US20070032289A1 - Bingo-opoly - Google Patents

Bingo-opoly Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070032289A1
US20070032289A1 US11/195,549 US19554905A US2007032289A1 US 20070032289 A1 US20070032289 A1 US 20070032289A1 US 19554905 A US19554905 A US 19554905A US 2007032289 A1 US2007032289 A1 US 2007032289A1
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Prior art keywords
bingo
opoly
player
system
game
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Abandoned
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US11/195,549
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Samuel Sims
Richard Slater
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Sims Samuel W
Slater Richard C
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Priority to US11/195,549 priority Critical patent/US20070032289A1/en
Publication of US20070032289A1 publication Critical patent/US20070032289A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/06Lottos or bingo games; Systems, apparatus or devices for checking such games
    • A63F3/062Bingo games, e.g. Bingo card games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/06Lottos or bingo games; Systems, apparatus or devices for checking such games
    • A63F3/0625Devices for filling-in or checking

Abstract

The Bingo-opoly invention is directed to methods and processes for conducting a bingo-related prize distribution and marketing system whereby participation in and use of such is determined by results of play in a primary traditional bingo game and conditioned upon a player's ongoing presence in the primary game location and/or continued participation in ongoing primary games. The invention is further directed to addressing inadequacies in the prior art in meeting bingo market demand for novelty, the cultivation of player loyalty and to provide unique and improved methods of bingo game marketing, player incentives and prize distribution.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/142,779 filed Jun. 2, 2005 entitled “Post Play Bingo.” The entire content of said application is incorporated by reference.
  • FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH
  • Not Applicable
  • SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM
  • This application contains a computer program on CD-ROM, attached as Appendix A and incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of Invention
  • This invention relates to methods and processes for a bingo-related prize distribution and marketing system whereby use of and participation in such is determined by results of play in a primary traditional bingo game and conditioned upon a player's ongoing presence in the primary game location and/or continued participation in ongoing primary games.
  • 2. Prior Art
  • Bingo in its traditional form is a game enjoyed by millions and familiar to millions more. The proliferation of charity, for-profit and tribal gaming, the advent of the computer age and the worldwide Internet explosion have spawned an intensely competitive bingo environment. Bingo game operators are continually seeking new ways to not only draw initial interest to their games but, more importantly, maintain that interest, build player loyalty and increase revenues.
  • Traditional bingo is played with bingo “cards” containing 25 squares arranged in a 5×5 grid, with the letters “B.” “I,” “N,” “G,” and “O” at the top of each column. The squares of each column are randomly assigned numbers ranging from 1 to 75, inclusive, with each column encompassing 15 numbers (i.e. B 1-15, I 16-30, etc.). Players purchase cards prior to the start of each game and compete to match preannounced patterns on their cards to numbers randomly selected and “called” by the game operator (i.e. “B 12,” “0 71,” etc.). The first player to match the preannounced pattern wins the game and a predetermined prize. Traditionally, once a player completes the pattern, calls “bingo,” is confirmed the winner and awarded his/her prize, the game ends. Traditional bingo is commonly played in “sessions” consisting of a series of bingo games played one after another at one location over the course of an evening or afternoon.
  • Over time, player demand for increased speed of play, game novelty and attractive prize awarding schemes has risen dramatically. One popular response has been the advent of “good neighbor” games in which the prize is shared between the winning player and those seated to his or her immediate right and/or left. Another is “instant,” or fast bingo, which games can be played in rapid succession on electronic devices. In addition, “add-on” games are commonly offered wherein players may purchase additional add-on bingo cards to use for play in a particular primary game. Players compete in the primary game using the additionally purchased add-on cards, which are configured in the same fashion as traditional bingo cards. If the winner achieves “bingo” on one of the add-on cards, he or she is then entitled to an additional prize, as well as the original prize offered in the primary game. If the game winner achieves bingo without an add-on card, no additional prize is awarded for that add-on game. Today's bingo player, however, is not satisfied by a session of relatively slow-moving, common, traditional bingo games with a single player winning a single prize each game.
