US20070020571A1 - Multi-region compressed wax article and method for making same - Google Patents

Multi-region compressed wax article and method for making same Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070020571A1
US20070020571A1 US11/187,164 US18716405A US2007020571A1 US 20070020571 A1 US20070020571 A1 US 20070020571A1 US 18716405 A US18716405 A US 18716405A US 2007020571 A1 US2007020571 A1 US 2007020571A1
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Prior art keywords
wax
regions
particles
method
wax particles
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US11/187,164
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Ronald Burkhamer
Steven Gutkowski
Robert Hutchins
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Candle Corp of America
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Candle Corp of America
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Priority to US11/187,164 priority Critical patent/US20070020571A1/en
Assigned to CANDLE CORPORATION OF AMERICA reassignment CANDLE CORPORATION OF AMERICA ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BURKHAMER, RONALD E., GUTKOWSKI, STEVEN M., HUTCHINS, ROBERT L.
Publication of US20070020571A1 publication Critical patent/US20070020571A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11CFATTY ACIDS FROM FATS, OILS OR WAXES; CANDLES; FATS, OILS OR FATTY ACIDS BY CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF FATS, OILS, OR FATTY ACIDS OBTAINED THEREFROM
    • C11C5/00Candles
    • C11C5/008Candles characterised by their form; Composite candles, e.g. candles containing zones of different composition, inclusions, or the like
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11CFATTY ACIDS FROM FATS, OILS OR WAXES; CANDLES; FATS, OILS OR FATTY ACIDS BY CHEMICAL MODIFICATION OF FATS, OILS, OR FATTY ACIDS OBTAINED THEREFROM
    • C11C5/00Candles
    • C11C5/02Apparatus for preparation thereof
    • C11C5/021Apparatus for preparation thereof by compressing solid materials in a mould without heating

Abstract

A multi-region compressed wax article such as a candle is made by simultaneously dispensing multiple types of wax particles into a pressing mold to form a body of wax particles having corresponding multiple regions, and then the body of wax particles is compressed. A mass of wax particles divided into regions can be formed directly in the mold, or outside of the mold, and then dispensed into the mold to form a body of particles for compression. Alternatively, a body of wax particles can be formed directly in the mold, or outside of the mold and then transferred into the mold for compression. The resulting multi-region compressed wax article can have contiguous or non-contiguous regions of various shapes, such as parallel, swirled, checkered.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Disclosure
  • The disclosure relates generally to decorative and functional wax articles. More particularly, the disclosure relates to multi-region decorative and functional articles, including candles.
  • 2. Brief Description of Related Technology
  • Candles are known which are made from compressed wax particles. In one particular compressed candle, layers of wax prill are added successively into a compression mold, the wax is compressed, and a wick is added to form a compression candle with multiple horizontally-disposed layers.
  • SUMMARY
  • One aspect of the disclosure provides a method of making a multi-region compressed wax article, including the steps of forming a body of wax particles including a first region including first wax particles and a second region including second wax particles different from the first wax particles, including simultaneously dispensing first wax particles and second wax particles into a pressing mold and compressing the body of wax particles.
  • Another aspect of the disclosure provides a compressed wax article, including a compressed body including wax particles, said body including at least two parallel, contiguous regions wherein a first region includes a first wax and a second region includes a second wax different from the first wax, at least one of the regions including a wick disposed in the region along an axis parallel to a plane formed by intersection of the parallel regions.
  • Still another aspect of the disclosure provides a compressed wax article, including a compressed body including wax particles, said body including at least two regions contiguous along a first axis of the body, wherein a first region includes a first wax and a second region includes a second wax different from the first wax, and wherein the intersection of the regions is nonplanar.
  • Yet another aspect of the disclosure is a compressed wax article, including a compressed body including wax particles, said body including a plurality of first regions including a first wax and a plurality of second regions including a second wax different from the first wax, the first and second regions disposed in alternating vertical and radial relationship to each other.
