US20070056596A1 - Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system - Google Patents

Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070056596A1
US20070056596A1 US11216475 US21647505A US2007056596A1 US 20070056596 A1 US20070056596 A1 US 20070056596A1 US 11216475 US11216475 US 11216475 US 21647505 A US21647505 A US 21647505A US 2007056596 A1 US2007056596 A1 US 2007056596A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
amplitude
pulse
method
pulses
linear
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11216475
Inventor
Douglas Fanney
Mikhail Boukhny
Bruno Dacquay
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Novartis AG
Original Assignee
Alcon Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F9/00Methods or devices for treatment of the eyes; Devices for putting-in contact lenses; Devices to correct squinting; Apparatus to guide the blind; Protective devices for the eyes, carried on the body or in the hand
    • A61F9/007Methods or devices for eye surgery
    • A61F9/00736Instruments for removal of intra-ocular material or intra-ocular injection, e.g. cataract instruments
    • A61F9/00745Instruments for removal of intra-ocular material or intra-ocular injection, e.g. cataract instruments using mechanical vibrations, e.g. ultrasonic
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B06GENERATING OR TRANSMITTING MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS IN GENERAL
    • B06BMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR GENERATING OR TRANSMITTING MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS OF INFRASONIC, SONIC, OR ULTRASONIC FREQUENCY, e.g. FOR PERFORMING MECHANICAL WORK IN GENERAL
    • B06B1/00Methods or apparatus for generating mechanical vibrations of infrasonic, sonic, or ultrasonic frequency
    • B06B1/02Methods or apparatus for generating mechanical vibrations of infrasonic, sonic, or ultrasonic frequency making use of electrical energy
    • B06B1/0207Driving circuits
    • B06B1/0215Driving circuits for generating pulses, e.g. bursts of oscillations, envelopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00017Electrical control of surgical instruments
    • A61B2017/00137Details of operation mode
    • A61B2017/00154Details of operation mode pulsed
    • A61B2017/00159Pulse shapes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00017Electrical control of surgical instruments
    • A61B2017/00137Details of operation mode
    • A61B2017/00154Details of operation mode pulsed
    • A61B2017/00172Pulse trains, bursts, intermittent continuous operation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00017Electrical control of surgical instruments
    • A61B2017/00137Details of operation mode
    • A61B2017/00154Details of operation mode pulsed
    • A61B2017/00172Pulse trains, bursts, intermittent continuous operation
    • A61B2017/00176Two pulses, e.g. second pulse having an effect different from the first one
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00017Electrical control of surgical instruments
    • A61B2017/00137Details of operation mode
    • A61B2017/00154Details of operation mode pulsed
    • A61B2017/00181Means for setting or varying the pulse energy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00973Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pedal-operated
    • A61B2017/00977Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets pedal-operated the depression depth determining the power rate