  • Bingo halls now compete with and incorporate electronic and computer-based devices in their operations. These devices allow players to monitor more cards per game (as many as 50 or more) and play more games through computer-generated random ball calls. In this context, bingo in its traditional form is still being played, but at a more rapid pace. Bingo players, however, continue to demand novelty.
  • Currently, 46 of 50 states permit the play of traditional bingo. Federally, traditional bingo is classified as Class II gaming by the National Indian Gaming Commission. This includes the basic characteristics of requiring more than one participant, having a preannounced prize and pattern for a winner to complete on bingo cards sold prior to commencement of the game, a random number call and an element of competition between players. Class III gaming encompasses what are commonly known as slot machines, where players play against the machine itself. Class III gaming is universally prohibited in traditional bingo hall-type operations and is of the type conducted in casinos.
  • In response to player demand for novelty in this age of computers and electronic gaming devices, a way to give traditional bingo players “more bang for the buck” has presented the bingo industry with a dilemma. Many “bingo-styled” games played on electronic machines violate the rules of traditional bingo by failure to meet the criteria of having more than one participant or involving an element of competition between players. As a result, games of this type cannot be operated in traditional bingo hall settings without violating current state law or federal regulations.
  • The challenge thus facing traditional bingo operators is maintaining the integrity of traditional bingo while, at the same time, satisfying player novelty demand and cultivating player loyalty. The concept of Post Play Bingo described in related U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/142,779 filed Jun. 2, 2005 is an invention which was designed, in broader terms, to address this industry challenge. Bingo-opoly is an invention which specifically effectuates the Post Play Bingo concept by incorporating its unique attributes in a revolutionary prize distribution and marketing process.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION—OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES
  • The objects and advantages of the Bingo-opoly invention are directed toward the shortcomings of the prior art in responding to current bingo market demands in numerous ways:
  • A. The use of Bingo-opoly does not affect or alter the primary underlying and universally accepted traditional bingo game. As a result, game operators do not jeopardize the legality of their operations by offering gaming which may otherwise be prohibited.
      • B. By use of Bingo-opoly across a series of primary traditional bingo games within a bingo session, several advantages are realized:
        • 1. Player excitement is increased with the prospect of additional winnings and prize sharing, which may be progressive through the session.
        • 2. Player competition is heightened and continued across games.
        • 3. Player demand for novelty is addressed by the unique aspects of Bingo-opoly.
        • 4. Players are given incentive to play throughout the entire session.
      • C. By use of Bingo-opoly across a series of bingo sessions, several advantages are realized:
        • 1. Player excitement is increased with the prospect of additional winnings and prize sharing, which may be progressive over a series of sessions.
        • 2. Player competition is heightened between players not only within individual sessions but over a series of sessions.
        • 3. Player demand for novelty is addressed by the unique aspects of Bingo-opoly.
        • 4. Players are given incentive to return to the location offering Bingo-opoly in order to compete in ongoing add-on Bingo-opoly games and share in prizes awarded.
        • 5. Player loyalty is increased to locations offering Bingo-opoly participation across sessions.
      • D. The concept of prize sharing within Bingo-opoly, an offshoot of “good neighbor bingo,” is accepted and popular with players.
      • E. Use of Bingo-opoly acts as a forced marketing tool as players have a continuing stake in winning and prize sharing across ongoing games within individual sessions and across a series of sessions, so long as they are present at the bingo location and/or participate in ongoing primary games.
      • F. Bingo-opoly allows operators flexibility to alter prize distribution, which adds to player excitement, increases player competition and builds player loyalty to the location offering Bingo-opoly.
      • G. Flexibility in winning and prize distribution criteria allows operators to comply with unique local laws, regulations and player tastes.
      • H. Operators can increase overall player participation and revenues through use of Bingo-opoly.
      • I. The concept of Bingo-opoly is equally applicable to a paper-based primary game operation as to one utilizing electronic assistive devices.