  • Further aspects and advantages will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art from a review of the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the drawings. While the method and articles are susceptible of embodiments in various forms, the description hereafter includes specific embodiments with the understanding that the disclosure is illustrative, and is not intended to limit the invention to the specific embodiments described herein.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For further facilitating the understanding of the present invention, thirteen drawing figures of embodiments of various apparatus according to the disclosure are appended hereto, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 shows a top view of a wax charge cylinder.
  • FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the wax charge cylinder of FIG. 1 with an associated drive unit and belt.
  • FIG. 3 shows a side view with cutaways of an apparatus for performing the method described herein and making the articles described herein.
  • FIG. 4 shows a top view of the apparatus of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 shows a top view of a wax charge device inside a cylindrical press wall.
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of the wax charge device of FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of a compressed wax candle having three parallel vertical regions.
  • FIGS. 8 shows a perspective view of a compressed wax article having three swirled regions.
  • FIG. 9 shows a side view of the article of FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 10 shows a top view of another wax charge cylinder.
  • FIG. 11 shows a top view of another wax charge cylinder.
  • FIG. 12 shows a top view of an uncompressed mass of wax particles of two types in the charge cylinder of FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 13 shows a perspective view of a cylindrical, checkerboard, compressed wax article that can be made from the wax charge cylinder and uncompressed mass of wax particles shown in FIGS. 11 and 12.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A multi-region compressed wax article is made by simultaneously dispensing multiple types of wax particles into a pressing mold to form a body of wax particles having corresponding multiple regions, and then the body of wax particles is compressed. A mass of wax particles divided into regions can be formed directly in the mold, or outside of the mold, and then dispensed into the mold to form a body of particles for compression. Alternatively, a body of wax particles can be formed directly in the mold, or outside of the mold and then transferred into the mold for compression. The mold is preferably cylindrical.
  • A mass of wax particles physically divided into regions can be formed outside the mold and then simultaneously dispensed into the mold. The entire divided mass can be loaded into the mold and then the mass separated from the dividers to simultaneously dispense the particles into the mold and form a body, or the pellets can be separated from the dividers while outside the mold and simultaneously dispensed into the mold (e.g., by gravity from above the mold).
  • In another variation, a mass of wax particles physically divided into regions can be formed inside the mold and then the regions can be simultaneously dispensed into the mold to form a body of wax particles by removing the one or more physical dividers. For example, one or more dividing walls can be inserted into the pressing mold, multiple wax pellet types can be loaded into physical regions formed by the dividing wall(s), optionally together with the mold wall(s), without regard to loading sequence, and then all pellet types can be simultaneously dispensed to form a body by removing the dividing wall(s).
  • When dispensed by any variation on the method, the relative vertical arrangement of the wax particles preferably is at least substantially maintained. For example, the relative vertical arrangement of the particles can be maintained by supporting the particles in the mass or body during dispensing, such as to prevent freefall and horizontal scattering. Thus, in one expedient the method can include forming outside a pressing mold a mass of wax particles divided into regions, providing a support surface below the mass of particles, the support surface being a lower press plate of a pressing mold, and gradually lowering the lower press plate into the pressing mold to transfer the wax particles into the mold to substantially maintain their relative vertical arrangement.
  • The regions of the body of wax particles prior to compression can be identical in shape and size to the regions in the mass of wax particles prior to dispensing into the pressing mold, or they can vary. For example, as shown in the examples below, a cylindrical mold can be filled by a mass of wax particles divided into three, smaller cylindrical regions. Thus, the area of wax particles in cross section within the mass of wax particles can be somewhat smaller than the area of the pressing mold in cross section, and simultaneous dispensing from the regions will substantially maintain their relative vertical arrangement. Similarly, the volume of particles in a region of the mass of wax particles can be somewhat smaller than the volume of the region formed by the wax charge device, such as with relatively large chunks of wax with interstitial voids, and simultaneous dispensing from the regions will substantially maintain the relative vertical arrangement of the particles in the regions even if some smaller particles from one or more adjacent regions fill in the interstitial voids during dispensing and/or compression.
