US20070155277A1 - Mobile/portable and personal pre-recorded sound effects electronic amplifier device/gadget - Google Patents

Mobile/portable and personal pre-recorded sound effects electronic amplifier device/gadget Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070155277A1
US20070155277A1 US11489676 US48967606A US2007155277A1 US 20070155277 A1 US20070155277 A1 US 20070155277A1 US 11489676 US11489676 US 11489676 US 48967606 A US48967606 A US 48967606A US 2007155277 A1 US2007155277 A1 US 2007155277A1
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Prior art keywords
cheering
sound
effect
apparatus
invention
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Abandoned
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US11489676
Inventor
Avi Amitai
Ra'Anan Kessel
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Avi Amitai
Kessel Ra Anan
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/18Selecting circuits
    • G10H1/26Selecting circuits for automatically producing a series of tones
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H2220/00Input/output interfacing specifically adapted for electrophonic musical tools or instruments
    • G10H2220/155User input interfaces for electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H2220/395Acceleration sensing or accelerometer use, e.g. 3D movement computation by integration of accelerometer data, angle sensing with respect to the vertical, i.e. gravity sensing.
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H2250/00Aspects of algorithms or signal processing methods without intrinsic musical character, yet specifically adapted for or used in electrophonic musical processing
    • G10H2250/315Sound category-dependent sound synthesis processes [Gensound] for musical use; Sound category-specific synthesis-controlling parameters or control means therefor
    • G10H2250/365Gensound applause, e.g. handclapping; Cheering; Booing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H2250/00Aspects of algorithms or signal processing methods without intrinsic musical character, yet specifically adapted for or used in electrophonic musical processing
    • G10H2250/541Details of musical waveform synthesis, i.e. audio waveshape processing from individual wavetable samples, independently of their origin or of the sound they represent
    • G10H2250/641Waveform sampler, i.e. music samplers; Sampled music loop processing, wherein a loop is a sample of a performance that has been edited to repeat seamlessly without clicks or artifacts

Abstract

In one embodiment, the present invention is directed to a cheering apparatus, comprising: an effect selector, for selecting a sound effect to be played upon activation; a motion detector, for detecting an acceleration or deceleration by a user's limb; and an audio unit, for playing the selected sound upon indicating by the motion detector acceleration or deceleration of a user's limb. The cheering apparatus may further comprise a handheld casing, for housing at least a speaker of the audio unit. The cheering apparatus may further comprise a connector, such as one or more straps, for directly or indirectly connecting the motion detector to a human's limb. The motion detector may comprise: a conductive weighting object; a flexible conductive element connected at one end to the weighting object, and connected at the other end to a non-conductive chassis; and conductive housing.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to the field of cheering devices.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Audience participation in sports games, for example, is considered very essential. Many sports experts describe the audience/team fans cheering or protesting as vital as the sixth player on a basketball team or the twelfth player on a soccer team. Sports team fans all over the world continuously search for new means to cheer or protest in order to increase their influence on the sports games results while increasing, as well, their own enjoyment of the event. For example, fans frequently arrive wearing their favored team uniform, hats, socks, scarves, etc. to attend the events. During the games, fans may perform as an organized group/chorus, shouting interjections according to the immediate situation at the pitch.
  • [0003]
    Common ways people express themselves at spectacles like sports games, rock concerts, demonstrations, include creating as much noise as they can, by shouting, whistling, applauding, drumming, trumpeting or any other way that creates the desired sound effects.
  • [0004]
    Another common way for fans to increase their impact on the game results and to further their own enjoyment is by performing together as a large body the famous “Mexican wave movement”, accompanied by coordinated cheering or booing interjections. All cheering or protesting means that are mentioned above and many more are suitable and relevant for outdoor and indoor events with audience participation, such as sports games, demonstrations, processions, rallies, etc.
  • [0005]
    A spectator of a show such as a concert or sports match is basically limited to express himself by his own capabilities. He can clap his hands, cheer his team, “boo” the opponent, and so forth. However, spectators, especially of sports events, sometimes feel this is insufficient, and therefore use devices for amplifying their reaction, such as trumpets and the like.