Abstract

Methods of manipulating pulses of ultrasonic energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical device.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to the field of ophthalmic surgery and, more particularly, to a method of manipulating the shapes, sequences and durations of pulses of ultrasonic energy generated by an ultrasound handpiece of a phacoemulsification surgical system.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The human eye functions to provide vision by transmitting light through a clear outer portion called the cornea, and focusing the image by way of a lens onto a retina. The quality of the focused image depends on many factors including the size and shape of the eye, and the transparency of the cornea and lens. When age or disease causes the lens to become less transparent, vision deteriorates because of the diminished light that can be transmitted to the retina. This deficiency is medically known as a cataract. An accepted treatment for cataracts is to surgically remove the cataract and replace the lens with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). In the United States, the majority of cataractous lenses are removed using a surgical technique called phacoemulsification. During this procedure, a thin cutting tip or needle is inserted into the diseased lens and vibrated ultrasonically. The vibrating cutting tip liquefies or emulsifies the lens, which is aspirated out of the eye. The diseased lens, once removed, is replaced by an IOL.
  • A typical ultrasonic surgical device suitable for an ophthalmic procedure includes an ultrasonically driven handpiece, an attached cutting tip, an irrigating sleeve or other suitable irrigation device, and an electronic control console. The handpiece assembly is attached to the control console by an electric cable or connector and flexible tubings. A surgeon controls the amount of ultrasonic energy that is delivered to the cutting tip of the handpiece and applied to tissue by pressing a foot pedal to request power up to the maximum amount of power set on the console. Tubings supply irrigation fluid to and draw aspiration fluid from the eye through the handpiece assembly.
  • The operative part of the handpiece is a centrally located, hollow resonating bar or horn that is attached to piezoelectric crystals. The crystals are controlled by the console and supply ultrasonic vibrations that drive both the horn and the attached cutting tip during phacoemulsification. The crystal/horn assembly is suspended within the hollow body or shell of the handpiece by flexible mountings. The handpiece body terminates in a reduced diameter portion or nosecone at the body's distal end. The nosecone is externally threaded to accept the irrigation sleeve. Likewise, the horn bore is internally threaded at its distal end to receive the external threads of the cutting tip. The irrigation sleeve also has an internally threaded bore that is screwed onto the external threads of the nosecone. The cutting tip is adjusted so that the tip projects only a predetermined amount past the open end of the irrigating sleeve.
  • In use, the ends of the cutting tip and the irrigating sleeve are inserted into a small incision in the cornea, sclera, or other location. One known cutting tip is ultrasonically vibrated along its longitudinal axis within the irrigating sleeve by the crystal-driven ultrasonic horn, thereby emulsifying the selected tissue in situ. The hollow bore of the cutting tip communicates with the bore in the horn that in turn communicates with the aspiration line from the handpiece to the console. Other suitable cutting tips include piezoelectric elements that produce both longitudinal and torsional oscillations. One example of such a cutting tip is described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,769 (Boukhny), the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • A reduced pressure or vacuum source in the console draws or aspirates emulsified tissue from the eye through the open end of the cutting tip, the cutting tip and horn bores and the aspiration line, and into a collection device. The aspiration of emulsified tissue is aided by a saline solution or other irrigant that is injected into the surgical site through the small annular gap between the inside surface of the irrigating sleeve and the cutting tip.
  • One known technique is to make the incision into the anterior chamber of the eye as small as possible in order to reduce the risk of induced astigmatism. These small incisions result in very tight wounds that squeeze the irrigating sleeve tightly against the vibrating tip. Friction between the irrigating sleeve and the vibrating tip generates heat. The risk of the tip overheating and burning tissue is reduced by the cooling effect of the aspirated fluid flowing inside the tip.
  • Some known surgical systems use “pulse mode” in which the amplitude of fixed-width pulses can be varied using a controller, such as a foot pedal. Other known surgical systems utilize “burst mode” in which each pulse of a series of periodic, fixed width, constant amplitude pulses is followed by an “off” time. The off time can be varied using a controller. Other known systems use pulses having an initial maximum power level followed by a lower power level. For example, Publication No. PCT/US2004/007318 describes pulses that rise from zero to an initial, maximum power level, and then subsequently decrease to lower levels.
  • While known surgical systems have been used effectively, they can be improved by allowing greater control over pulses for use with various surgical devices and applications. For example, known systems that use square or rectangular pulses typically have power levels that increase very quickly to a maximum power level. Sharp pulse transitions can reduce the ability to hold and emulsify lens material. More specifically, when lens material is held at a tip of an ultrasound hand piece by vacuum, the very fast (almost immediate) ramping of a pulse to a maximum power level can displace or push the lens material away from the tip too quickly. This, in turn, complicates cutting of the lens material. In other words, rapid power transitions can create an imbalance between vacuum at the ultrasonic tip that holds or positions the lens material and the ability to emulsify lens material.
  • Other known systems operate at high power levels when less power or no power would suffice. For example, with rectangular pulses, an initial high power level may be needed to provide power to emulsify lens material. However, after the material is pushed away or emulsified, additional power may not be needed. Rectangular pulses that apply the same amount of power after movement or emulsification of lens material can result in excessive heat being applied to tissue, which can harm the patient.
  • Further, pulse patterns that are used by some known surgical systems do not adequately reduce cavitation effects. Cavitation is the formation of small bubbles resulting from the back and forth movement of an ultrasonic tip. This movement causes pockets of low and high pressure. As the ultrasonic tip moves backwards, it vaporizes liquid due to a low local pressure and generates bubbles. The bubbles are compressed as the tip moves forwards and implode. Imploding bubbles can create unwanted heat and forces and complicate surgical procedures and present dangers to the patient.
  • Therefore, a need continues to exist for methods that allow pulse shapes and durations to be manipulated for different phacoemulsification applications and procedures.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with one embodiment is a method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical device. The method includes programming linear rise and linear decay components, which are programmed separately from a natural rise and a natural decay caused by activating and deactivating a power element that generates the pulses. The method also includes generating a pulse having multiple segments. A first segment includes the linear rise component that increases from a first amplitude to a second amplitude. The second segment begins at the end of the first segment and is at the second amplitude. The third segment includes the linear decay component that decreases from the second amplitude to a third amplitude.
  • In accordance with another embodiment is a method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical device that includes generating a plurality of pulses, each of which includes multiple segments. A first pulse segment increases linearly from a first amplitude to a second amplitude in about 5-500 milliseconds. A second pulse segment is at the second amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time. A third pulse segment decreases linearly between the second amplitude and the third amplitude in about 5-500 milliseconds. The rates at which the first and third pulse segments respectively rise and decay are programmed separately from a natural rise and decay caused by activating and deactivating a power element that generates pulses.
  • In various embodiments, the linear rise component can increase slower than a natural rise when the power element is activated. The linear decay component can decay slower than a natural decay when the power element is de-activated. The first amplitude can be zero or non-zero. The linear rise component can increase at a rate that is about the same as or faster than the rate at which the linear decay component decreases. The third amplitude can be about the same as or greater than the first amplitude.
  • In accordance with another alternative embodiment, is a method of generating energy for use in an ophthalmic surgical device, the method that includes generating a plurality of pulses having first and second rectangular pulse segments. The first rectangular pulse segment is at a first amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time, and the second rectangular pulse segment is at a second amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time. A beginning of the second rectangular pulse segment follows an end of the first rectangular pulse segment,. The second amplitude is greater than the first amplitude. A multi-segment pulse may include more than two segments, e.g., three, four, five and other numbers of segments of increasing amplitude.
  • The first and second rectangular pulse segments can be about the same duration and the amplitudes of the first and second rectangular pulses can be adjusted in response to a controller, such as a foot pedal.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Referring now to the drawings, in which like reference numbers represent corresponding parts throughout and in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary phacoemulsification surgical system that may be used with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2A is block diagram showing components of an exemplary phacoemulsification surgical system;
  • FIGS. 2B and 2C illustrate pulses for use with a phacoemulsification surgical system;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates pulses having linear rise and linear decay components and a constant maximum amplitude component according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates pulses having linear rise and linear decay components that meet at a maximum point according to a further embodiment;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a combination of pulses having a rectangular pulse and a pulse having a linear component according to another embodiment;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a combination of pulses having a rectangular pulse and a pulse having a linear component according to further embodiment;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a combination of pulses having a rectangular pulse and a pulse having a linear component according to yet a further embodiment;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a combination of pulses having a rectangular pulse and a pulse having a linear component at the same amplitude according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 9 illustrates pulses having linear rise and decay components, a constant amplitude component that has sequentially increasing power according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 10 illustrates pulses having linear rise and decay components that meet at a maximum point and that have sequentially increasing power according to a further embodiment;
  • FIG. 11 illustrates a combination of rectangular pulses and pulses having a linear component having sequentially increasing power according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 12 illustrates pulses having linear rise and decay components, a constant amplitude component and sequentially decreasing power according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 13 illustrates pulses having linear rise and linear decay components that meet at a maximum point and having sequentially decreasing power according to a further embodiment;
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a combination of rectangular pulses and pulses having a linear component and that have sequentially decreasing power according to another embodiment;
  • FIG. 15 illustrates known fixed burst mode pulses;
  • FIG. 16 illustrates known linear burst mode pulses;
  • FIG. 17 illustrates known pulse mode pulses;
  • FIG. 18 illustrates continuous transformation of burst mode pulses to pulse mode pulses in response to a controller according to one embodiment;
  • FIG. 19 illustrates continuous transformation of pulse mode pulses to burst mode pulses in response to a controller according to another embodiment;
  • FIG. 20 illustrates multi-segment rectangular pulses having two pulse segments with increasing amplitude according to yet another embodiment;
  • FIG. 21 illustrates a multi-segment rectangular pulse according to an alternative embodiment having three pulse segments with increasing amplitude;
  • FIG. 22 illustrates packets of pulses of ultrasonic energy shown in FIG. 10; and
  • FIG. 23 illustrates packets of pulses of ultrasonic energy shown in FIG. 13.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS
  • This specification describes embodiments of methods of manipulating pulses of ultrasonic energy to control a surgical system for use in, for example, phacoemulsification surgery. Embodiments can be implemented on commercially available surgical systems or consoles through appropriate hardware and software controls. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate exemplary surgical systems.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates one suitable system and represents the INFINITI® Vision System available from Alcon Laboratories, Inc., 6201 South Freeway, Q-148, Fort Worth, Tex. 76134. FIG. 2A illustrates an exemplary control system 100 that can be used with this system.
  • The control system 100 is used to operate an ultrasound handpiece 112 and includes a control console 114, which has a control module or CPU 116, an aspiration, vacuum or peristaltic pump 118, a handpiece power supply 120, an irrigation flow or pressure sensor 122 (such as in the Infiniti® system) and a valve 124. Various ultrasound handpieces 112 and cutting tips can be utilized including, but not limited to, handpieces and tips described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,589,363; 4,223,676; 4,246,902; 4,493,694; 4,515,583; 4,589,415; 4,609,368; 4,869,715; 4,922,902; 4,989,583; 5,154,694 and 5,359,996, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. The CPU 116 may be any suitable microprocessor, micro-controller, computer or digital logic controller. The pump 118 may be a peristaltic, a diaphragm, a Venturi or other suitable pump. The power supply 120 may be any suitable ultrasonic driver. The irrigation pressure sensor 122 may be various commercially available sensors. The valve 124 may be any suitable valve such as a solenoid-activated pinch valve. An infusion of an irrigation fluid, such as saline, may be provided by a saline source 126, which may be any commercially available irrigation solution provided in bottles or bags.
  • In use, the irrigation pressure sensor 122 is connected to the handpiece 112 and the infusion fluid source 126 through irrigation lines 130, 132 and 134. The irrigation pressure sensor 122 measures the flow or pressure of irrigation fluid from the source 126 to the handpiece 112 and supplies this information to the CPU 116 through the cable 136. The irrigation fluid flow data may be used by the CPU 116 to control the operating parameters of the console 114 using software commands. For example, the CPU 116 may, through a cable 140, vary the output of the power supply 120 being sent to the handpiece 112 and the tip 113 though a power cable 142. The CPU 116 may also use data supplied by the irrigation pressure sensor 122 to vary the operation of the pump 118 and/or valves through a cable 144. The pump 118 aspirates fluid from the handpiece 112 through a line 146 and into a collection container 128 through line 148. The CPU 116 may also use data supplied by the irrigation pressure sensor 122 and the applied output of power supply 120 to provide audible tones to the user. Additional details concerning such surgical systems can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 6,179,808 (Boukhny, et al.) and U.S. Pat. No. 6,261,283 (Morgan, et al.), the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • The control console 114 can be programmed to control and manipulate pulses that are delivered to the handpiece 112 and, in turn, control the power of the pulses of the handpiece that is used during surgery. Referring to FIGS. 2B and 2C, the pulses are generated in packets or in on periods and off periods. In the illustrated example, the pulses have a 50% duty cycle. Indeed, various on-times, off-times and duty cycles can be used for different applications.
  • The following description assumes that a maximum power level of 100% is the maximum attainable power (i.e., maximum stroke or displacement of the ultrasonic tip). In other words, 50% power refers to half of the maximum attainable power. Power levels are represented as a percentage (%) of the maximum attainable power. Embodiments of pulse manipulation that can be used with the exemplary phacoemulsification surgical system described above are illustrated in FIGS. 3-21, which can be organized as micro-bursts or packets of pulses, as shown in FIGS. 2B and 2C. The packets or bursts of pulses are provided to the ultrasound handpiece, which generates a generally corresponding output at the ultrasonic tip.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, according to one embodiment, one or both of the rise and decay components 310 and 312 of each pulse 300 can be programmed separately from a natural rise and natural decay. For example rise and decay components 310 and 312 can be programmed is with linear and/or non-linear functions separately from natural rise and decay times that occur due to switching an amplifier on and off to generate pulses. Persons skilled in the art will appreciate that some pulses (e.g., square and rectangular pulses) are typically represented as “ideal” square or rectangular pulses having immediate and sharp transitions between low and maximum power levels. In practice, however, such pulses have natural rise and decay times, e.g., exponential rise and decay times, which are caused by a load or impedance. For example, typical natural decay times can be about 4 milliseconds (ms). Embodiments, in contrast, are directed to controlling linear rise and linear decay times separately from natural transitions that are caused by switching an amplifier on and off by setting or programming the rise and/or decay functions.