  • The regions of the body of wax particles and compressed wax article can be of any desired size and shape. For example, the article can be cylindrical with a plurality of equal-sized, wedge-shaped regions in cross section. Similarly, the article can be cylindrical with alternating wide and narrow regions having planar interfaces, to give the article a pinstriped appearance. As described in more detail below, the regions can also have non-planar interfaces, such as variations in a radial direction, to provide the article with a candystriped appearance. In one type of embodiment, the regions are continuous. In one type of embodiment, the regions of the body of wax particles and regions of the compressed wax article are approximately the same shape. In another type of embodiment, for example as described in connection with FIGS. 5-7, the body of wax particles and regions of the compressed wax article can differ in shape.
  • The relative horizontal arrangement of the wax particles can be varied to provide the compressed article with a variety of unique and distinct compositions, such as striped, zigzag, swirled, stepped, checkered, and combinations thereof. For example, if a mass of wax particles is made outside the mold and separated into multiple regions with one or more dividing walls, then as the particles are separated from the dividing wall(s), the method can include providing relative rotation of the mass of wax particles and the dividing wall(s) with respect to each other during separation to provide radial variation to the regions. The rotation can be continuous, e.g., to give a swirled appearance to the article, or intermittent, e.g., to give a stepped or checkerboard appearance to the article.
  • The compressed wax articles can be decorative or functional. In one type of embodiment, at least one region of the article is made up of combustible wax and is provided with a wick. A wick can be provided in any manner. For example, a wick can be disposed in an uncompressed wax particle region and compressed together with the wax. As another example, a cavity can be formed in a compressed wax region during or subsequent to compression, and a wick can later be fed into the cavity in a separate wicking operation.
  • There is no limit to the type of waxes that can be used in the method and articles, so long as they can be compressed, optionally with the aid of auxiliary additives, to form a cohesive article. Suitable non-limiting examples include paraffin wax, preferably having a melt point between 120° F. and 155° F. (49° C. and 68° C.) and a maximum oil content of about 3 wt. %; microcrystalline wax, preferably present up to 50 wt. % and having a melt point between 150° F. and 195° F. (66° C. and 91° C.); a C14 to C20 fatty acid, preferably present up to 20 wt. %; natural waxes such as vegetable derived fatty waxes; polymers, preferably present in an amount up to 10 wt. %; and synthetic waxes.
  • The wax particles are solid, and can have any shape. Suitable non-limiting examples include granules, pastilles, pellets, powders, prills, beads, flakes, and chunks. Particle size is not a limitation of the methods and articles, and will generally be related to the overall mold size and article size. For example, for compressed articles or regions in the centimeter size range, the particles are preferably in the micrometer to millimeter size range.
  • The regions preferably include one or more ingredients to provide the resulting article with decorative and/or functional properties. Examples include any number of solid or liquid additives known for use in candle making, including substituted fatty acids, alcohols, acid esters, crystal modifiers, stability additives, UV inhibitors, antioxidants, and combinations thereof. Such ingredients can be provided alone, e.g., in particulate form and mixed with the wax particles, or as part of the wax particles themselves. Suitable decorative ingredients include, but are not limited to, pigments, dyes, and non-wax particulates (e.g., glitter). For example, a colorant can be included in an amount up to 2 wt. % in one type of embodiment. Suitable functional and active ingredients include, but are not limited to, fragrances, deodorants, insect repellents, animal attractants, sanitizing agents, or any other such compounds suitable for release from the article into the surrounding environment. For example, a functional and/or active ingredient can be included in an amount up to 15 wt. % in one type of embodiment. The regions can also include more than one type of wax, such as a combination of a relatively large chunked wax and a relatively small granular wax.
  • At least one region is made up of a wax (including a combination of waxes) that differs from a wax forming another region, preferably an adjacent region. In one type of preferred embodiment, the difference in waxes is visual. For example, the waxes can have different colors, sizes, shapes, opacities, reflectivities, and combinations thereof. In another type of preferred embodiment, not mutually-exclusive, the difference in waxes is functional, such as by the inclusion of an active ingredient or in difference of base wax composition.
