect to the plane of the embroidered insignia 504 and the hook substrate in the direction of motion of the squeegee 802.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view 1000 of cutting the insignia assembly of FIG. 9 around the border of the insignia. Shown in FIG. 10 are a looped material 502, an embroidered insignia 504, and scissors 604.
  • In FIG. 10, the embroidered insignia 504 and the hook substrate assembly is cut around the border of the embroidered insignia 504 with the scissors 604. For large quantities, a die cutter may be used for greater efficiency and precision. Insignia made from a plastic such as vinyl may be cut with a die without a cutting blade that applies sufficient pressure to the border of the insignia to cut the plastic and the hook substrate. Metal and leather insignia may be stamped with the hook substrate to finish the edge of the insignia.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates a perspective view 1100 of applying pressure to the insignia of FIG. 10 with a press to remove any remaining air between the insignia and the hook substrate. Shown in FIG. 11 are an embroidered insignia 504, a press plate 1102, and a press column 1104. This step may also be used with plastic, leather, and metal insignia.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates a perspective view 1200 of applying pressure to the hook substrate with a press to remove any remaining air between the insignia and the hook substrate assembly of FIG. 1. Shown in FIG. 12 are array of flexible hooks 704, a press plate 1102, and a press column 1104. This step is preferably omitted for stamped metal substrates to avoid damaging the stamped pattern.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a perspective view 1300 of an insignia made from vinyl plastic. Shown in FIG. 13 are a vinyl sheet 1302 and a laminate top coat roll 1304.
  • In FIG. 13, the vinyl sheet 1302 is preprinted, for example, with personalized artwork, photographs, company logos, and so on. The laminate top coat roll 1304 may be applied, for example, by a laminating machine to make one or more insignia from the vinyl sheet 1302.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a perspective view 1400 of fastening the hook substrate to the back of the insignia of FIG. 13. Shown in FIG. 14 are laminated insignia 1402 and a hook substrate 1404.
  • In FIG. 14, the hook substrate 1404 may be, for example, the vinyl hook substrate of FIG. 7. The hook substrate 1404 is placed onto the laminated insignia 1402 in the same manner as described for FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a perspective view 1500 of applying pressure to the insignia at an angle to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 14. Shown in FIG. 15 are laminated insignia 1402 and a squeegee 802.
  • In FIG. 15, air pockets between the insignia 1402 and the hook substrate 1404 are removed by drawing the squeegee 802 across the top of the insignia 1402 in the same manner as described above for FIG. 9.
  • FIG. 16 illustrates a perspective view 1600 of applying pressure to the hook substrate at an angle to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate of FIG. 15. Shown in FIG. 16 are laminated insignia 1402, a hook substrate 1404, and a squeegee 802.
  • In FIG. 16, the insignia 1402 and hook substrate 1404 assembly is turned over, and air pockets between the laminated insignia 1402 and the hook substrate 1404 are further removed by drawing the squeegee 802 across the top of the hook substrate 1402 in the same manner as described above for FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 17 illustrates a perspective view 1700 of placing a die for cutting the insignia assembly of FIG. 16 around the border of the insignia. Shown in FIG. 17 are an insignia and hook substrate assembly 1702, a die 1704, a press plate 1102, and a press column 1104.
  • FIG. 18 illustrates a perspective view 1800 of cutting the insignia and the hook substrate assembly of FIG. 16 with a press. Shown in FIG. 17 are an insignia and hook substrate assembly 1702, a die 1704, a press plate 1102, and a press column 1104.
  • In FIG. 18, the insignia and hook substrate assembly 1702 is cut around the border of each insignia with the die 1704.
  • FIG. 19 illustrates a perspective view 1900 of the completed insignia after cutting in FIG. 18. Shown in FIG. 19 are a hook substrate assembly 1702 and a finished insignia 1902.
  • In another embodiment, a method of displaying insignia includes steps of providing an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate, fastening the hook substrate to a surface of the insignia; and making an article of clothing from a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed. The insignia is attached to the article of clothing by engaging the flexible hooks with the looped material. The insignia is removed from the article of clothing by releasing the flexible hooks from the looped material.
  • FIG. 20 illustrates a flow chart 2000 of a method of displaying insignia.
  • Step 2002 is the entry point of the flow chart 2000.
  • In step 2004, an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate is provided. The hook substrate may be a commercially available hook substrate such as the Velcro™ example in FIG. 6, or the hook substrate may be formed according to well-known techniques.
  • In step 2006, the hook substrate is fastened to a surface of an insignia, for example, with an adhesive that can withstand the extreme temperatures that may be encountered by the article of clothing. For example, a cap may be worn outdoors in winter at the cold temperature extreme and left on the dashboard of a locked car in the summer at the hot temperature extreme.
  • In step 2008, an article of clothing is made from a looped material that maintains a desired look and feel for the article of clothing when the insignia is removed, which means that no intermediate fastener appears on the article of clothing behind the insignia when the insignia is removed. The looped material preferably has low-profile loops such as found in polyester and nylon tricot materials and has a look and feel that is designed to be comfortable and attractive when made into garments. The loops in the looped material attach the insignia to the article of clothing by engaging the flexible hooks with the looped material. The insignia may be removed from the article of clothing by pulling the insignia away from the article of clothing to release the flexible hooks from the looped material.
  • The insignia may be, for example, embroidered fabric, stamped metal, stamped or sculptured leather, or laminated plastic. The hook substrate should be fastened to the insignia by an adhesive that will not separate or bubble when exposed to the temperature extremes anticipated when wearing or storing the article of clothing. Also, the process for fastening the hook substrate to the insignia should avoid entraining air, and the back surface of the insignia should be suitably prepared to ensure a strong bond to the hook substrate. The insignia and hook substrate assembly may be cut around the border of the insignia with a die. Insignia made of hard materials such as metal should be cut from the back side only to avoid damaging the insignia, while soft materials may be sealed on both sides to thoroughly remove any air between the insignia and the hook substrate.
  • Step 2010 is the exit point of the flow chart 2000.
  • Although the flowchart description above is described and shown with reference to specific steps performed in a specific order, these steps may be combined, sub-divided, or reordered without departing from the scope of the claims. Unless specifically indicated, the order and grouping of steps is not a limitation of other embodiments that may lie within the scope of the claims.
  • The specific embodiments and applications thereof described above are for illustrative purposes only and do not preclude modifications and variations that may be made within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (28)

