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US20070029645A1 - High permeability layered films to reduce noise in high speed interconnects - Google Patents

High permeability layered films to reduce noise in high speed interconnects Download PDF

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US20070029645A1
US20070029645A1 US11492253 US49225306A US2007029645A1 US 20070029645 A1 US20070029645 A1 US 20070029645A1 US 11492253 US11492253 US 11492253 US 49225306 A US49225306 A US 49225306A US 2007029645 A1 US2007029645 A1 US 2007029645A1
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lines
transmission
conductive
material
high
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Leonard Forbes
Kie Ahn
Salman Akram
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Micron Technology Inc
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Micron Technology Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11CSTATIC STORES
    • G11C5/00Details of stores covered by G11C11/00
    • G11C5/06Arrangements for interconnecting storage elements electrically, e.g. by wiring
    • G11C5/063Voltage and signal distribution in integrated semi-conductor memory access lines, e.g. word-line, bit-line, cross-over resistance, propagation delay
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L23/00Details of semiconductor or other solid state devices
    • H01L23/52Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames
    • H01L23/522Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames including external interconnections consisting of a multilayer structure of conductive and insulating layers inseparably formed on the semiconductor body
    • H01L23/5222Capacitive arrangements or effects of, or between wiring layers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L23/00Details of semiconductor or other solid state devices
    • H01L23/52Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames
    • H01L23/522Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames including external interconnections consisting of a multilayer structure of conductive and insulating layers inseparably formed on the semiconductor body
    • H01L23/5222Capacitive arrangements or effects of, or between wiring layers
    • H01L23/5225Shielding layers formed together with wiring layers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L23/00Details of semiconductor or other solid state devices
    • H01L23/52Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames
    • H01L23/522Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames including external interconnections consisting of a multilayer structure of conductive and insulating layers inseparably formed on the semiconductor body
    • H01L23/532Arrangements for conducting electric current within the device in operation from one component to another, i.e. interconnections, e.g. wires, lead frames including external interconnections consisting of a multilayer structure of conductive and insulating layers inseparably formed on the semiconductor body characterised by the materials
    • H01L23/53204Conductive materials
    • H01L23/53209Conductive materials based on metals, e.g. alloys, metal silicides
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2223/00Details relating to semiconductor or other solid state devices covered by the group H01L23/00
    • H01L2223/58Structural electrical arrangements for semiconductor devices not otherwise provided for
    • H01L2223/64Impedance arrangements
    • H01L2223/66High-frequency adaptations
    • H01L2223/6605High-frequency electrical connections
    • H01L2223/6627Waveguides, e.g. microstrip line, strip line, coplanar line
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L23/00Details of semiconductor or other solid state devices
    • H01L23/58Structural electrical arrangements for semiconductor devices not otherwise provided for, e.g. in combination with batteries
    • H01L23/64Impedance arrangements
    • H01L23/66High-frequency adaptations
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/0001Technical content checked by a classifier
    • H01L2924/0002Not covered by any one of groups H01L24/00, H01L24/00 and H01L2224/00
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/19Details of hybrid assemblies other than the semiconductor or other solid state devices to be connected
    • H01L2924/1901Structure
    • H01L2924/1903Structure including wave guides
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/30Technical effects
    • H01L2924/301Electrical effects
    • H01L2924/3011Impedance

Abstract

An electronic system includes apparatus having a transmission line circuit with an associated high permeability material. The high permeability material may include a layered structure of a nickel iron compound.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This application is a Divisional of U.S. Ser. No. 10/930,657, filed Aug. 31, 2004, which is a Divisional of U.S. Ser. No. 10/099,217 filed on Mar. 13, 2002, which applications are herein incorporated by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to integrated circuits. More particularly, it pertains to structure and methods for improved transmission line interconnections.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The metal lines over insulators and ground planes, or metal lines buried in close proximity to dielectric insulators and used for integrated circuit interconnects are in reality transmission lines or strip lines. The use of coaxial interconnection lines for interconnections through the substrate in CMOS integrated circuits can also be termed transmission lines or strip lines. Interconnection lines on interposers or printed circuit boards can also be described as transmission lines.
  • [0004]
    The low characteristic impedance of any of these lines, transmission, strip lines or coaxial lines results in part from the low characteristic impedance of free space, Zo=(μoo)1/2=377 ohms, and in part from the dielectric material used for electrical insulation in the lines which has a higher dielectric permittivity than free space. Most commonly used coaxial lines have an impedance of 50 ohms or 75 ohms, it is difficult to achieve larger values. In the past these effects have not received much consideration on the integrated circuits themselves since the propagation speed with oxide insulators is 15 cm/ns and switching speeds on integrated circuits of the size of a centimeter have been slower than 1/15 ns or 70 picoseconds. Transmission line effects only become important if the switching time is of the same order as the signal propagation time. Switching times in CMOS circuits have been limited by the ability to switch the capacitive loads of long lines and buffers, and charge these capacitances over large voltage swings to yield a voltage step signal.
  • [0005]
    Most current CMOS integrated circuit interconnections rely on the transmission of a voltage step or signal from one location to another. FIG. 1 illustrates R-C limited, short high impedance interconnections with capacitive loads. The driver may simply be a CMOS inverter as shown in FIG. 1 and the receiver a simple CMOS amplifier, differential amplifier, or comparator.
  • [0006]
    As shown in FIG. 1, the CMOS receiver presents a high impedance termination or load to the interconnection line. This is problematic in that:
  • [0007]
    (i) the switching time response or signal delay is determined mainly by the ability of the driver to charge up the capacitance of the line and the load capacitance,
  • [0008]
    (ii) the line is not terminated by its characteristic impedance resulting in reflections and ringing,
  • [0009]
    (iii) large noise voltages may be induced on the signal transmission line due to capacitive coupling and large voltage swing switching on adjacent lines, the noise voltage can be a large fraction of the signal voltage.
  • [0010]
    The transmission of voltage step signals only works well if the interconnection line is short so that the stray capacitance of the line is small. Long lines result is slow switching speeds and excessive noise due to capacitive coupling between lines.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 shows the commonly used signal interconnection in CMOS integrated circuits, where voltage signals are transmitted from one location to another. This is problematic in that the interconnection lines are normally loaded with the capacitive input of the next CMOS stage and the large stray capacitance of the line itself. The response time is normally slow due to the limited ability of the line drivers to supply the large currents needed to charge these capacitances over large voltage swings. These times are usually much larger than the signal transmission time down the line so a lumped circuit model can be used to find the signal delay, as shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0012]
    In the example here the output impedance of the source follower is 1 /gm=1000 ohms, and a line 0.1 cm long will have a capacitance of about 0.2 pF if the dimensions of the line are about 1 micron by 1 micron and the insulator or oxide thickness under the line is 1 micron. This results in a time constant of 200 pS and it takes about 400 pS to charge the line from 10% to 90% of the final voltage value. This is a relatively slow response.
  • [0013]
    Furthermore, if two interconnection wires are in close proximity then the voltage swing on one line can induce a large voltage swing or noise voltage on the adjacent line as shown in FIG. 1. The noise voltage is just determined by the capacitance ratios, or ratio of interwire capacitance, Cint, to the capacitance of the interconnection wire, C.
  • [0014]
    In prior art these can be comparable, as shown, and depend on the insulator thickness under the wires and the spacing between the wires. Therefore, the noise voltage can be a large fraction of the signal voltage if the wires are in close proximity and far removed from the substrate by being over thick insulators. The emphasis in prior art has always been in trying to minimize the capacitance of the interconnection line, C, by using thick insulators and low dielectric constant materials.