    SUMMARY
  • Bingo-opoly is an invention by which participation and prize distribution are determined by the results of play in a primary traditional bingo game, but does not in any way alter the play of such game. The unique requirement of continuing player presence in the location and/or ongoing participation in subsequent primary games overcomes numerous deficiencies in the existing art of the bingo industry related to player demand for novelty in games, prize distribution, marketing, the cultivation of player loyalty and increasing bingo operation revenues.
  • DRAWINGS
  • The following drawings illustrate the exemplary features and various embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates the static template portion of the Bingo-opoly board which overlaps the “Property” and “Bonus Position” array depicted in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the Bingo-opoly board Property and Bonus Position array configured in one potential arrangement corresponding to the 96 grid positions depicted in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates each individual Property contained in FIG. 2 and includes a Property description of each used for player enhancement and marketing purposes.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates the static positions of the Bonus Positions corresponding to the 96 grid positions depicted in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates the different Bonus Positions which are designated in FIG. 4 and also included on the 96 grid positions depicted in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates each individual Bonus Position depicted in FIG. 5 and includes a description of the consequence or a list of the alternative consequences of each.
  • FIG. 7 depicts each Property on the Bingo-opoly board and illustrates one potential prize-sharing schedule expressed in percentage form.
  • FIG. 8 depicts each Bonus Position consequence possible on the Bingo-opoly board and illustrates one potential prize-distribution schedule expressed in percentage form.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates four traditional bingo cards used in the conduct of traditional bingo. As used herein, for the purpose of illustration of the invention, Card 1 represents Player A's card used for play in the traditional primary bingo game; Card 2 represents Player A's add-on bingo card used for Bingo-opoly; Card 3 represents Player B's traditional primary bingo game card; and Card 4 represents Player B's add-on Bingo-opoly card.
  • FIG. 10 depicts the outcome of a traditional primary bingo game wherein Player A has achieved bingo upon the call of “G54” on Card 1.
  • FIG. 11 depicts the outcome of a traditional primary bingo game wherein Player B has achieved bingo upon the call of “N39” on Card 4, Player B's Bingo-opoly card.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates Player B's position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates Player B's position on the Bingo-opoly board corresponding to FIGS. 11 and 12.
  • FIG. 14 depicts the outcome of a traditional primary bingo game wherein Player A has achieved a bingo upon the call of “B9” on Card 2, Player A's Bingo-opoly card.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates Player A's position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to FIG. 14.
  • FIG. 16 illustrates Player A's position on the Bingo-opoly board corresponding to FIGS. 14 and 15.
  • FIG. 17 depicts the outcome of a traditional primary bingo game wherein Player B has achieved bingo upon the call of “O67” on Card 4, Player B's Bingo-opoly card.
  • FIG. 18 illustrates Player B's position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to FIG. 17.
  • FIG. 19 illustrates Player B's position on the Bingo-opoly board corresponding to FIGS. 17 and 18.
  • Exhibit A is a CD-ROM which contains the computer software program utilized to implement the Bingo-opoly invention. As seen, the program includes Bingo-opoly graphics, Property and Bonus Position screens and descriptions and navigational tools used to facilitate operation and player participation. Also included are prize sharing and distribution schedules and accounting functions which allow operators the means of tracking player participation, revenues, Property ownership and maintaining status reports. This application includes all modifications, adjustments and upgrades to such program.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION—PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • The concept of the Bingo-opoly invention, its methods of operation and advantages over the prior art can best be understood in conjunction with and in reference to the accompanying drawings and Exhibit.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates the static template portion of the Bingo-opoly board which overlays and corresponds to the “Properties” and “Bonus Position” configuration depicted in FIG. 2. This portion of the Bingo-opoly board consists of a grid configured in the fashion of four traditional bingo cards, each card having a designated “Free” square in the center. The 96 squares comprising the five columns of each card have been assigned a number ranging from 1 to 75, inclusive. As there are 96 squares, but only 75 numbers used for traditional bingo, there are 21 numbers which are used twice (1, 2, 7, 10, 15, 18, 19, 21, 24, 30, 34, 46, 47, 48, 54, 58, 64, 66, 67, 69 and 73) in order to have a number in each square. The configuration of FIG. 1 does not change and is utilized throughout the conduct of Bingo-opoly.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a Bingo-opoly board Property and Bonus Position array configured in one potential arrangement corresponding to the 96 grid positions depicted in FIG. 1. There are 52 Properties, each of which corresponds to at least one square on the 96 square grid.