  • Controlling the rise and decay components 310 and 312 and rise and decay times 312 and 322 provides advantageously allows different pulse configurations to be generated for particular surgical applications and systems. For example, pulses having programmed rise components 310 that gradually increase in power allow the lens material to be positioned more accurately. Gradual power transitions, for example, do not prematurely push the lens material away from the tip of the handpiece. In contrast, known systems using pulses having sharp minimum to maximum transitions may inadvertently push lens material away from the tip too quickly, thus complicating the surgical procedure. Accordingly, pulses that include programmed rise components can improve the positioning and cutting of lens material and the effectiveness of surgical procedures. Further, programming decay components and pulse times allows less energy to be delivered to the eye, resulting in less heating of the tissue.
  • According to one embodiment, the programmed rise and/or decay component is programmed according to a linear function. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3, each pulse 300 is programmed with two linear components-a linear rise component 310 and a linear decay component 320. The linear rise component 310 increases from a first amplitude to a second amplitude. An intermediate component 330 extends between the linear components 310 and 320 at a second amplitude. The decay component 330 decreases from the second amplitude to a third amplitude.
  • The linear rise component 310 has a linear rise time 312, the linear decay component 320 has a linear decay time 322, and the maximum amplitude component 330 has a maximum amplitude or active or “on” time 332. Linear rise and linear decay times 312 and 322 can vary depending on the maximum power level of a pulse since more time is typically required to reach higher power levels.
  • In one embodiment, the linear rise time 312 can be programmed to be about 5 ms to about 500 ms. If a pulse must reach 100% power, the duration of the linear rise time 312 may be longer. However, if the pulse must reach less than 100% power, then the linear rise time 312 can be shorter, e.g. less than or about 5 ms. Linear rise time 312 durations may increase with increasing power levels and can be appropriately programmed using the control console 114. If necessary, the rate at which the linear component increases can be limited to protect power components, such as an amplifier.
  • According to one embodiment, the linear decay time 322 can be programmed to be about 5 ms to about 500 ms. In one embodiment, the liner decay time 322 is programmed using the control console 114 so that power decays linearly and about 70% of the power dissipates in about 2 ms, and about 98% of the power dissipates in about 4 ms. The linear decay time 322 may be longer than, about the same as, or shorter than the linear rise time 312. For example, FIG. 3 illustrates the decay time 322 being longer than the rise time 312. The linear decay time 322 can be longer or slower than a natural decay time. The rise and decay rates may also be the same so that the pulse is symmetrical and has both programmed rise and decay components.
  • The maximum amplitude or active or “on” time 332 can vary with different applications. The maximum amplitude time can be about 5 ms to about 500 ms. In the illustrated embodiment, the intermediate component 330 has a constant amplitude (at the second amplitude). In an alternative embodiment, the duration of the maximum amplitude time can be less than 5 ms depending on, for example, required power and resulting heat considerations. In further alternative embodiments, the amplitude may vary across the intermediate component 330, e.g., increase or decrease between the first and second components 310 and 320.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, the rise component 310 begins at a non-zero level. In an alternative embodiment, the rise component 310 can begin at a zero level. The initial power level may depend on the particular surgical procedure and system configuration. Similarly, the decay component 320 can end at a zero or non-zero power level. FIG. 3 illustrates the first and third amplitudes being about the same. In alternative embodiments, they can be different. For example, the third amplitude at the end of the decay component 320 can be greater than the first amplitude.
  • In an alternative embodiment, the programmed rise and/or decay component can be a non-linear component. A non-linear component can be programmed according to logarithmic, exponential and other non-linear functions. For purposes of explanation, not limitation, FIG. 3 illustrates linear rise and decay components. However, one or both of the rise and decay components can be programmed with a non-linear function.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, according to an alternative embodiment, a pulse 400 is programmed with linear rise and linear decay components 310 and 320 that meet at a maximum point 410 at a second amplitude rather than having an intermediate component 330, as shown in FIG. 3. In the illustrated embodiment, the programmed rise and decay times 312 and 322 are equal. The linear rise and decay components 310 and 320 meet at a midpoint. In alternative embodiments, as discussed above with respect to FIG. 3, linear rise and decay times 312 and 322 can be programmed to be about 5 ms to about 500 ms. Thus, the rise and decay times may not be equal, and the maximum point 410 may not be a midpoint.
  • Referring to FIGS. 5-8, in alternative embodiments, pulses having one or more linear and/or non-linear components can be combined with other pulses and pulse patterns. For purposes of explanation, not limitation, FIGS. 5-8 illustrate pulses having programmed linear components, however, one or more programmed linear components can be replaced with a programmed non-linear component.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a sequence or combination 500 of pulses having a first rectangular pulse 510, a second rectangular pulse 520, a pulse 530 having a linear decay component, a pulse 540 having a linear rise component and a pulse 550 having linear rise and linear decay components, similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a sequence or combination 600 of pulses according to another embodiment that includes a pulse 610 having linear rise and decay components and an intermediate component, similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 3, a rectangular pulse 620, a rectangular pulse 630 having a longer duration than pulse 620, a pulse 640 having a linear decay component and a pulse 650 having a linear rise component.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates yet a further embodiment of a sequence or combination 700 of pulses that includes a pulse 710 having a linear decay component, a multi-segment rectangular pulse 720 having decreasing amplitude, a pulse 730 having a linear decay component, a pulse 740 having a linear decay component and a 750 pulse having both linear rise and linear decay components, similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 4, and another rectangular pulse 760.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a further alternative embodiment of a sequence or combination 800 of pulses having the same maximum amplitude and at least one pulse having a linear component. In particular, FIG. 8 illustrates a pulse 810 having a linear decay component, a multi-segment rectangular pulse 820 having decreasing amplitude, a pulse 810 having a linear decay component, a pulse 840 having a linear decay component, a pulse 850 having both linear rise and decay components, similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 4, and a rectangular pulse 860.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 5-8, each pulse in a packet of pulses can have an attribute that differentiates it from other pulses, e.g., based on different amplitude, duration, shape, number of programmed linear components and/or power. For example, pulse combinations can have pulses having different powers, amplitudes, shapes and durations. Further, pulse combinations can have different numbers of pulses, different numbers of rectangular and square pulses, different numbers of pulses having linear components, different numbers of pulses having one linear component, numbers of pulses having two linear components, and different numbers of pulses having two linear components and a constant amplitude component. Thus, embodiments surgeons to customize pulses to suite particular surgical procedures and phacoemulsification systems.
  • As shown in FIG. 5-8, the rectangular pulses and pulses having one or more linear component, can be placed in different positions and sequences, e.g., and at the beginning or end of a pulse sequence, or somewhere in between. The order of rectangular (or other shaped pulses) and pulses having a linear component can be altered depending on the surgical application and the system used. Certain pulses may be grouped together or commingled with other types of pulses.
  • For example, referring to FIG. 5, rectangular pulses 510 and 520 are grouped together and pulses 520, 530 and 540 having a linear component are grouped together. In an alternative embodiment, one or more non-rectangular pulses can be between the rectangular pulses so that the rectangular pulses are commingled with different types pulses. Similarly, one or more pulses that do not include a linear component can be placed between the pulses having a programmed linear component.
  • Referring to FIGS. 9-14, in alternative embodiments, pulses having a programmed linear component are included in a pattern of pulses in which each pulse has sequentially decreasing power or increasing power. FIGS. 9-11 illustrate pulse sequences in which each pulse has sequentially higher power, and FIGS. 12-14 illustrate pulse sequences in which each pulse has sequentially decreasing power.
  • Referring to FIG. 9, an alternative embodiment includes a sequence or combination 900 of pulses that includes pulses 910, 920, 930, 940 and 950, each of which is similar to the pulses shown in FIG. 3. Each successive pulse has a higher power (P1-P5) than a prior pulse. For example, pulse 930 has a power P3, which is greater than the power P2 of pulse 920.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates an alternative embodiment in which a sequence or combination 1000 of pulses includes pulses 1010, 1020, 1030, 1040, and 1050, each of which is similar to the pulses shown in FIG. 4. Each successive pulse has a higher power than a prior pulse.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates yet a further embodiment in which a sequence or combination 1100 of pulses includes pulses of various shapes and sizes, including rectangular pulses and at least one pulse having a linear component. Each successive pulse has a higher power than a prior pulse. A sequence or group of pulses having an initial low power level and subsequent increasing power levels may be useful to effectively hold and control lens material at a tip of an ultrasound handpiece, while gradually increasing power to emulsify lens material.
  • Referring to FIG. 12, according to another embodiment, a sequence or combination 1200 of pulses includes pulses 1210, 1220, 1230, 1240 and 1250, each of which is similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 3. Each pulse includes a programmed linear rise component 310 and a programmed linear decay component 320. Each pulse has reduced power relative to a prior pulse. For example, pulse P3 has less power than pulse P2, and pulse P4 has less power than pulse P3.
  • In an alternative embodiment, referring to FIG. 13, a sequence or group of pulses includes pulses 1310, 1320, 1330, 1340 and 1350. Each pulse is similar to the pulse shown in FIG. 4, and each pulse has reduced power relative to a prior pulse. FIG. 14 illustrates yet a further embodiment in which a sequence or combination 1400 of pulses 1410, 1420, 1430, 1440 and 1450 having reduced power over time. The combination 1400 includes pulses having different shapes and sizes, including rectangular pulses and pulses having a linear component.
  • Referring to FIGS. 15-19, alternative embodiments are directed to transforming pulses between different pulse modes in response to a controller, such as a foot pedal or foot switch. According to one embodiment, pulses are transferred between burst and pulse modes. Pulse patterns are shown relative to four foot pedal positions, which may or may not be defined by a detent or position indicator. Persons skilled in the art will appreciate that a foot pedal or switch can have other numbers of positions, and that the transitions described herein can be performed by pressing and releasing the foot pedal.
  • Referring to FIG. 15, “burst” mode provides a series of periodic, fixed width, constant amplitude pulses 1500 of ultrasonic power, each of which is followed by an “of” time 1510. The off time 1510 between pulses 1500 is controlled by the surgeon's input by moving or pressing the foot pedal. In other words, in burst mode, each pulse 1500 has a fixed “on” time 1520, and a variable “off” time 1510, and the “off” time 1510 is adjusted based on the user's manipulation of the foot pedal. Burst mode pulses can have active times of about 5 ms to about 500 ms. The spacing between bursts or the “off-time” can be about 0 ms (when the foot pedal is fully depressed and power is continuous) to about 2.5 seconds. The off-time can depend on the application and system, for example, the desired amount of cooling or heat dissipation that may be required. Burst mode pulses may be “fixed burst” mode pulses as shown in FIG. 15 or, alternatively, be “linear burst” mode pulses as shown in FIG. 16. In fixed burst mode, pressing the foot pedal decreases the off-time 1510, while the amplitude of the pulses remains constant. In linear burst mode, pressing the foot pedal decreases the off-time 1500 and, in addition, adjusts the amplitude. In the illustrated embodiment, pressing the foot pedal increases the amplitude. Thus, in both fixed and linear burst modes, the power “Off” time 1510 can be adjusted, and the amplitude of pulses may or may not be adjusted.
  • More particularly, FIGS. 15 and 16 illustrate a foot pedal in four positions. The off time 1510 decreases when the foot pedal is initially at Position 1 and pressed further to Position 2. The number of fixed width, constant amplitude pulses 1500 increases as the foot pedal is pressed. As the foot pedal is pressed from Position 2 to Position 3, the off time 1510 eventually reaches a pre-determined off time 1520, e.g., the on time 1520 or another suitable time. Pressing the foot pedal further from position 3 to position 4 reduces the off time 1510 to zero, i.e., a 100% on-time 1520 (continuous mode). A similar process is illustrated in FIG. 16, except that the pulses are linear burst mode pulses, and the amplitude of the pulses also increases as the foot pedal is moved among different positions.
  • Referring to FIG. 17, in “pulse” mode, the amplitude of fixed-width pulses 1700 changes according to the position of the foot pedal. In the illustrated embodiment, the amplitude increases by pressing the foot pedal.
  • Referring to FIGS. 18 and 19, alternative embodiments are directed to transforming pulses between burst and pulse modes in response to movement of the foot pedal. FIG. 18 illustrates transitioning from burst mode to pulse mode. The foot pedal is pressed from Position 1 to Position 2 to decrease the off time 1510. The off-time decreases further when the foot pedal is pressed from Position 2 to Position 3. The number of fixed width, constant amplitude pulses in a period of time increases as the foot pedal is pressed further. As the foot pedal is pressed further, the off time 1510 eventually reaches a pre-determined value, such as the on time 1520 or another suitable value. In the illustrated embodiment, the pre-determined value is equal to the on-time 1520. The pulse amplitude is then adjusted after the off time 1510 is the same as the on time 1520 (or another suitable value), thereby increasing energy generated by the handpiece, and transforming pulses from burst mode to pulse mode pulses.
  • Referring to FIG. 19, in an alternative embodiment, pulses are transformed from pulse mode to burst mode pulses. If the system is initially in pulse mode and the foot pedal is pressed to position 4, releasing the foot pedal initially decreases the amplitude of the pulses. After the amplitude reaches a pre-determined amplitude, releasing the foot pedal further results in adjusting the burst mode and increasing the power “Off” time 1510, thereby providing fewer fixed width pulses 1500 in a given time and less power to the ultrasonic tip 113, in order to cool the tip 113.
  • As shown in FIGS. 18 and 19, a surgeon can advantageously switch between burst mode and pulse mode pulses by manipulating a single controller, e.g., by pressing and releasing the foot pedal. This arrangement is particularly beneficial since these transformations can be achieved without the interruptions and adjustments that are otherwise associated with changing to different pulse modes, e.g., adjusting parameters on a display screen or interface. Instead, embodiments advantageously allow continuous pulse transitions by pressing and releasing the foot pedal as part of a natural and continuous motion of the surgeon's foot, thereby simplifying the configuration and operation of surgical equipment and simplifying surgical procedures.
  • Referring to FIG. 20, in a further alternative embodiment, the amount of power of each pulse can be gradually increased by utilizing a multi-step or multi-segment pulse 2000. Persons skilled in the art will appreciate that a multi-segment pulse can have two, three, four and other numbers of segments. Thus, the two-segment pulse shown in FIG. 20 is provided for purposes of illustration, not limitation.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, a first step 2010 has less power than a subsequent step 2020. For example, as shown in FIG. 20, a first pulse segment 2010 is at a first amplitude for a pre-determined time, followed by a second pulse segment 2020 at a second amplitude for a pre-determined time. Configuring a multi-segment pulse to provide a gradual transition from low power to higher power provides the ability to hold and emulsify lens material more accurately in contrast to abrupt transitions from low to maximum power levels such as in a typical square, which can inadvertently move lens material away from the tip during cutting of the lens material Referring to FIG. 21, in alternative embodiments, a multi-segment pulse 2100 may have more than two segments of increasing amplitude. In the illustrated embodiment, a pulse has three pulse segments 2110, 2120 and 2130. Other pulses may have four, five and other numbers of pulse segments as needed.
  • The different pulses and pulse patterns described above are pulses of ultrasonic energy that can be delivered in packets to transducer elements of the handpiece. For example, as shown in FIGS. 2B and 2C, ultrasonic energy is delivered to piezoelectric elements as intermittent packets of pulses that are separated by an off period. The pulses patterns according to alternative embodiments of the invention described above are delivered to piezoelectric elements of an ultrasound handpiece during these “on” times and within these packets.
  • For example, FIG. 23 illustrates packets of pulses of ultrasonic energy having sequentially increasing power, as shown in FIG. 10. As a further example, FIG. 24 illustrates packets of pulses of ultrasonic energy having sequentially decreasing power, as shown in FIG. 13. Persons skilled in the art will appreciate that a packet may have one or multiple groups of pulses, and that a packet may end at the end of a group of pulses or in the middle of a group of pulses. For example, FIGS. 22 and 23 illustrate a packet ending with the second pulse in a group of pulses. The packet may also end with the last pulse in the group of pulses. Accordingly, FIGS. 22 and 23 are provided for purposes of illustration, not limitation. Persons skilled in the art will also appreciate that the embodiments of pulses described in this specification are not required to be framed or organized in packets in order to control the ultrasound handpiece.
  • Although references have been made in the foregoing description to various embodiments, persons of skilled in the art will recognize that insubstantial modifications, alterations, and substitutions can be made to the described embodiments without departing from the scope of embodiments.