  • Wax particles are commercially available, or can be made by Example 1 described below.
  • One embodiment of the type wherein a mass of wax particles physically divided into regions is formed outside the mold and then simultaneously dispensed into the mold will now be described in detail with respect to the figures. FIGS. 1 and 2 show chamber for receiving wax particles in the form of a rotating wax charge cylinder 10. The cylinder 10 has a side wall 12 and dividing walls 14, 18, and 20 fixed to the side wall 12, to form three contiguous, vertical regions 22, 24, and 28. The cylinder 10 is coupled to a drive unit 30 including a motor 32, a shaft 34, and a pulley 38, by a drive belt 40 to provide rotation of the cylinder 10 including dividing walls 14, 18, and 20. In an alternative arrangement, the dividing walls 14, 18, and 20 can be fixed together but free to rotate as a whole inside the side wall 12, for example by a top-mounted drive unit.
  • FIG. 3 shows a support surface 42 under which is mounted a cylindrical pressing mold 44 shown in cross-section having a side wall 46 forming a mold cavity 48. The pressing apparatus includes upper and lower presses including press plates 50, 52 connected by upper and lower shafts 54, 58 to upper and lower cylinders 70, 72, such as hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders. The lower press plate 52 and the shaft 58 are shown in the extended position to the top of the pressing mold 44.
  • The wax charge cylinder 10 (shown with cutaway regions above and below the drive belt) and the drive unit 30 are mounted into a transport box 74 shown in cross-section coupled by a shaft 78 to a transfer cylinder 80, such as a hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, for lateral movement. Above the transport box 74 are mounted three wax particle storage hoppers 82, 84, and 88 holding corresponding wax particles of different varieties.
  • FIG. 4 shows a top view of the apparatus of FIG. 3, without the upper and lower presses.
  • In operation, the transport cylinder 80 moves the transport box 74 such that the wax charge cylinder 0 is positioned below the storage hopper 82 for loading: wax particles into the region 22, then under the storage hopper 84 for loading wax particles into the region 24, and then under the storage hopper 88 for loading wax particles into the region 28. If the outlets of the hoppers 82, 84, and 88, are not aligned with the respective regions, then the wax charge cylinder 10 can be rotated by drive unit 30 for proper alignment.
  • After filling the wax charge cylinder 10, the transfer cylinder 80 moves the transport box 74 laterally such that the wax charge cylinder 10 is aligned over the pressing mold 44. The lower end of the wax charge cylinder 10 is sealed by surface 42 during until the cylinder 10 is positioned over the pressing chamber 44, at which time it becomes sealed by lower press plate 52. The wax particles (not shown) in the wax charge cylinder 10 are supported by surface 42 until the cylinder 10 is positioned over the pressing chamber 44, at which time they are supported by the lower press plate 52.
  • To fill the mold chamber 48 with wax particles while substantially maintaining the relative vertical arrangement of the wax particles, the lower press plate 52 is slowly lowered into the pressing mold 44. If a non-vertical (e.g., swirled pattern) is desired in the resulting compressed article, the cylinder 10 can be rotated by the drive unit 30 as the lower press plate 52 is lowered. As another example, if a checkerboard pattern is desired, the lowering of press plate 52 and rotation of cylinder 10 can be alternated in even increments to fill the mold chamber 48. In an alternative arrangement, the cylinder 10 can be sized to fit inside the pressing mold 44, and the mold 44 can be filled by first lowering the lower press plate 52 and cylinder 10 into the pressing mold 44 and then raising the cylinder 10 out of the pressing mold 44, with optional rotation of the cylinder 10.
  • Subsequent to filling, the transfer cylinder 80 operates to move the transport box 74 laterally back to the start position or for subsequent filling of the cylinder 10 for another cycle. Next, the upper press cylinder 70 lowers the upper press plate 50 to seal the top of the pressing mold 44. To compress wax particles in the pressing mold 44, the lower press cylinder 72 raises the lower press plate 52. In the alternative, upper press cylinder 70 can further lower the upper press plate 50 into the pressing mold 44. To discharge a compressed wax article, the upper press cylinder 70 raises the upper press plate 50, and the lower press cylinder 72 raises the upper press plate 52 to push out the compressed wax article.
