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Conduit for interventional procedures

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Publication number
US20070083215A1
US20070083215A1 US11246592 US24659205A US2007083215A1 US 20070083215 A1 US20070083215 A1 US 20070083215A1 US 11246592 US11246592 US 11246592 US 24659205 A US24659205 A US 24659205A US 2007083215 A1 US2007083215 A1 US 2007083215A1
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Prior art keywords
sheath
introducer
lumens
fig
stent
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US11246592
Inventor
Rochelle Hamer
Eric Johnson
Stanislaw Zukowski
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Gore W L and Associates Inc
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Gore Enterprise Holdings Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/50General aspects of joining tubular articles; General aspects of joining long products, i.e. bars or profiled elements; General aspects of joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; General aspects of joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/63Internally supporting the article during joining
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2/954Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts for placing stents or stent-grafts in a bifurcation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/01Introducing, guiding, advancing, emplacing or holding catheters
    • A61M25/06Body-piercing guide needles or the like
    • A61M25/0662Guide tubes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C66/00General aspects of processes or apparatus for joining preformed parts
    • B29C66/50General aspects of joining tubular articles; General aspects of joining long products, i.e. bars or profiled elements; General aspects of joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; General aspects of joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • B29C66/51Joining tubular articles, profiled elements or bars; Joining single elements to tubular articles, hollow articles or bars; Joining several hollow-preforms to form hollow or tubular articles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • A61F2002/061Blood vessels provided with means for allowing access to secondary lumens
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • A61F2002/065Y-shaped blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2250/00Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof
    • A61F2250/0014Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof having different values of a given property or geometrical feature, e.g. mechanical property or material property, at different locations within the same prosthesis
    • A61F2250/0039Special features of prostheses classified in groups A61F2/00 - A61F2/26 or A61F2/82 or A61F9/00 or A61F11/00 or subgroups thereof having different values of a given property or geometrical feature, e.g. mechanical property or material property, at different locations within the same prosthesis differing in diameter
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0021Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing
    • A61M25/0023Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing by the form of the lumen, e.g. cross-section, variable diameter
    • A61M25/0026Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements
    • A61M2025/0034Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements characterized by elements which are assembled, connected or fused, e.g. splittable tubes, outer sheaths creating lumina or separate cores
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0021Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing
    • A61M25/0023Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the form of the tubing by the form of the lumen, e.g. cross-section, variable diameter
    • A61M25/0026Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements
    • A61M25/0032Multi-lumen catheters with stationary elements characterized by at least one unconventionally shaped lumen, e.g. polygons, ellipsoids, wedges or shapes comprising concave and convex parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M39/00Tubes, tube connectors, tube couplings, valves, access sites or the like, specially adapted for medical use
    • A61M39/02Access sites
    • A61M39/06Haemostasis valves, i.e. gaskets sealing around a needle, catheter or the like, closing on removal thereof
    • A61M39/0693Haemostasis valves, i.e. gaskets sealing around a needle, catheter or the like, closing on removal thereof including means for seal penetration
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor

Abstract

A conduit, such as an introducer sheath, catheter, or guide catheter, incorporating two or more separate lumens to prevent the entanglement of guidewires located at least partially within the conduit. The lumens are separated by at least one disruptable barrier that allows multiple lumens to be converted into fewer lumens prior to or as a device is advanced through the introducer sheath.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0002]
    Novel conduits, such as guide catheters and catheter introducer sheaths, for use in interventional procedures, particularly introducer sheaths adapted for use with multiple guidewires.
  • [0003]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0004]
    It is often desirable to use multiple guidewires in various endovascular procedures. For example when deploying stent graft aneurismal repair devices within branched vasculature, a first guidewire would be used to access the main artery while second and/or third guidewires would access the side branched arteries. Stent grafts with multiple guidewire ports would then be advanced along the respective guidewires and deployed at the desired sites. A common problem associated with the use of multiple guidewires is the “crossing” or entanglement of the guidewires in the vasculature proximal to the treatment site. Crossed and entangled guidewires prohibit or severely restrict the ability to advance a device with multiple guidewire ports to the treatment site. An introducer catheter or sheath is often employed to protect the vasculature from possible damage due to the advancement of the guidewires, catheters and subsequent devices but such use does not eliminate the occurrence of crossed guidewires. See for example U.S. Pat. No. 6,884,258 (to Vardi et al.) for a disclosure of problematic crossed guidewires.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    The invention comprises a conduit (such as an introducer sheath or a guide catheter) for use in an interventional procedure comprising: a main body having a length; at least one disruptable barrier within the main body extending along at least a portion of the length of the main body, defining at least two lumens within the main body; and wherein the barrier is adapted to be disrupted before or during the procedure to reduce the number of lumens within the main body. In an aspect of the invention the at least two lumens are adapted to receive separate elongated members (such as guide wires) and prevent the elongated members from tangling with each other.
