US20070062886A1 - Reduced pressure drop coalescer - Google Patents

Reduced pressure drop coalescer Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070062886A1
US20070062886A1 US11230694 US23069405A US2007062886A1 US 20070062886 A1 US20070062886 A1 US 20070062886A1 US 11230694 US11230694 US 11230694 US 23069405 A US23069405 A US 23069405A US 2007062886 A1 US2007062886 A1 US 2007062886A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
coalescer
dispersed phase
fibrous media
according
fibers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11230694
Inventor
Eric Rego
Brian Schwandt
Eric Janikowski
Barry Verdegan
Kwok-Lam Ng
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cummins Filtration IP Inc
Original Assignee
Cummins Filtration Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D17/00Separation of liquids, not provided for elsewhere, e.g. by thermal diffusion
    • B01D17/02Separation of non-miscible liquids
    • B01D17/04Breaking emulsions
    • B01D17/045Breaking emulsions with coalescers

Abstract

A coalescer includes fibrous media capturing droplets of the dispersed phase, coalescingly growing the droplets into larger drops which further coalesce and grow to form pools that drain, and adapted to reduce pressure drop thereacross by increasing dispersed phase drainage therefrom.

Description

    BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY
  • The invention related to fibrous media coalescers.
  • Fibrous media coalescers are known in the prior art for coalescing and separating a medium having two immiscible phases, namely a continuous phase and a dispersed phase. For example: in engine crankcase ventilation systems, and other air-oil separation systems, the continuous phase is air, and the dispersed phase is oil; in fuel-water separation systems, such as fuel filters, fuel is the continuous phase, and water is the dispersed phase; in water-oil separation systems, water is the continuous phase, and oil is the dispersed phase. The invention is particularly well suited for engine crankcase ventilation applications, but may be used in other separation systems having immiscible fluids, e.g. air-oil, fuel-water, water-oil, etc.
  • In designing a coalescer, trade-offs often need to be made. For example, to increase efficiency by decreasing fiber diameter and/or decreasing porosity and/or increasing thickness, the trade-off may be higher pressure drop and/or shorter life and/or larger package size. The present invention provides desirable options for more favorable trade-offs, including lower pressure drop.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • FIG. 1 schematically illustrates coalescence.
  • FIG. 2 is a graph showing loading and saturation.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a coalescer in accordance with the invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a front elevation view of the coalescer of FIG. 3, and shows a further embodiment.
  • FIG. 5. is like FIG. 4 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 6 is like FIG. 4 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 7 is like FIG. 4 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 8 is like FIG. 4 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 9 is like FIG. 4 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 10 is like FIG. 4 and shows a further embodiment.
  • FIG. 11 is a schematic illustration showing fiber orientation angle.
  • FIG. 12 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 13 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 14 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 15 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 16 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 17 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 18 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 19 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 20 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 21 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 22 is like FIG. 11 and shows another embodiment.
  • FIG. 23 is a microphotograph of fibrous media taken with a scanning electron microscope at 43× magnification.
  • FIG. 24 is a microphotograph of fibrous media taken with a scanning electron microscope at 35× magnification, at a 90° orientation relative to FIG. 23.
  • FIG. 25 is a schematic illustration of a further embodiment showing fiber orientation across a localized pocket.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a coalescer 20 for coalescing a medium 22 having two immiscible phases, namely a continuous phase 24 and a dispersed phase 26. For example, in the case of an engine crankcase ventilation coalescer, the continuous phase 24 is air, and the dispersed phase is oil, e.g. in the form of a fine mist having droplets 26 of about one micron and smaller in diameter. The continuous phase 24 flows from upstream to downstream, i.e. left to right in FIG. 1. The coalescer includes fibrous media 28 capturing droplets of the dispersed phase, coalescingly growing the droplets into larger drops, for example as shown at 30, 32, which further coalesce and grow to form pools such as 34 which drain as shown at 36. Within the gas or air stream 24, droplets 26 can collide and grow in size by drop to drop coalescence. Upon entry into coalescer 20, the droplets are captured by impaction, interception, diffusion, or electrostatic or other filtration mechanisms. Droplets grow in size as captured and uncaptured droplets coalesce to form larger drops. When the drops become large enough and pool at 34 such that flow and/or gravitational forces exceed adhesion forces, the enlarged/pooled drops flow through the bed of fibrous media and are released as shown at 36. Dispersed phase saturation varies within the coalescer, typically with increasing saturation as one approaches the downstream face (right hand face FIG. 1), due to viscous forces, and with increasing saturation at the bottom of the coalescer due to gravity. Saturation, like porosity, is a dimensionless number representing the fraction or percent of a filter media's void space that is occupied by the captured dispersed phase. Saturation does not mean that the entire void volume is filled with the captured dispersed phase such as oil, but rather that the element is holding as much oil as it can. At saturation, more oil is held at the bottom and right than at the top and left in FIG. 1.
  • In the absence of solid contaminants, the pressure drop across a coalescer increases during the loading of the coalescer, left side of FIG. 2, and then stabilizes once the coalescer becomes saturated, right side of FIG. 2. FIG. 2 is a graphical plot of pressure drop, ΔP, in millimeters of water, verses time in minutes. During loading, the rate of capture is greater than the rate of drainage. During saturation, the rate of capture equals the rate of drainage. In practice, plugging or excessively high pressure occurs due to solid contaminants being captured and held by the coalescer and/or the rate of capture exceeding the rate of drainage from the coalescer. In two of the desirable aspects of the present disclosure, the solids holding capacity of the coalescer is increased and the rate of drainage of the coalescer is increased. The noted saturation profile is important in coalescer design because increased saturation corresponds to decreasing effective porosity within the fibrous media bed and increasing restriction.
  • The present disclosure provides a coalescer with fibrous media adapted to reduce pressure drop thereacross by increasing drainage therefrom. This is accomplished in various ways, to be described.
  • FIG. 3 shows a fibrous media coalescer 40 having a hollow interior 42 and providing inside-out flow, namely incoming flow as shown at 44 into hollow interior 42, and then flow from hollow interior 42 outwardly through fibrous media 46 as shown at arrows 48. Coalescer 40 has a first cross-sectional area A1 along a first horizontal plane 50, and a second cross-sectional area A2 along a second horizontal plane 52. Horizontal plane 52, FIGS. 3, 4, is vertically below horizontal plane 50. Cross-sectional area A2 is less than cross-sectional area A1. Coalescer 40 has a perimeter 54 having a plurality of chords thereacross, including vertical chords such as 56 and horizontal chords such as 58. The longest of the chords, e.g. 56, extends vertically. The horizontal chords include a first horizontal chord, e.g. 58, along horizontal plane 50, and a second horizontal chord 60 along horizontal plane 52. Horizontal chord 60 is shorter than horizontal chord 58. The drainage pressure on the dispersed phase coalesced drops at the bottom of the coalescer, and hence the drainage rate at such point, is a function of the height of the dispersed phase column, which is proportional to the element height and cross-sectional area. By providing the long dimension of the shape along a vertical orientation, drainage pressure is maximized. By having the cross-sectional area decrease towards the bottom of the coalescer, two benefits are obtained. Firstly, the volume of the element that is dispersed phase saturated is minimized, where restriction is greatest and contaminated fluid flow rate and removal are least. Conversely, the volume of the element is maximized where restriction is least and contaminated fluid flow rate and removal greatest. Secondly, a greater proportion of element volume is available to capture and hold any solids that may plug the coalescer or otherwise cause excessive pressure drop. The lower section is more restrictive and has a lower flow rate than the upper section, due to increased local saturation relative to the upper section. One would expect removal to also be higher in the lower section, however this is not the case because: (a) since less flow goes through the lower section, its contribution to total removal by the element is less; and (b) the local velocity in the lower section is relatively high, which in conjunction with the increased saturation, increases re-entrainment of drops, which adversely affects removal.
  • FIGS. 3, 4, show the noted given shape in the vertical plane as a hollow racetrack shape. Other given shapes in the vertical plane are possible, for example a hollow oval shape 62, FIG. 5, a hollow triangle shape 64, FIG. 6, a hollow square shape 66, FIG. 7, a hollow trapezoid shape 68, FIG. 8, and a hollow circle shape 70, FIG. 9. Inside-out flow is preferred because flow velocity decreases with distance into the media, which minimizes possible re-entrainment and carryover of coalesced drops into the clean side and reduces the velocity in the portion of the coalescer where saturation is high. This is a particular advantage for racetrack and oval shapes because of their better space utilization due to the smaller upstream open hollow space in the interior of elements of these shapes. Outside-in flow is also possible.