Claims (21)

  1. 1. A method generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical device, the method comprising:
    programming a linear rise component;
    programming a linear decay component; and
    generating a pulse having multiple segments, wherein
    a first segment includes the linear rise component that increases from a first amplitude to a second amplitude,
    a second segment begins at the end of the first segment and is at the second amplitude, and
    a third segment includes the linear decay component that decreases from the second amplitude to a third amplitude, and
    the linear rise and decay components being programmed separately from is a natural rise and a natural decay caused by activating and deactivating a power element that generates the pulses.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the linear rise component increases slower than a natural rise when the power element is activated.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1, wherein the linear decay component decays slower than a natural decay when the power element is de-activated.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein the first amplitude is zero.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein the first amplitude is non-zero.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1, wherein the linear rise component increases at a rate that is about the same as the rate at which the linear decay component decreases.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1, wherein the linear rise component increases faster than the linear decay component decreases.
  8. 8. The method of claim 1, wherein the second stage is at a substantially constant amplitude.
  9. 9. The method of claim 1, wherein the third amplitude is about the same as the first amplitude.
  10. 10. The method of claim 1, wherein the third amplitude is greater than the first amplitude.
  11. 11. A method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical device, the method comprising:
    generating a plurality of pulses, each pulse having
    a first pulse segment that increases linearly from a first amplitude to a second amplitude in about 5-500 milliseconds,
    a second pulse segment at the second amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time, and
    a third pulse segment that decreases linearly between the second amplitude and the third amplitude in about 5-500 milliseconds,
    wherein the rates at which the first and third pulse segments respectively rise and decay are programmed separately from a natural rise and a natural decay caused by activating and deactivating a power element that generates the pulses.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11, wherein the third amplitude is about the same as the first amplitude.
  13. 13. The method of claim 1, wherein the third amplitude is greater than the first amplitude.
  14. 14. The method of claim 11, wherein the first amplitude is zero.
  15. 15. The method of claim 1, wherein the first amplitude is non-zero.
  16. 16. The method of claim 1, wherein the second amplitude being substantially constant.
  17. 17. A method of generating energy for use in an ophthalmic surgical device, the method comprising:
    generating a plurality of pulses, each pulse having
    a first rectangular pulse segment at a first amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time, and
    a second rectangular pulse segment at a second amplitude for a pre-determined amount of time, wherein a beginning of the second rectangular pulse segment follows an end of the first rectangular pulse segment, and the second amplitude is greater than the first amplitude.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17, wherein the first and second rectangular pulse segments are about the same duration.
  19. 19. The method of claim 17, further comprising increasing the amplitudes of the first and second rectangular pulse segments in response to a controller.
  20. 20. The method of claim 19, wherein the controller is a foot pedal, further comprising increasing the amplitudes of the first and second rectangular pulse segments in response to movement of the foot pedal.
  21. 21. The method of claim 17, wherein each pulse includes a third rectangular pulse segment, and wherein the amplitude of the third rectangular pulse segment is greater than the second amplitude.
US11216475 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system Abandoned US20070056596A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11215923 US8353297B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US11216475 US20070056596A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US11216724 US20070078379A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes

Applications Claiming Priority (27)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11216724 US20070078379A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
US11215923 US8353297B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US11216475 US20070056596A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
CA 2555955 CA2555955C (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-08 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
AT06118988T AT432059T (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Control of a phacoemulsification system by switching between pulse and burst mode
DE200660007209 DE602006007209D1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Manipulation of the pulse amplitude to control a surgical Phacoemulsifikationssystems
AT06118991T AT432060T (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Pulse manipulation for control of a phacoemulsification
EP20070107964 EP1832259B1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Pulse amplitude manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
DE200660006949 DE602006006949D1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Pulse manipulation to control a phacoemulsification
EP20060118988 EP1759672B1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
EP20060118991 EP1759674B1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
AT07107964T AT433311T (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Manipulation of the pulse amplitude to control a surgical phacoemulsifikationssystems
ES07107964T ES2325287T3 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Handling of the pulse width for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system.
DE200660006948 DE602006006948D1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Control of a phacoemulsification system by switching between pulse and burst mode
ES06118988T ES2325869T3 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Control of a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between modes and pulse burst.
ES06118991T ES2323809T3 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Manipulating pulses to control a phacoemulsification surgical system.
EP20060118989 EP1759673B1 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-16 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
CA 2556639 CA2556639C (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-21 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
CA 2556527 CA2556527C (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-21 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
AU2006203723A AU2006203723B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-28 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
AU2006203720A AU2006203720B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-28 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
AU2006203721A AU2006203721B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-28 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
JP2006233694A JP4838076B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-30 Method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical equipment
JP2006233478A JP4838074B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-30 Method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical equipment
JP2006233562A JP4838075B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2006-08-30 Method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical equipment
US12875249 US20100331764A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2010-09-03 Controlling A Phacoemulsification Surgical System By Transitioning Between Pulse and Burst Modes
JP2011006303A JP5266345B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2011-01-14 Method of generating energy for use with an ophthalmic surgical equipment

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070056596A1 true true US20070056596A1 (en) 2007-03-15

Family

ID=38282346

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11216724 Abandoned US20070078379A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
US11216475 Abandoned US20070056596A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US11215923 Active 2030-04-30 US8353297B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US12875249 Abandoned US20100331764A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2010-09-03 Controlling A Phacoemulsification Surgical System By Transitioning Between Pulse and Burst Modes

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11216724 Abandoned US20070078379A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11215923 Active 2030-04-30 US8353297B2 (en) 2005-08-31 2005-08-31 Pulse manipulation for controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system
US12875249 Abandoned US20100331764A1 (en) 2005-08-31 2010-09-03 Controlling A Phacoemulsification Surgical System By Transitioning Between Pulse and Burst Modes

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (4) US20070078379A1 (en)
EP (4) EP1832259B1 (en)
JP (3) JP4838076B2 (en)
CA (3) CA2555955C (en)
DE (3) DE602006006948D1 (en)
ES (3) ES2325287T3 (en)

Cited By (60)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060200068A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2006-09-07 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Novel enhanced microburst ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US20060235307A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2006-10-19 Mikhail Boukhny Graphical user interface for selecting pulse parameters in a phacoemulsification surgical system
US20070073309A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2007-03-29 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Control of pulse duty cycle based upon footswitch displacement
US20070118071A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2007-05-24 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US20080033342A1 (en) * 2006-08-01 2008-02-07 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US20080058799A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2008-03-06 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US20090163827A1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2009-06-25 Yeda Research And Development Co. Ltd Time-based imaging
US7842005B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2010-11-30 Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitational effects
US20110015627A1 (en) * 2009-07-15 2011-01-20 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Impedance monitoring apparatus, system, and method for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US20110082486A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2011-04-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US20110196398A1 (en) * 2010-02-11 2011-08-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Seal arrangements for ultrasonically powered surgical instruments
US20120083800A1 (en) * 2010-10-04 2012-04-05 Lutz Andersohn Systems and methods for defining a transition point of a foot pedal of an ophthalmic surgery system
US20120302941A1 (en) * 2011-05-23 2012-11-29 Dan Teodorescu Phacoemulsification systems and associated user-interfaces and methods
DE102012018984A1 (en) * 2011-09-29 2013-04-04 Carl Zeiss Meditec Ag Ophthalmic surgical pulse control device
US8461744B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2013-06-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotating transducer mount for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8469981B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-06-25 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotatable cutting implement arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8486096B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-07-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Dual purpose surgical instrument for cutting and coagulating tissue
US8512365B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2013-08-20 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US8523889B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2013-09-03 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US8531064B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-09-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonically powered surgical instruments with rotating cutting implement
US8546999B2 (en) 2009-06-24 2013-10-01 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Housing arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8579928B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-11-12 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Outer sheath and blade arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8591536B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2013-11-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument blades
US8623027B2 (en) 2007-10-05 2014-01-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ergonomic surgical instruments
US8663220B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2014-03-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8704425B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2014-04-22 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic device for cutting and coagulating with stepped output
US8808319B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2014-08-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US8900259B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2014-12-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US8951248B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-02-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US8961547B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2015-02-24 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments with moving cutting implement
US9044261B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2015-06-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Temperature controlled ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9050627B2 (en) 2011-09-02 2015-06-09 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Systems and methods for ultrasonic power measurement and control of phacoemulsification systems
US9050124B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2015-06-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument and cartilage and bone shaping blades therefor
US9095367B2 (en) 2012-10-22 2015-08-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Flexible harmonic waveguides/blades for surgical instruments
US9168054B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-10-27 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9198714B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2015-12-01 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Haptic feedback devices for surgical robot
US9226767B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-01-05 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Closed feedback control for electrosurgical device
US9226766B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-05 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Serial communication protocol for medical device
US9232979B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2016-01-12 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Robotically controlled surgical instrument
US9237921B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9241728B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument with multiple clamping mechanisms
US9241731B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotatable electrical connection for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9283045B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-03-15 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with fluid management system
US9326788B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-05-03 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Lockout mechanism for use with robotic electrosurgical device
US9351754B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-05-31 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with distally positioned jaw assemblies
EP2187851B1 (en) 2007-09-13 2016-06-22 Carl Zeiss Meditec AG Phacoemulsification device
US9393037B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-07-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with articulating shafts
US9408622B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-08-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with articulating shafts
US9439669B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2016-09-13 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9439668B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-09-13 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Switch arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9504483B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2016-11-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments
US9636135B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2017-05-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9700339B2 (en) 2009-05-20 2017-07-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Coupling arrangements and methods for attaching tools to ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9707027B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2017-07-18 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Medical device
US9724118B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2017-08-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9820768B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2017-11-21 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with control mechanisms
US9883884B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2018-02-06 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US10010339B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2018-07-03 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical blades
US10034704B2 (en) 2015-06-30 2018-07-31 Ethicon Llc Surgical instrument with user adaptable algorithms
US10034684B2 (en) 2015-06-15 2018-07-31 Ethicon Llc Apparatus and method for dissecting and coagulating tissue