  • [0006]
    An aspect of the invention comprises an introducer sheath that incorporates at least two separate lumens to prevent the entanglement of at least two guidewires. The lumens are separated by disruptable barrier(s) that allows multiple lumens to be converted into fewer lumens. The barrier(s) forms at least two separate lumens along at least a portion of the length of the sheath. Guidewires and guide catheters can be advanced through the separate lumens to a desired treatment site. The separated lumens prevent the guidewires from crossing and becoming entangled. In an aspect of the invention, an endovascular device having multiple guidewire lumens and ports can then be “back-loaded” onto the proximal ends of the guidewires. As the multi-lumen device is advanced through the introducer sheath, the distruptable barrier tears or separates to form fewer lumens, thus allowing the multi-lumen device to pass while maintaining guidewire separation. An operational procedure using an introducer sheath of the present invention allows the user to initially place all required guidewires into the target sites. After all required guidwires are in place, the interventional device or devices can then be advanced along the guidewires.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of the abdominal part of the aorta and its principal branches showing an introducer sheath and multiple guidewires of the current art.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 2A is a partial, mid-section perspective view of a multi-lumen introducer sheath according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 2B is an end view of the introducer sheath of FIG. 2A. Shown are two disruptable barriers that form three lumens within the introducer sheath.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 3 is a partial perspective view of a distal portion of an introducer sheath according to the present invention. Shown are three guidewires positioned within the aorta and within the two renal arteries.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an introducer sheath according to the present invention. Shown are the proximal ends of three guidewires projecting from the proximal hub assembly.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 5 is a partial cross-sectional schematic view of a distal end of a stent delivery system that is compatible with an introducer sheath of the present invention.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of an introducer sheath 44 of the present invention. Shown is the distal end of the stent delivery system being advanced toward the proximal hub assembly.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 7 is a partial cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath with two disruptable barriers. The barriers are shown being ripped, deformed or in other words “disrupted” to form a single lumen within the introducer sheath.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 8 is a partial perspective view of an introducer sheath that has been fully “converted” or “transformed” into a single lumen catheter by the disruption of the two internal barriers.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 9 is a partial perspective view of a stent delivery system along with an introducer sheath according to the present invention. Shown is the introducer sheath being partially withdrawn to fully expose the constrained self-expanding stent portion of the delivery system.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 10 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a partial perspective view of a stent delivery system. Shown is a first or “main body” stent after deployment.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 11 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent. Shown are two guidewires within the targeted renal arteries that pass through two side ports within the wall of the deployed main body stent.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 12 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent. Shown is a first side-branch stent delivery system being advanced over the first guidewire 34.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 13 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent. Shown is a first side branch stent that has been deployed into the right renal artery.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 14A is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent. Shown is a second side branch stent that has been deployed into the left renal artery.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 14B is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent and two attached side-branch stents. Also shown is a dashed profile of a bifurcated intraluminal device engaged into the main body stent.
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 15A through 15C are top plane views of three hemostatic sealing disks that incorporate pre-punctured guidewire insertion sites and pre-slit device insertion slots.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 16 is a side view of three sealing disks aligned and stacked to form a hemostatic sealing disk assembly.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 17A is an end view of a multi-lumen catheter having three lumens prior to expansion.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 17B is an end view of the catheter of 17A after expansion. The three lumen catheter of 17A has been converted into a single lumen catheter by the expansion.
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 18A through 18C depict catheters with interior barriers that can be disrupted. Once disrupted the catheter is converted into a catheter with a fewer number of lumens.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 19A is an end view of a catheter having two lumens that will transform into a single lumen catheter when expanded.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 19B is an end view of a catheter having three lumens that will transform into a single lumen catheter when expanded.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 20 is an end view of a catheter of the present invention. Shown is an end view of a catheter having four disruptable barriers that form three lumens. The three lumens can be converted into a single lumen when expanded.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 21 is an end view of a catheter of the present invention. Shown is a catheter having two disruptable barriers that form three lumens. Each barrier can have a slit (or other longitudinal opening) that can release the guidewires as a delivery catheter is advanced distally through catheter.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 22 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath surrounding a dilator that has two flat surfaces. The clearance space between the introducer sheath and the dilator flat surfaces form two guidewire lumens.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 23 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath surrounding a dilator that has three guidewire grooves.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 24 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath surrounding a dilator that has two guidewire grooves and a central lumen.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 25 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath surrounding a dilator that has a “cross-shaped” profile that forms four lumens.