  • In one embodiment, the fibrous media is provided by a plurality of fibers having a nonrandom dominantly vertical orientation, FIG. 4. The fibers are preferably polymeric and preferentially oriented around the periphery of the given shape and where possible parallel to the direction of gravity. The fibers preferably extend dominantly circumferentially tangentially along perimeter 54. The fibers preferentially extending dominantly circumferentially tangentially along perimeter 54 are dominantly vertical and provide increasing drainage pressure at lower regions of the coalescer. The elements are preferably made by electro-spinning or melt-blowing the fibers or wrapping or winding sheets of fibrous media around the element periphery giving the fibers the noted preferred orientation. The preferred orientation and alignment of the fibers reduces the resistance of captured drops to flow and enhances drainage by forming flow paths and channels parallel to gravity. For ease of manufacturability, polymeric fibers formed by melt-blowing or electro-spinning are preferred, but other materials may also be used.
  • In a further embodiment, FIG. 4, vibration or oscillation of the coalescer in a vertical direction, particularly in combination with the above noted fiber orientation, is a further way to enhance drainage, minimize restriction, and increase coalescer life. A shaker 72 as shown in dashed line, which in one embodiment may be an internal combustion engine or other mechanical component, vibrates or oscillates the coalescer in a vertical direction. This movement or vibration in the vertical direction accelerates the captured drops, and the sudden reversal in direction causes them to shear from the fibers and drain with minimum resistance. In the noted implementation, the normal vibration of an engine or other equipment facilitates such vibration, however it may be desirable to provide judicious positioning and mounting of the coalescer or by the addition of a mechanical vibrator for vibrating the coalescer.
  • The coalescer has a lower region, e.g. at plane 52, FIG. 4, of greater dispersed phase saturation and smaller volume than an upper region, e.g. at plane 50, to minimize the volume of fibrous media that is saturated with the dispersed phase where restriction is greatest and continuous phase flow rate least and contaminant removal least, and to maximize the volume of the fibrous media where restriction is least and continuous phase flow rate greatest and contaminant removal greatest. In a further embodiment, FIG. 10, a lower media element 74 is provided of greater dispersed phase wettability than fibrous media 46 and in contact with the lower region of coalescer 40 and wicking coalesced drops from fibrous media 46 at the lower region. In one embodiment, fibrous media 46 is non-wetting with respect to the dispersed phase, and lower media element 74 is wetting with respect to the dispersed phase. In preferred form, the cosine of the dispersed phase contact angle of lower media element 74 is greater than the cosine of the dispersed phase contact angle of fibrous media 46. In the above noted internal combustion engine application, the purpose of wicking layer 74 is to draw oil from the coalescer and direct it to a collection vessel, such as the engine or a sump. In the preferred form of such embodiment, wicking layer 74 is a non-woven filter media, though alternatively it could be the walls of the sump itself or other material with suitable wettability characteristics.
  • The above disclosure provides various means for reducing pressure drop across the coalescer, including enhancing drainage of the coalesced dispersed phase from the coalescer. As shown in FIG. 2, the pressure drop across the coalescer increases with time until the rate of drainage of the coalesced dispersed phase (e.g. oil in the case of crankcase ventilation filters) equals the rate of dispersed phase capture. The equilibrium pressure drop can be reduced by increasing the drainage rate, which in turn reduces the dispersed phase saturation of the coalescer and increases the coalescer's effective porosity. By increasing the porosity, the solids loading capacity of the coalescer is increased, as is coalescer life.
  • Further to the above disclosed manner for increasing drainage rate, various ways are available for taking further advantage of fiber orientation. Fibers may be beneficially oriented with respect to gravity and with respect to one another, as above noted. For purposes herein, a first dominant fiber orientation angle α is defined as the angle of fiber extension 76, FIGS. 11-22, relative to horizontal, i.e. relative to a direction which is perpendicular to gravity. In FIGS. 11, 18, 20, α is 0°. In FIGS. 12, 15, 21, α is minus 45°. In FIGS. 13, 16, 22, α is minus 90°. In FIGS. 14, 17, 19, α is 45°. Fibers may also be beneficially oriented with respect to the direction of flow. For purposes herein, a second dominant fiber orientation angle β is defined as the angle of fiber extension 76 relative to flow direction 24. In FIGS. 11, 15, 19, β is 0°. In FIGS. 12, 16, 20, β is minus 45°. In FIGS. 13, 17, 21, β is minus 90°. In FIGS. 14, 18, 22, β is 45°. FIGS. 11-22 show various exemplary flow directions among the plurality of flow directions from hollow interior 42 outwardly through fibrous media 46. FIGS. 11-14 show a flow direction 24 parallel to horizontal. FIGS. 15-18 show a flow direction 24 at minus 45° relative to horizontal. FIGS. 19-22 show a flow direction 24 at 45° relative to horizontal.
  • Three forces act on captured and coalesced drops, namely: drag forces due to fluid flow; gravity; and adhesion or attachment forces due to capillary pressure. The third force is controlled by the wetting characteristics of the media and is noted above. Also of significance is the interplay between drag and gravity forces. Since it is desired to drain drops downwardly, it is desired that fiber orientation angle a satisfy the condition that sine α is less than zero, so that gravity assists drainage, for example FIGS. 12, 13. If sine α is greater than zero, gravity hinders drainage, increasing the equilibrium pressure drop, and reducing life. Accordingly, the fiber orientation angles α in FIGS. 11 and 14 are less desirable. It is preferred that α be less than 0° and greater than or equal to minus 90°. As to fiber orientation angle β relative to flow direction 24, drag forces due to fluid flow decrease as cosine β increases. It is preferred that cosine β be greater than 0.5, i.e. that β be less than 60° and greater than minus 60°.
  • In order to decrease overall saturation of the coalescer, reduce pressure drop, and increase life, it is not necessary for all fibers to exhibit the preferred orientation. Rather, most of the fibers should have the desired orientation, i.e. have a dominant fiber orientation or angle. FIG. 23 is a microphotograph showing dominant fiber orientation generally parallel to gravity and perpendicular to flow direction, as shown by the indicated arrows. FIG. 24 is a microphotograph showing fiber orientation relative to gravity, wherein the direction of flow is into the page. In further embodiments, sufficient numbers of fibers may be provided having the desired orientation to enhance drainage locally. Because the coalesced dispersed phase drains more freely from such areas, the low local dispersed phase saturation and pressure drop are maintained, and the net effective saturation of the coalescer is reduced. While it is desirable for all fibers to exhibit α less than 0° and greater than or equal to minus 90° and β less than 60° and greater than minus 60°, this may not be feasible. Various combinations may also be employed. For example, in FIG. 25 if localized regions of different fiber orientation are desired other than perpendicular, localized pockets such as shown at 78 may be formed in the fibrous media, such pockets deflecting a plurality of fibers along other fiber orientation angles α and β. These localized pockets may be provided as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,387,144, incorporated herein by reference, for example by needle punching to create such localized pockets, depressions, or indentations with fiber orientation angles α and β different than 0° and other than 90° or minus 90°. Other means may also be used for forming the localized pockets, for example the media may be spiked with larger fibers, wires, nails, brads, or similar structures having a high length to width aspect ratio oriented such that α and/or β is other than 90° or minus 90° as desired. In another alternative, a thread-like material may be sewed into the coalescer media using a sewing machine or the like, with the threads being oriented along an angle of 0° (parallel to flow direction), and the puncturing needle and thread would cause the surrounding media fibers to orient at angles other than 90° or minus 90°. In another alternative, rather than needle punching, the localized pockets could be created using a heated needle or an ultrasonic welding type process. This will create a saturation gradient causing the coalesced dispersed phase to drain from the coalescer. Hence, even though all fibers do not have a desired orientation angle α other than 0°, drainage will nonetheless be enhanced compared to having all fibers oriented with α equal to 0°. These refinements introduce fibers or structures preferentially oriented with respect to flow in a manner that assists drainage and reduces pressure drop. Since it is often impractical to have all fibers so oriented, localized pockets having the preferred orientation can be created in layered media to reduce pressure drop and improve coalescer life.
  • The present system provides a method of increasing the life of a coalescer. The coalescer has a pressure drop thereacross increasing with time until the rate of drainage of the coalesced dispersed phase equals the rate of capture, providing an equilibrium pressure drop. The method increases coalescer life by reducing dispersed phase saturation and increasing porosity and solids loading capacity by decreasing equilibrium pressure drop by increasing the rate of drainage. The method involves providing fibrous media as a plurality of fibers and dominantly orienting the fibers preferably along a first dominant fiber orientation angle α less than 0° and greater than or equal to minus 90° and preferably along a second dominant fiber orientation angle β less than 60° and greater than minus 60°. In one embodiment, the coalescer is vertically vibrated. The method involves minimizing the volume of fibrous media that is saturated with the dispersed phase where restriction is greatest and flow rate and removal least, and maximizing the volume of the fibrous media where restriction is least and flow rate and removal greatest, by providing the coalescer with a lower region of greater dispersed phase saturation and smaller volume than an upper region. In one embodiment, the coalesced drops are wicked away from the fibrous media at the lower region of increased dispersed phase saturation.
  • It is recognized that various equivalents, alternatives and modifications are possible within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (26)