  • [0015]
    Thus, there is a need to provide a solution for these types of problems for CMOS-scaled integrated circuits. Due to the continued reduction in scaling and increases in frequency for transmission lines in integrated circuits such solutions remain a difficult hurdle. For these and other reasons there is a need to reduce noise in high speed interconnections.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 shows the commonly used signal interconnection in CMOS integrated circuits, where voltage signals are transmitted from one location to another.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 illustrates one technique to minimize the interwire capacitance, Cint, by using an intermediate line at ground for shielding.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3A illustrates signal transmission using correctly terminated transmission lines and current sense amplifiers, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 3B illustrates two interconnection lines in close proximity and the interwire capacitance between these lines and the mutual inductance coupling between the lines.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view illustrating a pair of neighboring transmission lines above a conductive substrate, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram for an interconnection on an integrated circuit according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 9 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 10 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 11 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 12 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, according to the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 13 is a block diagram which illustrates an embodiment of a system using line signaling according to teachings of the present invention.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 14 is a block diagram which illustrates another embodiment of a system according to teaching of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0031]
    In the following detailed description of the invention, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof, and in which is shown, by way of illustration, specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. In the drawings, like numerals describe substantially similar components throughout the several views. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. Other embodiments may be utilized and structural, logical, and electrical changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • [0032]
    The terms wafer and substrate used in the following description include any structure having an exposed surface with which to form the integrated circuit (IC) structure of the invention. The term substrate is understood to include semiconductor wafers. The term substrate is also used to refer to semiconductor structures during processing, and may include other layers that have been fabricated thereupon. Both wafer and substrate include doped and undoped semiconductors, epitaxial semiconductor layers supported by a base semiconductor or insulator, as well as other semiconductor structures well known to one skilled in the art. The term conductor is understood to include semiconductors, and the term insulator is defined to include any material that is less electrically conductive than the materials referred to as conductors. The following detailed description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined only by the appended claims, along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 2 illustrates one technique to minimize the interwire capacitance, Cint, by using an intermediate line at ground for shielding. This technique is disclosed in a co-pending application by a common inventor, Dr. Leonard Forbes, entitled “Novel Transmission Lines for CMOS Integrated Circuits,” Ser. No. 09/364199. The same is incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0034]
    Also, as disclosed in issued U.S. Pat. No. 6,255,852 by Dr. Leonard Forbes, entitled “Current Mode Interconnects on CMOS Integrated Circuits,” low impedance transmission lines such as those which exist on CMOS integrated circuits are more amenable to signal current interconnections over longer interconnection lines. U.S. Pat. No. 6,255,852 is incorporated herein by reference. These longer interconnection lines may be on the CMOS integrated circuit itself, an interconnection line between integrated circuits mounted in a module as for instance a memory module, an interposer upon which these integrated circuits are mounted, or on a printed circuit board upon which the integrated circuits are mounted. If the line is terminated with a low input impedance current sense amplifier then the line can be regarded as a transmission line terminated with the characteristic impedance of the interconnection line. This is advantageous in that:
  • [0035]
    (i) the signal delay depends only on the velocity of light on the line and is easily predictable and reproducible, eliminating or allowing for compensation for signal and/or clock skew,
  • [0036]
    (ii) there are no reflections at the receiving end of the line and this minimizes ringing,
  • [0037]
    (iii) noise signals will be smaller due to weaker coupling between lines resulting in better signal to noise ratios, the noise current will only be a small fraction of the signal current. The transmission of current signals rather than voltage signals is more desirable at high speeds, and in high speed or high clock rate circuits over longer interconnection lines. A CMOS circuit might for instance use a combination of techniques, conventional voltage signals over short interconnections with little coupling between lines and current signals over longer interconnections and where lines might be in close proximity.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 3A illustrates capacitive coupling between low impedance terminated interconnection lines. FIG. 3A illustrates signal transmission using correctly terminated transmission lines and current sense amplifiers, such as those disclosed in issued U.S. Pat. No. 6,255,852 by Dr. Leonard Forbes, entitled “Current Mode Interconnects on CMOS Integrated Circuits.” The signal interconnection or transmission line is terminated by the matching impedance of the current sense amplifier. This means the impedance looking into the sending end of the transmission line will just be the characteristic impedance of the line and the signal delay down the line will just be the small propagation delay down the line. The response time of the source follower being used as a line driver will be determined primarily by the longer rise time of the input voltage. This driver will supply a signal current whose rise time is basically just that of the input voltage signal.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 3A also illustrates the coupling to another signal line in close proximity, in this case the coupling will be both magnetic through the induced magnetic fields and mutual inductance and capacitive coupling. The noise current induced will be shown to be only a fraction of the signal current or the signal to noise ratio is high. Once received this signal current is converted back to a signal voltage by the current sense amplifier at the receiving end of the line. Since the signal propagation time is small, the signal delay time will in practice be limited by the rise time of the signal to the gate of the source follower. Since the gate capacitance of the source follower is small this can be very fast.
  • [0040]
    Other methods to minimize capacitive coupling between lines use low dielectric constant materials or insulators, or ground shields, such as shown in FIG. 2. In the present invention, it is desirable to use very low impedance lines, it is also desirable to keep the capacitive coupling between lines small and the magnitude of voltage steps on the interconnection lines small. The current step will induce a voltage step at the load which is the magnitude of the load impedance times this current step. This voltage step while small, 1 mA times Zin in this example, still can induce a capacitively coupled noise signal on an adjacent line.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 3A shows an integrated circuit 300 in which a first transmission line, strip line, or coaxial line 301A interconnects circuit components, e.g. a driver 310 to a receiver 320. FIG. 3A illustrates a first transmission line 301A over a conductive substrate 305. Conventionally, a voltage signal (i.e. a 5 volt signal swing) is provided by the driver 310 to the transmission line 301A. The schematic illustrations in FIG. 3A demonstrate that the transmission line 301A includes a small resistance, shown generally by resistor symbols 302A, 302B, . . . , 302N. Also, the transmission line 301A includes a distributed inductance (L) which is represented generally by inductor symbols 303A, 303B, . . . , 303N. In one embodiment, the driver 310 may be an inverter 310 and the receiver 320 may be an amplifier 320. Capacitor plate symbols 304 (C) are used to schematically represent the capacitive coupling which occurs between the transmission line 301A and the conducting substrate 305. In FIG. 3A, a second transmission line 301B is shown. Capacitor plate symbols 306 are used to schematically represent the capacitive coupling (Cint) which similarly occurs between the first transmission line 301A and neighboring transmission lines, e.g. second transmission line 301B.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 3B illustrates two interconnection lines in close proximity and the interwire capacitance between these lines and the mutual inductance coupling between the lines. (See generally, H. Johnson, “High-Speed Digital Circuits: A Handbook of Black Magic,” Prentice-Hall, 1993; and S. Ramo, J. R. Whinnery and T. Van Duzer, “Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, 3rd Ed.,” John Wiley, New York, 1994). Although the interconnection lines on integrated circuits might tend to be more square than round, the concepts involved can be most conveniently described and formulas approximated by assuming for simplicity that the lines are round or circular. Approximate formulas have been developed describing round wires over conductive planes or two wires in close proximity, in this case they are interconnection wires on a CMOS integrated circuit, interposer, or printed circuit board.
  • [0043]
    In FIG. 3B the illustrated pair of interconnect, or transmission lines, 301A and 301B, displayed in a perspective view, are separated from a conducting substrate 305. The transmission lines, 301A and 301B are spaced a distance (h) from the conducting substrate 305 and a distance (s) from one another. The transmission lines, 301A and 301B, are shown in a circular geometry, each with a diameter (a). Some general characterizations can be made about the transmission lines, 301A and 301B, in an environment floating or suspended in air. First, each transmission line, 301A and 301B, will have a characteristic impedance in air (Z0) approximately or generally given by Z0≈60 ln (4h/a). Second, each transmission line, 301A and 301B, has a inductance (L) which is L≈5.08×10−9×ln (4h/a) Henrys/inch (H/inch). Additionally, the two transmission lines, 301A and 301B, will exhibit an interwire mutual inductance (M) which is given by M=L×{1/[1+(s/h)2]}. Third, an interwire capacitive coupling (Cint) exists between the two transmission lines, 301A and 301B, and is expressed as Cint=πε/cosh−1(s/a). Using the trigonometric relationship of cosh−1(y)=ln(2y), the interwire capacitive coupling can similarly be expressed as Cint=πε/ln(2s/a). Thus, in this environment, the two transmission lines, 301A and 301B, exhibit an interline capacitance (Cint) given by Cint={0.7/[ln(2 s/a)]} pico Farads/inch (pF/inch). Lastly, each transmission line, 301A and 301B, will further exhibit capacitive coupling C with the conducting substrate 305.
  • [0044]
    Again, in FIG. 3B the transmission lines, 301A and 301B, are spaced a distance (h) from the conducting substrate 305. Using the method of images and the interwire capacitive relationship, Cint=πε/ln(2 s/a), a single transmission line, 301A, over a conducting substrate is given by C=2πε/ln(4h/a) pF/inch where h=s/2. Thus, in this environment, the two transmission lines, 301A and 301B, exhibit a capacitance, or capacitive coupling C with the conductive substrate 305 which is C={1.41/[ln(4h/a)]} pF/inch. The above equations have been presented by assuming that the transmission lines have round or circular geometries. Actual transmission lines on integrated circuits might tend to be more square or rectangular than round due to present lithography techniques. Nevertheless, due to the actual physical size of transmission lines, determined according to minimum lithographic feature techniques, the formulas scale well to square, rectangular or other physical cross sectional geometries for the transmission lines.