  • [0036]
    FIGS. 26 and 27 are cross-sectional end views of guidewire positioning catheters surrounded by an introducer sheath. The guidewire positioning catheter has three guidewire lumens each having a longitudinal slit or opening. The slit or opening allows the guidewires to be released as a subsequent delivery system is advanced through the introducer sheath.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0037]
    A better understanding of the present invention may be had with reference to the several figures.
  • [0038]
    Shown in FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of the abdominal part of the aorta and its principal branches. The abdominal aorta 20 is characterized by a right renal artery 22 and left renal artery 24. The large terminal branches of the aorta are the right and left common iliac arteries 26 and 28. Each common iliac artery branches into internal 30 and external 32 iliac arteries. An external iliac artery 32 becomes the femoral artery below the inguinal ligament. Internal iliac artery 30 is also known as the hypogastric artery. Additional vessels (e.g., second lumbar, testicular, inferior mesenteric, middle sacral) have been omitted for simplification. The infrarenal aorta is that portion of the aorta disposed between the renal arteries and the common iliac arteries. Throughout this application the term “distal” refers to the direction that is furthest away from the clinician or access site and the term “proximal” refers to the direction that is closest to the clinician or access site.
  • [0039]
    A typical procedure entails gaining initial femoral artery access percutaneously or with a surgical access. A floppy guidewire is then inserted into the artery past the treatment site to ensure access is maintained. An introducer sheath consisting of the outer sheath and an inner dilator is placed over the guidewire and into the vessel to the treatment site or as far as it will go. The dilator serves to both stiffen the sheath for pushability and to create a smooth transition between the relatively sharp end of the sheath and the tissue. The floppy guidewire is switched out for the appropriate stiff guidewire using the sheath to maintain arterial access. The dilator is then removed and the treatment device is then guided over the guidewire and deployed.
  • [0040]
    As shown in FIG. 1, first, second and third guidewires 34, 36, 38 have been positioned within the main aorta 20 and within the two renal arteries 22, 24. The guidewires have been positioned with the aid of a single lumen introducer sheath 40 according to the current art. As depicted in the cut away portion of the introducer sheath, the three guidewires 34, 36, 38 are “crossed” 42 and entangled within the introducer sheath. The crossed and entangled guidewires prohibit or severely restrict the ability to advance devices, and particularly multi-lumen devices, to the treatment site.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 2A is a partial, mid-section perspective view of a multi-lumen introducer sheath according to an aspect of the present invention. Shown is an introducer sheath portion 44 having two distruptable barriers 46, 48 that can extend through a substantial length (or the entire length) of the introducer sheath 44. The two disruptable barriers 46, 48 form first, second and third lumens 50, 52, 54 that can extend through a substantial length (or the entire length) of the introducer sheath 44. Typical hemostatic valves, radiopaque markers and sheath distal tip details have been omitted for clarity.
  • [0042]
    Shown in FIG. 2B is an end view of the introducer sheath 44 of FIG. 2A. Shown are the two disruptable barriers 46, 48 that form three lumens 50, 52, 54 within the introducer sheath 44.
  • [0043]
    FIGS. 3 through 14 depict an operational procedure used to repair an aortic aneurysm that includes the deployment of three stent grafts. The first stent graft is deployed across the main body of the aorta adjacent to the two renal arteries. The second and third stent grafts are then guided through “side branch” openings within the main stent graft and are then deployed within the renal arteries.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of the abdominal part of the aorta and its principal branches. Included is a partial perspective view of a distal portion of an introducer sheath 44 according to an aspect of the present invention. Shown are three guidewires 34, 36, 38 positioned within the aorta 20 and within the two renal arteries 22, 24. The guidewires have been positioned with the aid of a three lumen introducer sheath 44 according to an aspect of the present invention. Each guidewire is contained within a separate lumen within the introducer sheath. As depicted in the cut away portion of the introducer sheath, the three guidewires 34, 36, 38 are separated 56 and prevented from being “crossed” as a result of the three separate lumens.