  1. 1. A device for displaying insignia comprising:
    a first part comprising an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate, the hook substrate fastened to a surface of an insignia; and
    a second part comprising an article of clothing made of a looped material for engaging the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the article of clothing and for releasing the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the article of clothing while maintaining a desired look and feel of the article of clothing where the insignia is removed.
  2. 2. The device of claim 1 further comprising the insignia.
  3. 3. The device of claim 2 further comprising an adhesive for fastening the hook substrate to the insignia.
  4. 4. The device of claim 3, the adhesive selected to withstand temperatures between about (−30) to about (+110) degrees centigrade.
  5. 5. The device of claim 3, the adhesive formulated for bonding to a vinyl hook substrate.
  6. 6. The device of claim 2, the insignia comprising an embroidered patch.
  7. 7. The device of claim 2, the insignia comprising molded plastic.
  8. 8. The device of claim 2, the insignia comprising stamped metal.
  9. 9. The device of claim 2, the article of clothing comprising one of a hat, a shirt, a pair of shorts, a pair of pants, a pair of shoes, a purse, a handbag, a backpack, a tote bag, and a pair of gloves.
  10. 10. The device of claim 2, the article of clothing comprising one of a cap, a baseball glove, a golf glove, a jersey, a team uniform, an equipment bag, a duffel bag, a visor, and a pennant.
  11. 11. A method of displaying insignia comprising steps of:
    providing an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate;
    fastening the hook substrate to a surface of an insignia; and
    providing an article of clothing made from a looped material for engaging the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the article of clothing and for releasing the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the article of clothing, the looped material maintaining a desired look and feel for the article of clothing where the insignia is removed.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of fastening the hook substrate to the insignia by an adhesive.
  13. 13. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of selecting the adhesive to withstand temperatures between about (−30) to about (+110) degrees centigrade.
  14. 14. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of formulating the adhesive especially for bonding to a vinyl hook substrate.
  15. 15. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of embroidering the insignia as a patch.
  16. 16. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of molding the insignia from plastic.
  17. 17. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of stamping the insignia from metal.
  18. 18. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of making the article of clothing as one of a hat, a shirt, a pair of shorts, a pair of pants, a pair of shoes, a purse, a handbag, a backpack, a tote bag, and a pair of gloves.
  19. 19. The method of claim 11 further comprising a step of making the article of clothing as one of a cap, a baseball glove, a golf glove, a jersey, a team uniform, an equipment bag, a duffel bag, a visor, and a pennant.
  20. 20. The method of claim 12 further comprising a step of applying pressure to the insignia to remove air between the insignia and the hook substrate.
  21. 21. The method of claim 20 further comprising a step of applying pressure to the insignia by drawing an edge at a non-vertical angle over the insignia.
  22. 22. The method of claim 12 further comprising a step of applying pressure to the hook substrate by drawing an edge at a non-vertical angle over the hook substrate.
  23. 23. The method of claim 22 further comprising a step of applying pressure to the hook substrate by drawing an edge at a non-vertical angle over the hook substrate.
  24. 24. A device for displaying insignia comprising:
    a first part comprising an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate, the hook substrate fastened to a surface of an insignia; and
    a second part comprising an article of clothing made of a looped material for engaging the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the article of clothing and for releasing the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the article of clothing without an intermediate fastener between the article of clothing and the array of flexible hooks.
  25. 25. The device of claim 24 further comprising the insignia.
  26. 26. A method of making a removable insignia comprising steps of:
    providing an array of flexible hooks formed on a first surface of a hook substrate and an adhesive applied to a second surface of the hook substrate;
    providing an insignia;
    fastening the insignia to the second surface of the hook substrate by the adhesive;
    cutting the insignia and the hook substrate around a border of the insignia; and
    removing air entrained between the insignia and the second surface of the hook substrate.
  27. 27. A device for displaying insignia comprising:
    a first part comprising an array of flexible hooks formed on a hook substrate, the hook substrate fastened to a surface of an insignia; and
    a second part comprising a surface made of a looped material for engaging the flexible hooks to attach the insignia to the surface and for releasing the flexible hooks to remove the insignia from the surface while maintaining a uniform appearance and texture of the surface over an area that includes and extends beyond an area of the surface from which the insignia is removed.
  28. 28. The device of claim 27, the surface comprising a liner inside a vehicle.
US11691265 2002-06-01 2007-03-26 Device and method for displaying insignia Abandoned US20070186327A1 (en)