  • [0006]
    Publication DE4015323 discloses a musical instrument incorporated in a glove. It has a number of operating kegs provided at the ends of each of the fingers and at spaced points across the palm, to allow them to be independently generated by strumming the fingers or pressing the palm of the glove against a solid surface. The glove is coupled via a wireless transmission link to a base unit incorporating an amplifier and a speaker or a handset. The transmitter may be incorporated in the glove wrist band.
  • [0007]
    Publication JP10277273 discloses a toy that generates sounds as a result of colliding with a wall or a floor in order to dissipate stresses, by fitting an electronic circuit provided with a shock-sensitive sensor, an electric source, a shaper, a voice generator, an amplifier, a speaker, etc., in the inside of the toy and wrapping it with an elastic raw material at the outside thereof.
  • [0008]
    Publication WO9748092 discloses an interchangeable sound effect device which incorporates and plays sound effects that have been digitally recorded on interchangeable sound cartridges. The device is designed to be used with entertainment and educational type products such as toys, dolls, figurines, books and instructional guides. The sound effect device employs an infrared receiver housed within a durable encasement which straps around the user's waist or is embedded within the doll, figurine, toy, or book. The receiver unit contains an infrared detector, an electronic driving means, an audio speaker, and a sound cartridge that rests within a sound cartridge chamber. The sound cartridge contains a sound enabler chip that stores, in digital form, a number of prerecorded sound effects. In addition, the user can easily remove the sound cartridge and insert one of many other sound cartridges, each containing a different set of sound effects. Finally, the sound effect device uses an infrared transmitter that attaches to an adjustable glove.
  • [0009]
    Publication U.S. Pat. No. 6,758,769 is considered to be the closest prior art. It discloses a sound effect assembly that attaches to the net of a goal. The sound effect device contains a sensor that either detects the motion of the net or the passing of the ball or puck. When the sound effect assembly is activated, the sound effect device generates audible sounds, preferably of a cheering crowd. Accordingly, each time a goal is made, the sound effect device produces the sounds of a cheering crowd. The sound effect device is produced in a very small housing that hooks onto the net of a goal.
  • [0010]
    All the methods and devices described above have not yet provided satisfactory solutions to the problem of amplifying a user's reaction to events of a happening, such as a spectacle and sport match.
  • [0011]
    It is an object of the present invention to provide a cheering apparatus, which improves the ability of a spectator to cheer and boo in a better way than in the prior art.
  • [0012]
    Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0013]
    The following embodiments and aspects thereof are described and illustrated in conjunction with systems, tools and methods, which are meant to be merely illustrative, not limiting in scope. In various embodiments, one or more of the above-described problems have been reduced or eliminated, while other embodiments are directed to other advantages or improvements.
  • [0014]
    The term “cheering apparatus” refers herein to an apparatus for producing a sound effect such as of cheering, booing, clapping, and the like, as a reaction of a kinematical event.
  • [0015]
    The term “cheering effect” or “sound effect” refers herein to an audio signal of cheering, booing, clapping, and so on. A cheering effect can be produced by playing a recorded sample or playing an artificial sound, such as a sound produced by electronic means.
  • [0016]
    In one embodiment, the present invention is directed to a cheering apparatus, comprising:
  • [0017]
    an effect selector, for selecting a sound effect to be played upon activation;
  • [0018]
    a motion detector, for detecting acceleration or deceleration (of a user's limb); and
  • [0019]
    an audio unit, for playing the selected sound upon indicating by the motion detector an acceleration or deceleration.
  • [0020]
    The cheering apparatus may further comprise a handheld casing, for housing at least a speaker of the audio unit.
  • [0021]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select an arbitrary sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  • [0022]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select in a cyclic order a sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  • [0023]
    The audio unit may comprise:
  • [0024]
    an audio player, for producing an audio signal of a selected sound effect;
  • [0025]
    an audio amplifier, for amplifying the sound signal; and
  • [0026]
    a speaker, for playing the signal.
  • [0027]
    In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the audio unit further comprises a sound recorder, for recording the sound effects.