  • [0045]
    The signal rise time (trise) in conventional voltage signaling is normally slow due to the limited ability of the transmission line drivers to supply the large currents needed to charge these capacitances over large voltage swings. The signal rise times are usually much larger than the signal transmission time down the line (tprop). Additionally, if two transmission lines are in close proximity then the voltage swing on one transmission line can induce a large voltage swing or noise voltage on the adjacent transmission line. The noise voltage is determined by the capacitance ratios of interwire capacitance, Cint, to the capacitance of the transmission line with the substrate, C. In other words, the noise voltage is determined according to the ratio Cint/C, Cint/C=1/2[ln(4h/a)/ln(2s/a)].
  • [0046]
    The values of Cint and C can be comparable, dependant upon the insulator thickness (h) under the transmission lines and the spacing between the transmission lines. Emphasis in prior art is placed upon minimizing the capacitance of the transmission line, C, by using thick insulators and low dielectric constant materials. Emphasis is also to some extent placed upon minimizing the interwire capacitance, Cint. Thus, the approach in the prior art results in a noise voltage which can be a large fraction of the signal voltage if the transmission lines are in close proximity and far removed from the substrate by being over thick insulators.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view illustrating a pair of neighboring transmission lines, 401A and 401B, above a conductive substrate 405 according to the teachings of the present invention. The present invention is designed to use current signaling across low impedance transmission lines, 401A and 401B, to reduce signal transmission delay and to improve signaling performance over longer transmission lines. Under conventional voltage signaling the current provided in the transmission lines is too weak to provide clean, accurately detectable current signal. In order to obtain better current signals in the transmission lines the signal to noise ratio of the transmission lines must be improved.
  • [0048]
    To improve the signal to noise ratio of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, the capacitance coupling between the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, and the conductive substrate 405, is made large. The characteristic impedance (Zo) of the transmission lines, 401A and 401 B, can be expressed as Z0=√{square root over (L/C)}. Thus, making C large makes the characteristic impedance Zo=Zin, small and similarly makes the voltage division ratio for capacitive coupling small. In the present invention, C increases as the insulator 407 thickness (h) separating the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, from the ground plane, or substrate 405 is decreased. In FIG. 4, the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, are separated a distance (h) from the conducting substrate 405 by an insulating layer 407. In one embodiment, the insulating layer 407 is an oxide layer 407. The capacitive coupling C between the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, and the conducting substrate 405 separated by an oxide layer 407 is given as C≈1.66/[ln(4h/a)] pF/cm. Additionally, the inductance (L) for the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, over the oxide layer 407 is L≈2×ln(4h/a) nanoHenrys/centimeter (nH/cm). The transmission lines, 401A and 401B, are shown in a square geometry having a width (a). The insulator 407 has a thickness (b) separating the transmission lines, 401A and 401B from the substrate. 405. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator thickness (b) is made thinner than the thickness (t) of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B. The center of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B, are a distance (h) above the conducting substrate 405.
  • [0049]
    According to the teachings of the present invention, in one embodiment the thickness (b) of the insulator is equal to or less than 1.0 micrometers (μm). In one embodiment, the thickness (t) of the of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B is approximately equal to 1.0 micrometers (μm). In one embodiment, the thickness (t) of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B is less than 1.0 (μm). In one embodiment, the width (a) of the transmission lines, 401A and 401B is approximately 1.0 micrometers (μm). As one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate upon reading the present disclosure, one embodiment of the present invention includes transmission lines 401A and 401B formed according to the above described dimensions and separated from the substrate 405 by an insulator having a thickness (b) of less than 1.0 micrometers (μm). In one exemplary embodiment, the transmission lines 401A and 401B have an input impedance (Z0) approximately equal to 50 ohms.
  • [0050]
    A co-pending application, by the same inventors, entitled “Capacitive Techniques to Reduce Noise in High Speed Interconnections,” application Ser. No. 10/060,801, filed 30 Jan. 2002, describes minimizing interwire coupling capacitance, and making the insulator thickness over the group plane small, minimizing Zo. The same is incorporated herein by reference. According to the teachings described therein, a characteristic impedance of 50 ohms is easily realizable.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram for an interconnection on an integrated circuit 500 according to the teachings of the present invention. The interconnection on the integrated circuit 500 includes a pair of transmission lines, 501A and 501B, in close proximity. The first transmission line 501A is separated by a distance (s) from the second transmission line 501B. The first transmission line 501A and the second transmission line 501B each have a first end, 505A and 505B respectively. In one embodiment, the first end 505A for the first transmission line 501A is coupled to a driver 503. The first transmission line 501A and the second transmission line 501 B each have a second end, 506A and 506B respectively. In one embodiment, the second end 506A is coupled to a termination 504 formed using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process.
  • [0052]
    Reference to FIG. 5 is useful in explaining the reduced amount of noise current between two transmission lines, 501A and 501B, using the current signaling technique of the present invention. In one embodiment of the present invention, transmission lines, 501A and 501B, have a low characteristic impedances Zo. In one embodiment, the input impedance (Zin) seen by the driver 503 coupling to the first transmission line 501A (in this example the “driven line”) is just the characteristic impedance Zo for the first transmission line 501A. In other words, the CMOS termination 504 is impedance matched to the characteristic impedance Zo of the transmission line 501A.
  • [0053]
    In one embodiment, the first transmission line 501A is separated by approximately 3 μm from the second transmission line 501B and the transmission lines have a length (l) of at least 500 μm. In another embodiment the transmission lines, 501A and 501B, have a length (l) of at least 0.1 cm, or 1000 μm. As in FIGS. 4 and 5, the transmission lines, 501A and 501B, are separated from a conducting substrate by an insulating layer. In one embodiment, the insulating layer is an oxide layer. In this embodiment, the capacitive coupling C between the transmission lines, 501A and 501B, and the conducting substrate is given as C≈1.66/[ln(4h/a)] pF/cm. In one exemplary embodiment, each transmission line, 501A and 501B, has a length (l) of 0.1 cm or 1000 μm, each has a width (a) of approximately 1.0 μm, and the insulator layer thickness (b) is approximately 0.2 μm. In this embodiment, the ln(4h/a) will be approximately 1. Thus, C≈1.66/[ln(4h/a)] pF/cm and for a line 0.1 cm long will produce a C≈0.2 pF. In the same embodiment, the inductance (L) for the transmission lines, 501A and 501B, over the oxide layer is L≈2×ln(4h/a) nH/cm, or L=0.2 nH for a line 0.1 cm long. In this embodiment, a 1 milli Ampere (niA) current step, ii(t), is applied to the gate 502 of a transistor driver 503. In one embodiment, the driver is an n-channel source follower driver 503. In this embodiment, the rise time (trise) on the gate 502 of the driver 503 is approximately 100 ps. This is the limiting time on the system response since the signal delay (tprop) down a the transmission line is proportional to √{square root over (LC)}. For a 0.1 cm transmission line, 501A or 501B, tprop is only 7 ps. A current, di1(t)/dt, of approximately 1×107 A/sec is then produced on the first transmission line 501A.
  • [0054]
    The noise current i2(t) induced on the second transmission line 501B by interwire capacitive coupling (Cint) is calculated as approximately i2(t)=(Cint)×(V1step/trise). The interwire capacitive coupling (Cint) between the transmission lines, 501A and 501B, separated by an oxide dielectric can be expressed as Cint=0.46 pF/cm. Again, for a 0.1 cm transmission line, 501A or 501B, Cint≈0.05 pF. As described in connection with FIG. 5, a 1 mA current provided to the first transmission line 501A having a low characteristic impedance Zo of approximately 30 Ohms will result in a corresponding 30 mV Voltage step (V1step) on the first transmission line 501A. Therefore, if trise is 100 ps a noise current, i2(t), of approximately 0.015 mA is produced on the second, neighboring, transmission line 501B. This noise current, i2(t), induced in the second transmission line 501B is a very small percentage, or about 1%, of the signal current i1(t) provided to the first transmission line 501A. Hence, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) will be large. It can be shown, in general, that a signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the present invention, due to capacitive coupling is of the order (C/Cint) (trise/tprop); where, trise, is the rise time for the current signal and, tprop, the signal propagation time down the first transmission line 501A. The rise time on the signal current, i1(t), in the first transmission line 501A is fast and just follows the rise time (trise) on the input signal, or 100 ps. The response time of this system utilizing current signals is thus much faster than those using voltage signals.