  1. 1. A coalescer for coalescing a medium having two immiscible phases, namely a continuous phase and a dispersed phase, said continuous phase flowing from upstream to downstream, said coalescer comprising fibrous media capturing droplets of said dispersed phase, coalescingly growing said droplets into larger drops which further coalesce and grow to form pools that drain, said fibrous media being adapted to reduce pressure drop thereacross by increasing dispersed phase drainage therefrom.
  2. 2. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said coalescer has a first cross-sectional area along a first horizontal plane, and a second cross-sectional area along a second horizontal plane, said second horizontal plane being vertically below said first horizontal plane, said second cross-sectional area being less than said first cross-sectional area.
  3. 3. The coalescer according to claim 2 wherein said coalescer has a perimeter defining a given shape in a vertical plane, said perimeter having a plurality of chords thereacross, including vertical chords and horizontal chords.
  4. 4. The coalescer according to claim 3 wherein the longest of said chords extends vertically.
  5. 5. The coalescer according to claim 3 wherein said given shape in said vertical plane is selected from the group consisting of a racetrack shape, an oval shape, a triangle shape, a square shape, a trapezoid shape, and a circle shape.
  6. 6. The coalescer according to claim 3 wherein said given shape in said vertical plane has a hollow interior.
  7. 7. The coalescer according to claim 6 wherein flow direction is selected from the group consisting of: inside-out, namely from said hollow interior outwardly through said fibrous media; and outside-in, namely inwardly through said fibrous media into said hollow interior.
  8. 8. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said fibrous media comprises a plurality of fibers having a nonrandom dominantly vertical orientation.
  9. 9. The coalescer according to claim 8 wherein said coalescer has a perimeter, and said fibers extend dominantly circumferentially tangentially along said perimeter.
  10. 10. The coalescer according to claim 9 wherein said perimeter defines a given shape in a vertical plane, said perimeter having a plurality of chords thereacross, the longest of said chords extending vertically, said fibers extending dominantly circumferentially tangentially along said perimeter being dominantly vertical and providing increasing drainage pressure at lower vertical regions of said coalescer.
  11. 11. The coalescer according to claim 10 wherein said coalescer has a first cross-sectional area along a first horizontal plane, and a second cross-sectional area along a second horizontal plane, said second horizontal plane being vertically below said first horizontal plane, said second cross-sectional area being less than said first cross-sectional area, said plurality of chords include vertical chords and horizontal chords, said horizontal chords including a first horizontal chord along said first horizontal plane, and a second horizontal chord along said second horizontal plane, said second horizontal chord being shorter than said first horizontal chord.
  12. 12. The coalescer according to claim 8 comprising a shaker vertically vibrating said coalescer.
  13. 13. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said coalescer has a lower region of greater dispersed phase saturation and smaller volume than an upper region, to minimize the volume of said fibrous media where restriction is greatest and continuous phase flow rate least, and to maximize the volume of said fibrous media where restriction is least and continuous phase flow rate greatest.
  14. 14. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said coalescer has a lower region of increased dispersed phase saturation, and comprising a lower media element of greater dispersed phase wettability than said fibrous media and in contact with said lower region of said coalescer and wicking said coalesced drops from said fibrous media at said lower region.
  15. 15. The coalescer according to claim 14 wherein said fibrous media is nonwetting with respect to said dispersed phase, and said lower media element is wetting with respect to said dispersed phase.
  16. 16. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said coalescer has a lower region, and comprising a lower media element in contact with said lower region of said coalescer, and wherein the cosine of the dispersed phase contact angle of said lower media element is greater than the cosine of the dispersed phase contact angle of said fibrous media.
  17. 17. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said fibrous media comprises a plurality of fibers having a dominant fiber orientation angle α defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to horizontal, and wherein α is less than 0° and greater than minus 90°.
  18. 18. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein said fibrous media comprises a plurality of fibers having a dominant fiber orientation angle β defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to flow direction, and wherein β is less than 60° and greater than minus 60°.
  19. 19. The coalescer according to claim 1 wherein:
    said fibrous media comprises a plurality of fibers having a first dominant fiber orientation angle α defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to horizontal;
    said plurality of fibers have a second dominant fiber orientation angle β defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to flow direction;
    wherein in combination α is less than 0° and greater than or equal to minus 90°, and β is less than 60° and greater than minus 60°.
  20. 20. The coalescer according to claim 1 comprising a plurality of localized pockets formed in said fibrous media, said pockets deflecting a plurality of fibers along desired fiber orientation angles α and β, fiber orientation angle α being defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to horizontal, fiber orientation angle β being defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to flow direction.
  21. 21. A method of increasing the life of a coalescer coalescing a medium having two immiscible phases, namely a continuous phase and a dispersed phase, said continuous phase flowing from upstream to downstream, said coalescer comprising fibrous media capturing droplets of said dispersed phase, coalescingly growing said droplets into larger drops which further coalesce and grow to form pools that drain, said coalescer having a pressure drop thereacross increasing with time until the rate of drainage of said dispersed phase equals the rate of capture, providing an equilibrium pressure drop, said method comprising increasing coalescer life by reducing dispersed phase saturation and increasing porosity by increasing said rate of drainage.
  22. 22. The method according to claim 21 comprising providing said fibrous media as a plurality of fibers and dominantly orienting said fibers along a dominant fiber orientation angle α less than 0° and greater than or equal to minus 90°, where α is defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to horizontal.
  23. 23. The method according to claim 21 comprising providing said fibrous media as a plurality of fibers and dominantly orienting said fibers along a dominant orientation angle β less than 60° and greater than minus 60°, where β is defined as the angle of fiber extension relative to flow direction.
  24. 24. The method according to claim 21 comprising vertically vibrating said coalescer.
  25. 25. The method according to claim 21 comprising minimizing the volume of said fibrous media where restriction is greatest and flow rate least, and maximizing the volume of said fibrous media where restriction is least and flow rate greatest, by providing said coalescer with a lower region of greater dispersed phase saturation and smaller volume than an upper region.
  26. 26. The method according to claim 21 comprising providing said coalescer with a lower region of increased dispersed phase saturation, and wicking said coalesced drops away from said fibrous media at said lower region.
US11230694 2005-09-20 2005-09-20 Reduced pressure drop coalescer Abandoned US20070062886A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11230694 US20070062886A1 (en) 2005-09-20 2005-09-20 Reduced pressure drop coalescer

