US20070007009A1 - Methods of well stimulation and completion - Google Patents

Methods of well stimulation and completion Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070007009A1
US20070007009A1 US11522287 US52228706A US2007007009A1 US 20070007009 A1 US20070007009 A1 US 20070007009A1 US 11522287 US11522287 US 11522287 US 52228706 A US52228706 A US 52228706A US 2007007009 A1 US2007007009 A1 US 2007007009A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
well bore
fracture
method
resin
area
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11522287
Inventor
Philip Nguyen
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Original Assignee
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K8/00Compositions for drilling of boreholes or wells; Compositions for treating boreholes or wells, e.g. for completion or for remedial operations
    • C09K8/60Compositions for stimulating production by acting on the underground formation
    • C09K8/62Compositions for forming crevices or fractures
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K8/00Compositions for drilling of boreholes or wells; Compositions for treating boreholes or wells, e.g. for completion or for remedial operations
    • C09K8/56Compositions for consolidating loose sand or the like around wells without excessively decreasing the permeability thereof
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K8/00Compositions for drilling of boreholes or wells; Compositions for treating boreholes or wells, e.g. for completion or for remedial operations
    • C09K8/60Compositions for stimulating production by acting on the underground formation
    • C09K8/62Compositions for forming crevices or fractures
    • C09K8/66Compositions based on water or polar solvents
    • C09K8/68Compositions based on water or polar solvents containing organic compounds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K8/00Compositions for drilling of boreholes or wells; Compositions for treating boreholes or wells, e.g. for completion or for remedial operations
    • C09K8/60Compositions for stimulating production by acting on the underground formation
    • C09K8/62Compositions for forming crevices or fractures
    • C09K8/66Compositions based on water or polar solvents
    • C09K8/68Compositions based on water or polar solvents containing organic compounds
    • C09K8/685Compositions based on water or polar solvents containing organic compounds containing cross-linking agents
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K8/00Compositions for drilling of boreholes or wells; Compositions for treating boreholes or wells, e.g. for completion or for remedial operations
    • C09K8/60Compositions for stimulating production by acting on the underground formation
    • C09K8/80Compositions for reinforcing fractures, e.g. compositions of proppants used to keep the fractures open
    • C09K8/805Coated proppants

