US20070022689A1 - Plastic flooring with improved seal - Google Patents

Plastic flooring with improved seal Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070022689A1
US20070022689A1 US11/479,479 US47947906A US2007022689A1 US 20070022689 A1 US20070022689 A1 US 20070022689A1 US 47947906 A US47947906 A US 47947906A US 2007022689 A1 US2007022689 A1 US 2007022689A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
block
system
ridges
edge
strip
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/479,479
Inventor
Bruce Thrush
John Grimm
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
PARALLAX GROUP LLC
Parallax Group International LLC
Original Assignee
Parallax Group International LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US69746605P priority Critical
Application filed by Parallax Group International LLC filed Critical Parallax Group International LLC
Priority to US11/479,479 priority patent/US20070022689A1/en
Assigned to THE PARALLAX GROUP, LLC reassignment THE PARALLAX GROUP, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: THRUSH, BRUCE, GRIMM, JOHN
Publication of US20070022689A1 publication Critical patent/US20070022689A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/10Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/18Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements of organic plastics with or without reinforcements or filling materials or with an outer layer of organic plastics with or without reinforcements or filling materials; plastic tiles
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/01Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship
    • E04F2201/0138Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by moving the sheets, plates or panels perpendicular to the main plane
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/05Separate connectors or inserts, e.g. pegs, pins, keys or strips

Abstract

A floor or wall covering has blocks with mating strips having multiple ridges and multiple grooves in both mating members. Ridges and grooves can have different sizes and cross-sectional shapes from one another, and can mate in a manner that provides expansion gaps. Male/female positioning pairs can advantageously be included to facilitate alignment of the blocks during installation and use. Preferred floor blocks comprise a ribbed support portion that supports a working surface, and the ribbed support portion defines a plurality of cells that collectively reduce the weight of the block by a factor of at least 20% relative to corresponding block without such cells.