Applications Claiming Priority (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11230694 US20070062886A1 (en) 2005-09-20 2005-09-20 Reduced pressure drop coalescer
US11346679 US8114183B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2006-02-03 Space optimized coalescer
DE200611002480 DE112006002480T5 (en) 2005-09-20 2006-04-25 Coalescing with reduced pressure drop
CN 200680034766 CN101282773B (en) 2005-09-20 2006-04-25 Reduced pressure drop coalescer
PCT/US2006/015934 WO2007035192A3 (en) 2005-09-20 2006-04-25 Reduced pressure drop coalescer
US11940729 US7828869B1 (en) 2005-09-20 2007-11-15 Space-effective filter element
US12982259 US8545707B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2010-12-30 Reduced pressure drop coalescer

Related Child Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11273101 Continuation-In-Part US7674425B2 (en) 2005-11-14 2005-11-14 Variable coalescer
US11346679 Continuation-In-Part US8114183B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2006-02-03 Space optimized coalescer
US12982259 Continuation US8545707B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2010-12-30 Reduced pressure drop coalescer

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070062886A1 true true US20070062886A1 (en) 2007-03-22

Family

ID=37882999

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11230694 Abandoned US20070062886A1 (en) 2005-09-20 2005-09-20 Reduced pressure drop coalescer
US12982259 Active 2026-10-10 US8545707B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2010-12-30 Reduced pressure drop coalescer

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12982259 Active 2026-10-10 US8545707B2 (en) 2005-09-20 2010-12-30 Reduced pressure drop coalescer

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US20070062886A1 (en)
CN (1) CN101282773B (en)
DE (1) DE112006002480T5 (en)
WO (1) WO2007035192A3 (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080270004A1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2008-10-30 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Engine idle warm-up of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine
DE112006002921T5 (en) 2005-11-14 2008-12-18 Fleetguard, Inc., Nashville variable coalescer
US20090178970A1 (en) * 2008-01-16 2009-07-16 Ahlstrom Corporation Coalescence media for separation of water-hydrocarbon emulsions
US20090266346A1 (en) * 2008-04-29 2009-10-29 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Crankcase filtration assembly with additive for treating condensate material
US20090313977A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Apparatus and method to control engine crankcase emissions
US20100050871A1 (en) * 2008-09-03 2010-03-04 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Air-Jacketed Coalescer Media with Improved Performance
US20110124941A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2011-05-26 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Surface Coalescers
US20110168647A1 (en) * 2008-10-08 2011-07-14 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Modular Filter Elements for Use in a Filter-in-Filter Cartridge
US20110168621A1 (en) * 2008-10-08 2011-07-14 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Two stage fuel water separator and particulate filter
US8114182B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2012-02-14 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Authorized filter servicing and replacement
US8360251B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2013-01-29 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Multi-layer coalescing media having a high porosity interior layer and uses thereof
US20140284263A1 (en) * 2011-12-09 2014-09-25 Mann+Hummel Gmbh Fuel Filter of an Internal Combustion Engine and Filter Element of a Fuel Filter
US9138671B2 (en) 2012-08-30 2015-09-22 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Inertial gas-liquid separator and porous collection substrate for use in inertial gas-liquid separator

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE202008012976U1 (en) 2008-10-01 2010-03-11 Hengst Gmbh & Co.Kg Separator for separating liquid droplets from a gas stream
US10058808B2 (en) 2012-10-22 2018-08-28 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Composite filter media utilizing bicomponent fibers
US9138673B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-09-22 Baldwin Filters, Inc. Coalescer filter
USD746661S1 (en) 2014-04-16 2016-01-05 General Electric Company Coalescer bracket
US9447714B2 (en) 2014-04-16 2016-09-20 General Electric Company Systems and methods for coalescing internal combustion engine blow-by