Families Citing this family (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070078379A1 (en) * 2005-08-31 2007-04-05 Alcon, Inc. Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes
US8380126B1 (en) 2005-10-13 2013-02-19 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Reliable communications for wireless devices
US8565839B2 (en) * 2005-10-13 2013-10-22 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Power management for wireless devices
US8491528B2 (en) 2006-11-09 2013-07-23 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Critical alignment of fluidics cassettes
US20080112828A1 (en) * 2006-11-09 2008-05-15 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Fluidics cassette for ocular surgical system
US9295765B2 (en) * 2006-11-09 2016-03-29 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Surgical fluidics cassette supporting multiple pumps
US9522221B2 (en) 2006-11-09 2016-12-20 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Fluidics cassette for ocular surgical system
US20090005712A1 (en) * 2007-05-24 2009-01-01 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. System and method for controlling a transverse phacoemulsification system with a footpedal
US8348967B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2013-01-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8257377B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2012-09-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Multiple end effectors ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8252012B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2012-08-28 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument with modulator
US20090048607A1 (en) * 2007-08-13 2009-02-19 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Systems and methods for phacoemulsification with vacuum based pumps
USD594983S1 (en) 2007-10-05 2009-06-23 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Handle assembly for surgical instrument
US7901423B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-03-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Folded ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
USD700699S1 (en) 2011-08-23 2014-03-04 Covidien Ag Handle for portable surgical device
JP5301936B2 (en) * 2008-09-30 2013-09-25 株式会社ニデック Ultrasonic surgical device
CA2733825C (en) * 2008-11-07 2017-09-12 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Method for programming foot pedal settings and controlling performance through foot pedal variation
CA2733827C (en) * 2008-11-07 2017-09-12 Dung Ma Semi-automatic device calibration
CA2742981C (en) * 2008-11-07 2017-09-12 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Surgical cassette apparatus
US9795507B2 (en) 2008-11-07 2017-10-24 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Multifunction foot pedal
CA2941759A1 (en) * 2008-11-07 2010-05-14 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Automatically pulsing different aspiration levels to an ocular probe
WO2010054142A1 (en) 2008-11-07 2010-05-14 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Controlling of multiple pumps
CA2743098C (en) * 2008-11-07 2017-08-15 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Automatically switching different aspiration levels and/or pumps to an ocular probe
CA2951889C (en) 2008-11-07 2017-09-12 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Adjustable foot pedal control for ophthalmic surgery
US9999710B2 (en) * 2009-01-07 2018-06-19 Med-Logics, Inc. Tissue removal devices, systems and methods
US9492317B2 (en) 2009-03-31 2016-11-15 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Cassette capture mechanism
US20110137231A1 (en) * 2009-12-08 2011-06-09 Alcon Research, Ltd. Phacoemulsification Hand Piece With Integrated Aspiration Pump
US20110144567A1 (en) * 2009-12-15 2011-06-16 Alcon Research, Ltd. Phacoemulsification Hand Piece With Integrated Aspiration Pump and Cartridge
US8323302B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2012-12-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Methods of using ultrasonically powered surgical instruments with rotatable cutting implements
US9259234B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2016-02-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with rotatable blade and hollow sheath arrangements
US8382782B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-02-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments with partially rotating blade and fixed pad arrangement
US8419759B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-04-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument with comb-like tissue trimming device
US9149388B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2015-10-06 Alcon Research, Ltd. Attenuated RF power for automated capsulorhexis
US8979890B2 (en) 2010-10-01 2015-03-17 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument with jaw member
US8888809B2 (en) 2010-10-01 2014-11-18 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument with jaw member
US8968293B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2015-03-03 Covidien Lp Systems and methods for calibrating power measurements in an electrosurgical generator
USD687549S1 (en) 2011-10-24 2013-08-06 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument
US9730835B2 (en) 2012-12-19 2017-08-15 Novartis Ag Burst mode vitrectomy system
US9962288B2 (en) 2013-03-07 2018-05-08 Novartis Ag Active acoustic streaming in hand piece for occlusion surge mitigation
US9545337B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-01-17 Novartis Ag Acoustic streaming glaucoma drainage device
US9693896B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-07-04 Novartis Ag Systems and methods for ocular surgery
US9915274B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-03-13 Novartis Ag Acoustic pumps and systems
US9126219B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-09-08 Alcon Research, Ltd. Acoustic streaming fluid ejector
US9750638B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-09-05 Novartis Ag Systems and methods for ocular surgery
CN103763570B (en) * 2014-01-20 2017-02-01 华侨大学 hevc fast intra prediction method based on a satd
CN106163467B (en) * 2014-02-28 2018-08-10 易格赛尔透镜有限公司 Laser-assisted cataract surgery
US9700333B2 (en) 2014-06-30 2017-07-11 Ethicon Llc Surgical instrument with variable tissue compression
US9974689B2 (en) 2014-11-06 2018-05-22 Novartis Ag Dual mode vitrectomy surgical system
DE102015005331B3 (en) 2015-04-25 2016-08-18 Carl Zeiss Meditec Ag Control apparatus for a phacoemulsification and phacoemulsification system with such a control device

Citations (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3589363A (en) * 1967-07-25 1971-06-29 Cavitron Corp Material removal apparatus and method employing high frequency vibrations
US3941122A (en) * 1974-04-08 1976-03-02 Bolt Beranek And Newman, Inc. High frequency ultrasonic process and apparatus for selectively dissolving and removing unwanted solid and semi-solid materials and the like
US4223676A (en) * 1977-12-19 1980-09-23 Cavitron Corporation Ultrasonic aspirator
US4246902A (en) * 1978-03-10 1981-01-27 Miguel Martinez Surgical cutting instrument
US4493694A (en) * 1980-10-17 1985-01-15 Cooper Lasersonics, Inc. Surgical pre-aspirator
US4515583A (en) * 1983-10-17 1985-05-07 Coopervision, Inc. Operative elliptical probe for ultrasonic surgical instrument and method of its use
US4589415A (en) * 1984-08-31 1986-05-20 Haaga John R Method and system for fragmenting kidney stones
US4609368A (en) * 1984-08-22 1986-09-02 Dotson Robert S Jun Pneumatic ultrasonic surgical handpiece
US4827911A (en) * 1986-04-02 1989-05-09 Cooper Lasersonics, Inc. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic surgical fragmentation and removal of tissue
US4869715A (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-09-26 Sherburne Fred S Ultrasonic cone and method of construction
US4922902A (en) * 1986-05-19 1990-05-08 Valleylab, Inc. Method for removing cellular material with endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator
US4989583A (en) * 1988-10-21 1991-02-05 Nestle S.A. Ultrasonic cutting tip assembly
US5154694A (en) * 1989-06-06 1992-10-13 Kelman Charles D Tissue scraper device for medical use
US5913823A (en) * 1997-07-15 1999-06-22 Acuson Corporation Ultrasound imaging method and system for transmit signal generation for an ultrasonic imaging system capable of harmonic imaging
US6027515A (en) * 1999-03-02 2000-02-22 Sound Surgical Technologies Llc Pulsed ultrasonic device and method
US6175180B1 (en) * 1998-03-27 2001-01-16 Optikon 2000 S.P.A. Method for optimizing the drive of a piezoelectric actuator, in particular for phacoemulsifier devices, by dynamic detection of its eletromechanical characteristics and devices based thereupon
US6261283B1 (en) * 1999-08-31 2001-07-17 Alcon Universal Ltd. Liquid venting surgical system and cassette
US6261297B1 (en) * 1998-03-10 2001-07-17 Allergan Sales, Inc. Thermal mode phaco apparatus and method
US6319220B1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2001-11-20 Stephen S. Bylsma Phacoemulsification apparatus
US6402769B1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2002-06-11 Alcon Universal Ltd. Torsional ultrasound handpiece
US20020082793A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2002-06-27 Kadziauskas Kenneth E. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US6629948B2 (en) * 1997-01-22 2003-10-07 Advanced Medical Optics Rapid pulse phaco power for burn free surgery
US20040092922A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2004-05-13 Kadziauskas Kenneth E. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
WO2005007002A1 (en) * 2003-07-11 2005-01-27 Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck Method for operation of a laser
US20050096680A1 (en) * 2003-08-10 2005-05-05 Jaime Zacharias Repetitive progressive axial displacement pattern for phacoemulsifier needle tip
US20050209621A1 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-09-22 Alcon, Inc. Method of controlling a surgical system based on irrigation flow
US20050277869A1 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-12-15 Alcon, Inc. Method of operating an ultrasound handpiece

Family Cites Families (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS62193316A (en) * 1986-02-19 1987-08-25 Sony Corp Output circuit
US5090425A (en) * 1990-03-02 1992-02-25 Stahl Norman O Method of controlling astigmatism during eye surgery
US5346491A (en) * 1991-03-28 1994-09-13 Sony Corporation Feed device for bipolar electrodes for capsulotomy
JP3209545B2 (en) * 1991-08-06 2001-09-17 オリンパス光学工業株式会社 Ultrasonic driving device
JPH06194559A (en) * 1992-12-25 1994-07-15 Olympus Optical Co Ltd Rapidly deformable piezoelectric actuator
US6120523A (en) * 1994-02-24 2000-09-19 Radiance Medical Systems, Inc. Focalized intraluminal balloons
JPH08252261A (en) * 1995-03-17 1996-10-01 Toshiba Corp Ultrasonic medical treatment device
JPH09299381A (en) * 1996-05-20 1997-11-25 Olympus Optical Co Ltd Ultrasonic operation device
JP3807783B2 (en) * 1996-05-31 2006-08-09 株式会社ニデック Ophthalmic ultrasonic surgical devices
US6007517A (en) * 1996-08-19 1999-12-28 Anderson; R. David Rapid exchange/perfusion angioplasty catheter
KR100285662B1 (en) * 1999-01-30 2001-01-05 박성하 Apparatus for driving a magnetostriction oscillator using a PWM circuit
US6179808B1 (en) * 1999-06-18 2001-01-30 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Method of controlling the operating parameters of a surgical system
US6494862B1 (en) * 1999-07-13 2002-12-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Substance delivery apparatus and a method of delivering a therapeutic substance to an anatomical passageway
US6884252B1 (en) * 2000-04-04 2005-04-26 Circuit Tree Medical, Inc. Low frequency cataract fragmenting device
JP4347563B2 (en) * 2000-10-17 2009-10-21 アルコン,インコーポレイティド Mappable Ashidoshiki controller for microsurgical systems
WO2003068047A3 (en) * 2002-02-11 2004-04-01 Gold T Tech Inc Method for preventing thrombus formation
US7363088B2 (en) * 2002-02-15 2008-04-22 Hak Ja Han Human-body potential controlling electrotherapeutic device
US7077820B1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2006-07-18 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Enhanced microburst ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US20040092921A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2004-05-13 Kadziauskas Kenneth E. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitation effects
CA2830583C (en) * 2003-03-12 2015-06-09 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitation effects
JP4162544B2 (en) * 2003-01-15 2008-10-08 株式会社ニデック Ultrasonic surgical device
US7625388B2 (en) * 2004-03-22 2009-12-01 Alcon, Inc. Method of controlling a surgical system based on a load on the cutting tip of a handpiece
US7811255B2 (en) * 2004-03-22 2010-10-12 Alcon, Inc. Method of controlling a surgical system based on a rate of change of an operating parameter
US20070078379A1 (en) * 2005-08-31 2007-04-05 Alcon, Inc. Controlling a phacoemulsification surgical system by transitioning between pulse and burst modes