Description

  • This application claims the benefit of our U.S. provisional patent application with the Ser. No. 60/697,466, which was filed Jul. 7, 2005.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The field of the invention is floor coverings.
  • BACKGROUND
  • There is a need for modular floor covering systems that are relatively easy to install, maintain, and provide reasonably good seal against water infiltration.
  • Various types of modular floor covering systems are well known, including for example systems having edges that mate using a single ridge and a single groove (see US 2002/0189183, U.S. Pat. No. 5,630,304). The known single-ridge, single-groove floor covering blocks (also called tiles) are relatively easy to install and maintain, but can come apart too easily. In addition, use of only a single ridge and a single groove on each strip provides a relatively poor water barrier.
  • More sophisticated water barriers have been developed that use multiple ridges and grooves in only one of the strips, and a removable seal disposed in one of the multiple grooves. For example, Flooring Surfaces™ markets a floor covering system in which an upper edge strip mates with a lower edge strip having a separate seal. Interestingly, there do not appear to be any flooring or wall covering systems in which both mating strips have multiple ridges and multiple grooves. Thus, there is still a need for a modular floor covering system in which both mating strips have multiple ridges and multiple grooves.
  • In addition, there is a long-standing problem with alignment of ridged mating systems that has never been resolved. Since any portion of a block edge can mate with any other portion of a mating block edge, larger installations frequently get out of alignment. Thus, there is still a need for systems and methods for aligning blocks having grooved mating systems.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides apparatus, systems and methods for covering a floor or wall surface, in which blocks have mating strips with multiple ridges and multiple grooves in both mating members.
  • In one aspect of preferred embodiments, the ridges on the various strips can have different cross-sectional shapes from one another. Accordingly, the ridges on one of the strips can combine to be more massive than the ridges on the opposing strip, and the strip having the more massive ridges can be used advantageously as the upper strip. The strip having the less massive ridges can be used advantageously as the lower strip.
  • In another aspect the various ridges and grooves mate in a manner that provides expansion gaps. Such gaps allow expansion room for easier assembly and disassembly.
  • In yet another aspect, systems and methods are contemplated in which at least some of the blocks have both ridged mating strips and at least one mechanical positioner. Preferred positioners are male and female pairs, including for example locator and slot pairs, and boss and hole pairs. Blocks can have multiple positioners.
  • Various objects, features, aspects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention, along with the accompanying drawings in which like numerals represent like components.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • FIG. 1 is a vertical cross-section of a mating region of prior art floor covering blocks, before installation.
  • FIG. 2 is a vertical cross-section of a mating region of prior art floor covering blocks of FIG. 1, after installation.
  • FIG. 3 is a vertical cross-section of a mating region between two modular floor covering blocks, before installation.
  • FIG. 4 is a vertical cross-section of the mating region between the two modular floor covering blocks of FIG. 3, after installation.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the bottom of a block, showing a waffle pattern that supports a main or “working surface”.
  • FIG. 5A is a perspective view of a portion of block having a locator in the middle of one of the sides, and a boss at a corner.
  • FIG. 5B is a perspective view of a portion of another block having a female connector that mates with the boss of FIG. 5A.
  • FIG. 5C is a perspective view of a portion of the block of FIG. 5B, having a slot that mates with the locator of FIG. 5A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In prior art FIGS. 1 and 2, a modular floor covering system 100 generally comprises blocks 110 and 120, having edge strips 112, 122, respectively. Edge strip 112 has a single ridge 115 and a single groove 117. Edge strip 122 has two ridges 125A, 125B, and two grooves 127A, 127B. A resiliently compressible tubular seal 129 is disposed in groove 127B.
  • In FIGS. 3 and 4, a floor covering system 200 generally has a plurality of modular blocks. Here, edge portions of blocks 210 and 220 are shown prior to installation.
  • Each block generally has four sides. In a preferred embodiment, two of the sides have edge strips arranged as strip 212, and two other sides have edge strips arranged as strip 222. This configuration allows identical blocks to interlock in a manner that covers a large area. Of course, other embodiments are also contemplated that have other than four sides. Thus, contemplated embodiments include those that have three sides (triangular), five sides (pentagonal), and so forth, as well as embodiments where the sides do not define a regular geometric shape.
  • Floor covering block 200 generally has a thickness of at least 2 mm, preferably at least 5 mm, more preferably at least 10 mm, most preferably at least 15 mm. In preferred embodiments, block 100 is contemplated to be at least 10 cm long, more preferably at least 50 cm long, and most preferably at least 80 cm long. The modular floor covering blocks can be made of any suitable material common known for floor covering, including clay, stone, wood, polymeric materials, and especially material selected from the list consisting of vinyl, rubber, linoleum, and resin. Especially contemplated materials include PVC, DOP, polypropylene, TPR, TPE, and blends of these, along with smaller amounts of fillers and stabilizers.
  • Along one edge of block 210 is edge strip 212 having two parallel ridges 215A, 215B and grooves 217A, 217B. A second block 220 has edge strip 222, with corresponding parallel grooves 227A, 227B sized and dimensioned to mate with the two ridges 215A, 215B. Edge strip 222 also has two parallel ridges, 225A, 225B, sized and dimensioned to mate with the two grooves 217A, 217B. Those skilled in the art will immediately appreciate how any number of such blocks could be configured together to make a square, rectangular or other grouping to cover a desired area of floor, lawn, wall, etc.