Citations (92)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3645398A (en) * 1969-07-24 1972-02-29 Exxon Research Engineering Co Coalescer cartridge and coalescer for oily water
US3755527A (en) * 1969-10-09 1973-08-28 Exxon Research Engineering Co Process for producing melt blown nonwoven synthetic polymer mat having high tear resistance
US3801400A (en) * 1972-03-24 1974-04-02 Celanese Corp Varying density cartridge filters
US3841953A (en) * 1970-12-31 1974-10-15 Exxon Research Engineering Co Nonwoven mats of thermoplastic blends by melt blowing
US3870640A (en) * 1971-12-27 1975-03-11 Dover Corp Filter with vibration of screen
US3904798A (en) * 1972-03-24 1975-09-09 Celanese Corp Varying density cartridge filters
US3933557A (en) * 1973-08-31 1976-01-20 Pall Corporation Continuous production of nonwoven webs from thermoplastic fibers and products
US3938973A (en) * 1974-04-19 1976-02-17 Kershaw Eli J Air filter
US3949130A (en) * 1974-01-04 1976-04-06 Tuff Spun Products, Inc. Spun bonded fabric, and articles made therefrom
US3971373A (en) * 1974-01-21 1976-07-27 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Particle-loaded microfiber sheet product and respirators made therefrom
US3972759A (en) * 1972-06-29 1976-08-03 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Battery separators made from polymeric fibers
US3978185A (en) * 1968-12-23 1976-08-31 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Melt blowing process
US4048364A (en) * 1974-12-20 1977-09-13 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Post-drawn, melt-blown webs
US4078364A (en) * 1975-05-07 1978-03-14 Jagenberg-Werke Device for folding and closing gable-shaped folding closures
US4116738A (en) * 1976-01-14 1978-09-26 Pall Corporation Continuous production of tubular modular filter elements using nonwoven webs from thermoplastic fibers and products
US4192919A (en) * 1977-05-17 1980-03-11 Mpl, Inc. Blood sampling and culturing kit
US4253954A (en) * 1979-07-02 1981-03-03 Nelson Industries, Inc. Two-stage spin-on separating device
US4282097A (en) * 1979-09-24 1981-08-04 Kuepper Theodore A Dynamic oil surface coalescer
US4416782A (en) * 1979-12-12 1983-11-22 Girmes-Werke Ag Method for separating oil from aqueous or solvent dispersions
US4524000A (en) * 1983-02-17 1985-06-18 Shell Oil Company Process for the removal of oil from an oil-in-water dispersion
US4594202A (en) * 1984-01-06 1986-06-10 Pall Corporation Method of making cylindrical fibrous filter structures
US4668393A (en) * 1985-05-14 1987-05-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Semipermeable baffle fuel filter
US4689058A (en) * 1986-02-07 1987-08-25 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable stove hood filter
US4723901A (en) * 1986-04-01 1988-02-09 Kazumasa Sarumaru Extruder for rubber materials
US4859348A (en) * 1986-12-29 1989-08-22 National Fluid Separators, Inc. Method and device for filtering oils from infusion beverages
US4859349A (en) * 1987-10-09 1989-08-22 Ciba-Geigy Corporation Polysaccharide/perfluoroalkyl complexes
US4874399A (en) * 1988-01-25 1989-10-17 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Electret filter made of fibers containing polypropylene and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)
US4878929A (en) * 1989-02-01 1989-11-07 Nelson Industries Inc. Liquid-gas separator
US4892667A (en) * 1988-09-16 1990-01-09 Kaydon Corporation Method and means for dewatering lubricating oils
US4995974A (en) * 1988-04-06 1991-02-26 Manfred Lorey Separator element
US5061170A (en) * 1989-12-08 1991-10-29 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Apparatus for delivering molten polymer to an extrusion
US5122048A (en) * 1990-09-24 1992-06-16 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charging apparatus for meltblown webs
US5145689A (en) * 1990-10-17 1992-09-08 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing die
US5227172A (en) * 1991-05-14 1993-07-13 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charged collector apparatus for the production of meltblown electrets
US5236641A (en) * 1991-09-11 1993-08-17 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Metering meltblowing system
US5254297A (en) * 1992-07-15 1993-10-19 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charging method for meltblown webs
US5296061A (en) * 1991-06-12 1994-03-22 Toray Industries, Inc. Process for producing a tubular nonwoven fabric and tubular nonwoven fabric produced by the same
US5306321A (en) * 1992-07-07 1994-04-26 Donaldson Company, Inc. Layered air filter medium having improved efficiency and pleatability
US5340479A (en) * 1992-08-20 1994-08-23 Osmonics, Inc. Depth filter cartridge and method and apparatus for making same
US5401458A (en) * 1993-10-25 1995-03-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing of ethylene and fluorinated ethylene copolymers
US5409642A (en) * 1993-10-06 1995-04-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Melt blowing of tubular filters
US5411576A (en) * 1993-03-26 1995-05-02 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Oily mist resistant electret filter media and method for filtering
US5419953A (en) * 1993-05-20 1995-05-30 Chapman; Rick L. Multilayer composite air filtration media
US5427597A (en) * 1992-07-07 1995-06-27 Donaldson Company, Inc. Layered air filter medium having improved efficiency and pleatability
US5480547A (en) * 1994-03-08 1996-01-02 Pall Corporation Corrosive liquid coalescer
US5501872A (en) * 1995-04-19 1996-03-26 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Method and apparatus for coating a six-sided fibrous batting
US5591335A (en) * 1995-05-02 1997-01-07 Memtec America Corporation Filter cartridges having nonwoven melt blown filtration media with integral co-located support and filtration
US5618566A (en) * 1995-04-26 1997-04-08 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Modular meltblowing die
US5672232A (en) * 1993-04-14 1997-09-30 Clack Corporation Apparatus for producing tubular products from nonwoven fibers
US5750024A (en) * 1992-11-12 1998-05-12 Porous Media Corporation Conical coalescing filter
US5800706A (en) * 1996-03-06 1998-09-01 Hyperion Catalysis International, Inc. Nanofiber packed beds having enhanced fluid flow characteristics
US5913851A (en) * 1995-06-07 1999-06-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of making an absorbent article including liquid containment beams
US5972063A (en) * 1995-04-21 1999-10-26 Donaldson Company, Inc. Air filtration arrangement and method
US5994482A (en) * 1997-03-04 1999-11-30 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Polypropylene copolymer alloys and process for making
US6019809A (en) * 1990-10-19 2000-02-01 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filtration arrangement
US6093231A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-07-25 Air-Maze Corporation Air/oil separator with unitary top end cap and flange
US6114017A (en) * 1997-07-23 2000-09-05 Fabbricante; Anthony S. Micro-denier nonwoven materials made using modular die units
US6117322A (en) * 1993-06-23 2000-09-12 Pall Corporation Dynamic filter system
US6123061A (en) * 1997-02-25 2000-09-26 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Crankcase ventilation system
US6136076A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-10-24 Air-Maze Corporation Air/oil separator with molded top sealing flange
US6171369B1 (en) * 1998-05-11 2001-01-09 Airflo Europe, N.V. Vacuum cleaner bag construction and method of operation
US6179890B1 (en) * 1999-02-26 2001-01-30 Donaldson Company, Inc. Air cleaner having sealing arrangement between media arrangement and housing
US6342283B1 (en) * 1999-03-30 2002-01-29 Usf Filtration & Separations, Inc. Melt-blown tubular core elements and filter cartridges including the same
US6358417B1 (en) * 1999-04-21 2002-03-19 Osmonics, Inc. Non-woven depth filter element
US20020046656A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-04-25 Benson James D. Filter structure with two or more layers of fine fiber having extended useful service life
US6387144B1 (en) * 2000-03-16 2002-05-14 Nelson Industries, Inc. Enhanced performance fibrous filter media and extended life fluid filter assembly
US6387141B1 (en) * 1998-09-21 2002-05-14 Firma Carl Freudenberg Depth air filter having fibers intertwined by liquid-jetting
US6402951B1 (en) * 1999-02-05 2002-06-11 Hitco Carbon Composites, Inc. Composition based on a blend of inorganic fibers and inorganic fiber whiskers
US20020070471A1 (en) * 1999-12-10 2002-06-13 George Lee Method and apparatus for controlling flow in a drum
US20020073667A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-06-20 Barris Marty A. Filtration arrangement utilizing pleated construction and method
US6413344B2 (en) * 1999-06-16 2002-07-02 First Quality Nonwovens, Inc. Method of making media of controlled porosity
US20020092423A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-07-18 Gillingham Gary R. Methods for filtering air for a gas turbine system
US6423227B1 (en) * 1997-02-07 2002-07-23 Nordson Corporation Meltblown yarn and method and apparatus for manufacturing
US6422396B1 (en) * 1999-09-16 2002-07-23 Kaydon Custom Filtration Corporation Coalescer for hydrocarbons containing surfactant
US6432175B1 (en) * 1998-07-02 2002-08-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Fluorinated electret
US20030010002A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2003-01-16 Johnson Bruce A. Mist filtration arrangement utilizing fine fiber layer in contact with media having a pleated construction and floor method
US6521555B1 (en) * 1999-06-16 2003-02-18 First Quality Nonwovens, Inc. Method of making media of controlled porosity and product thereof
US6544310B2 (en) * 2001-05-24 2003-04-08 Fleetguard, Inc. Exhaust aftertreatment filter with particulate distribution pattern
US20030080464A1 (en) * 2001-10-23 2003-05-01 Osmonics, Inc. Process for making three-dimensional non-woven media
US6585790B2 (en) * 1998-02-28 2003-07-01 Donaldson Company, Inc. Conically shaped air-oil separator
US6613268B2 (en) * 2000-12-21 2003-09-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of increasing the meltblown jet thermal core length via hot air entrainment
US20030203696A1 (en) * 2002-04-30 2003-10-30 Healey David Thomas High efficiency ashrae filter media
US6736274B2 (en) * 2001-08-17 2004-05-18 Total Filter Technology, Inc. Nonwoven tubular filter extracting
US6838402B2 (en) * 1999-09-21 2005-01-04 Fiber Innovation Technology, Inc. Splittable multicomponent elastomeric fibers
US6860917B2 (en) * 2001-12-04 2005-03-01 Fleetguard, Inc. Melt-spun ceramic fiber filter and method
US6872431B2 (en) * 1995-11-17 2005-03-29 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filter material construction and method
US20050082238A1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2005-04-21 Heritage-Crystal Clean, L.L.C Filter system
US6916353B2 (en) * 2003-04-01 2005-07-12 Coltec Industries Inc. Curved side oil or fluid separator element
US6932923B2 (en) * 2003-03-03 2005-08-23 Arvin Technologies, Inc. Method of making a melt-blown filter medium for use in air filters in internal combustion engines and product
US6989193B2 (en) * 2003-06-19 2006-01-24 William Alston Haile Water-dispersible and multicomponent fibers from sulfopolyesters
US7128835B1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2006-10-31 Pall Corporation Fluid treatment packs, fluid treatment elements, and methods for treating fluids
US20070039300A1 (en) * 2004-11-05 2007-02-22 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filter medium and structure