Patent Citations (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3589363A (en) * 1967-07-25 1971-06-29 Cavitron Corp Material removal apparatus and method employing high frequency vibrations
US3941122A (en) * 1974-04-08 1976-03-02 Bolt Beranek And Newman, Inc. High frequency ultrasonic process and apparatus for selectively dissolving and removing unwanted solid and semi-solid materials and the like
US4223676A (en) * 1977-12-19 1980-09-23 Cavitron Corporation Ultrasonic aspirator
US4246902A (en) * 1978-03-10 1981-01-27 Miguel Martinez Surgical cutting instrument
US4493694A (en) * 1980-10-17 1985-01-15 Cooper Lasersonics, Inc. Surgical pre-aspirator
US4515583A (en) * 1983-10-17 1985-05-07 Coopervision, Inc. Operative elliptical probe for ultrasonic surgical instrument and method of its use
US4609368A (en) * 1984-08-22 1986-09-02 Dotson Robert S Jun Pneumatic ultrasonic surgical handpiece
US4589415A (en) * 1984-08-31 1986-05-20 Haaga John R Method and system for fragmenting kidney stones
US4827911A (en) * 1986-04-02 1989-05-09 Cooper Lasersonics, Inc. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic surgical fragmentation and removal of tissue
US4922902A (en) * 1986-05-19 1990-05-08 Valleylab, Inc. Method for removing cellular material with endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator
US4869715A (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-09-26 Sherburne Fred S Ultrasonic cone and method of construction
US4989583A (en) * 1988-10-21 1991-02-05 Nestle S.A. Ultrasonic cutting tip assembly
US5359996A (en) * 1988-10-21 1994-11-01 Nestle, S.A. Ultrasonic cutting tip and assembly
US5154694A (en) * 1989-06-06 1992-10-13 Kelman Charles D Tissue scraper device for medical use
US20020082793A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2002-06-27 Kadziauskas Kenneth E. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US6629948B2 (en) * 1997-01-22 2003-10-07 Advanced Medical Optics Rapid pulse phaco power for burn free surgery
US5913823A (en) * 1997-07-15 1999-06-22 Acuson Corporation Ultrasound imaging method and system for transmit signal generation for an ultrasonic imaging system capable of harmonic imaging
US6261297B1 (en) * 1998-03-10 2001-07-17 Allergan Sales, Inc. Thermal mode phaco apparatus and method
US6175180B1 (en) * 1998-03-27 2001-01-16 Optikon 2000 S.P.A. Method for optimizing the drive of a piezoelectric actuator, in particular for phacoemulsifier devices, by dynamic detection of its eletromechanical characteristics and devices based thereupon
US6402769B1 (en) * 1998-06-29 2002-06-11 Alcon Universal Ltd. Torsional ultrasound handpiece
US6391042B1 (en) * 1999-03-02 2002-05-21 Sound Surgical Technologies Llc Pulsed ultrasonic device and method
US6027515A (en) * 1999-03-02 2000-02-22 Sound Surgical Technologies Llc Pulsed ultrasonic device and method
US6261283B1 (en) * 1999-08-31 2001-07-17 Alcon Universal Ltd. Liquid venting surgical system and cassette
US6319220B1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2001-11-20 Stephen S. Bylsma Phacoemulsification apparatus
US20040092922A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2004-05-13 Kadziauskas Kenneth E. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
WO2005007002A1 (en) * 2003-07-11 2005-01-27 Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck Method for operation of a laser
US20060111697A1 (en) * 2003-07-11 2006-05-25 Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck Gmbh Method for operation of laser
US20050096680A1 (en) * 2003-08-10 2005-05-05 Jaime Zacharias Repetitive progressive axial displacement pattern for phacoemulsifier needle tip
US20050209621A1 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-09-22 Alcon, Inc. Method of controlling a surgical system based on irrigation flow
US20050277869A1 (en) * 2004-03-22 2005-12-15 Alcon, Inc. Method of operating an ultrasound handpiece