  • FIG. 3 contains a list of such Properties, along with the number of squares (bingo ball numbers) assigned to each. As noted, some Properties appear on more than one square, the reason for which is twofold: First, as there are only 52 Properties but 75 numbers (corresponding to each bingo number from 1 to 75), by assigning some Properties more than one number all 75 bingo numbers are utilized. Secondly, Properties with more than one number are ascribed greater relative “value” than single-number Properties. As can be seen, each bingo ball number corresponds to a Property, with some Properties occupying more than one square. The significance of the concept of relative value will be more fully explained below.
  • In addition to the 52 Properties there are 21 Bonus Positions which are also each assigned numbers between 1 and 75, inclusive, which occupy static positions on the Bingo-opoly board, which are depicted in FIGS. 4 and 5. A specific listing of each Bonus Position and the potential consequences of each are depicted in FIG. 6. When one considers there are 96 squares for bingo ball numbers, the reason for having 21 Bonus Positions emerges: 75 bingo numbers+21 Bonus Positions=96 squares. The remaining squares not covered by Bonus Positions per FIGS. 4 and 5 are occupied by the Properties, which are positioned randomly by the operator prior to commencement of Bingo-opoly. This configuration may then be employed for a time period specified at the discretion of the operator.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates four commonly recognized traditional bingo cards. Each card consists of a 5×5 square grid pattern with the letters “B,” “I,” “N,” “G” and “O” appearing at the top of each column of squares. Under each vertical letter column, numbers ranging from 1 to 75, inclusive, are randomly assigned, with each column containing 5 of a possible 15 numbers corresponding to the letter at the top of that column. For column B, the numbers range from 1 to 15; for column I, from 16 to 30, and so on. Many times, the center square is designated as “Free,” meaning the player is automatically given credit for having covered or matched that square. Players compete to match a preannounced pattern on their cards as numbers are randomly selected and announced. For the purpose of this discussion, FIG. 9 represents the first primary traditional bingo game discussed in this application involving Players A and B competing to complete a bingo pattern of five squares-in-a-row in any direction. Also for the purpose of this discussion, each player shall be considered to be utilizing one “standard” primary bingo card and one “add-on” Bingo-opoly card as described on page two of this application. Each player is competing to complete the bingo pattern both on the standard card as well as the add-on Bingo-opoly card. Finally, for the purpose of this discussion, the players shall be competing for a $100 prize in each primary game and an additional $100 prize with their add-on Bingo-opoly cards.
  • FIG. 10 depicts the outcome of a traditional primary bingo game described in FIG. 9 wherein Player A has achieved bingo upon the call of “G54” on Card 1, Player A's primary game bingo card. As seen, Player A's five-in-a-row bingo includes the numbers “B8,” “I19,” “N37,” “G54” and “O69.” In this instance, since Player A did not bingo on an add-on Bingo-opoly card, use of the Bingo-opoly invention does not arise and the primary game is ended with Player A being awarded the $100 primary game prize.
  • FIG. 11 depicts the outcome of a subsequent traditional primary bingo game wherein Player B has achieved bingo upon the call of “N39” on Card 4, Player B's Bingo-opoly card. Player B's bingo includes the numbers “B2,” “I19,” “N39,” “G59” and “O74.” In this instance, Player B is awarded the $100 primary game prize and, since bingo was achieved on a Bingo-poly card, Player B is then further entitled to participate in Bingo-opoly.