  • [0055]
    Reference to FIG. 5 is similarly useful to illustrate the noise voltage signal from magnetic coupling induced in the second transmission line 501B by the signal current in the first transmission line 501A. As shown in FIG. 5, a voltage will be induced in the second transmission line 501B which has a magnitude that depends on the trise, di1(t)/dt, of the current i1(t) in the driven transmission line 501A, and the mutual inductance coupling (M) between neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 501A and 501B. Each transmission line, 501A and 501B, has an inductance (L). As stated above, L≈0.2 nH for a 0.1 cm transmission line, 501A and 501B. In one exemplary embodiment, the current i1(t) in the first transmission line, 501A (in this example the “driven line”) rises to 1 mA in 100 ps. A current, di1(t)/dt, of approximately 1×107 A/sec is then produced on the first transmission line 501A. As presented above in connection with FIGS. 3A and 3B, the mutual inductance coupling (M) can be expressed as M=L×{1/[1+(s/h)2]}. In one exemplary embodiment, s is approximately equal to 3 μm, and h is approximately equal to 0.7 μm. In this embodiment, M will equate to approximately M=0.02 nano Henrys (nH).
  • [0056]
    Using the relationship that the induced voltage (Vind)=M×di1(t)/dt, Vind is approximately equal to 0.2 mV. During this 100 ps time period the induced voltage traveling down the second transmission line 501B just sees the characteristic impedance Zo of the second transmission line 501B. In one embodiment Zo is approximately 30 Ohms, so here, the current induced i2(t) in the second transmission line is i2(t)=Vind/Zo or 0.007 mA. This low value current is only approximately one percent (1%) of the signal current i1(t) on the first transmission line, 501A. Hence, a large signal to noise ratio (SNR) results. In contrast, under the prior technology, if high impedance capacitive loads had been used on high characteristic impedance lines and conventional voltage signaling employed there is typically a large noise voltage between the neighboring transmission lines, 501A and 501B. In the prior technology, the large noise voltage can be about one half as big as signal voltages.
  • [0057]
    The second transmission line 501B has an equivalently rapid time constant, (L/R) to that of the first transmission line 501A. In the embodiment presented above, the time constant is approximately 7 pico seconds (ps). The noise current i2(t) in the second transmission line 501B will reach a steady state in that time constant. The noise current stays at this steady state value until the end of trise, in this embodiment 100 ps, at which point i1(t) stops changing. After this, the noise current in the second line decays away very quickly. Again, when the input impedance seen by the driver 503 is matched to the characteristic impedance Zo of the first transmission line 501A, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to inductive coupling between the first transmission line 501A and the second, or neighboring, transmission line 501B is of the order, (L/M) (trise/tprop). In other embodiments, the actual mutual inductance and self inductances may vary from these given values without departing from the scope of the invention.
  • [0058]
    Inductive effects which become important at high speeds include not only the self inductance of the interconnection lines, L, but also the mutual inductance between lines, M. As shown with respect to FIG. 5, previously the signal-to-noise ratio due to inductive coupling between lines is of the order, (L/M)(trise/tprop). Any technique which will minimize the mutual inductance between lines will improve the signal-to-noise ratio on long interconnection lines in integrated circuits with high switching speeds.
  • [0059]
    The present invention, as described further below, provides structures and methods through which inductive coupling on high speed interconnects can be further reduced thus increasing the signal to noise ratio across the same.
  • [0060]
    According to the teachings of the present invention, inductive coupling can be minimized by:
      • (i) magnetic shields above and below the lines
      • (ii) magnetic shields between lines
  • [0063]
    These magnetic shields may be:
      • (i) good conductors with a thickness greater than the skin depth, the conventional approach, but one which may not be possible or practical with interconnection lines of sub-micron dimensions
      • (ii) shields with high permeability metals to minimize the mutual coupling or inductance between lines
  • [0066]
    High speed interconnections are provided which accord exemplary performance. That is, the invention described here provides an improved and efficiently fabricated technique for high speed transmission lines on CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, the novel low input impedance CMOS circuit offers the following advantages: (1) the signal delay depends only on the velocity of light on the line and is easily predictable and reproducible, eliminating or allowing for compensation for signal and/or clock skew, (2) there are no reflections at the receiving end of the line and this minimizes ringing, and (3) noise signals will be smaller due to weaker coupling between lines resulting in better signal to noise ratios, the noise current will only be a small fraction of the signal current.
  • [0067]
    One embodiment of the invention includes a method for forming transmission lines in an integrated circuit. The method includes forming a first layer of electrically conductive material on a substrate. A first layer of insulating material is formed on the first layer of the electrically conductive material. A pair of layered high permeability shielding lines are formed on the first layer of insulating material. The pair of layered high permeability shielding lines include layered perm alloy and Ni45Fe55 films. A transmission line is formed on the first layer of insulating material and between and parallel with the pair of layered high permeability shielding lines. A second layer of insulating material is formed on the transmission line and the pair of layered high permeability shielding lines. And, the method includes forming a second layer of electrically conductive material on the second layer of insulating material.
  • [0068]
    One embodiment of the invention, as discussed further below in connection with FIG. 6, is a structure where an interconnection line is located between a ground buss and a power supply buss (which for the AC signal is AC ground) and as such constitutes a low impedance transmission line interconnection. If the ground and power supply busses are thicker than the skin depth at the frequency of interest, the electric and magnetic fields will be shielded and confined to the area between these plates. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 6, a layered high permeability shielding line is placed between interconnection lines to distort the magnetic fields and shield the lines.
  • [0069]
    Other possible configurations are shown in FIGS. 7-12. These configurations highlight the fact that a single metal might not have all the suitable properties for a given or desired implementation by systems designed for low noise operation. For example, two materials might be necessary, one which has the desired magnetic properties to confine magnetic fields and one to confine the electric fields. Accordingly, FIGS. 8-12 illustrate various alternative embodiments of the present invention as can be best suited to a particular system designed for low noise operation. These embodiments make use of a sandwich layer of both a high permeability material, well suited for magnetic shielding, as well as a low resistive conductive material that is well suited for electrical shielding. By placing even a thin layer of the high permeability material, a considerable amount of the magnetic field can be contained.
  • [0070]
    FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, 601A and 601B, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 6 illustrates one or more transmission lines, shown as 601A and 601B. The one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601B, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 604 and 605. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate-can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0071]
    As shown in FIG. 6, the invention includes a number of layered high permeability shielding lines, shown in this embodiment as 602A and 602B. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 602A and 602B, consist of alternating layers of high permeability metal 670 and a low resistive conductive material 671. According to the teachings of the present invention, the layers of high permeability metal 670 include permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films. As shown in FIG. 6, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 602A and 602B are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601B. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601 B, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 602A and 602B, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 6. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601B, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 602A and 602B, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 604 and 605 by an insulator material 606. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 606 includes an oxide.
  • [0072]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 6, the pair of electrically conductive planes 604 and 605 include metal ground planes 604 and 605. In the invention, the electrically conductive planes, 604 and 605, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus as the same will be known and understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, at least one of the pair of electrically conductive planes, 604 and 605, is formed to a thickness (t) which is greater than a skin depth (sd) penetrable by electrically induced magnetic field lines.
  • [0073]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601B will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 601A and 601B. In the embodiment of FIG. 6 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 611. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 602A and 602B, and the electrically conductive planes, 604 and 605, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 601A and 601B.
  • [0074]
    FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 7 illustrates one or more transmission lines, shown as 701-1 and 701-2. The one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 704 and 705. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 701-1, . . . , 701-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 704 and 705. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0075]
    As shown in FIG. 7, the invention includes a number of layered high permeability shielding lines, shown in this embodiment as 702-1 and 702-2. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2, consist of alternating layers of high permeability metal 770 and a low resistive conductive material 771. According to the teachings of the present invention, the layers of high permeability metal 770 include permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films. As shown in FIG. 7, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2 are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 701 -1 and 701-2. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 7. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 701-1, . . . , 701-N can be spaced between any number of number layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1, . . . , 702-N. That is, one or more layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1, . . . , 702-N will separate one or more transmission lines, 701-1, . . . , 701-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 704 and 705 by an insulator material 706. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 706 includes an oxide.
  • [0076]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 7, the pair of electrically conductive planes 704 and 705 each include two portions, 704A, 704B and 705A and 705B. In this embodiment, a first portion, 704A and 705A respectively, include metal ground planes. A second portion or surface portion, 704B and 705B respectively, consist of alternating layers of high permeability metal 780 and a low resistive conductive material 781. According to the teachings of the present invention, the layers of high permeability metal 780 include permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films. That is, the second portion or surface portion having the layers of high permeability metal 780, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines 702-1 and 702-2, include layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 704 and 705, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0077]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 7 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 711. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2, and the electrically conductive planes, 704 and 705, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 701-1 and 701-2.