  • FIGS. 5 and 6 show an alternative embodiment of a wax charge device 100, which is a bundle of three small cylinders 102, 104, and 108, defining regions 112, 114, and 118, respectively. The cylinders 102, 104, and 108 are shown in FIG. 6 as held together by straps 120 and 122. The wax charge device 100 is shown in FIG. 5 from above and as sized with respect to a cylindrical press wall 124. The wax charge device 100 is preferably loaded with three different types of wax particles (not shown) into regions 112, 114, and 118, respectively. In cross-section with respect to the cylindrical press chamber defined by wall 124, four regions of space 128, 130, 132, and 134 remain. These regions within the press chamber defined by wall 124 will be proportionally filled in by wax particles from regions 112, 114, and 118, as the charge device 100 is separated from the wax particles, while the particles in regions 112, 114, and 118 substantially maintain their relative vertical arrangement with respect to each other.
  • FIG. 7 shows a candle 140 made by the apparatus shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. The candle 140 is cylindrical and, with respect to central axis A has three parallel vertical regions 142, 144, and 148, made from three different wax particles. Regions 142, 144, and 148 are each contiguous from the top of the candle 140 to the bottom of the candle 140. Regions 142, 144, and 148 have wicks 152, 154, and 158, respectively disposed in each of the regions, and each along an axis parallel to the central axis (which is also parallel to the intersection planes between each parallel region 142, 144, and 148). Wicks 152 and 154 are shown lit, with respective flames.
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 show another compressed wax article 170 made from the apparatus of FIGS. 5 and 6. The article 170 is cylindrical, and has three contiguous regions 172, 174, and 178. The regions 172, 174, and 178, are swirled around central axis B, and were formed by rotating wax charge device 100 (FIGS. 5 and 6) while dispensing wax particles from the cylinders 102, 104, and 108 simultaneously into a cylindrical press cavity formed by wall 124. The interface 180 is nonplanar, is linear in the axial direction C with respect to axis B, and varies in the radial direction D with respect to axis B.
  • FIG. 10 shows another variation of a cylindrical wax charge chamber 182 having a side wall 184 and vertically-disposed dividing walls 188, 190, and 192, forming parallel chamber regions 194, 198, 200, and 202, each of which is contiguous from the top of the cylinder wall 184 to the bottom of the cylinder wall 184.
  • FIG. 11 shows another variation of a cylindrical wax charge chamber 204 having a side wall 208 and vertically-disposed dividing walls 210 a-c, 212 a-c, 214 a-c, and 218 a-c. The dividing walls form chamber regions 220-240 in a cylindrical checkerboard pattern. The chamber 204 can dispense wax particles into a complimentary-sized cylindrical pressing chamber in increments by alternating separation of wax particles from the chamber 204 (e.g., by lowering a lower press plate, as in the procedure described with respect to FIG. 3, above) and rotation of the chamber 204, to form a body of wax particles in three-dimensional checkerboard pattern, which can be pressed into an article having the same composition.
  • For example, FIG. 12 shows a top view of a pressing chamber 208 filled with wax particles making up a mass of wax particles having parallel regions 242-262, prior to dispensing. Wax particle regions 242, 248, 258, and 262 can be of a first type of wax (e.g., black in color), and wax particle regions 244, 250, 252, 254, and 260 can be of a second type of wax (e.g., white in color). FIG. 13 shows an example of a resulting cylindrical, checkerboard, compressed wax article that can be made from such a filled chamber 204 by the following procedure.