  • [0045]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of an introducer sheath 44 according to the present invention. Shown is an introducer sheath 44 with three separate lumens 50, 52, 54. Three guidewires 34, 36, 38 are shown, each guidewire being contained within one of the three separate lumens. The three guidewires are positioned distally into the main portion of the aorta and into two renal arteries. The proximal ends of the three guidewires project from the proximal hub assembly 58. The proximal hub assembly contains a hemostatic valve assembly that minimizes or prevents back-bleeding while also allowing advancement of guidewires and subsequent devices. Additional hubs and connectors, for example flushing hubs, have been omitted for clarity.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 5 is a partial cross-sectional schematic view of a distal end of a stent delivery system 60 that is compatible with an introducer sheath of the present invention. Shown is a catheter 71, containing two guidewire tubes 67, 69 along with a central catheter shaft 61. The guidewire tubes 67, 69 have guidewire lumens 62, 66. The central catheter shaft 61 has a guidewire lumen 64. All four components 61, 71, 67, 69 extend to the proximal hub (not shown).
  • [0047]
    A self expanding main body stent or stent graft (for simplicity, as used herein it should be understood that “stent” shall mean both a stent or a stent graft) 63 is shown compressed onto the central catheter shaft 61. The self expanding stent 63 is constrained in the compressed state by a flexible sheath 65. The sheath 65 can be activated by a pull line (not shown) releasing a series of “slip-knots” that allow the sheath to split open and release the self expanding stent. The two guidewire tubes 67, 69 are passed through two side-branch openings in the stent 63 and also pass through two openings within the flexible sheath 65. The openings in the flexible sheath can be configured, for example, as slits propagating to the seam line of the flexible sheath.
  • [0048]
    The three guidewires 34, 36, 38 (from FIG. 4, emanating from the proximal hub assembly 58) are shown being “back-loaded” into the three guidewire lumens 62, 64, 66 within the stent delivery system 60, in the direction depicted by the arrows 73.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of an introducer sheath 44 of the present invention. Two guidewires 34, 38 are shown back-loaded into the stent delivery system tubes 67, 69. The third guidewire 36 is shown back-loaded into the guidewire lumen within the central catheter shaft 61. Shown is the distal end of the stent delivery system 60 being advanced in the direction 68 toward the proximal hub assembly 58.
  • [0050]
    Shown in FIG. 7 is a partial cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath 44 according to the present invention. A distal end of a stent delivery system 60 has been inserted through the proximal hub assembly 58 (see FIG. 6) and is being advanced distally in the direction depicted by arrow 68. In portion 72, the three guidewires 34, 36 and 38 are separated by the disruptable barriers 46 and 48. As the stent delivery system 60 is advanced, the barriers 46 and 48 tear, rip, deform or in other words “disrupt” 70, thereby forming a single lumen within the introducer sheath portion 74.
  • [0051]
    The term “disruptable barrier” is defined as a member that creates at least two lumens within a catheter shaft and is tailored to allow conversion to a fewer number of lumens. For example a pair of disruptable barriers can create three separate lumens that are then transformed into less than three lumens. Similarly, flexible partitions or walls within a catheter can initially form several lumens (for example four) that are subsequently converted into less than four lumens. A disruptable barrier (or barriers) therefore provides a means to prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires, while also allowing the subsequent advancement of a medical device along the guidewires. In an aspect of the invention, a disruptable barrier (or barriers) provides a means to isolate and prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires, while also allowing the subsequent advancement of a medical device along the guidewires.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a partial perspective view of an introducer sheath 44 according to the present invention. Shown is the distal end of a stent delivery system 60 projecting from the distal end of the introducer sheath 44. The introducer sheath 44 has been fully “converted” or “transformed” into a single lumen catheter by the disruption of the two internal barriers (46, 48 FIG. 2A). Also shown are three guidewires 34, 36 and 38 located within the aorta and within two renal arteries. The three guidewires are contained within the stent delivery system guidewire lumens (62, 64 and 66 of FIG. 5).
  • [0053]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a partial perspective view of a stent delivery system 60 along with an introducer sheath 44 according to the present invention. Shown is the introducer sheath 44 being partially withdrawn from the distal end of the stent delivery system 60, in the direction depicted by arrow 76. The sheath 44 is partially withdrawn to fully expose the constrained self-expanding stent portion of the delivery system 60.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 10 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a partial perspective view of a stent delivery system. Shown is a first or “main body” stent 78 after deployment. In a preferred embodiment the main body stent is self-expanding and has appropriate side hole openings 80 and 82 that roughly align to the side branch arteries to be subsequently stented. The main body stent 78 is compacted into the stent delivery system 60 (FIG. 9) with the two guidewire tubes 67, 69 and two side branch guidewires 34, 38 pre-routed through the appropriate side holes or ports in the main body stent. Thus when deployed, the two side branch guidewires 34, 38 remain within the target vessels and are pre-routed through the side ports in the main body stent. The flexible sheath (FIG. 5, item 65) has been omitted for clarity.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 11 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent 78. Shown are two guidewires 34, 38 within the targeted renal arteries that pass through two side ports 80, 82 within the wall of the deployed main body stent 78. Shown is the central shaft 61 of the stent delivery system (60, FIG. 9) being withdrawn along with the two guidewire tubes 67, 69 and the catheter shaft 71, in the direction depicted by arrow 76. The three guidewires 34, 36, 38 remain in their target vessels.