  • [0078]
    As shown in FIG. 7, the second portion or surface portion, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines 702-1 and 702-2, each consisting of alternating layers of high permeability metal 780, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 781, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 711 shown in FIG. 7, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 702-1 and 702-2, and the second portion or surface portion 704B and 705B, from magnetic fields produces by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 701-1 and 701-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the first portion, 704A and 705A respectively, of the electrically conductive planes, 704 and 705, provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current.
  • [0079]
    As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 7 and other embodiments below, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 780, e.g. magnetic material permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 781 are formed on the inside of the conductive planes 704 and 705, also referred to as the Vss or ground, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 701 -1 and 701-2. However as one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 780, e.g. magnetic material permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 781 can also be placed on the outside of the conductive planes 704 and 705. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 780, e.g. magnetic material permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 781 confine both the electric and magnetic fields in both the x and y direction.
  • [0080]
    FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment for a pair of neighboring transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 8 illustrates one or more integrated circuit lines, or transmission lines, shown as 801-1 and 801-2. The one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 804 and 805. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 801-1, . . . , 801-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 804 and 805. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0081]
    As shown in FIG. 8, the invention includes a number of layered high permeability shielding lines, shown in this embodiment as 802-1 and 802-2. In contrast to the embodiment of FIG. 7, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 are layered vertically rather than horizontally. As shown in FIG. 8, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 include alternating layers of high permeability metal 870, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 871. As shown in FIG. 8, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 8. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 801-1, . . . , 801-N can be spaced between any number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-N. That is, one or more layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 will separate one or more transmission lines, 801-1, . . . , 801-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 804 and 805 by an insulator material 806. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 806 includes an oxide.
  • [0082]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 8, the pair of electrically conductive planes 804 and 805 each include two portions, 804A, 804B and 805A and 805B. In this embodiment, a first layer, 804A and 805A respectively, include metal ground planes. A second layer or surface layer, 804B and 805B respectively, is formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal 880, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 881. That is, the second layer or surface layer, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2, are formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 804 and 805, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0083]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 8 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 811. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 and the electrically conductive planes, 804 and 805, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 801-1 and 801-2.
  • [0084]
    As shown in FIG. 8, the second layer or surface portion 804B and 805B, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2, each consisting of alternating layers of high permeability metal, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 811 shown in FIG. 8, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 802-1 and 802-2 and the second layer or surface layer 804B and 805B, from magnetic fields produces by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 801-1 and 801-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the first layer, 804A and 805B respectively, of the electrically conductive planes, 804 and 805, provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current.
  • [0085]
    In the embodiment shown in FIG. 8 both the electric and magnetic fields are confined in both the x and y direction. Here the conductors are separated by not only a high permeability magnetic material but a sandwich of both a very low resistive ground plane which acts as a low resistive return path for induced currents and high permeability magnetic material.
  • [0086]
    FIG. 9 illustrates another embodiment for neighboring transmission lines, 901 -1 and 901-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 9 illustrates one or more integrated circuit lines, or transmission lines, shown as 901-1 and 901-2. The one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 904 and 905. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 901-1, . . . , 901-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 904 and 905. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0087]
    As shown in FIG. 9, the invention includes a number of electrically conductive lines, 902-1 and 902-2. According to the teachings of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, include alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 9, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971 are formed on the one or more transmission lines, 901 -1 and 901-2, on at least three sides of the number of transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2. In this embodiment, the three sides include opposing surfaces adjacent to the number of electrically conductive lines, 902-1 and 902-2, and on a side adjacent to the first conductive plane 904. As shown in FIG. 9, the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971, are interspaced between the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 902-1 and 902-2. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 901 -1 and 901-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 902-1 and 902-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 9. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 901-1, . . . , 901-N, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971, can be spaced between any number of number electrically conductive metal lines, 902-1, . . . , 902-N. That is, one or more electrically conductive metal lines, 902-1, . . . , 902-N will separate one or more transmission lines, 901-1, . . . , 901-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 902-1 and 902-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 904 and 905 by an insulator material 906. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 906 includes an oxide.
  • [0088]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 9, the at least one of the pair of electrically conductive planes 904 and 905 includes two portions. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 9, conductive plane 905 includes two portions, 905A and 905B. In this embodiment, conductive plane 904, and a first layer 905A for conductive plane 905, include metal ground planes. In conductive plane 905 a second layer or surface layer 905B, is formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal 980, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 981. That is, the second layer or surface layer, 905B adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, and the number of electrically conductive metal lines 902-1 and 902-2, both include alternating layers of high permeability metal, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 904 and 905, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0089]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 9 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 911. According to the teachings of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971, the number of electrically conductive metal lines 902-1 and 902-2, and the electrically conductive planes, 904 and 905, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 901-1 and 901-2.
  • [0090]
    As shown in FIG. 9, the second layer or surface layer 905B, adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 901 -1 and 901-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971, the electrically conductive planes, 904 and 905, and the number of electrically conductive metal lines 902-1 and 902-2, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 911 shown in FIG. 9, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 970, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 971, the number of electrically conductive metal lines 902-1 and 902-2 and the second layer or surface layer 905B, from magnetic fields produced by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 901-1 and 901-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, conductive plane 904 and the first layer 905A of conductive plane 905 provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current.
  • [0091]
    The embodiment provided in FIG. 9 is easy to manufacture. Here the current carrying low resistive conductors or metal lines, e.g. 901-1 and 901-2 are encased on three sides by a high permeability magnetic material and separated from one another by low resistive metal lines 902-1 and 902-2 that are grounded. To provide magnetic field confinement in the Y direction, a sandwich layer is used at the top of the conductors as provided by second layer 905B. This sandwich layer is composed of both a low resistive component as well as a high permeability component. The bottom side, e.g. conductive plane 904, of the embedded metal lines or conductors 901-1 and 901-2 contain only a ground plane. This provides complete electric and magnetic field confinement.
  • [0092]
    FIG. 10 illustrates another embodiment for neighboring transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 10 illustrates one or more integrated circuit lines, or transmission lines, shown as 1001-1 and 1001-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071. The one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 1004 and 1005. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1001-1, . . . , 1001-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 1004 and 1005. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0093]
    As shown in FIG. 10, the invention includes a number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 10, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091 are formed on the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, on at least three sides of the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2. In this embodiment, the three sides include opposing surfaces adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, and on a side adjacent to the first conductive plane 1004. As shown in FIG. 10, the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091, are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2. Further, in this embodiment, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, include alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 10, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071 are formed on the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, on at least three sides of the number of transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2. In this embodiment, the three sides include opposing surfaces adjacent to the number of electrically conductive lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, and on a side adjacent to the first conductive plane 1004. As shown in FIG. 10, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071, are interspaced between the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 10. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1001-1, . . . , 1001-N, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071, can be spaced between any number of number electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1, . . . , 1002-N also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091. That is, one or more electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1, . . . , 1002-N will separate one or more transmission lines, 1001-1, . . . , 1001-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1002-1 and 1002-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 1004 and 1005 by an insulator material 1006. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 1006 includes an oxide.
  • [0094]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 10, at least one of the pair of electrically conductive planes 1004 and 1005 includes two portions. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 10, conductive plane 1005 includes two portions, 1005A and 1005B. In this embodiment, conductive plane 1004, and a first layer 1005A for conductive plane 1005, include metal ground planes. In conductive plane 1005 a second layer or surface layer 1005B, is formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal 1080, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1081. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 1004 and 1005, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0095]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 10 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 1011. According to the teachings of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071, the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1002-1 and 1002-2 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091, and the electrically conductive planes, 1004 and 1005, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 1001-1 and 1001-2.
  • [0096]
    As shown in FIG. 10, the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071, the electrically conductive planes, 1004 and 1005, and the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1002-1 and 1002-2 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 1011 shown in FIG. 10, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1070, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1071, the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1002-1 and 1002-2 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1090, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1091, and the second layer or surface layer 1005B, from magnetic fields produced by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 1001-1 and 1001-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, conductive plane 1004 and the first layer 1005A provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current.
  • [0097]
    FIG. 10 is another embodiment that is very easy to manufacture. The main difference in the embodiment of FIG. 10 from the embodiment provided in FIG. 9 is that in this case the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1002-1 and 1002-2, which where previously used only for electric field confinement can also be used for magnetic field confinement. An alternate configuration to that shown in FIG. 10 is shown in FIG. 12. In FIG. 12, conductors 1201-1 and 1201-2 do not have a magnetic material around them.