Family Cites Families (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4078124A (en) * 1969-10-09 1978-03-07 Exxon Research & Engineering Co. Laminated non-woven sheet
US4249918A (en) * 1979-05-21 1981-02-10 Monsanto Company Fiber bed element and process for removing aerosols from gases
US4726901A (en) * 1984-01-06 1988-02-23 Pall Corporation Cylindrical fibrous structures with graded pore size
US5174907A (en) 1985-07-05 1992-12-29 Kalsen Limited Method of filtering using an expandable bed fiber and coalescer
US4874339A (en) 1985-08-09 1989-10-17 Saes Getters S.P.A. Pumping tubulation getter
GB2214837B (en) * 1988-02-17 1991-09-04 Process Scient Innovations Oil coalescing filter
CA2027687C (en) 1989-11-14 2002-12-31 Douglas C. Sundet Filtration media and method of manufacture
US5075068A (en) 1990-10-11 1991-12-24 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Method and apparatus for treating meltblown filaments
US5273565A (en) 1992-10-14 1993-12-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblown fabric
JPH06233909A (en) 1993-02-02 1994-08-23 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Co <3M> Air filter and its production
US5454848A (en) * 1993-05-19 1995-10-03 Schuller International, Inc. Method of making air filtration media by inter-mixing coarse and fine glass fibers
US5916678A (en) * 1995-06-30 1999-06-29 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-degradable multicomponent fibers and nonwovens
US5667562A (en) * 1996-04-19 1997-09-16 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Spunbond vacuum cleaner webs
EP0960645B1 (en) 1998-05-11 2003-08-27 Airflo Europe N.V. Vacuum cleaner bag or filter, and method of filtering a gas
US6146580A (en) 1998-11-17 2000-11-14 Eldim, Inc. Method and apparatus for manufacturing non-woven articles
DE19854565A1 (en) 1998-11-26 2000-05-31 Mann & Hummel Filter Multilayer filter element
CA2370361C (en) 1999-04-20 2005-11-08 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Filter media
DE19920983C5 (en) 1999-05-06 2004-11-18 Fibermark Gessner Gmbh & Co. Ohg Two- or multi-layer filter medium for air filtration, and made therefrom filter element
US6372004B1 (en) 1999-07-08 2002-04-16 Airflo Europe N.V. High efficiency depth filter and methods of forming the same
US6314344B1 (en) 2000-03-17 2001-11-06 Space Systems/Loral, Inc. Automated orbit compensation system and method
WO2002089956A1 (en) 2001-05-02 2002-11-14 Hollingsworth & Vose Company Filter media with enhanced stiffness and increased dust holding capacity
US7105124B2 (en) 2001-06-19 2006-09-12 Aaf-Mcquay, Inc. Method, apparatus and product for manufacturing nanofiber media
US7998384B2 (en) * 2001-08-02 2011-08-16 Fiberweb Simpsonville, Inc. Spunbond nonwoven fabrics from reclaimed polymer and the manufacture thereof
US20030116874A1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2003-06-26 Haynes Bryan David Air momentum gage for controlling nonwoven processes
US6811588B2 (en) 2002-11-01 2004-11-02 Advanced Flow Engineering, Inc. High capacity hybrid multi-layer automotive air filter
US20060278574A1 (en) 2003-06-06 2006-12-14 Pall Corporation Fluid treatment element