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US10449149 US20050187817A1 (en) 2002-06-01 2003-05-30 Indicia display system and method
US11691265 US20070186327A1 (en) 2003-05-30 2007-03-26 Device and method for displaying insignia

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

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US11691265 US20070186327A1 (en) 2003-05-30 2007-03-26 Device and method for displaying insignia

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US20080189830A1 (en) * 2007-02-14 2008-08-14 Colin Egglesfield Clothing with detachable symbols
US20100017932A1 (en) * 2007-02-14 2010-01-28 Colin Egglesfield Clothing with detachable symbols
US20100024089A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Apparel With Selectively Attachable And Detachable Elements
US20100024100A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Layered Apparel With Attachable And Detachable Elements
US20100024101A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Compression Apparel With Insert Elements
US20140352022A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Advertisement-capable clothing
US8918914B2 (en) 2011-09-09 2014-12-30 Mark Estorge Baseball glove with visual indicia
USD741048S1 (en) * 2014-01-17 2015-10-20 Ballbusters Mascots & Logos, Llc Ball cap having indicia comprising a baseball skin
US9386812B2 (en) 2011-07-25 2016-07-12 Nike, Inc. Articles of apparel incorporating cushioning elements
US9521870B2 (en) 2008-08-01 2016-12-20 Nike, Inc. Article of apparel with detachably-secured attachment components
US10034498B2 (en) 2011-07-25 2018-07-31 Nike, Inc. Articles of apparel incorporating cushioning elements

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US20100017932A1 (en) * 2007-02-14 2010-01-28 Colin Egglesfield Clothing with detachable symbols
US7765618B2 (en) * 2007-02-14 2010-08-03 Colin Egglesfield Clothing with detachable symbols
US20080189830A1 (en) * 2007-02-14 2008-08-14 Colin Egglesfield Clothing with detachable symbols
US9521870B2 (en) 2008-08-01 2016-12-20 Nike, Inc. Article of apparel with detachably-secured attachment components
US20100024089A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Apparel With Selectively Attachable And Detachable Elements
US20100024100A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Layered Apparel With Attachable And Detachable Elements
US20100024101A1 (en) * 2008-08-01 2010-02-04 Nike, Inc. Compression Apparel With Insert Elements
US8256034B2 (en) 2008-08-01 2012-09-04 Nike, Inc. Article of apparel with inner and outer layer and an insert element in between
US8898820B2 (en) * 2008-08-01 2014-12-02 Nike, Inc. Layered apparel with attachable and detachable elements
US9386812B2 (en) 2011-07-25 2016-07-12 Nike, Inc. Articles of apparel incorporating cushioning elements
US10034498B2 (en) 2011-07-25 2018-07-31 Nike, Inc. Articles of apparel incorporating cushioning elements
US8918914B2 (en) 2011-09-09 2014-12-30 Mark Estorge Baseball glove with visual indicia
US20140352022A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Advertisement-capable clothing
USD741048S1 (en) * 2014-01-17 2015-10-20 Ballbusters Mascots & Logos, Llc Ball cap having indicia comprising a baseball skin

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