  • [0056]
    Shown in FIG. 12 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent 78. Shown is a first side-branch stent delivery system 86 being advanced over the first guidewire 34, in the direction indicated by arrow 68. The side-branch stent can be self expanding and constrained by a sheath in a manner similar to that of the main body stent of FIG. 5.
  • [0057]
    Shown in FIG. 13 is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent 78. Shown is a first side branch stent 88 that has been deployed into the right renal artery 22. The first side branch stent 88 has been deployed through the first side branch port 80 creating a seal between the main body stent 78 and the first side branch stent 88.
  • [0058]
    Shown in FIG. 14A is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent 78. Shown is a second side branch stent 90 that has been deployed into the left renal artery 24. The second side branch stent 90 has been deployed through the second side branch port 82 creating a seal between the main body stent 78 and the second side branch stent 90.
  • [0059]
    The existing guidewire placements can be subsequently used for additional diagnostics or repairs (such as ballooning or stent placement). Additional repair or diagnostic devices can include but are not limited to bifurcated stent grafts, single lumen tube grafts, combinations of modular graft components, radiographic injection devices, embolic filters, occlusion, anchoring or seating balloons, fixation or anchoring devices and endoscopes. In a preferred example the two side-branch guidewires 34, 38 can be withdrawn and an additional device (or devices) can be advanced along the central guidewire 36. When at the desired location subsequent devices can be released and engaged to the “docking” portion 92 of the main body stent 78 forming a complete repair of the aneurysmal site.
  • [0060]
    For example, shown in FIG. 14B is a schematic representation of an aortic section with a perspective view of a deployed main body stent 78 and two attached side-branch stents. Also shown is a dashed profile of a bifurcated intraluminal device 94 engaged into the docking portion 92 of the main body stent 78.
  • [0061]
    As shown in FIG. 14A, the stents 78, 88, 90 can be balloon expandable, self expanding or both. Self expanding stents can be further “seated” with a balloon if desired, using the appropriate guidewire or guidewires. The side ports 80 and 82 in the main body stent 78 can incorporate side branch stent sealing features such as conical interfaces, support frames, compliant surfaces etc. that enhance or maintain an effective seal between the stents. Side branch stents 88 and 90 can similarly incorporate sealing features.
  • [0062]
    Although depicted in a renal/aortic repair procedure, the devices and methods of the present invention can be used in other repair procedures involving branched vessels. Anchoring balloons can also be incorporated into the various guidewires to help maintain the guidewire positions during the repair procedure.
  • [0063]
    During the insertion of an introducer sheath of the present invention a “split” dilator can be used in a normal fashion. Such a split dilator has longitudinal slits or separate stiffening portions that are tailored to slip into the individual lumens of the introducer sheath of the present invention.
  • [0064]
    The disruption or tearing of the barrier or barriers of the present invention can be initiated, for example, with the use of a “slitting tool”. Such a slitting tool can be partially inserted into the introducer sheath of the present invention prior to the back loading of the first stent device. The slitting tool can initiate the disruption or separation of the barrier/s and can then be removed prior to the device insertion. Similarly, the distal tip of the first stent device can incorporate a barrier “disrupting” feature such as a sharp or fluted surface. Also, the barrier can be of a material that will tear as a relatively blunt distal tip of a catheter is advanced.