  • [0098]
    FIG. 11 illustrates another embodiment for neighboring transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 11 illustrates one or more integrated circuit lines, or transmission lines, shown as 1101-1 and 1101 -2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1171. The one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 1104 and 1105. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1101-1, . . . , 1101-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 1104 and 1105. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0099]
    As shown in FIG. 11, the invention includes a number of layered high permeability shielding lines, shown in this embodiment as 1102-1 and 1102-2. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2, are formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal 1190, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1191. As shown in FIG. 1 1, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2 are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 11. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 11, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1 171 are formed on the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, in an orientation parallel to the first and the second conductive planes 1104 and 1105. As shown in FIG. 11, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, having at least one surface layer 1115 formed of a layered perm alloy and Ni45Fe55 film, are interspaced between the number layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 11. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1101-1, . . . , 1101-N, having at least one surface layer 1115 formed of a layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 film, can be spaced between any number of number layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1, . . . , 1102-N. That is, one or more layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1, . . . , 1102-N will separate one or more transmission lines, 1101-1, . . . , 1101-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 1104 and 1105 by an insulator material 1106. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 1106 includes an oxide. In an alternative embodiment, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1171, and the number or layered high permeability shielding lines, 1102-1 and 1102-2, do not have to be located between the pair of electrically conductive planes 1104 and 1105, but are still encapsulated by an insulator material 1106. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the high permeability planes, 1104 and 1105, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0100]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 11 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 1111. According to the teachings of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1171, the number of layered high permeability shielding lines 1102-1 and 1102-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1190, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1191, and the electrically conductive planes, 1104 and 1105, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 1101-1 and 1101-2.
  • [0101]
    As shown in FIG. 11, the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1171, the electrically conductive planes, 1104 and 1105, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines 1102-1 and 1102-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1190, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1191, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 1111 shown in FIG. 11, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1170, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1171, the electrically conductive planes, 1104 and 1105, and the number of layered high permeability shielding lines 1102-1 and 1102-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1190, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1191, from magnetic fields produced by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 1101-1 and 1101-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 1104 and 1105, provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current.
  • [0102]
    The embodiment provided in FIG. 11 is another possibility that provides for magnetic confinement in all directions, but in this case, the magnetic material is only placed at the top and bottom of conductors 1101-1 and 1101-2. These conductors are separated by a high permeability magnetic material. In the embodiment of FIG. 11, the one or more transmission lines 1101-1 and 1101-2 are enclosed by low resistive metals, e.g. conductive planes 1104 and 1105 on both sides.
  • [0103]
    FIG. 12 illustrates another embodiment for neighboring transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, according to the teachings of the present invention. FIG. 12 illustrates one or more integrated circuit lines, or transmission lines, shown as 1201-1 and 1201-2. The one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, are spaced between a pair of electrically conductive planes 1204 and 1205. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1201-1, . . . , 1201-N, can be spaced between the conductive planes 1204 and 1205. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, in one embodiment at least one of the electrically conductive planes is formed on a substrate. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the substrate can include an insulator, a semiconductor material, silicon on insulator material, or other materials. The invention is not so limited.
  • [0104]
    As shown in FIG. 12, the invention includes a number of electrically conductive metal lines, shown in this embodiment as 1202-1 and 1202-2. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2, include alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 12, the alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291 are formed on the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2, on at least three sides of the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2. In this embodiment, the three sides include opposing surfaces adjacent to the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, and on a side adjacent to the first conductive plane 1204. As shown in FIG. 12, the number of electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291, are interspaced between the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2. As shown in FIG. 12, the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2 are interspaced between the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291. In one embodiment of the present invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2, are spaced parallel to one another and are oriented lengthwise perpendicular to the plane of the page illustrated in FIG. 12.
  • [0105]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, any number of transmission lines, 1201-1, . . . , 1201-N, can be spaced between any number of number electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1, . . . , 1202-N having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291. That is, one or more electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1, . . . , 1202-N, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291, will separate one or more transmission lines, 1201-1, . . . , 1201-N. In the invention, the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, and the number or electrically conductive metal lines, 1202-1 and 1202-2, are separated from one another and from the pair of electrically conductive planes 1204 and 1205 by an insulator material 1206. In one embodiment of the present invention, the insulator material 1206 includes an oxide.
  • [0106]
    In one embodiment as shown in FIG. 12, the electrically conductive planes 1204 and 1205 includes two portions, e.g. 1204A, 1204B, 1205A and 1205B. In this embodiment, a first layer 1204A for conductive plane 1204, and a first layer 1205A for conductive plane 1205, include metal ground planes. In conductive planes 1204 and 1205 a second layer or surface layer 1204B and 1205B, are formed of alternating layers of high permeability metal 1280, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1281. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading the present disclosure, the electrically conductive planes, 1204 and 1205, can be independently coupled to a ground source and/or a power supply bus.
  • [0107]
    As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, an electrical signal transmitted across the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2 will induce a magnetic field surrounding the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2. In the embodiment of FIG. 12 such a magnetic field is illustrated by magnetic field lines 1211. According to the teachings of the present invention, the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1202-1 and 1202-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291, and the electrically conductive planes, 1204 and 1205 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1280, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1281, provide magnetic shielding to reduce the amount of magnetically induced noise on neighboring transmission lines, e.g. 1201-1 and 1201-2.
  • [0108]
    As shown in FIG. 12, the electrically conductive planes, 1204 and 1205, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1280, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1281, and the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1202-1 and 1202-2 also having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291, serve to shield the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2, from such electrically induced magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines 1211 shown in FIG. 12, illustrates the magnetic shielding effect provided by the number of electrically conductive metal lines 1202-1 and 1202-2 having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1290, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1291, and the electrically conductive planes, 1204 and 1205, having alternating layers of high permeability metal 1280, e.g. permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films, and a low resistive conductive material 1281, from magnetic fields produced by a current transmitted in the one or more transmission lines, 1201-1 and 1201-2. As one of ordinary skill in the art will understand upon reading this disclosure, the first layer 1204A of conductive plane 1204 and the first layer 1205A of conductive plane 1205 provide a lower resistance such that there is very little resistance to the path of the return current. FIG. 12 highlights a configuration that is similar to FIG. 10 but allows for more space to be used for conductors 1201-1 and 1201-2 since they are not encased on magnetic material.
  • [0109]
    FIG. 13 is a block diagram which illustrates an embodiment of a system 1300 using line signaling according to teachings of the present invention. The system 1300 includes a low output impedance driver 1310 having a driver impedance, as is well known in the art. The low output impedance driver 1310 is coupled to a transmission line circuit 1320. Embodiments of the transmission line circuit 1320 are described and presented above with reference to FIGS. 6-12. Moreover, the system 1300 includes a termination circuit 1330 having a termination impedance that is matched to the impedance of the transmission line circuit 1320.
  • [0110]
    FIG. 14 is a block diagram which illustrates an embodiment of a system 1400 according to teaching of the present invention. The system 1400 includes an integrated circuit 1410. The integrated circuit 1410 includes the transmission line circuit described and presented above with reference to FIGS. 6-12. Additionally, the system 1400 includes a processor 1420 that is operatively coupled to the integrated circuit 1410. The processor 1420 is coupled to the integrated circuit 1410 through a system bus 1430. In one embodiment, the processor 1420 and the integrated circuit 1410 are on the same semiconductor chip.
  • [0000]
    High Frequency Permeability Films
  • [0111]
    The study of high frequency permeability of thin-film magnetic stripes under high field excitation is important for the development of high rate data read heads as discussed in an article by Yimin Hsu et al. (See generally, J. Appl. Phys., 89, 11, 6808 (2001)). The measurement is conventionally performed by using permeameters as described in articles by B. C. Webb et al. (See generally, J. Appl. Phs., 69, 5611 (1991); and IEEE Trans. Magn., 27, 4876 (1991)). However, it is difficult to perform the measurement in both high field excitation and at 100 MHz and beyond. In a recent article, the high field high frequency permeability of permalloy and Ni45Fe55 patterned films is measured from lithographically defined toroidal devices. (See generally, Yimin Hsu et al., J. Appl. Phys., 89, 11, 6808 (2001)). Permeability and rolloff characteristics as the patterned width is reduced are discussed therein.