  • [0028]
    The cheering apparatus may further comprise a connector, such as one or more straps, for connecting the motion detector to a human's limb directly (i.e., when the motion detector is an integral part of the housing) or indirectly (i.e., when the motion detector is separate from the housing).
  • [0029]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the motion detector comprises:
  • [0030]
    a conductive weighting object;
  • [0031]
    a flexible conductive element connected by one end to the weighting object, and connected at the other end to a non-conductive chassis; and
  • [0032]
    conductive housing;
  • [0033]
    thereby upon accelerating the chassis by a certain level and on, the weighting object contacts the housing, resulting with closing a circuit.
  • [0034]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is deployed within the casing.
  • [0035]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is deployed as part of the casing, and connected to the corresponding element inside the casing by conductive wires.
  • [0036]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the motion detector is deployed within the casing.
  • [0037]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, the motion detector is deployed separately from the casing, and connected to the corresponding element inside the casing by conductive wires.
  • [0038]
    The cheering apparatus may further comprise at least one visual indicator, such as LED, for indicating an operational state of the apparatus.
  • [0039]
    The cheering apparatus may further comprise communication interface, for communication with an external device (e.g., for importing and exporting sound effects). The communication interface may be, for example, wired communication interface such as USB, wireless communication interface such as infrared, Bluetooth, and so forth.
  • [0040]
    In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a cheering apparatus, comprising:
  • [0041]
    a motion detector, for detecting an acceleration or deceleration (of a user's limb); and
      • an audio unit, for playing a sound effect upon indicating by the motion detector an acceleration or deceleration (of a user's limb), the audio unit comprising a sound recorder, for recording the sound effect.
  • [0043]
    The apparatus may further comprise an effect selector, for selecting a sound effect to be played upon activation.
  • [0044]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select an arbitrary sound effect.
  • [0045]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, the effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select in a cyclic order a sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  • [0046]
    In a further embodiment, the present invention comprises a connector, for connecting directly or indirectly the motion detector to a human's limb and the like.
  • [0047]
    In addition to the exemplary aspects and embodiments described above, further aspects and embodiments will become apparent by reference to the figures and by study of the following detailed description.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0048]
    The objects and features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0049]
    FIG. 1 schematically illustrates the modules of a cheering apparatus, according to a preferred embodiment of the invention;
  • [0050]
    FIG. 2 schematically illustrates an effect selector, which may be used in embodiments of the invention;
  • [0051]
    FIG. 3 schematically illustrates an electronic scheme of an electrical effect selector, which may be used in embodiments of the invention;
  • [0052]
    Each of FIGS. 4 a and 4 b is a sectional view which schematically illustrates a common motion detector that can be employed in embodiments of the present invention.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 5 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to one embodiment of the invention;
  • [0054]
    FIG. 6 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to another embodiment of the invention; and
  • [0055]
    FIG. 7 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to a preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0056]
    It is to be understood, however, that the drawings are designed solely for purposes of illustration and not as a definition of the limits of the invention, for which reference should be made to the appended claims. It should be further understood that the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale and that, unless otherwise indicated, they are merely intended to conceptually illustrate the structures and procedures described herein. Reference numerals may be repeated among the figures to indicate corresponding or analogous elements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0057]
    In the following detailed description, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the disclosure. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known methods, procedures, components and circuits have not been described in detail, so as not to obscure the present disclosure.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 1 schematically illustrates the modules of a cheering apparatus, according to a preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0059]
    According to this embodiment, the cheering device is designed as a mobile device which comprises the following modules:
  • [0060]
    An audio recorder 10, for recording sound effects such as cheering, booing, and the like.
  • [0061]
    An effect selector 20, for selecting by a user the sound effect to be played upon activation (e.g., cheering, booing, clapping).
  • [0062]
    A motion detector 30, for detecting motion of a user's limb, and triggering the playing of the selected sound sample upon detecting a certain level of acceleration or deceleration and on.
  • [0063]
    An audio player 40, for playing recorded samples or generating signals of desired effects.
  • [0064]
    An audio amplifier 50, for amplifying played signal.