  • FIG. 12 depicts Player B's entry position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to N39, the number upon which Player B achieved bingo in the primary game using a Bingo-opoly card. As depicted in FIG. 13, N39 corresponds to the Property entitled “Dauberville.” In this illustration, since Player B is the first to enter Bingo-opoly, Dauberville will not be “owned” by any previous Bingo-opoly participant and will automatically be awarded to Player B. In addition, Player B will be awarded the $100 additional prize for achieving bingo on the add-on Bingo-opoly card.
  • FIG. 14 depicts the outcome of a subsequent traditional primary bingo game wherein Player A has achieved bingo upon the call of “B9” on Card 2, Player A's Bingo-opoly card. Player A's bingo includes the numbers “B9,” “I30,” the Free square, “G46” and “O68.” Here, Player A is awarded the $100 primary game prize and, since bingo was achieved on a Bingo-opoly card, Player A is entitled to participate in Bingo-opoly.
  • FIG. 15 depicts Player A's entry position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to number B9, the number upon which Player A achieved bingo in the primary game using a Bingo-opoly card. As illustrated in FIG. 16, B9 corresponds to the Property entitled Dauberville. In this instance, Player B has already been awarded Dauberville, as described in FIGS. 11, 12 and 13. If Player B is present in the bingo location when Player A “lands” on his/her Property, Player A must pay Player B “rent.” As shown in FIG. 7, Dauberville's rent is 42% of the prize. In this case, if Player B is present, he/she will receive $42 of Player A's $100 additional prize for achieving bingo on the add-on Bingo-opoly card. If Player B is not present to collect his/her rent, Player A is awarded the entire $100 additional prize.
  • FIG. 17 depicts the outcome of a subsequent traditional primary bingo game wherein Player B has achieved bingo upon the call of “O67” on Card 4, Player B's Bingo-opoly card. Player B's diagonal bingo includes “B7,” “I19,” the Free square, “G54” and “O67.” Player B is awarded the $100 primary game prize and, since bingo was achieved on a Bingo-opoly card, Player B gets to return to Bingo-opoly.
  • FIG. 18 depicts Player B's entry position on the Bingo-opoly board template corresponding to “O67,” the number upon which bingo was achieved in the primary game using a Bingo-opoly card. As depicted in FIG. 19, O67 corresponds to the Property entitled “Shifty Sam's Pawn Shop.” In this instance, since this Property is “unowned” it will automatically be awarded to Player B who will also collect the $100 prize without a deduction of rent for the Property “owner.” Thereafter, any time someone lands on Shifty Sam's Pawn Shop, Player B will be entitled to collect rent by sharing in the add-on game prize—but ONLY if Player B is present at the bingo location when this occurs. If, in another embodiment, Shifty Sam's Pawn Shop is owned by another player, Player B would pay rent by sharing the additional prize with Shifty Sam's owner if the owner was present at the bingo location.
  • As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, the square corresponding to 067 is also a Bonus Position entitled “Take in the Movies.” In our example represented in FIGS. 17, 18 and 19, Player B would also be entitled to receive an additional $5, which corresponds to the schedule contained in FIG. 8. As shown, Bonus Positions occupy squares with Properties and constitute additional means by which a player's prize is increased or decreased. In every instance, a player achieving bingo on a Bingo-opoly card will land on a Property. In only some instances (21 out of 96), will a player also land on a Bonus Position.
  • Operation—Preferred Embodiment
  • As described, traditional bingo is commonly played in sessions consisting of a series of games played one after another over the course of an afternoon or evening at a bingo operation location. Players purchase individual cards for each bingo game being offered in which they choose to participate. Players may also purchase “add-on” bingo cards to play in conjunction with their primary, or regular cards to be eligible to win additional prizes.