  • [0112]
    In the above article, test structures were fabricated having toroidal shapes with widths ranging from 0.5 to 30 μm. Each toroid consists of two parallel rectangular-shape patterned films connected by “pedestals” at both ends. The base designed of the test structure 55 μm long with ten-turn coils. The coils are embedded in alumina and these devices are fully planarized by the chemical-mechanical-polish process to avoid undesirable stress induced by topography. In this experiment, the bottom layers are 2.5 μm thick permalloy and the pedestals are 2.2 μm tall permalloy. One wafer has 2.5 μm of permalloy and top layers and other Ni45Fe55. The inductance rolloff date of these structures are measured by using a Hewlett Packard 4291 A impedance analyzer. The test structures are excited by applying high frequency current to the pancake coils. The permeability frequency rolloff characteristics of the magnetic thin films were calculated from the inductance rolloff data by using the segmental transmission line method as described in an article by T. Amoldussen. (See generally, IEEE Trans. Magn., 24, 2482 (1988)). The simple geometry of these devices minimizes the ambiguity in permeability calculations.
  • [0113]
    Permeability of patterned permalloy and Ni45Fe55 films with widths from 30 to 0.5 μm has been studied under high field up to 5 Oe and frequency up to 500 MHz. It is observed that the permeability increases as the excitation field increases due to the increasing flux conduction from wall motion. At frequencies where wall motion is damped, there is no discernible difference between high and low field excitation. The data also suggest that the permeability rolloff measured at low excitation current is sufficient to predict high frequency write head performance. As the width of the patterns is reduced, the reduction of effective rotational permeability results from reduction of the active area since the edge closure region does not participate in flux conduction. As the width is reduced to sub-micron range, the rotational permeability is significantly reduced. The 0.5 μm wide device has μrot of 80 for the permalloy case and 50 for the Ni45Fe55 case.
  • [0114]
    A new process has been used in the industry to measure the high permeability materials at high frequencies, up to 1 GHz. (See generally, M. Senda, “Permeability measurement of soft magnetic films at high frequency and multilayering effect,” IEEE Translation of J. of Magnetics in Japan, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 161-168, March 1993). An inductance line with a magnetic/conductive/magnetic layer structure was used to estimate the permeability (to see the details of the parts, a reader is recommended to see the original text cited above). The inductance line made it possible to measure the frequency characteristics of the permeability up to the GHz range because of a low stray capacitance and high resonance frequency. The magnetic film pattern was designed so as to eliminate demagnetizing field effects, and the permeability was estimated based on analysis of the magnetic circuit. Using this method, NiFe/SiO2 and (Fe/SiO2)/SiO2 multilayer films were confirmed to show superior frequency characteristics by a factor of 20 over those of NiFe single-layer film. Also, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was observed in these multilayer films at 650 and 750 MHz.
  • [0115]
    A Hewlett Packard HP4191 A was used in impedance measurements. Specialized tubes (16091-60023) were connected to both ends of the sample, and these were mounted inside a cylindrical fixture (16091A) to perform measurements. The sample impedance ranged from several Ohms to several ten of Ohms between 10 MHz and 1000 MHz, and above several tens of MHz the instrument measurement error was within several percent.
  • [0116]
    The method of measurement was confirmed to operate as expected, and the high-frequency magnetic characteristics of multilayer films were evaluated, and the main results are as follows:
      • 1. Through this method, the magnetic circuit composed of an inductance line with a magnetic/conductive/magnetic films structures was analyzed the basis of its impedance characteristics, enabling calculation of the relative permeability of the magnetic material. The inductance line had a stripe shape, and the stray capacitance was reduced to raise the resonance frequency, making possible measurements in the GHz range. By adopting a strip pattern for the magnetic layers, the effect of the demagnetizing field was avoided. In order to perform still more accurate measurements, it will probably be necessary to add improvements to the magnetic circuit analysis and impedance matching.
      • 2. It was confirmed that the multilayer structure including none magnetic layers is an effective means of improving the frequency characteristic, reducing losses and expanding the effective magnetic path width. For NiFe/SiO2 [50-100 nm] and (Fe/SiO2)SiO2 [(7/2.5)/50 nm] multilayer film, an improvement of some twenty times or so over NiFe single-layer film was observed.
      • 3. The high-frequency magnetic properties of multilayer film are limited by dielectric breakdown of the insulating layers when the latter are thin, and by eddy current loss due to formation of an electrical capacitance and/or by ferromagnetic resonance when the insulating layer are thick. Ferromagnetic resonance was observed at 650 MHz in the NiFe/SiO2, and at 750 MHz in the (Fe/SiO2)SiO2 multilayer films.
  • [0120]
    These results demonstrate that the characteristics of multilayer films involving non-magnetic materials as well as NiFe or Fe magnetic materials have higher effective permeabilities at higher frequencies than simple layers of magnetic materials by themselves. This disclosure then describes the use of the multilayers as magnetic shields to reduce the inductive coupling between interconnection lines in integrated circuits.
  • CONCLUSION
  • [0121]
    Thus, structures and methods are provided for improved, high speed transmission lines on integrated circuits. High speed interconnections are provided which accord exemplary performance. That is, the invention described here provides an improved and efficiently fabricated technique for high speed transmission lines on CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, the novel low input impedance CMOS circuit offers the following advantages: (1) the signal delay depends only on the velocity of light on the line and is easily predictable and reproducible, eliminating or allowing for compensation for signal and/or clock skew, (2) there are no reflections at the receiving end of the line and this minimizes ringing, and (3) noise signals will be smaller due to weaker coupling between lines resulting in better signal to noise ratios, the noise current will only be a small fraction of the signal current.
  • [0122]
    Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that any arrangement which is calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiment shown. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the present invention. It is to be understood that the above description is intended to be illustrative, and not restrictive. Combinations of the above embodiments, and other embodiments will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the above description. The scope of the invention includes any other applications in which the above structures and fabrication methods are used. The scope of the invention should be determined with reference to the appended claims, along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled.

Claims (66)

  1. 1. An electronic system comprising:
    a processor; and
    an integrated circuit coupled to the processor, the integrated circuit including:
    a layer of insulating material disposed above a substrate;
    a number of transmission lines on the layer of insulating material; and
    a number of shielding lines on the layer of insulating material, the transmission lines interposed between and parallel with the shielding lines, wherein at least one of the transmission lines, at least one of the shielding lines, or at least one of both the transmission lines and the shielding lines include a layered film of a high permeability material.
  2. 2. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes a layered film having a layer of a nickel iron compound and a layer of an electrically conductive material, the layers of the nickel iron compound and the electrically conductive material arranged as alternating layers.
  3. 3. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes a layered film having a layer of a nickel iron compound, a layer of an electrically conductive material, and a layer of another nickel iron compound, the layers of the nickel iron compounds and the electrically conductive material arranged as alternating layers.
  4. 4. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes permalloy and Ni45Fe55.
  5. 5. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein a conductive plane is disposed on a dielectric layer, the dielectric disposed on the transmission lines and the shielding lines above the layer of insulating material such that the transmission lines and the shielding lines are situated between the conductive plane and the substrate.
  6. 6. The electronic system of claim 5, wherein the insulating material and the dielectric layer have a common composition.
  7. 7. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein a conductive plane is disposed between the substrate and the layer of insulating material.
  8. 8. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein each transmission line has a width that is greater than a thickness of the transmission line.
  9. 9. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the transmission lines include the layered film of the high permeability material.
  10. 10. The electronic system of claim 8, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes permalloy and Ni45Fe55.
  11. 11. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the shielding lines include the layered film of the high permeability material.
  12. 12. The electronic system of claim 10, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes permalloy and Ni45Fe55.
  13. 13. The electronic system of claim 1, wherein the integrated circuit includes a driver circuit coupled to at least one of the transmission lines, the at least one transmission line coupled to a termination circuit, the at least one transmission line having an impedance and the termination having a termination impedance such that the impedance of the transmission line is matched to the termination impedance.
  14. 14. An electronic system comprising:
    a processor; and
    an integrated circuit coupled to the processor, the integrated circuit including:
    a first conductive plane on a substrate;
    a first layer of insulating material disposed above the substrate and on the first conductive plane;
    a number of shielding lines on the first layer of insulating material, wherein the shielding lines include a layered film of a high permeability material;
    a number of transmission lines on the first layer of insulating material, the transmission lines interposed between and parallel with the shielding lines;
    a second layer of insulating material on the number of transmission lines and the number of shielding lines; and
    a second conductive plane on the second layer of insulating material.
  15. 15. The electronic system of claim 14, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes a layered film having layers of the high permeability material and layers of an electrically conductive material such that a set of the layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane and another set of the layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane.
  16. 16. The electronic system of claim 15, wherein the shielding lines are coupled to ground.
  17. 17. The electronic system of claim 14, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes a layered film having a layer of the high permeability material and a layer of an electrically conductive material.