  • [0065]
    A speaker 60, for converting electrical signal of the amplifier into audible sound.
  • [0066]
    A mobile power source (not illustrated), such as but not limited to batteries, should be used in order to provide the power required for the cheering apparatus. In addition, a user interface for operating the apparatus is employed (also not illustrated).
  • [0067]
    The Audio Unit
  • [0068]
    Audio recorders are universally well known. Actually, almost every MP3 player includes an audio recorder and player. The current audio recorders and players make use of non-volatile flash memory as a substitute for the tape utilized in the past. This enables designing miniature audio recorders and players.
  • [0069]
    The Effect Selector
  • [0070]
    According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cheering apparatus is adapted to record/reproduce a plurality of cheering effects, such as cheering, booing, clapping, and so forth. The effect selector is a device by which a user selects an effect to be recorded or played.
  • [0071]
    For example, a cheering apparatus is adapted to handle only two cheering effects. In this case, a user may decide that one effect is cheering and the other, booing. Thus, when setting the selector to cheering, the recorded or reproduced sound will be of cheering, and when setting the selector to booing, the recorded or reproduced sound will be of booing.
  • [0072]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the selector is a switch having a state for each allowed expression (cheering, booing, and so forth). Usually, the state of the switch is indicated by corresponding contacts.
  • [0073]
    Switches that have two or more states are well known in the art. Such a switch may be based on mechanical elements, electrical elements, electronic elements, and so on.
  • [0074]
    FIG. 2 schematically illustrates a mechanical effect selector, which may be used in embodiments of the invention.
  • [0075]
    The effect selector has three states: cheering, booing and clapping. Contacts 22 and 23 correspond to the cheering state; contacts 24 and 25 correspond to the booing state; and contacts 26 and 27 correspond to the clapping state. A user may move the carriage 28 from one state to another. In the illustration, carriage 28 is in the cheering state, thus it connects the corresponding contacts 22 and 23.
  • [0076]
    FIG. 3 schematically illustrates an electronic scheme of an electrical effect selector, which may be used in embodiments of the invention.
  • [0077]
    A ring counter is basically a circulating shift register in which the output of the most significant stage is fed back to the input of the least significant stage. FIG. 3 illustrates a 3-bit ring counter constructed from D flip-flops 29. The output of each stage is shifted into the next stage on the positive edge of a pulse from switch 21. If the CLEAR signal is high, all the flip-flops except the first one FFO are reset to zero. FFO is preset to 1 instead.
  • [0078]
    Since the count sequence has 3 distinct states, the counter can be considered as a mod-3 counter. No extra decoding circuit is needed to determine in which state the counter is.
  • [0079]
    Specified Selection is Cyclic Selection
  • [0080]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the selector comprises a multi-states switch, each one corresponding to a different cheering effect. A user sets the cheering apparatus to the desired state by setting the switch at the position associated with the desired state. This type of switch is illustrated in FIG. 2.
  • [0081]
    According to another embodiment of the invention, the user flips from one state to another by hitting a sensor. This can be embodied by a sensor used for flipping from one state to the next state in a group of states. This type of switch is illustrated in FIG. 3.
  • [0082]
    For example, in case wherein the selector has two states, cheering and booing, a hit switches from one state to the other state, e.g., from cheering to booing; and the next hit on the sensor sets the state from the booing state to the cheering state. In another example, where the selector has three states, such as cheering, booing and clapping, a hit on the sensor switches the cheering apparatus from cheering to booing, the next hit from booing to clapping, the next hit from clapping to cheering, and so on.
  • [0083]
    Since this type of selector enables selecting the “next” state from a group of states, it is referred to also as “cyclic selector”, and “rotating selector”.
  • [0084]
    The sensor of a cyclic switch may be a mechanical sensor (e.g., a mechanical button that closes a circuit), a microphone that samples a sound, etc. In the latter case, sound may be converted to current, and an electronic circuit thereof may treat a certain level of current and as instruction to switch from one state to the next state.
  • [0085]
    According to one embodiment of the invention, the cheering apparatus comprises a plurality of pairs, triples, and so on, of cheering effects. A user may select a pair, triple and so on by an additional selector. Thus, for example, in the case of a plurality of pairs, the motion detector switches from a member of one pair to the next member of the same group.