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3978185A (en) * 1968-12-23 1976-08-31 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Melt blowing process
US3645398A (en) * 1969-07-24 1972-02-29 Exxon Research Engineering Co Coalescer cartridge and coalescer for oily water
US3755527A (en) * 1969-10-09 1973-08-28 Exxon Research Engineering Co Process for producing melt blown nonwoven synthetic polymer mat having high tear resistance
US3841953A (en) * 1970-12-31 1974-10-15 Exxon Research Engineering Co Nonwoven mats of thermoplastic blends by melt blowing
US3870640A (en) * 1971-12-27 1975-03-11 Dover Corp Filter with vibration of screen
US3801400A (en) * 1972-03-24 1974-04-02 Celanese Corp Varying density cartridge filters
US3904798A (en) * 1972-03-24 1975-09-09 Celanese Corp Varying density cartridge filters
US3972759A (en) * 1972-06-29 1976-08-03 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Battery separators made from polymeric fibers
US3933557A (en) * 1973-08-31 1976-01-20 Pall Corporation Continuous production of nonwoven webs from thermoplastic fibers and products
US3949130A (en) * 1974-01-04 1976-04-06 Tuff Spun Products, Inc. Spun bonded fabric, and articles made therefrom
US3971373A (en) * 1974-01-21 1976-07-27 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Particle-loaded microfiber sheet product and respirators made therefrom
US3938973A (en) * 1974-04-19 1976-02-17 Kershaw Eli J Air filter
US4048364A (en) * 1974-12-20 1977-09-13 Exxon Research And Engineering Company Post-drawn, melt-blown webs
US4078364A (en) * 1975-05-07 1978-03-14 Jagenberg-Werke Device for folding and closing gable-shaped folding closures
US4116738A (en) * 1976-01-14 1978-09-26 Pall Corporation Continuous production of tubular modular filter elements using nonwoven webs from thermoplastic fibers and products
US4192919A (en) * 1977-05-17 1980-03-11 Mpl, Inc. Blood sampling and culturing kit
US4253954A (en) * 1979-07-02 1981-03-03 Nelson Industries, Inc. Two-stage spin-on separating device
US4282097A (en) * 1979-09-24 1981-08-04 Kuepper Theodore A Dynamic oil surface coalescer
US4416782A (en) * 1979-12-12 1983-11-22 Girmes-Werke Ag Method for separating oil from aqueous or solvent dispersions
US4524000A (en) * 1983-02-17 1985-06-18 Shell Oil Company Process for the removal of oil from an oil-in-water dispersion
US4594202A (en) * 1984-01-06 1986-06-10 Pall Corporation Method of making cylindrical fibrous filter structures
US4668393A (en) * 1985-05-14 1987-05-26 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Semipermeable baffle fuel filter
US4689058A (en) * 1986-02-07 1987-08-25 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable stove hood filter
US4723901A (en) * 1986-04-01 1988-02-09 Kazumasa Sarumaru Extruder for rubber materials
US4859348A (en) * 1986-12-29 1989-08-22 National Fluid Separators, Inc. Method and device for filtering oils from infusion beverages
US4859349A (en) * 1987-10-09 1989-08-22 Ciba-Geigy Corporation Polysaccharide/perfluoroalkyl complexes
US4874399A (en) * 1988-01-25 1989-10-17 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Electret filter made of fibers containing polypropylene and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)
US4995974A (en) * 1988-04-06 1991-02-26 Manfred Lorey Separator element
US4892667A (en) * 1988-09-16 1990-01-09 Kaydon Corporation Method and means for dewatering lubricating oils
US4878929A (en) * 1989-02-01 1989-11-07 Nelson Industries Inc. Liquid-gas separator
US5061170A (en) * 1989-12-08 1991-10-29 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Apparatus for delivering molten polymer to an extrusion
US5122048A (en) * 1990-09-24 1992-06-16 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charging apparatus for meltblown webs
US5145689A (en) * 1990-10-17 1992-09-08 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing die
US5605706A (en) * 1990-10-17 1997-02-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing die
US6019809A (en) * 1990-10-19 2000-02-01 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filtration arrangement
US5227172A (en) * 1991-05-14 1993-07-13 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charged collector apparatus for the production of meltblown electrets
US5296061A (en) * 1991-06-12 1994-03-22 Toray Industries, Inc. Process for producing a tubular nonwoven fabric and tubular nonwoven fabric produced by the same
US5236641A (en) * 1991-09-11 1993-08-17 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Metering meltblowing system
US5306321A (en) * 1992-07-07 1994-04-26 Donaldson Company, Inc. Layered air filter medium having improved efficiency and pleatability
US5427597A (en) * 1992-07-07 1995-06-27 Donaldson Company, Inc. Layered air filter medium having improved efficiency and pleatability
US5254297A (en) * 1992-07-15 1993-10-19 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Charging method for meltblown webs
US5340479A (en) * 1992-08-20 1994-08-23 Osmonics, Inc. Depth filter cartridge and method and apparatus for making same
US5750024A (en) * 1992-11-12 1998-05-12 Porous Media Corporation Conical coalescing filter
US5411576A (en) * 1993-03-26 1995-05-02 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Oily mist resistant electret filter media and method for filtering
US5672232A (en) * 1993-04-14 1997-09-30 Clack Corporation Apparatus for producing tubular products from nonwoven fibers
US5419953A (en) * 1993-05-20 1995-05-30 Chapman; Rick L. Multilayer composite air filtration media
US6117322A (en) * 1993-06-23 2000-09-12 Pall Corporation Dynamic filter system
US5409642A (en) * 1993-10-06 1995-04-25 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Melt blowing of tubular filters
US5470663A (en) * 1993-10-25 1995-11-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing of ethylene and fluorinated ethylene copolymers
US5401458A (en) * 1993-10-25 1995-03-28 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Meltblowing of ethylene and fluorinated ethylene copolymers
US5480547A (en) * 1994-03-08 1996-01-02 Pall Corporation Corrosive liquid coalescer
US5501872A (en) * 1995-04-19 1996-03-26 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Method and apparatus for coating a six-sided fibrous batting
US5972063A (en) * 1995-04-21 1999-10-26 Donaldson Company, Inc. Air filtration arrangement and method
US5618566A (en) * 1995-04-26 1997-04-08 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Modular meltblowing die
US5733581A (en) * 1995-05-02 1998-03-31 Memtec America Corporation Apparatus for making melt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US5681469A (en) * 1995-05-02 1997-10-28 Memtec America Corporation Melt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US5591335A (en) * 1995-05-02 1997-01-07 Memtec America Corporation Filter cartridges having nonwoven melt blown filtration media with integral co-located support and filtration
US5913851A (en) * 1995-06-07 1999-06-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of making an absorbent article including liquid containment beams
US6872431B2 (en) * 1995-11-17 2005-03-29 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filter material construction and method
US5800706A (en) * 1996-03-06 1998-09-01 Hyperion Catalysis International, Inc. Nanofiber packed beds having enhanced fluid flow characteristics
US6423227B1 (en) * 1997-02-07 2002-07-23 Nordson Corporation Meltblown yarn and method and apparatus for manufacturing
US6123061A (en) * 1997-02-25 2000-09-26 Cummins Engine Company, Inc. Crankcase ventilation system
US5994482A (en) * 1997-03-04 1999-11-30 Exxon Chemical Patents, Inc. Polypropylene copolymer alloys and process for making
US6114017A (en) * 1997-07-23 2000-09-05 Fabbricante; Anthony S. Micro-denier nonwoven materials made using modular die units
US6585790B2 (en) * 1998-02-28 2003-07-01 Donaldson Company, Inc. Conically shaped air-oil separator
US6797025B2 (en) * 1998-02-28 2004-09-28 Donaldson Company, Inc. Conically shaped air-oil separator
US6171369B1 (en) * 1998-05-11 2001-01-09 Airflo Europe, N.V. Vacuum cleaner bag construction and method of operation
US6432175B1 (en) * 1998-07-02 2002-08-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Fluorinated electret
US6387141B1 (en) * 1998-09-21 2002-05-14 Firma Carl Freudenberg Depth air filter having fibers intertwined by liquid-jetting
US6093231A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-07-25 Air-Maze Corporation Air/oil separator with unitary top end cap and flange
US6136076A (en) * 1998-10-16 2000-10-24 Air-Maze Corporation Air/oil separator with molded top sealing flange
US6402951B1 (en) * 1999-02-05 2002-06-11 Hitco Carbon Composites, Inc. Composition based on a blend of inorganic fibers and inorganic fiber whiskers
US6179890B1 (en) * 1999-02-26 2001-01-30 Donaldson Company, Inc. Air cleaner having sealing arrangement between media arrangement and housing
US6342283B1 (en) * 1999-03-30 2002-01-29 Usf Filtration & Separations, Inc. Melt-blown tubular core elements and filter cartridges including the same
US6358417B1 (en) * 1999-04-21 2002-03-19 Osmonics, Inc. Non-woven depth filter element
US6521555B1 (en) * 1999-06-16 2003-02-18 First Quality Nonwovens, Inc. Method of making media of controlled porosity and product thereof
US6413344B2 (en) * 1999-06-16 2002-07-02 First Quality Nonwovens, Inc. Method of making media of controlled porosity
US6422396B1 (en) * 1999-09-16 2002-07-23 Kaydon Custom Filtration Corporation Coalescer for hydrocarbons containing surfactant
US6838402B2 (en) * 1999-09-21 2005-01-04 Fiber Innovation Technology, Inc. Splittable multicomponent elastomeric fibers
US7128835B1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2006-10-31 Pall Corporation Fluid treatment packs, fluid treatment elements, and methods for treating fluids
US20020070471A1 (en) * 1999-12-10 2002-06-13 George Lee Method and apparatus for controlling flow in a drum
US6387144B1 (en) * 2000-03-16 2002-05-14 Nelson Industries, Inc. Enhanced performance fibrous filter media and extended life fluid filter assembly
US20030010002A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2003-01-16 Johnson Bruce A. Mist filtration arrangement utilizing fine fiber layer in contact with media having a pleated construction and floor method
US20020092423A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-07-18 Gillingham Gary R. Methods for filtering air for a gas turbine system
US20020046656A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-04-25 Benson James D. Filter structure with two or more layers of fine fiber having extended useful service life
US20020073667A1 (en) * 2000-09-05 2002-06-20 Barris Marty A. Filtration arrangement utilizing pleated construction and method
US6613268B2 (en) * 2000-12-21 2003-09-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of increasing the meltblown jet thermal core length via hot air entrainment
US6544310B2 (en) * 2001-05-24 2003-04-08 Fleetguard, Inc. Exhaust aftertreatment filter with particulate distribution pattern
US6736274B2 (en) * 2001-08-17 2004-05-18 Total Filter Technology, Inc. Nonwoven tubular filter extracting
US6938781B2 (en) * 2001-10-23 2005-09-06 Osmonics, Incorporated Three-dimensional non-woven filter
US20030080464A1 (en) * 2001-10-23 2003-05-01 Osmonics, Inc. Process for making three-dimensional non-woven media
US6916395B2 (en) * 2001-10-23 2005-07-12 Osmonics, Inc. Process for making three-dimensional non-woven media
US6860917B2 (en) * 2001-12-04 2005-03-01 Fleetguard, Inc. Melt-spun ceramic fiber filter and method
US20050082238A1 (en) * 2002-03-25 2005-04-21 Heritage-Crystal Clean, L.L.C Filter system
US20030203696A1 (en) * 2002-04-30 2003-10-30 Healey David Thomas High efficiency ashrae filter media
US6932923B2 (en) * 2003-03-03 2005-08-23 Arvin Technologies, Inc. Method of making a melt-blown filter medium for use in air filters in internal combustion engines and product
US6916353B2 (en) * 2003-04-01 2005-07-12 Coltec Industries Inc. Curved side oil or fluid separator element
US6989193B2 (en) * 2003-06-19 2006-01-24 William Alston Haile Water-dispersible and multicomponent fibers from sulfopolyesters
US20070039300A1 (en) * 2004-11-05 2007-02-22 Donaldson Company, Inc. Filter medium and structure