  18. 18. The electronic system of claim 17, wherein the layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially parallel with a surface of the first conductive plane.
  19. 19. The electronic system of claim 17, wherein the layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane.
  20. 20. The electronic system of claim 17, wherein the second conductive plane includes a layered structure having a layer of a second high permeability material and a layer of a second electrically conductive material.
  21. 21. The electronic system of claim 20, wherein the layered structure is disposed on and contacting the second layer of insulating material.
  22. 22. The electronic system of claim 20, wherein the second conductive plane includes a ground plane separated from the second layer of insulating material by the layered structure.
  23. 23. The electronic system of claim 20, wherein the layered structure includes a layer of the second high permeability material separated from a layer of a third high permeability material by the layer of the second electrically conductive material.
  24. 24. The electronic system of claim 23, wherein the second high permeability material includes permalloy and the third high permeability material includes Ni45Fe55.
  25. 25. The electronic system of claim 17, wherein the first conductive plane includes a first layered structure having a layer of a second high permeability material and a layer of a second electrically conductive material and the second conductive plane includes a second layered structure having a layer of a third high permeability material and a layer of a third electrically conductive material.
  26. 26. The electronic system of claim 25, wherein the first layered structure is disposed in contact with the first layer of insulating material and the second layered structure is disposed in contact with the second layer of insulating material.
  27. 27. The electronic system of claim 25, wherein the first layered structure includes the layer of the second high permeability material separated from a layer of a fourth high permeability material by the layer of the second electrically conductive material and the second layered structure includes the layer of the third high permeability material separated from a layer of a fifth high permeability material by the layer of the third electrically conductive material.
  28. 28. The electronic system of claim 27, wherein the second and third high permeability materials each includes permalloy and the fourth and fifth high permeability materials each includes Ni45Fe55.
  29. 29. The electronic system of claim 14, wherein the integrated circuit is a memory.
  30. 30. An electronic system comprising:
    a processor; and
    an integrated circuit coupled to the processor, the integrated circuit including:
    a first conductive plane on a substrate;
    a first layer of insulating material disposed above the substrate and on the first conductive plane;
    a number of shielding lines on the first layer of insulating material;
    a number of transmission lines on the first layer of insulating material, the transmission lines interposed between and parallel with the shielding lines, wherein the transmission lines include a layered film of a high permeability material;
    a second layer of insulating material on the number of transmission lines and the number of shielding lines; and
    a second conductive plane on the second layer of insulating material.
  31. 31. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the layered film of the high permeability material includes a layered film having layers of the high permeability material and layers of an electrically conductive material such that a set of layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane and another set of layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane.
  32. 32. The electronic system of claim 31, wherein the shielding lines are electrically conductive lines coupled to ground.
  33. 33. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the layered film of the transmission lines includes a layer of the high permeability material and a layer of the electrically conductive material, and the shielding lines include a second layered film having a layer of a second high permeability material and a layer of a second electrically conductive material.
  34. 34. The electronic system of claim 33, wherein the second layered film includes a layered film having layers of the second high permeability material and layers of the second electrically conductive material such that a set of the layers of the second high permeability material and the second electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane and another set of the layers of the second high permeability material and the second electrically conductive material are disposed substantially perpendicular with the surface of the first conductive plane.
  35. 35. The electronic system of claim 33, wherein the layers of the second high permeability material and the second electrically conductive material of the shielding lines are disposed substantially perpendicular with a surface of the first conductive plane.
  36. 36. The electronic system of claim 35, wherein the layers of the high permeability material and the electrically conductive material of the transmission lines disposed substantially parallel with the surface of the first conductive plane.
  37. 37. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the layered film of the transmission lines includes a layer of the high permeability material and a layer of the electrically conductive material, and the second conductive plane includes a layered structure having a layer of a second high permeability material and a layer of a second electrically conductive material.
  38. 38. The electronic system of claim 37, wherein the layered structure is disposed on and contacting the second layer of insulating material.
  39. 39. The electronic system of claim 37, wherein the second conductive plane includes a ground plane separated from the second layer of insulating material by the layered structure.
  40. 40. The electronic system of claim 37, wherein the layered structure includes a layer of the second high permeability material separated from a layer of a third high permeability material by the layer of the second electrically conductive material.
  41. 41. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the second high permeability material includes permalloy and the third high permeability material includes Ni45Fe55.
  42. 42. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the first conductive plane includes a first layered structure having a layer of a second high permeability material and a layer of a second electrically conductive material and the second conductive plane includes a second layered structure having a layer of a third high permeability material and a layer of a third electrically conductive material.
  43. 43. The electronic system of claim 42, wherein the first layered structure is disposed in contact with the first layer of insulating material and the second layered structure is disposed in contact with the second layer of insulating material.
  44. 44. The electronic system of claim 42, wherein the first layered structure includes the layer of the second high permeability material separated from a layer of a fourth high permeability material by the layer of the second electrically conductive material and the second layered structure includes the layer of the third high permeability material separated from a layer of a fifth high permeability material by the layer of the third electrically conductive material.
  45. 45. The electronic system of claim 44, wherein the second and third high permeability materials each includes permalloy and the fourth and fifth high permeability materials each includes Ni45Fe55.
  46. 46. The electronic system of claim 44, wherein the first conductive plane includes a ground plane separated from the first layer of insulating material by the first layered structure.
  47. 47. The electronic system of claim 30, wherein the integrated circuit is a memory.
  48. 48. An electronic system comprising:
    a processor; and
    an integrated circuit coupled to the processor, the integrated circuit including:
    a layer of insulating material disposed above a substrate;
    a number of transmission lines on the layer of insulating material; and
    a number of shielding lines on the layer of insulating material, the shielding lines being electrically conductive lines, the transmission lines interposed between and parallel with the shielding lines, wherein at least one of the transmission lines and the conductive lines includes a layered film of a high permeability material, the layered film of a high permeability material being a layered film a first nickel iron compound and a second nickel iron compound.
  49. 49. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein the first nickel iron compound is permalloy and the second nickel iron compound is Ni45Fe55.
  50. 50. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein a conductive plane is disposed on the layer of insulating material such that the transmission lines and the conductive lines are situated between the conductive plane and the substrate.
  51. 51. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein a conductive plane is disposed between the substrate and the layer of insulating material.
  52. 52. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein the transmission lines include the layered film of the first nickel iron compound and the second nickel iron compound.
  53. 53. The electronic system of claim 52, wherein the first nickel iron compound is permalloy and the second nickel iron compound is Ni45Fe55.
  54. 54. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein the conductive lines include the layered film of the first nickel iron compound and the second nickel iron compound.
  55. 55. The electronic system of claim 54, wherein the first nickel iron compound is permalloy and the second nickel iron compound is Ni45Fe55.
  56. 56. The electronic system of claim 48, wherein the integrated circuit is a memory.
  57. 57. An electronic system comprising:
    a processor; and
    an integrated circuit coupled to the processor, the integrated circuit including:
    a first layer of insulating material above a substrate;
    a number of shielding lines on the first layer of insulating material, the shielding lines being electrically conductive lines;
    a number of transmission lines on the first layer of insulating material, the number of transmission lines spaced between and parallel with the number of electrically conductive lines, wherein the number of transmission lines include a layered film of a high permeability material, the layered film of a high permeability material being a layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 film; and
    a second layer of insulating material on the number of transmission lines and the number of shielding lines.
  58. 58. The electronic system of claim 57, wherein the first layer of insulating material is formed on a first conductive plane.
  59. 59. The electronic system of claim 58, wherein the system includes a second conductive plane formed on the second layer of insulating material.
  60. 60. The electronic system of claim 59, wherein the first and the second conductive planes have a thickness of approximately 3 to 5 micrometers (μm).
  61. 61. The electronic system of claim 59, wherein the second conductive plane is coupled to a power supply.
  62. 62. The electronic system of claim 57, wherein the substrate includes an insulator material.
  63. 63. The electronic system of claim 57, wherein the number of shielding lines include a layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 film.
  64. 64. The electronic system of claim 63, wherein the number of transmission lines having a layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 film includes a layered permalloy and Ni45Fe55 film on at least two sides of the number of transmission lines, the two sides being on opposing surfaces and at least one of the two side being adjacent to the substrate.
  65. 65. The electronic system of claim 57, wherein the integrated circuit is a memory.
  66. 66. The electronic system of claim 65, wherein the memory is a Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM).
US11492253 2002-03-13 2006-07-25 High permeability layered films to reduce noise in high speed interconnects Abandoned US20070029645A1 (en)

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