  • [0086]
    The Motion Detector
  • [0087]
    The motion detector 30 is a sensor which detects acceleration/deceleration of an object 40 to which it is connected. Upon detecting acceleration/deceleration of the object 40, an activation mechanism activates the operation of playing the selected sound.
  • [0088]
    Each of FIGS. 4 a and 4 b is a sectional view which schematically illustrates a common motion detector that can be employed in embodiments of the present invention.
  • [0089]
    The motion detector 30 comprises the following elements:
  • [0090]
    a conductive spring 32, which is connected at one end to the rigid object 70;
  • [0091]
    a conductive ball 34, which is connected to the other end of the spring 32; and
  • [0092]
    a conductive casing 36, which is also connected to the rigid object 70.
  • [0093]
    At the idle state, which is illustrated in FIG. 4 a, there is no conductive contact between casing 36 and spring 32. When the rigid object 70 accelerates, spring 32 bends. From a certain level of acceleration/deceleration, as illustrated in FIG. 4 b, spring 32 bends such that ball 34 contacts casing 36. The contact closes a circuit through the conductive wires 38 and 39.
  • [0094]
    The acceleration/deceleration level that causes a contact between ball 34 and casing 36 depends on the characteristics of the spring 32 (such as its length, flexibility, and so on) and on the weight of the ball 34.
  • [0095]
    Applying sensor 30 to a cheering apparatus may be carried out as follows:
  • [0096]
    Sensor 30 is fastened to a user's wrist. When a user is interested in activating the sound player to play the selected sound, he has to shake his hand with sufficient intensity that sensor 30 indicates a desired acceleration/deceleration. However, since the user accelerates/decelerates his wrist as a reaction to an event that happens at the event where he is a spectator, the activation of the cheering effect is actually a result of his own behavior at that moment.
  • [0097]
    For example, assume the cheering apparatus is set to two states, cheering and booing, and the current state is cheering. If the user's favored team scores in a basketball match, the user may shake the hand to which the motion sensor is attached until the motion sensor activates the sound effect. At this point, the ball may pass to the opponent, upon which the user hits the selector's sensor in order to switch to the booing effect. When the opponent is approaching the user's favored team, he may shake his hand in order to activate the booing sound.
  • [0098]
    The motion detector illustrated in FIGS. 4 a and 4 b is merely an example, and those skilled in the art will appreciate that other types of motion detectors may be employed for the same purpose. Thus, the example of FIGS. 4 a and 4 b is merely illustrative and not restrictive.
  • [0099]
    The Amplifier and the Speaker(s)
  • [0100]
    All the activities of the apparatus are designed to emit a loud sound, and as such, the amplifier and the speaker(s) have a substantial importance to a cheering apparatus.
  • [0101]
    The desired audio level for a cheering apparatus is about 120 db. Of course, this is only an example, and a cheering apparatus may be designed to well exceed this level.
  • [0102]
    Some conflicting factors are involved in selecting an amplifier: on the one hand, the produced sound of the amplifier has to be at such a level that it is heard well on the sports ground, and as such, it requires an appropriate power source, amplifier and speaker. On the other hand, the entire cheering apparatus has to be worn on the human body, such as a hand, and accordingly, it has to be suitable for easy user carrying.
  • [0103]
    Presently, flat speakers are available on the market. A flat speaker may be a benefit when designing a compact cheering apparatus.
  • [0104]
    As per the power of the amplifier, compact amplifiers which may by operated by battery power are available on the market, and they may produce the desired audio level for the purpose of cheering.
  • [0105]
    Design
  • [0106]
    As mentioned above, conflicting factors are involved in selecting an amplifier: on the one hand, the apparatus has to be relatively small, such as a handheld device, and on the other hand, it must be capable of reaching a level of that is heard on the sports ground.
  • [0107]
    FIG. 5 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0108]
    The cheering apparatus 100 is designed as a handheld device, which comprises one or more straps 82 for attaching the apparatus 100 to a human's limb, such as to a hand, foot, or the like. In this case both the effect selector and motion detector are embedded in the casing.