Cited By (137)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9788998B2 (en) 1997-01-22 2017-10-17 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Control of pulse duty cycle based upon footswitch displacement
US8876747B2 (en) 1997-01-22 2014-11-04 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US8195286B2 (en) 1997-01-22 2012-06-05 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Control of pulse duty cycle based upon footswitch displacement
US20070073309A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2007-03-29 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Control of pulse duty cycle based upon footswitch displacement
US20070118071A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2007-05-24 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US7857783B2 (en) 1997-01-22 2010-12-28 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US8197436B2 (en) 1997-01-22 2012-06-12 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US20110160646A1 (en) * 1997-01-22 2011-06-30 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Micro-burst ultrasonic power delivery
US9642745B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2017-05-09 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US8945162B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2015-02-03 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitational effects
US20080108938A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2008-05-08 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Modulated Pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US8231564B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2012-07-31 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US20080058799A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2008-03-06 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US8887735B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2014-11-18 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US9707127B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2017-07-18 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US20110077583A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2011-03-31 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitational effects
US20060200068A1 (en) * 2002-10-21 2006-09-07 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Novel enhanced microburst ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US7938120B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2011-05-10 Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. Enhanced microburst ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US8852138B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2014-10-07 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasound power delivery system and method
US8020565B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2011-09-20 Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. Modulated pulsed ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US7842005B2 (en) 2002-10-21 2010-11-30 Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. System and method for pulsed ultrasonic power delivery employing cavitational effects
US20060235307A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2006-10-19 Mikhail Boukhny Graphical user interface for selecting pulse parameters in a phacoemulsification surgical system
US20060248477A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2006-11-02 Mikhail Boukhny Graphical user interface including a pop up window for an ocular surgical system
US7983771B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2011-07-19 Novartis Ag Graphical user interface including a pop up window for an ocular surgical system
US7945341B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2011-05-17 Alcon, Inc. Graphical user interface for selecting pulse parameters in a phacoemulsification surgical system
US20080033342A1 (en) * 2006-08-01 2008-02-07 Advanced Medical Optics, Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US9226849B2 (en) 2006-08-01 2016-01-05 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US20100114009A1 (en) * 2006-08-01 2010-05-06 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US8202287B2 (en) 2006-08-01 2012-06-19 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US7785336B2 (en) * 2006-08-01 2010-08-31 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US7998156B2 (en) 2006-08-01 2011-08-16 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US8366728B2 (en) 2006-08-01 2013-02-05 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US8034067B2 (en) * 2006-08-01 2011-10-11 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US20100114010A1 (en) * 2006-08-01 2010-05-06 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Vacuum sense control for phaco pulse shaping
US9504483B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2016-11-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments
US9883884B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2018-02-06 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9050124B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2015-06-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument and cartilage and bone shaping blades therefor
US9801648B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2017-10-31 Ethicon Llc Surgical instruments
US9987033B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2018-06-05 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8900259B2 (en) 2007-03-22 2014-12-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US9636135B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2017-05-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8523889B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2013-09-03 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US8808319B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2014-08-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US9707004B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2017-07-18 Ethicon Llc Surgical instruments
US9220527B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2015-12-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments
US9913656B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2018-03-13 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9642644B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2017-05-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments
US9414853B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2016-08-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic end effectors with increased active length
US9445832B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2016-09-20 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments
US9044261B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2015-06-02 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Temperature controlled ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8512365B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2013-08-20 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instruments
US9439669B2 (en) 2007-07-31 2016-09-13 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
EP2187851B1 (en) 2007-09-13 2016-06-22 Carl Zeiss Meditec AG Phacoemulsification device
US9848902B2 (en) 2007-10-05 2017-12-26 Ethicon Llc Ergonomic surgical instruments
US8623027B2 (en) 2007-10-05 2014-01-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ergonomic surgical instruments
US9486236B2 (en) 2007-10-05 2016-11-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ergonomic surgical instruments
US10045794B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2018-08-14 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical blades
US8591536B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2013-11-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument blades
US9339289B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2016-05-17 Ehticon Endo-Surgery, LLC Ultrasonic surgical instrument blades
US9066747B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2015-06-30 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instrument blades
US10010339B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2018-07-03 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical blades
US8403862B2 (en) * 2007-12-20 2013-03-26 Yeda Research And Development Co. Ltd. Time-based imaging
US20090163827A1 (en) * 2007-12-20 2009-06-25 Yeda Research And Development Co. Ltd Time-based imaging
US9504855B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2016-11-29 Ethicon Surgery, LLC Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US10022567B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2018-07-17 Ethicon Llc Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9089360B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2015-07-28 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9795808B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2017-10-24 Ethicon Llc Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US8546996B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2013-10-01 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US20110082486A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2011-04-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9072539B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2015-07-07 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US10022568B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2018-07-17 Ethicon Llc Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US8704425B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2014-04-22 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic device for cutting and coagulating with stepped output
US8749116B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2014-06-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US8779648B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2014-07-15 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic device for cutting and coagulating with stepped output
US9700339B2 (en) 2009-05-20 2017-07-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Coupling arrangements and methods for attaching tools to ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8546999B2 (en) 2009-06-24 2013-10-01 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Housing arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9498245B2 (en) 2009-06-24 2016-11-22 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8754570B2 (en) 2009-06-24 2014-06-17 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments comprising transducer arrangements
US8461744B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2013-06-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotating transducer mount for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US20110015627A1 (en) * 2009-07-15 2011-01-20 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Impedance monitoring apparatus, system, and method for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8773001B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2014-07-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotating transducer mount for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9017326B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2015-04-28 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Impedance monitoring apparatus, system, and method for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8663220B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2014-03-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9764164B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2017-09-19 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9039695B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-05-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9623237B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2017-04-18 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9168054B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-10-27 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US8951248B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-02-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US8956349B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-02-17 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9060776B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-06-23 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9050093B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-06-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US8986302B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-03-24 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9060775B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2015-06-23 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical generator for ultrasonic and electrosurgical devices
US9649126B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2017-05-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Seal arrangements for ultrasonically powered surgical instruments
US9427249B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2016-08-30 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Rotatable cutting implements with friction reducing material for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8579928B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-11-12 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Outer sheath and blade arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US8469981B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-06-25 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotatable cutting implement arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9510850B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2016-12-06 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments
US20110196398A1 (en) * 2010-02-11 2011-08-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Seal arrangements for ultrasonically powered surgical instruments
US9962182B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2018-05-08 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with moving cutting implement
US10117667B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2018-11-06 Ethicon Llc Control systems for ultrasonically powered surgical instruments
US8531064B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-09-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonically powered surgical instruments with rotating cutting implement
US8486096B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2013-07-16 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Dual purpose surgical instrument for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9848901B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2017-12-26 Ethicon Llc Dual purpose surgical instrument for cutting and coagulating tissue
US8951272B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2015-02-10 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Seal arrangements for ultrasonically powered surgical instruments
US8961547B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2015-02-24 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Ultrasonic surgical instruments with moving cutting implement
US9107689B2 (en) 2010-02-11 2015-08-18 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Dual purpose surgical instrument for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9707027B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2017-07-18 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Medical device
WO2012044600A3 (en) * 2010-10-01 2013-03-14 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US20120083800A1 (en) * 2010-10-04 2012-04-05 Lutz Andersohn Systems and methods for defining a transition point of a foot pedal of an ophthalmic surgery system
US20120302941A1 (en) * 2011-05-23 2012-11-29 Dan Teodorescu Phacoemulsification systems and associated user-interfaces and methods
US9050627B2 (en) 2011-09-02 2015-06-09 Abbott Medical Optics Inc. Systems and methods for ultrasonic power measurement and control of phacoemulsification systems
DE102012018984A1 (en) * 2011-09-29 2013-04-04 Carl Zeiss Meditec Ag Ophthalmic surgical pulse control device
US9232979B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2016-01-12 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Robotically controlled surgical instrument
US9925003B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2018-03-27 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Robotically controlled surgical instrument
US9724118B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2017-08-08 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9241731B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Rotatable electrical connection for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9439668B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-09-13 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Switch arrangements for ultrasonic surgical instruments
US9237921B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9700343B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2017-07-11 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Devices and techniques for cutting and coagulating tissue
US9226766B2 (en) 2012-04-09 2016-01-05 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Serial communication protocol for medical device
US9713507B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2017-07-25 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Closed feedback control for electrosurgical device
US9283045B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-03-15 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with fluid management system
US9198714B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2015-12-01 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Haptic feedback devices for surgical robot
US9226767B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-01-05 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Closed feedback control for electrosurgical device
US9351754B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-05-31 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with distally positioned jaw assemblies
US9393037B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-07-19 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with articulating shafts
US9408622B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-08-09 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Surgical instruments with articulating shafts
US9820768B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2017-11-21 Ethicon Llc Ultrasonic surgical instruments with control mechanisms
US9737326B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2017-08-22 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Haptic feedback devices for surgical robot
US9326788B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-05-03 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc Lockout mechanism for use with robotic electrosurgical device
US9795405B2 (en) 2012-10-22 2017-10-24 Ethicon Llc Surgical instrument
US9095367B2 (en) 2012-10-22 2015-08-04 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Flexible harmonic waveguides/blades for surgical instruments
US9241728B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc. Surgical instrument with multiple clamping mechanisms
US9743947B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-29 Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Llc End effector with a clamp arm assembly and blade
US10034684B2 (en) 2015-06-15 2018-07-31 Ethicon Llc Apparatus and method for dissecting and coagulating tissue
US10034704B2 (en) 2015-06-30 2018-07-31 Ethicon Llc Surgical instrument with user adaptable algorithms

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
ES2323809T3 (en) 2009-07-24 grant
JP4838074B2 (en) 2011-12-14 grant
JP2007061624A (en) 2007-03-15 application
CA2555955C (en) 2011-04-05 grant
US8353297B2 (en) 2013-01-15 grant
EP1759674A3 (en) 2007-04-04 application
US20070078379A1 (en) 2007-04-05 application
EP1759673B1 (en) 2010-10-06 grant
EP1759674B1 (en) 2009-05-27 grant
JP4838075B2 (en) 2011-12-14 grant
EP1832259B1 (en) 2009-06-10 grant
CA2556639A1 (en) 2007-02-28 application
ES2325869T3 (en) 2009-09-22 grant
US20070073214A1 (en) 2007-03-29 application
CA2556527C (en) 2010-07-20 grant
DE602006006948D1 (en) 2009-07-09 grant
EP1759673A1 (en) 2007-03-07 application
US20100331764A1 (en) 2010-12-30 application
CA2556527A1 (en) 2007-02-28 application
JP2007061626A (en) 2007-03-15 application
EP1759674A2 (en) 2007-03-07 application
JP4838076B2 (en) 2011-12-14 grant
CA2555955A1 (en) 2007-02-28 application
JP2007061627A (en) 2007-03-15 application
DE602006007209D1 (en) 2009-07-23 grant
EP1759672B1 (en) 2009-05-27 grant
CA2556639C (en) 2010-07-20 grant
EP1832259A1 (en) 2007-09-12 application
DE602006006949D1 (en) 2009-07-09 grant
ES2325287T3 (en) 2009-08-31 grant
EP1759672A1 (en) 2007-03-07 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5997499A (en) Tip for a liquefaction handpiece
US6287274B1 (en) Liquefaction handpiece
US8070711B2 (en) Thermal management algorithm for phacoemulsification system
EP0261230B1 (en) Method and apparatus for ultrasonic surgical fragmentation
US7077820B1 (en) Enhanced microburst ultrasonic power delivery system and method
US6331171B1 (en) Tip for a liquefracture handpiece
US6575929B2 (en) Pumping chamber for a liquefaction handpiece
US20060041220A1 (en) Ultrasound handpiece
US6962583B2 (en) Cataract extraction apparatus and method with rapid pulse phaco power
US20090005712A1 (en) System and method for controlling a transverse phacoemulsification system with a footpedal
US7182759B2 (en) Cataract extraction apparatus and method with rapid pulse phaco power
US5989212A (en) Pumping chamber for a liquefaction handpiece having a countersink electrode
US6491661B1 (en) Infusion control system
US6676628B2 (en) Pumping chamber for a liquefracture handpiece
US5591127A (en) Phacoemulsification method and apparatus
US6860868B1 (en) Surgical handpiece
US20100185150A1 (en) Post-Occlusion Chamber Collapse Canceling System For A Surgical Apparatus and Method of Use
US7169123B2 (en) Control of pulse duty cycle based upon footswitch displacement
US20050277869A1 (en) Method of operating an ultrasound handpiece
US20080294087A1 (en) Systems and Methods for Transverse Phacoemulisification
US6315755B1 (en) Method of controlling a liquefracture handpiece
US5766146A (en) Method of infusion control during phacoemulsification surgery
US20080319374A1 (en) Post-occlusion chamber collapse canceling system for a surgical apparatus and method of use
US20030050619A1 (en) Method of operating an infusion control system
US20080281253A1 (en) Method of Operating an Ultrasound Handpiece

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ALCON, INC., SWITZERLAND

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BOUKHNY, MIKHAIL;DACQUAY, BRUNO;FANNEY, DOUGLAS M.;REEL/FRAME:016948/0576

Effective date: 20050826

AS Assignment

Owner name: NOVARTIS AG, SWITZERLAND

Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:ALCON, INC.;REEL/FRAME:026376/0076

Effective date: 20110408