  • The chamber 204 and wax particles can be supported at the bottom by a lower press plate (not shown), as in FIG. 3, and lowered into a pressing chamber. The chamber 204 can be raised a distance equal to one quarter of its height to dispense a first layer “a” of wax particles having corresponding regions 242 a-262 a (compare FIG. 13). The chamber 204 can then be rotated 45 degrees counter-clockwise and then again raised a distance equal to one quarter of its height to dispense a second layer “b” of wax particles having corresponding regions 242 b-262 b (compare FIG. 13). The chamber 204 can then be rotated another 45 degrees counter-clockwise and then again raised a distance equal to one quarter of its height to dispense a third layer “c” of wax particles having corresponding regions 242 c-262 c (compare FIG. 13). The chamber 204 can then be rotated another 45 degrees counter-clockwise and then again raised a distance equal to one quarter of its height to dispense a fourth and final layer “d” of wax particles having corresponding regions 242 d-262 d (compare FIG. 13). The resulting body of wax particles can be compressed to form a unitary, compressed wax article, as shown in FIG. 13, having a plurality of first regions 242 a-d, 248 a-d, 258 a-d, and 262 a-d made of a first wax and a plurality of second regions 244 a-d, 250 a-d, 252 a-d, 254 a-d, and 260 a-d made of a second wax different from the first wax, the first and second regions disposed in alternating vertical and radial relationship to each other.
  • EXAMPLES
  • The following examples are provided for illustration and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.
  • Example 1
  • Fully refined paraffin EXXON PARAVAN 1420 is pre-blended with BAKER PETROLITE VYBAR 260 polymer, COGNIS Stearic 132, and CIBA TINUVIN 329 UV absorber until all components are thoroughly dissolved. Fragrances and dyes are added to the wax blend and mixed until thoroughly dispersed. The wax batch is held at a temperature of 145° F. (63° C.) to maintain a molten state.
  • The wax is pumped to a KURSCHNER wax spray drum system and held at 145° F. (63° C.). The spray drum temperature is maintained at 55° F. (13° C.). The drum rotates at 45 yards/min (41 meters/min). The spray room is maintained at approximately 65° F. (18° C.).
  • The wax pumps through a spray manifold system and onto the rotating drum. A scraper on the opposite side of the drum removes the wax granules, depositing them on a vibrating conveyor system. The conveyor system transfers the granules inside the drum, where the granules tumble for further cooling. After traveling through the drum, the granulated wax is transferred to a hopper for storage and later use.
  • Additional batches, with variations on wax content, are created by the same general procedure and stored in separate hoppers for storage and later use.
  • The foregoing description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, as modifications within the scope of the invention may be apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art.
  • Throughout the specification, where compositions are described as including components or materials, it is contemplated that the compositions can also consist essentially of, or consist of, any combination of the recited components or materials, unless described otherwise.
  • The practice of a method disclosed herein, and individual steps thereof, can be performed manually and/or with the aid of electronic equipment. Although processes have been described with reference to particular embodiments, a person of ordinary skill in the art will readily appreciate that other ways of performing the acts associated with the methods may be used. For example, the order of various of the steps may be changed without departing from the scope or spirit of the method. In addition, some of the individual steps can be combined, omitted, or further subdivided into additional steps.

Claims (21)

1. A method of making a multi-region compressed wax article, comprising the steps of:
forming a body of wax particles comprising a first region comprising first wax particles and a second region comprising second wax particles different from said first wax particles, comprising simultaneously dispensing first wax particles and second wax particles into a pressing mold; and
compressing said body of wax particles.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising the steps of:
providing a chamber for holding wax particles, said chamber comprising a top end and a bottom end;
providing a wall disposed in said chamber, said wall defining in said chamber at least two regions, each of said regions being contiguous from the top end of said chamber to the bottom end of said chamber;
filling said regions with wax particles, comprising filling a first region with a first wax and filling a second region with a second wax different from said first wax, to form a mass of wax particles divided by said wall; and
separating said wall from said mass of wax particles.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein said separating step comprises dispensing said particles into said pressing mold.