  • [0109]
    Also illustrated in FIG. 5 is a speaker 60, an ON/OFF button 84, a LED 86 for indicating if the power is on, a volume slider 88, a recording button 90, and a microphone 92.
  • [0110]
    FIG. 6 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0111]
    In this case, both the effect selector 20 and motion detector 30 are external, and connected to the casing of apparatus 100 by wires 89 and 39, thereby allowing attaching the casing, which is a relatively-heavy component, to the user's belt, while the selectors or at least the sensors thereof, which are relatively-light components, are attached to the hand or elsewhere by straps (not illustrated) and the like. For example, the sensors 20 and 30 may be connected to a strap worn by a user via Velcro.
  • [0112]
    In order to inform a user about the selected sound effect, the remaining power on the batteries, and so forth, one or more visual indicators, such as LEDs (Light Emission Diode) are used. The power consumption of a LED is relatively low, and therefore it may be a suitable solution for the visual indicator.
  • [0113]
    Operating a Cheering Apparatus
  • [0114]
    Firstly, a user inserts batteries into the “batteries housing”, which is disposed within the casing of the apparatus.
  • [0115]
    Recording: The user selects the desired cheering effect, such as cheering, booing, and so on. Then he presses the RECORD button 90. While holding the RECORD button 90 pressed, the sound associated with the selected cheering effect is recorded. When finished, the user releases RECORD button 90.
  • [0116]
    Setting the volume level: Slider 88 is used for setting the volume level of the reproduced sound.
  • [0117]
    Cheering: Assuming the cheering apparatus 100 has two states, cheering and booking, and the current state is cheering: if the user's team scores in a basketball match, the user may shake the hand to which the motion sensor is attached with such intensity that the motion sensor 30 activates the sound effect. At this point, assuming the ball passes to the opponent, the user hits the sensor of the effect selector 20 in order to switch to booing. When the opponent is approaching the user's team, he may shake his hand in order to activate the booing sound.
  • [0118]
    A Preferred Design
  • [0119]
    FIG. 7 schematically illustrates a cheering apparatus, according to a preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • [0120]
    According to this embodiment of the invention, the apparatus is designed to produce a plurality of pairs of effects. A user selects the desired pair by moving the button 95 of slider 96. Button 21 flips the selected state from the cheering state to the booing state and vice versa. The operation of button 21 is described in the electronic scheme of FIG. 3.
  • [0121]
    When in the cheering state, the cheering indicator 86 a (which may be embodied as a LED) is on the booing indicator 86 b is off; and when in the booing state, the booing indicator 86 b is on and the cheering indicator 86 a is off.
  • [0122]
    Button 96 is used for recording a sound effect, and indicator 86 c indicates the recording action.
  • [0123]
    Some additional features which may be added are, for example, a slot (not illustrated) for replacing the non-volatile memory card (such as flash memory, SIM, and so forth), a USB connector (not illustrated), for connecting the cheering apparatus to other devices, such as a personal computer, or even to other cheering apparatus. The replaceable memory chip may be used, for example, for storing pre-recorded sound effects, and so forth.
  • [0124]
    Advantage Over the Prior Art
  • [0125]
    The cheering apparatus of the present invention can be used as means for elevating the effect a user wishes to project, such as cheering or booing, in a spectacle such as a sports game, rock concert, a demonstration, and so on.
  • [0126]
    A user thereof is free to record any sound he is interested in. The recording may be carried out even during the spectacle itself. In addition the apparatus may use pre-recorded sound effects, generated sound effects, and so on.
  • [0127]
    By employing a cyclic effect selector 20, the transition between the states is actually a very simple operation.
  • [0128]
    The cheering apparatus of the present invention may be used also for other situations, such as a demonstration and actually any gathering of people.
  • [0129]
    The cheering apparatus of the present invention may be used also for other emotions, such as protesting.
  • [0130]
    Activating a plurality of cheering devices simultaneously during a sport game creates a significant advantage for their chosen sport team. Coordinated and loud sound effects emanating from the direction of specific team fans galleries at crucial moments in a sport game creates the impression that a much larger crowd is cheering, and this can have a positive impact on the players.