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE112006002921T5 (en) 2005-11-14 2008-12-18 Fleetguard, Inc., Nashville variable coalescer
US20080270004A1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2008-10-30 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Engine idle warm-up of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine
US8114182B2 (en) 2007-11-15 2012-02-14 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Authorized filter servicing and replacement
US20090178970A1 (en) * 2008-01-16 2009-07-16 Ahlstrom Corporation Coalescence media for separation of water-hydrocarbon emulsions
US7980233B2 (en) 2008-04-29 2011-07-19 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Crankcase filtration assembly with additive for treating condensate material
US20090266346A1 (en) * 2008-04-29 2009-10-29 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Crankcase filtration assembly with additive for treating condensate material
US20090313977A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Apparatus and method to control engine crankcase emissions
US8245498B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2012-08-21 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Apparatus and method to control engine crankcase emissions
US20100050871A1 (en) * 2008-09-03 2010-03-04 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Air-Jacketed Coalescer Media with Improved Performance
US20110168621A1 (en) * 2008-10-08 2011-07-14 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Two stage fuel water separator and particulate filter
US20110168647A1 (en) * 2008-10-08 2011-07-14 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Modular Filter Elements for Use in a Filter-in-Filter Cartridge
US8360251B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2013-01-29 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Multi-layer coalescing media having a high porosity interior layer and uses thereof
US8517185B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2013-08-27 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Two stage fuel water separator and particulate filter utilizing pleated nanofiber filter material
US8590712B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2013-11-26 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Modular filter elements for use in a filter-in-filter cartridge
US8678202B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2014-03-25 Cummins Filtration Ip Inc. Modular filter elements for use in a filter-in-filter cartridge
US20110124941A1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2011-05-26 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Surface Coalescers
US9199185B2 (en) 2009-05-15 2015-12-01 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Surface coalescers
US20140284263A1 (en) * 2011-12-09 2014-09-25 Mann+Hummel Gmbh Fuel Filter of an Internal Combustion Engine and Filter Element of a Fuel Filter
EP2788612B1 (en) * 2011-12-09 2017-04-12 Mann + Hummel GmbH Fuel filter of an internal combustion engine and filter element of a fuel filter
US9138671B2 (en) 2012-08-30 2015-09-22 Cummins Filtration Ip, Inc. Inertial gas-liquid separator and porous collection substrate for use in inertial gas-liquid separator

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2007035192A2 (en) 2007-03-29 application
US8545707B2 (en) 2013-10-01 grant
DE112006002480T5 (en) 2008-08-07 application
CN101282773B (en) 2012-01-25 grant
CN101282773A (en) 2008-10-08 application
US20110094382A1 (en) 2011-04-28 application
WO2007035192A3 (en) 2007-11-01 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5443724A (en) Apparatus for separating the components of a liquid/liquid mixture
US3931011A (en) Fluid separation apparatus
US6872431B2 (en) Filter material construction and method
US6858051B2 (en) Device for separating a fluid from a gas stream
US6071419A (en) Fluid filter, method of making and using thereof
DE202008007717U1 (en) filter bag
US4976858A (en) Multi-layer filter medium
US6203698B1 (en) Filter assembly
US4058463A (en) Element for filtering and separating fluid mixtures
US6123751A (en) Filter construction resistant to the passage of water soluble materials; and method
US4144040A (en) Method and apparatus for demisting gases
US4676807A (en) Process for removal of liquid aerosols from gaseous streams
US20080202078A1 (en) Waved filter media and elements
US6569330B1 (en) Filter coalescer cartridge
US5938921A (en) Water baffle for filter cartridge
US6517612B1 (en) Centrifugal filtration device
US7754123B2 (en) High performance filter media with internal nanofiber structure and manufacturing methodology
US6290738B1 (en) Inertial gas-liquid separator having an inertial collector spaced from a nozzle structure
US20030226792A1 (en) Multilayer filter element
US7527739B2 (en) Apparatus, system, and method for multistage water separation
US3268442A (en) Process for separating immisicible liquids and apparatus
US4564377A (en) Fiber bed separator
US20070084776A1 (en) Water separation and filtration structure
US4300918A (en) Method for removing moisture particles
US4053290A (en) Fiber bed separator

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: FLEETGUARD, INC., TENNESSEE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:REGO, ERIC J.;SCHWANDT, BRIAN W.;JANIKOWSKI, ERIC A.;ANDOTHERS;REEL/FRAME:016682/0845;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050914 TO 20050919

AS Assignment

Owner name: CUMMINS FILTRATION IP INC., MINNESOTA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CUMMINS FILTRATION INC.;REEL/FRAME:023527/0347

Effective date: 20090218

Owner name: CUMMINS FILTRATION INC., TENNESSEE

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:FLEETGUARD, INC.;REEL/FRAME:023527/0186

Effective date: 20060524