  • [0065]
    When multiple guidewires are used with an introducer sheath, an effective hemostatic seal within the proximal hub assembly (FIG. 6, item 58) is desirable to minimize back-bleeding. Elastomeric sealing disks can be incorporated into a proximal hub assembly (FIG. 6, item 58) that are configured to allow the insertion of multiple guidewires followed by the insertion of a larger device or delivery system. Shown in FIG. 15A through 15C are top plane views of three sealing disks 100A, 100B, 100C that incorporate pre-punctured guidewire insertion sites 102. The guidewire insertion sites can be interconnected to allow for the formation of one orifice for the subsequent advancement of a larger device or delivery system. For example, shown are pre-punctured guidewire insertion sites 102 interconnected by linear pre-slit device insertion features 104, or interconnected by curved pre-slit device insertion features 106. The seals can also incorporate “rip able” sections that readily separate or tear as an alternative to pre-slit insertion features. Multiple sealing disks can then be aligned and stacked together within the hub assembly to form an effective guidewire or device hemostatic seal. Shown in FIG. 16 is a side view of three sealing disks 100A, 100B, 100C aligned and stacked to form a sealing disk assembly 108.
  • [0066]
    Disruptable barriers of the present invention can have various configurations. Shown for example in FIG. 17A is an end view of a multi-lumen catheter 110A having first, second and third lumens 112, 114, 116. The multi-lumen catheter 110A can be expanded (for example by the insertion of a device delivery system) to form a single lumen 118 within the catheter as shown in end view, FIG. 17B. Thus the barriers of FIG. 17A “disrupt” to form a catheter with fewer lumens. Suitable materials for use as disruptable barriers include, but are not limited to, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethanes, siloxanes, polyetherester, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyimide, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, thermoplastic elastomers, polyolefins, polyester, polyamides, polydimethylsiloxane, natural rubber, polyether block amide (PEBAX), ethylene vinyl acetate, and combinations thereof.
  • [0067]
    Similarly, FIGS. 18A through 18C depict catheters with interior barriers that can be disrupted to form fewer lumens. Shown in FIG. 18A is an end view of a catheter 120A with two disruptable barriers 122 that form first and second lumens 112, 114. Shown in FIG. 18B is an end view of a catheter 120B with three disruptable barriers 122 that form first, second and third lumens 112, 114, 116. Shown in FIG. 18C is an end view of a catheter 120C with four disruptable barriers 122 that form first, second, third and fourth lumens 112, 114, 116, 117. In these embodiments the barriers can be disrupted by pushing a device (or devices) distally along guide wire(s) previously located in the lumens. The barriers can be disrupted by being pushed aside as the device is advanced along the guide wire.
  • [0068]
    Other configurations of the present invention, similar to that of FIG. 17A, are configured with disruptable barriers. Shown for example in FIG. 19A is an end view of a catheter 124A having two lumens 112, 114 that will transform into a single lumen catheter when expanded. Shown in FIG. 19B is an end view of a catheter 124B having three lumens 112, 114, 116 that will transform into a single lumen catheter when expanded.
  • [0069]
    Shown in FIG. 20 is an end view of a further embodiment of the present invention. Shown is an end view of a catheter 126 having four disruptable membranes 122 that form three lumens 112, 114, 116. The three lumens can be converted into a single lumen when expanded. Or, as discussed above, the lumens can be converted into a single lumen by being pushed aside by a suitable device (or devices) as the device(s) is advanced along guidewire(s) previously located in the lumens.
  • [0070]
    Shown in FIG. 21 is an end view of an alternate embodiment of the present invention. Shown is an end view of a catheter 130 having two disruptable barriers 131 that form three lumens 112, 114, 116. Guidewires are advanced and retained in these flexible cylindrical lumens internally tangent to the inner surface of the catheter. Each barrier can have a slit (or other longitudinal opening) that can release the guidewires as a delivery catheter is advanced distally through catheter 130.
  • [0071]
    Various cross-sectional profiles according to the present invention can be extruded, formed by wrapping or windings, or be comprised of multiple sections laminated or bonded together. The initial number of lumens can include but are not limited to two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine or ten or more lumens. These multi-lumen catheters can be converted, according to the present invention, into “fewer than the initial number of lumens” which includes but is not limited to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine or ten or more lumens.
  • [0072]
    A catheter or introducer sheath having two disruptable barriers that are “rip able”, “slit able” or tear able can be fabricated by providing, for example, a three piece mandrel having a general cross-section or end view according to FIG. 2B. A tubular member that has relatively high longitudinal strength but with relatively low radial strength can be placed around the center section of the three piece mandrel, forming an assembly. The assembly can then be wrapped with an adhesive coated film or constrained by an adhesive coated tube. After adhesive curing, the mandrel sections can be removed producing a catheter having the general cross-sectional profile as shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The outer wall of the catheter is therefore formed by the film wrap or tubular constraint. The two disruptable, (e.g., “rip able”, “slit able”, or tear able) barriers are formed from the tubular member. The low radial strength of the tubular member allows for the tubular member to be readily slit along its longitudinal axis. Suitable materials for use as rip able, slit able, or tear able barriers include, but are not limited to, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane, siloxanes, polyetherester, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyimide, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, thermoplastic elastomers, polyolefins, polyester, polyamides, polydimethylsiloxane, natural rubber, polyether block amide (PEBAX), and ethylene vinyl acetate, and combinations thereof.