  • [0131]
    While certain features of the invention have been illustrated and described herein, the invention can be embodied in other forms, ways, modifications, substitutions, changes, equivalents, and so forth. The embodiments described herein should be considered as illustrative and not restrictive.

Claims (23)

  1. 1-20. (canceled)
  2. 21. A cheering apparatus, comprising:
    an effect selector, for selecting a sound effect to be played upon activation;
    a motion detector, for detecting an acceleration or deceleration; and
    an audio unit, for playing said selected sound upon indicating by said motion detector an acceleration or deceleration.
  3. 22. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising:
    a handheld casing, for housing at least a speaker of said audio unit.
  4. 23. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select an arbitrary sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  5. 24. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select in a cyclic order a sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  6. 25. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said audio unit comprises:
    an audio player, for producing an audio signal of a selected sound effect;
    an audio amplifier, for amplifying said sound signal; and
    a speaker, for playing said signal.
  7. 26. An apparatus according to claim 25, wherein said audio unit further comprises a sound recorder, for recording said sound effect.
  8. 27. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising:
    a connector, for connecting directly or indirectly said motion detector to a human's limb.
  9. 28. A cheering apparatus according to claim 27, wherein said connector comprises at least one strap.
  10. 29. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, wherein said motion detector comprises:
    a conductive weighting object;
    a flexible conductive element connected at one end to said weighting object, and connected at the other end to a non-conductive chassis; and
    conductive housing;
    thereby upon accelerating or decelerating said chassis by a certain level, said weighting object contacts said housing, resulting in closing a circuit.
  11. 30. A cheering apparatus according to claim 22, wherein said effect selector is deployed within said casing.
  12. 31. A cheering apparatus according to claim 22, wherein said effect selector is deployed separately from said casing, and connected to the corresponding element inside said casing by conductive wires.
  13. 32. A cheering apparatus according to claim 22, wherein said motion detector is deployed within said casing.
  14. 33. A cheering apparatus according to claim 22, wherein said motion detector is deployed separately from said casing, and connected to the corresponding element inside said casing by conductive wires.
  15. 34. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising at least one visual indicator, for indicating an operational state of said apparatus.
  16. 35. A cheering apparatus according to claim 34, wherein said at least one visual indicator comprises a LED.
  17. 36. A cheering apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising communication interface, for communication with an external device.
  18. 37. A cheering apparatus according to claim 36, wherein said communication interface is selected from a group comprising: wired communication interface, wireless communication interface, Bluetooth communication interface, infrared communication interface, USB communication interface.
  19. 38. A cheering apparatus, comprising:
    a motion detector, for detecting an acceleration or deceleration; and
    an audio unit, for playing a sound effect upon indicating by said motion detector an acceleration or deceleration, said audio unit comprising a sound recorder, for recording said sound effect.
  20. 39. A cheering apparatus according to claim 38, further comprising an effect selector, for selecting a sound effect to be played upon activation.
  21. 40. A cheering apparatus according to claim 39, wherein said effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select an arbitrary sound effect.
  22. 41. A cheering apparatus according to claim 39, wherein said effect selector is adapted to allow a user to select in a cyclic order a sound effect from a group of sound effects.
  23. 42. A cheering apparatus according to claim 38, further comprising:
    a connector, for connecting directly or indirectly said motion detector to a human's limb.
US11489676 2005-07-25 2006-07-20 Mobile/portable and personal pre-recorded sound effects electronic amplifier device/gadget Abandoned US20070155277A1 (en)

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US11489676 US20070155277A1 (en) 2005-07-25 2006-07-20 Mobile/portable and personal pre-recorded sound effects electronic amplifier device/gadget

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US11489676 US20070155277A1 (en) 2005-07-25 2006-07-20 Mobile/portable and personal pre-recorded sound effects electronic amplifier device/gadget
PCT/IL2007/000826 WO2008010204A3 (en) 2006-07-20 2007-07-03 Cheering apparatus

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