  • Edge strips can be any practical width, thickness, and length. The ridges and grooves on edge strips need not be at the lateral ends of the strips, and indeed in many cases (such as that shown in FIGS. 3, 4), the most laterally positioned ridge 215A can be positioned several mm from the lateral-most edge of the strip.
  • The two ridges of each strip 212, 222 are preferably separated by at least 2 mm, more preferably at least 5 mm, most preferably at least 8 mm. As used herein the term “parallel” means substantially parallel, and includes ridges that are wavy or out of parallel by an amount that does not adversely affect performance to a significant degree. Thus, ridges that are out of parallel by 5-10% may well fall within the meaning of the term parallel, as used herein, provided that the arrangements does not adversely affect performance to a significant degree.
  • In preferred embodiments, ridge 225A is sized and dimensioned to abut groove 217A so as to prevent infiltration of moisture. All four of the ridges 215A, 215B, 225A, 225B are sufficiently thick to provided needed strength. In many cases this would mean that the ridge are at least 2 mm thick, more preferably at least 4 mm thick, and most preferably 6 mm thick. In a preferred embodiments, top ridges 215A and 215B are larger than bottom ridges 225A, 225B, preferably at least 5% larger, more preferably at least 15% larger, and most preferably at least 35% bigger. Bigger ridges are thought to allow relatively easier coupling of the upper and lower edge strips 220, 222, and relatively better locking performance.
  • With a given strip, the ridges can have same sizes as one another, or different sizes. Thus, top ridges 215A, 215B can be the same or different sizes from one another, and bottom ridges 225A, 225B can be the same or different sizes from one another. There is a potential benefit in having different sized ridges on a given strip in that different sizes can improve the ease of coupling the strips together. To that end a more lateral ridge is preferably larger than a more medial ridge.
  • It is also possible, although not desirable from a manufacturing cost standpoint, for different ridges on a given strip to be made of different materials, densities, shapes, colors and so forth. In FIGS. 3 and 4, ridges 215A, 215B project downwardly at angle slightly off normal, and have a laterally extending bulbous portion 218 that acts as a lead-in region. Those features also assist in locking strip 212 in place when mated with strip 222. Of course, various other shapes, sizes, and configurations of the ridges are also possible.
  • Further contemplated embodiments have edge strips shaped to create expansion gaps 300A-D when two blocks are installed. These expansion gaps allows relatively easier installation, relatively more aggressive snaps, and allows relatively easier disassembly. Size of the gap is defined by the distance between corresponding ridges and grooves. Preferred size of the gap is at least 0.05 mm, more preferably at least 0.5 mm, most preferably at least 1.0 mm.
  • It is further contemplated that a propositioned adhesive is disposed on the strips. Such an adhesive can help in preventing water and moisture penetration through the seals, and can assist in preventing unwanted separation of mating strips.
  • In FIG. 5, a tile system 300 has a “waffle design” portion 330 that supports a main or working surface 350. The waffle design portion 330 is shown here as orthogonal ribs 332 that define substantially square cells 334. In a preferred embodiment there are 20 ribs in each direction, forming 361 cells (a matrix of 19×19), but there could be a greater or lesser number of ribs in either direction. The ribs 332 can be any suitable thickness, or even have varying thicknesses, but preferably have a uniform thickness of 0.155 inch (or about 3 mm). The ribs could, of course, be oriented in some other manner, which would produce cells having a diamond, round, ovoid, or any other suitable shape. The cells can have any suitable depth, but are preferably about 4 mm deep, with a ceiling (the working surface) having a thickness of 0.063 inch (or about 2-3 mm). There can be any suitable number of cells, including especially at least 100 cells, more preferably at least 200 cells, and most preferably at least 300 cells.
  • It turns out that using a ribbed (“waffle design”) on the underside of a polymeric floor block provides sufficient structural integrity to support the weight of normally expected garage-based or other activity, including supporting the weight of cars, gym equipment, etc. The ribbed (“waffle design”) also provides significant cost and weight reduction. For example, use of a ribbed (“waffle design”) in place of a solid design can reduce the weight of the block by at least 20%, more preferably at least 30%, and most preferably at least 40%.
  • In FIG. 5A-5C a tile system 300 includes at least two pieces of block 310. In FIG. 5A, block 310 has a locator 312 in the middle of one of the sides, and a boss 314 at a corner. Each of the locator 312 and boss 314 could be placed elsewhere on the block 310, or replaced and/or supplemented with other types, sizes, and configurations of positioners. The boss 314, for example, could be rectangular or diamond shaped rather than round. In FIGS. 5B and 5C, a slot 322 on a first of the blocks 310, mates with the locator 312 on a second of blocks 310, and a ring 324 defining a hole on the first of blocks 310 that mates with the boss 314 on the second of blockss 310. The mating pairs, (locator 312 and slot 322; and boss 314 and ring 324), serve to maintain alignment among the various blocks of system 300 during installation and use.
  • Thus, specific embodiments and applications of plastic flooring with improved seal have been disclosed. It should be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that many more modifications besides those already described are possible without departing from the inventive concepts herein. The inventive subject matter, therefore, is not to be restricted except in the spirit of the appended claims. Moreover, in interpreting both the specification and the claims, all terms should be interpreted in the broadest possible manner consistent with the context. In particular, the terms “comprises” and “comprising” should be interpreted as referring to elements, components, or steps in a non-exclusive manner, indicating that the referenced elements, components, or steps may be present, or utilized, or combined with other elements, components, or steps that are not expressly referenced. Where the specification claims refers to at least one of something selected from the group consisting of A, B, C . . . and N, the text should be interpreted as requiring only one element from the group, not A plus N, or B plus N, etc.