  • [0073]
    As an alternative to the concept of “disruptable barriers” modified “dilators” used in conjunction with introducer sheaths can be used to minimize or prevent the occurrence of crossed or entangled guidewires. The dilator has a length, a proximal end, and a distal end, the dilator is sized to be locatable within the lumen of an introducer sheath. The introducer sheath has a length, a proximal end, a distal end, and a lumen extending from the proximal end to the distal end. The dilator is further defined as having an outer geometric shape that defines at least two lumens between the introducer sheath and the dilator when the dilator is inserted into the introducer sheath lumen. Moreover, the dilator can comprise at least one lumen defined by an inner surface of the dilator.
  • [0074]
    For example, a dilator can have two opposing flat surfaces extending along its length. When inserted into the mating introducer sheath, the flat surfaces form two guidewire lumens between the dilator and the inner wall of the introducer sheath. When the guidewires are positioned into the desired target site the dilator can be removed and a delivery system can then be back-loaded onto the guidewires and advanced through the introducer sheath. The proximal guidewire positions can be maintained by suitable fixation at the hub assembly. Shown in FIG. 22 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath 132 surrounding a dilator 134 that has two flat surfaces 136. The clearance space between the introducer sheath 132 and the dilator flat surfaces 136 form two guidewire lumens. Shown are two guidewires 138 positioned within the clearance space between the introducer sheath 132 and the dilator flat surfaces 136. Clearances between the introducer sheath 132 and dilator 134 have been exaggerated for clarity.
  • [0075]
    Shown in FIG. 23 is an alternate dilator according to the present invention. Shown is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath 132 surrounding a dilator 134 that has three guidewire grooves 140. Similarly, shown in FIG. 24 is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath 132 surrounding a dilator 134 that has two guidewire grooves 140 and a central lumen 142, formed by the inner surface of the dilator.
  • [0076]
    Shown in FIG. 25 is an alternate dilator according to the present invention. Shown is an end cross-sectional view of an introducer sheath 132 surrounding a dilator 134 that has a “cross-shaped” profile 144 that forms four lumens.
  • [0077]
    The modified dilators of the present invention therefore provide a “means to isolate and prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires” while also allowing the subsequent advancement of a medical device along the guidewires.
  • [0078]
    The specific configurations used to form separate guidewire lumens in the examples above can be embodied along the entire length of the dilator. Alternatively, the guidewire lumen features can be eliminated at the distal and/or proximal ends of the dilator. The elimination of the guidewire features for example at the distal end of the dilator allows a normal tapered tip of a dilator to extend from the introducer sheath during insertion. The dilator can then be further advanced into the introducer sheath to expose the distal guidewire lumens. The specific lumens of the present invention can be dimensioned to accept a variety of guidewire sizes or other devices. In any event, once the guidewires are advanced through the lumens and located at the desired treatment sites, the dilator can be removed from the introducer sheath lumen to allow for the advancement of the desired device(s) over the guidewires. The concepts of disruptable barriers can be combined with dilators modified to incorporate guidewire lumens. In addition the distal end of an introducer sheath can have staggered and/or angulated exit ports for the guidewires or other devices.
  • [0079]
    Shown in FIGS. 26 and 27 are cross-sectional end views of guidewire positioning catheters 146A-B surrounded by an introducer sheath 132. As shown in FIGS. 26 and 27, the guidewire positioning catheter 146A-B has three guidewire lumens 112, 114, 116 each having a longitudinal slit or opening. The slit or opening allows the guidewires to be released as a subsequent delivery system is advanced through the introducer sheath.
  • [0080]
    The guidewire positioning catheters of the present invention therefore provide a means to isolate and prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires while also allowing the subsequent advancement of a medical device along the guidewires.
  • [0081]
    A method of the present invention can include the following steps:
    • A) provide an introducer sheath and a matching dilator system that provides a means to prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires;
    • B) insert and locate the introducer sheath approximate to a desired target site;
    • C) insert and locate at least two guidewires within the introducer sheath;
    • D) back-load a medical device onto the at least two guidewires; and
    • E) advance the medical device over the at least two guidewires through the introducer sheath to the desired target site.