  • Bingo-opoly utilizes this concept of the add-on game. In the preferred embodiment, Bingo-opoly constitutes the add-on. Players A and B in the illustration described in this application must achieve bingos in a primary game on an add-on Bingo-opoly card. Players achieving bingo on an add-on Bingo-opoly card gain entry into Bingo-opoly, their position on the Bingo-opoly board determined by the number upon which bingo was achieved. As seen, every location on the Bingo-opoly contains a Bingo-opoly Property. Upon landing on the Property, if it is unowned, rent must be paid by means of prize sharing according to a schedule as depicted in FIG. 7. Prize sharing, however, ONLY occurs if the player who owns the property is physically present at the time. If the property-owning player is not present, he or she is not entitled to share in the prize. The physical presence requirement for prize sharing is a unique characteristic of this invention which encourages players to not only remain in the bingo location throughout the session but return to subsequent sessions in order to participate in prize sharing. This concept also applies as players compete to secure the best properties, i.e. those which are assigned more squares/numbers that increase the likelihood of other players landing upon them.
  • The presence of Bingo Positions throughout the Bingo-opoly board is a further novelty feature for players. As described, Bonus Positions can either add to, or in some cases, decrease a player's prize. This is a prospect which increases player excitement and competition as players are not sure whether their prize will be higher or lower than originally announced.
  • Description—Additional Embodiment
  • Bingo-opoly may be employed in alternative manners to that described above. In another embodiment, Bingo-opoly could be conducted as the primary game in a session or over a series of sessions. In this way, players would be assured the winner of each game would go to the Bingo-opoly board, greatly increasing the likelihood of prize sharing. In such a case, more players would leave the bingo session having experienced the thrill of winning and being awarded some prize.
  • In a further embodiment, Bingo-opoly would be conducted in electronic form with players from differing physical locations participating. Depending on applicable regulations, this could allow widespread participation over a virtually continuous time period.
  • Operation—Additional Embodiment
  • Conducting Bingo-opoly as the primary game in an individual bingo session or across a series of sessions would eliminate considerations related to the add-on game concept. In this embodiment, players would not need to purchase additional cards to be eligible to participate in Bingo-opoly. Every player would be participating in Bingo-opoly every game. In addition, operators could open a series of different Bingo-opoly boards which could be utilized over different individual games and time periods, allowing players more opportunities to own the best properties. Finally, Bingo-opoly could be offered as an add-on game in conjunction with a primary game of Bingo-opoly. Each primary game could relate to one specific Bingo-opoly board while the add-ons relate to another.
  • CONCLUSIONS, RAMIFICATIONS AND SCOPE
  • Bingo-opoly is an invention which conceptualizes the most demanding issues facing the bingo industry, incorporates improvements to the prior art and effectuates a unique method of offering bingo players novelty and operators an attractive means of forced marketing and developing player loyalty. Players participate in a unique bingo-related prize distribution and sharing process which arises from play in a traditional primary bingo game. The continuation of Bingo-opoly over a series of primary games within a bingo session or across a series of bingo sessions provides players an opportunity to share in the winnings of other players. Requiring players to be physically present at the bingo game location and involved in ongoing primary game play provides operators a revolutionary means to encourage further player participation, location patronage and increase revenues. The Bingo-opoly invention further improves upon the prior art by offering a new prize distribution and sharing method and marketing concept which maintains the integrity and “non-gambling” characteristics universally ascribed to traditional bingo.
  • Bingo-opoly is also an invention which contains inherent flexibility. Criteria for prize sharing eligibility can be tailored by individual bingo operators in response to local regulation and player tastes. This flexibility, moreover, can be maintained without affecting the nature of the underlying primary bingo game, which further broadens its appeal and enhances its utility.

Claims (25)

1. A bingo-associated prize distribution and marketing system product entitled Bingo-opoly whereby use of and participation in same is determined by results of play in a primary traditional bingo game.
2. The system of claim 1 wherein the primary traditional bingo game is played with predetermined bingo cards having number designations randomly assigned in a grid layout on a bingo card. Players compete to first achieve “bingo” by matching such numbers to a predesignated pattern to numbers randomly selected and announced by a game operator.