Claims (20)

1. A system for covering a surface, comprising:
a first block with an edge having a first edge strip along which are disposed at least two parallel ridges;
a second block with an edge having a second edge strip along which are disposed at least two parallel grooves, the grooves sized and dimensioned to mate with the ridges; and
the first and second blocks each having a thickness of at least 2 mm.
2. The system of claim 1 wherein the first block has a second edge with a second edge strip with at least two parallel ridges, and third and fourth edges each having edge strips with at least two parallel grooves.
3. The system of claim 1 wherein the first and second blocks comprise a polymeric material.
4. The system of claim 1 wherein the first strip is at least 10 cm long.
5. The system of claim 1 wherein first and second of the at least two ridges are separated by at least 2 mm.
6. The system of claim 1 wherein the first block is at least 5 mm thick.
7. The system of claim 1 further comprising a propositioned adhesive disposed upon at least one of the first and second strips.
8. The system of claim 1 wherein at least one of the ridges includes a bulbous region.
9. The system of claim 1 wherein at least one of the ridges extends downwardly at an angle slightly off normal.
10. The system of claim 1, further comprising a third ridge positioned between the two parallel grooves; and a third groove positioned between the at least two parallel ridges; wherein the third ridge is positioned to abut against the third groove as a barrier to moisture.
11. The system of claim 1, further comprising a three-channel interface between the first strip of the first block and first strip of the second block.
12. The system of claim 1 wherein the first edge strip is at least 5% more massive than the second edge strip.
13. The system of claim 10, further comprising gaps between the at least two ridges and the at least two grooves, allowing expansion room for the at least two ridges when the two edge strips snap together.
14. The system of claim 1, further comprising at least one positioning pair that includes a least one of a locator, slot, boss, and ring.
15. A floor block comprising a ribbed support portion that supports a working surface, the ribbed support portion defining a plurality of cells that collectively reduce the weight of the block by a factor of at least 20% relative to corresponding block without such cells.
16. The block of claim 15, wherein the factor is at least 30%.
17. The block of claim 15, wherein the factor is at least 40%.
18. The block of claim 15, wherein the ribbed support portion defines at least 100 cells.
19. The block of claim 15, wherein the ribbed support portion defines at least 200 cells.
20. The block of claim 15, wherein the ribbed support portion defines at least 350 cells.
US11/479,479 2005-07-07 2006-06-30 Plastic flooring with improved seal Abandoned US20070022689A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US69746605P true 2005-07-07 2005-07-07
US11/479,479 US20070022689A1 (en) 2005-07-07 2006-06-30 Plastic flooring with improved seal

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/479,479 US20070022689A1 (en) 2005-07-07 2006-06-30 Plastic flooring with improved seal

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070022689A1 true US20070022689A1 (en) 2007-02-01

Family

ID=37692775

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/479,479 Abandoned US20070022689A1 (en) 2005-07-07 2006-06-30 Plastic flooring with improved seal

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20070022689A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100180220A1 (en) * 2002-03-07 2010-07-15 SAP America, Inc. Method and System for Creating Graphical and Interactive Representations of Input and Output Data
WO2010142671A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-16 Fritz Egger Gmbh & Co. Og Panel of a floor system
WO2012136021A1 (en) * 2011-04-03 2012-10-11 Ge Yuejin Pvc lock floor board
US8806832B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2014-08-19 Inotec Global Limited Vertical joint system and associated surface covering system
EP2788561A4 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-04-06 Tarkett Usa Inc Interlocking floor tile

Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US714987A (en) * 1902-02-17 1902-12-02 Martin Wilford Wolfe Interlocking board.
US3694983A (en) * 1970-05-19 1972-10-03 Pierre Jean Couquet Pile or plastic tiles for flooring and like applications
US3731445A (en) * 1970-05-02 1973-05-08 Freudenberg C Joinder of floor tiles
US4037377A (en) * 1968-05-28 1977-07-26 H. H. Robertson Company Foamed-in-place double-skin building panel
US5630304A (en) * 1995-12-28 1997-05-20 Austin; John Adjustable interlock floor tile
US5791114A (en) * 1997-04-02 1998-08-11 Mandel; Nigel Quick-assembly interlocking tile
US5822944A (en) * 1996-09-04 1998-10-20 Penland, Sr.; Joe E. Double locking flooring system for a construction site
US20020046528A1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2002-04-25 Darko Pervan Locking system, floorboard comprising such a locking system, as well as method for making floorboards
US20020112433A1 (en) * 2001-01-12 2002-08-22 Darko Pervan Floorboard and locking system therefor
US20020189183A1 (en) * 2001-06-19 2002-12-19 Ricciardelli Thomas E. Decorative interlocking tile
US6510665B2 (en) * 2000-01-24 2003-01-28 Valinge Aluminum Ab Locking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US6606834B2 (en) * 1995-03-07 2003-08-19 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US20040031226A1 (en) * 2002-08-14 2004-02-19 Miller Robert J. Pre-glued tongue and groove flooring
US20040035079A1 (en) * 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Evjen John M. Method and apparatus for interconnecting paneling
US20040211143A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2004-10-28 Hans-Jurgen Hanning Panel and fastening system for such a panel
US20050138881A1 (en) * 2003-03-06 2005-06-30 Darko Pervan Flooring systems and methods for installation
US20050144878A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2005-07-07 Thomas Grafenauer Building board for use in subfloors
US7029741B2 (en) * 2002-12-09 2006-04-18 Pergo (Europe) Ab Process for sealing of a joint

Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US714987A (en) * 1902-02-17 1902-12-02 Martin Wilford Wolfe Interlocking board.
US4037377A (en) * 1968-05-28 1977-07-26 H. H. Robertson Company Foamed-in-place double-skin building panel
US3731445A (en) * 1970-05-02 1973-05-08 Freudenberg C Joinder of floor tiles
US3694983A (en) * 1970-05-19 1972-10-03 Pierre Jean Couquet Pile or plastic tiles for flooring and like applications
US6606834B2 (en) * 1995-03-07 2003-08-19 Pergo (Europe) Ab Flooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US5630304A (en) * 1995-12-28 1997-05-20 Austin; John Adjustable interlock floor tile
US5822944A (en) * 1996-09-04 1998-10-20 Penland, Sr.; Joe E. Double locking flooring system for a construction site
US5791114A (en) * 1997-04-02 1998-08-11 Mandel; Nigel Quick-assembly interlocking tile
US20020046528A1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2002-04-25 Darko Pervan Locking system, floorboard comprising such a locking system, as well as method for making floorboards
US6510665B2 (en) * 2000-01-24 2003-01-28 Valinge Aluminum Ab Locking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US20020112433A1 (en) * 2001-01-12 2002-08-22 Darko Pervan Floorboard and locking system therefor
US20020189183A1 (en) * 2001-06-19 2002-12-19 Ricciardelli Thomas E. Decorative interlocking tile
US20040211143A1 (en) * 2001-08-10 2004-10-28 Hans-Jurgen Hanning Panel and fastening system for such a panel
US20040031226A1 (en) * 2002-08-14 2004-02-19 Miller Robert J. Pre-glued tongue and groove flooring
US20040035079A1 (en) * 2002-08-26 2004-02-26 Evjen John M. Method and apparatus for interconnecting paneling
US7029741B2 (en) * 2002-12-09 2006-04-18 Pergo (Europe) Ab Process for sealing of a joint
US20050138881A1 (en) * 2003-03-06 2005-06-30 Darko Pervan Flooring systems and methods for installation
US20050144878A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2005-07-07 Thomas Grafenauer Building board for use in subfloors

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100180220A1 (en) * 2002-03-07 2010-07-15 SAP America, Inc. Method and System for Creating Graphical and Interactive Representations of Input and Output Data
WO2010142671A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-16 Fritz Egger Gmbh & Co. Og Panel of a floor system
CN102459780A (en) * 2009-06-08 2012-05-16 弗瑞兹艾格有限及两合公司 Panel of a floor system
US8820014B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2014-09-02 Fritz Egger Gmbh & Co. Og Panel of a floor system
US8806832B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2014-08-19 Inotec Global Limited Vertical joint system and associated surface covering system
US9103126B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2015-08-11 Inotec Global Limited Vertical joint system and associated surface covering system
US10000935B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2018-06-19 Inotec Global Limited Vertical joint system and associated surface covering system
WO2012136021A1 (en) * 2011-04-03 2012-10-11 Ge Yuejin Pvc lock floor board
EP2788561A4 (en) * 2011-12-06 2016-04-06 Tarkett Usa Inc Interlocking floor tile

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8713863B2 (en) Modular floor tile with resilient support members
RU2396398C2 (en) Panel, uppermost floor panel
US6467224B1 (en) Decking tile
US3594969A (en) Mounting frame
EP1014846B1 (en) Floor mat
EP0191868B1 (en) Method of laying tile-like floor materials
US7571572B2 (en) Modular floor tile system with sliding lock
US6769218B2 (en) Floorboard and locking system therefor
CA2036322C (en) Resilient floor system
US6233886B1 (en) Floor assembly and associated method of making a floor assembly
US8166722B2 (en) Modular floor tile system with transition edge
ES2241539T3 (en) Interconnectable coating system, separable soils.
AU2002217740C1 (en) Floorboard and locking system
US8336272B2 (en) Device and method for locking two building boards
EP0117707A2 (en) Mat module with ramp strip
RU2305164C2 (en) Floor plate laying system
US5907934A (en) Interfacing floor tile
EP0937184B1 (en) Tile flooring
EP1211365A9 (en) Modular construction elements
CA2551042C (en) Overlapping secured mat system
AU749743B2 (en) Revetment block
US8429870B2 (en) Connecting system for surface coverings
US6725617B2 (en) Waterproof deck
US20130042565A1 (en) Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US7621092B2 (en) Device and method for locking two building boards

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: THE PARALLAX GROUP, LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:THRUSH, BRUCE;GRIMM, JOHN;REEL/FRAME:018100/0009;SIGNINGDATES FROM 20050711 TO 20060803