  • [0087]
    The means to prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires can include the incorporation of at least one disruptable barrier within the introducer sheath. Additional means to prevent entanglement of at least two guidewires can include, but are not limited to, the incorporation of at least two guidewire lumens into the dilator or by the use of a guidewire positioning catheter.
  • [0088]
    While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described above, the present invention should not be limited to such particular illustrations and descriptions. It should be apparent that changes and modifications may be incorporated and embodied as part of the present invention within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (23)

1. A conduit for use in an interventional procedure comprising:
a main body having a length;
at least one disruptable barrier within the main body extending along at least a portion of the length of the main body, defining at least two lumens within the main body;
wherein the barrier is adapted to be disrupted before or during the procedure to reduce the number of lumens within the main body.
2. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the lumens are each adapted to receive a separate elongated member and prevent the elongated members from tangling with each other.
3. The conduit of claim 2, wherein at least one of the elongated members is used to access side vessels.
4. The conduit of claim 1, that comprises at least two disruptable barriers, defining at least three lumens within the main body.
5. The conduit of claim 1, that allows for delivery of a main treatment device through the main body following disruption of the barrier.
6. The conduit of claim 1, that includes at least one hemostatic seal having multiple openings, each corresponding with each of the lumens in the main body.
7. The conduit of claim 6, wherein the multiple openings are adapted to form into a single opening.
8. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the barrier comprises a membrane.
9. The conduit of claim 2, wherein the elongated member is a guidewire.
10. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the disruptable barrier material comprises a material selected from the group consisting of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyurethanes, siloxanes, polyetherester, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyimide, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, thermoplastic elastomers, polyolefins, polyester, polyamides, polydimethylsiloxane, natural rubber, polyether block amide, ethylene vinyl acetate, and combinations thereof.
11. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the conduit is an introducer sheath.
12. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the conduit is a guide catheter.
13. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the at least one disruptable barrier extends for substantially the entire length of the conduit.
14. An introducer sheath having a length, a proximal end, and a distal end comprising:
A hemostatic seal located at the proximal end;
The hemostatic seal comprising at least one elastomeric sealing disk;
The at least one elastomeric sealing disk comprising a plurality of interconnected guidewire insertion sites.
15. The introducer sheath of claim 14, wherein the hemostatic seal comprises at least three elastomeric sealing disks.
16. The introducer sheath of claim 14, wherein the at least one elastomeric sealing disk comprises at least three guidewire insertion sites.
17. The introducer sheath of claim 15, wherein the at least one elastomeric sealing disk comprises at least three guidewire insertion sites.
18. The introducer sheath of claim 14, wherein the plurality of guidewire insertion sites comprise pre-punctured holes sized to accept a guidewire therethrough.
19. A kit comprising:
An introducer sheath having a length, a proximal end, a distal end, and a lumen extending from the proximal end to the distal end; and
A dilator having a length, a proximal end, and a distal end, the dilator being sized to be locatable within the lumen of the introducer sheath and having an outer geometric shape that defines at least two lumens between the introducer sheath and the dilator when the dilator is inserted into the introducer sheath lumen.
20. The kit of claim 19, wherein the dilator outer geometric shape comprises at least two longitudinally extending grooves sized to accept a guidewire.
21. The kit of claim 19, wherein the dilator outer geometric shape is cross-shaped, the cross-shape forming four lumens between the dilator and the introducer sheath when the dilator is inserted into the introducer sheath lumen.
22. The introducer sheath of claim 14, wherein the guidewire insertion sites are interconnected by at least one slit.
23. The conduit of claim 1, wherein the main body has a first outer diameter, wherein the first outer diameter is expandable to a relatively larger diameter upon insertion of at least one elongated member into the main body.
US11246592 2005-10-07 2005-10-07 Conduit for interventional procedures Abandoned US20070083215A1 (en)

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US11246592 US20070083215A1 (en) 2005-10-07 2005-10-07 Conduit for interventional procedures
EP20060836181 EP1931285B1 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procedures
JP2008534650A JP5161095B2 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Interventional treatment for conduit
CA 2828140 CA2828140C (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procedures
CA 2754686 CA2754686C (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procedures
EP20090014737 EP2191793B1 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procudures
CA 2624945 CA2624945C (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procedures
ES09014737T ES2383481T3 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for intervention procedure
PCT/US2006/038800 WO2007044405A3 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Conduit for interventional procedures
DE200660010887 DE602006010887D1 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-03 Line for interventional interventions
US14255599 US9623603B2 (en) 2005-10-07 2014-04-17 Method of making a conduit for interventional procedures

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