3. The system of claim 1 wherein the primary game is played as part of a session consisting of a series of traditional bingo games where players purchase one or more bingo cards to participate in such games.
4. The system of claim 3 wherein players further purchase one or more predesignated add-on bingo cards to compete in the primary traditional bingo game for use with Bingo-opoly. Bingo cards for Bingo-opoly are formatted in similar fashion to those used in the primary game.
5. The system of claim 4 wherein bingo numbers for the primary game are announced and marked on the bingo cards purchased for both the primary game and Bingo-opoly.
6. The system of claim 5 wherein a player must be the first to achieve the predetermined bingo pattern designated for that primary game to be the winner of that game.
7. The system of claim 6 wherein a player who first achieves such predetermined pattern, but on a Bingo-opoly bingo card, will be the winner of the primary game and gain entry into Bingo-opoly.
8. The system of claim 7 wherein both the primary game and Bingo-opoly include preannounced prize amounts, which may be determined in accordance with applicable laws or regulations by the game operator.
9. The system of claim 8 wherein the number on which the winning player bingos determines said winning player's position or entry point into Bingo-opoly.
10. The system of claim 9 wherein Bingo-opoly can be carried forward or continued throughout an individual bingo session or across sessions.
11. The system of claim 9 wherein previous Bingo-opoly winners become eligible to participate in the sharing of prizes subsequently awarded in Bingo-opoly.
12. The system of claim 11 wherein, in one embodiment, such subsequent prize sharing can be conditioned upon a previous Bingo-opoly winner's subsequent participation in Bingo-opoly.
13. The system of claim 12 whereby, in another embodiment, such subsequent prize sharing can be conditioned upon a previous Bingo-opoly winner's physical presence in the primary game location at the time the prize to be shared is awarded.
14. The system of claim 12 wherein the method of prize distribution in Bingo-opoly does not impact or alter the winner or prize distribution in the primary game.
15. The system of claim 11 wherein player excitement and competition is enhanced by the possibility of sharing in subsequent prizes.
16. The system of claim 15 which acts as a marketing method to increase player participation during individual sessions through player purchase of add-on Bingo-opoly game bingo cards.
17. The system of claim 13 which further acts as a marketing method to increase player patronage and loyalty to the location offering Bingo-opoly.
18. The system of claim 11 which may be effected manually through use of traditional paper bingo cards.
19. The system of claim 14 which may be effected electronically, with subsequent prize sharing being conditioned upon a previous Bingo-opoly winner's continued participation in ongoing primary games and/or Bingo-opoly.
20. The system of claim 11 wherein, in one embodiment, following purchase of one or more bingo cards for Bingo-opoly, no additional consideration by a player must be given by said player in order to participate in Bingo-opoly, other than the requirement of that player's physical presence in the primary game location at the time the prize to be shared is awarded.
21. A system apparatus comprising a processor configured to implement a primary traditional bingo game and subsequently effect conduct of Bingo-opoly upon the occurrence of at least one prespecified event during play of said primary game and at least one display in communication with said processor.
22. (canceled)
23. The system apparatus of claim 21 wherein the primary game is played by at least two participants.
24. A system apparatus comprising a computer terminal at which a primary traditional bingo game is implemented and, upon the occurrence of at least one prespecified event during play of said primary game Bingo-opoly is initiated by the bingo hall operator and at least partially effected for participation by at least one player utilizing said first terminal and at least one additional terminal for participation in by another player.
25. The system apparatus of claim 24 comprising, in one embodiment, a remote computer in communication with said first primary terminal and said at least one additional terminal to implement Bingo-opoly.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2010108260A1 (en) * 2009-03-23 2010-09-30 Ingenio, Filiale De Loto-Quebec Inc. System for monitoring the state of bingo grids
US8757622B1 (en) 2012-12-18 2014-06-24 Innovate! Technologies Group, LLC Bingo table game and method of playing bingo

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US8757622B1 (en) 2012-12-18 2014-06-24 Innovate! Technologies Group, LLC Bingo table game and method of playing bingo

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