4. The method of claim 3, further comprising:
securing said dividing wall to said chamber; and
sealing the bottom end of said chamber with a bottom sealing wall prior to said filling step;
wherein said separating step comprises moving said chamber and dividing wall combination and said bottom sealing wall vertically with respect to each other.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising:
providing said pressing mold with a top end and a bottom end; and
disposing said bottom sealing wall at the top end of said pressing mold during said filling step;
wherein said separating step comprises lowering said bottom sealing wall into said pressing mold.
6. The method of claim 5, further comprising:
sealing the top end of said pressing mold with a top sealing wall, wherein said compressing step comprises raising said bottom sealing wall in said pressing mold.
7. The method of claim 2, wherein said chamber comprises said pressing mold and said separating step comprises removing said wall from said mold.
8. The method of claim 2, further comprising the step of rotating said wall and said mass with respect to each other during said separation.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein said rotation is continuous with said separation.
10. The method of claim 8, wherein said rotation and said separation are alternated until said separation is complete.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein said first wax and said second wax differ in particle size.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein said first wax and said second wax differ in color.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein said first wax and said second wax differ in scent.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein at least one of said waxes comprises an active ingredient selected from the group consisting of fragrance, insect repellent, animal attractant, sanitizing agent, and combinations thereof.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein at least one of said waxes is combustible, and further comprising the step of providing a wick disposed in the compressed article.
16. The method of claim 1, further comprising the steps of:
providing a pressing mold comprising a top end and a bottom end;
providing a wax particle dispenser comprising first and second outlets adjacent to each other in substantially the same plane, said first outlet in fluid communication with a supply of first wax particles and said second outlet in fluid communication with a supply of second wax particles;
lowering said dispenser into said pressing mold to the bottom of said mold; and
raising said wax particle dispenser during said dispensing step, to form said body of wax particles in said pressing mold.
17. A compressed wax article, comprising a compressed body comprising wax particles, said body comprising at least two parallel, contiguous regions wherein a first region comprises a first wax and a second region comprises a second Wax different from said first wax, at least one of said regions comprising a wick disposed in said region along an axis parallel to a plane formed by intersection of said parallel regions.
18. A compressed wax article, comprising a compressed body comprising wax particles, said body comprising at least two regions contiguous along a first axis of the body, wherein a first region comprises a first wax and a second region comprises a second wax different from said first wax, and wherein the intersection of said regions is nonplanar.
19. The article of claim 18, wherein said interface is linear in an axial direction with respect to said first axis.
20. The article of claim 19, wherein said interface varies in the radial direction with respect to said first axis, to provide the body with a swirled composition.
21. A compressed wax article, comprising a compressed body comprising wax particles, said body comprising a plurality of first regions comprising a first wax and a plurality of second regions comprising a second wax different from said first wax, said first and second regions disposed in alternating vertical and radial relationship to each other.
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US20070006521A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Bmc Manufacturing,Llc Multi-phase candle
US20070094917A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-05-03 Blyth Inc. Container candle with mottled appearance
WO2011156365A1 (en) * 2010-06-08 2011-12-15 The Yankee Candle Company, Inc. Candle with wax beads and solid wax topping
DE102010036580A1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2012-01-26 Vollmar Gmbh Fuel-form-pressing comprises simultaneously filling at least a 2 form-section of a hollow-form having a common, vertical interface with at least differently colored fuel powders along the interface, and compacting to a fuel form
US9566362B1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2017-02-14 Burton Hanna Poured and/or compressed multiple wax object

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US20070006521A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Bmc Manufacturing,Llc Multi-phase candle
US20070094917A1 (en) * 2005-10-19 2007-05-03 Blyth Inc. Container candle with mottled appearance
WO2011156365A1 (en) * 2010-06-08 2011-12-15 The Yankee Candle Company, Inc. Candle with wax beads and solid wax topping
CN103168091A (en) * 2010-06-08 2013-06-19 美国扬基蜡烛股份有限公司 Candle with wax beads and solid wax topping
US8651855B2 (en) 2010-06-08 2014-02-18 The Yankee Candle Company, Inc. Candle with wax beads and solid wax topping
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