Abstract

Improved methods for well stimulation and completion are provided. More particularly, the methods relate to stimulating and completing well bores while controlling formation sand migration and proppant flowback. One embodiment provides a method comprising: providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture; placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis; and placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part application of commonly-owned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/751,593, filed Jan. 5, 2004, entitled “Methods of Well Stimulation and Completion,” by Philip D. Nguyen, which is incorporated by reference herein for all purposes.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to improved methods for well stimulation and completion. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods of stimulating and completing well bores while controlling formation sand migration and proppant flowback.
  • A subterranean formation may be treated to increase its permeability by hydraulically fracturing the formation to create or enhance one or more cracks or “fractures.” The term “fracture” is defined herein to refer to any crack or open space that penetrates at least a portion of a subterranean formation, which may exist naturally, be created in the course of a subterranean treatment, or some combination thereof (e.g., a naturally-occurring fracture that is enlarged or enhanced in the course of a subterranean treatment). Such hydraulic fracturing is usually accomplished by injecting a viscous fracturing fluid into the subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to cause the formation to break down and produce one or more fractures or enhance one or more natural fractures. The fracture or fractures may be horizontal or vertical, with the latter usually predominating, and with the tendency toward vertical fractures increasing with the depth of the formation being fractured. The fracturing fluid is generally a highly viscous gel, emulsion, or foam that comprises a particulate material often referred to as proppant. In some fracturing operations, commonly known as “water fracturing” operations, the fracturing fluid viscosity is somewhat lowered and yet the proppant remains in suspension because the fracturing fluid is injected into the formation at a substantially higher velocity. Whether a highly viscous fluid is used or a less viscous fluid with a higher velocity, proppant is deposited in the fracture and functions, inter alia, to hold the fracture open while maintaining channels through which produced fluids can flow upon completion of the fracturing treatment.
  • To prevent the subsequent flowback of proppant and other unconsolidated particulates with the produced fluids, a portion of the proppant introduced into the fractures may be coated with a hardenable resin composition. When the fracturing fluid, which is the carrier fluid for the proppant, reverts to a thin fluid, the resin-coated proppant is deposited in the fracture, and the fracture closes on the proppant. Such partially closed fractures apply pressure on the resin-coated proppant particles, causing the particles to be forced into contact with each other while the resin composition hardens. The hardening of the resin composition under pressure brings about the consolidation of the resin-coated proppant particles into a substantially hard permeable mass having compressive and tensile strength that hopefully prevents unconsolidated proppant and formation sand from flowing out of the fractures with produced fluids.
  • Another method of preventing the flowback of proppant and other unconsolidated particulates involves the use of screen assemblies. Some of the early screen technology dictated that the screens had to be small enough to pass through the smallest diameter of the well bore on the way to its desired placement location where the diameter of the well bore may actually be larger. Developments in technology have lead to expandable screens such that a relatively small size or small diameter screen may be placed in a desired location along the well bore and then expanded to accommodate the actual size of the well bore at the point of placement. Flowback of the proppant or formation fines with formation fluids is undesirable as it may erode metal equipment, plug piping and vessels, and cause damage to valves, instruments, and other production equipment.
  • While the hydraulic fracturing techniques discussed above are commonly used on vertical well bores, they have not been widely used to stimulate horizontal well bores, particularly those penetrating hard rock formations such as sandstone, due, inter alia, to the fact that such formations usually require high fracturing pressures and result in complex and potentially unstable fracture geometries. The geometry of fractures caused by hydraulic pressure in horizontal well bores is primarily dependent on the formation in situ stresses. In situ stresses may be thought of as occurring in three orthogonal planes: vertical stress, maximum horizontal stress, and minimum horizontal stress. When subjected to hydraulic pressure, fractures, regardless of origin, attempt to propagate in planes orthogonal to the minimum horizontal stress. Thus, fracture configuration resulting from hydraulic pressure can depend on the orientation of the well bore with respect to the minimum horizontal stress. Two such configurations have been the subject on interest in the art: longitudinal fractures that propagate in plane parallel to the well bore axis that are formed when a horizontal well bore is drilled parallel to the maximum horizontal stress (as depicted in FIG. 1); and, transverse fractures that propagate in planes orthogonal to the well bore axis that are formed when a horizontal well bore is drilled perpendicular to the maximum horizontal stress (as depicted in FIG. 2). In such formations, it is often necessary to puncture the formation to direct the fracture geometry.
  • The term “vertical well bore” as used herein refers to a well bore or portion of a well bore that is substantially vertical or deviated from vertical in an amount up to about 30°. The term “horizontal well bore” as used herein refers to a well bore or portion of a well bore that is substantially horizontal or at an angle from vertical in the range of from about 70° to about 90° or more. The term “highly deviated well bore” as used herein refers to a well bore or portion of a well bore that is angled from about 30° to about 70° from vertical.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to improved methods for well stimulation and completion. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods of stimulating and completing well bores while controlling formation sand migration and proppant flowback.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention provides a method comprising: providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture; placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into an area of the fracture; placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or the near-well bore area of the fracture; and allowing the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback to displace at least a portion of the proppant coated with tackifying agent from one area of the fracture into the far-well bore area of the fracture.
  • In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method comprising: providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture; placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis; and placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture.
  • In another embodiment, the present invention provides a method of fracturing a formation surrounding a well bore comprising: hydraulically fracturing a formation to create or enhance at least one fracture; placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis; and placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture.
  • Other and further features and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the description of preferred embodiments which follows.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an example of longitudinal fractures propagated in a plane substantially parallel to the well bore axis.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an example of transverse fractures propagated in a plane substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an example of puncture orientations that may be used in the methods of the present invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention relates to improved methods for well stimulation and completion. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods of stimulating and completing well bores while controlling formation sand migration and proppant flowback.
  • The present invention provides methods that may be used, among other purposes, to stimulate production of hydrocarbons from a subterranean formation and/or controlling particulate migration into well bores penetrating subterranean formations. Certain embodiments of the present invention provide methods that comprise the steps of providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture, placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, and placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the near-well bore area. The term “agent capable of controlling particulate flowback” is defined herein to include materials and/or devices that, when placed in a subterranean formation or well bore, can hinder or prevent loose particulates in the subterranean formation (e.g., proppant particulates, formation sands, etc.) from migrating into the well bore penetrating that formation. In certain embodiments, the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis. In certain embodiments, the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 3 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis. Placing proppant coated with tackifying agent into the far-well bore area acts, inter alia, to help control the migration of formation sands. Placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback in the fracture near the well bore and/or in the well bore acts, inter alia, to keep the proppant in place instead of producing it along with the produced fluids.
  • In the methods of the present invention, at least one fracture in the subterranean formation may be provided, created, and/or enhanced. The term “fracture” is defined herein to refer to any crack or open space that penetrates at least a portion of a subterranean formation, which may exist naturally, be created in the course of a subterranean treatment, or some combination thereof (e.g., a naturally-occurring fracture that is enlarged or enhanced in the course of a subterranean treatment). Examples of subterranean treatments that may be used to create and/or enhance such fractures include, but are not limited to, hydraulic fracturing treatments, frac-packing treatments, hydrajetting treatments, and the like. In certain embodiments, the fracture may have been created and/or enhanced prior to the commencement of a method of the present invention. In certain embodiments, the fracture may be created and/or enhanced in the course of a method of the present invention.
  • Proppant particles used in accordance with the present invention are generally of a size such that formation particulates that may migrate with produced fluids are prevented from being produced from the subterranean zone. Any suitable proppant may be used, including graded sand, bauxite, ceramic materials, glass materials, walnut hulls, polymer beads and the like. Generally, the proppant particles have a size in the range of from about 4 to about 100 mesh, U.S. sieve series. The proppant coated with tackifying agent and placed in the far-well bore area may be the same as or different than a proppant coated with resin that may be placed in the near-well bore area.
  • A tackifying agent is a substance that remains sticky rather than curing over time. Placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture will help prevent formation sand from invading the near-well bore area of the fracture as the sands become trapped by the sticky character of the tackifying agent. Compounds suitable for use as a tackifying compound in the present invention comprise substantially any compound that, when in liquid form or in a solvent solution, will form a sticky, non-hardening coating upon a particulate. A particularly preferred group of tackifying compounds comprise polyamides that are liquids or in solution at the temperature of the subterranean formation such that the polyamides are, by themselves, non-hardening when present on the particulates introduced into the subterranean formation. A particularly preferred product is a condensation reaction product comprised of commercially available polyacids and a polyamine. Such commercial products include compounds such as mixtures of C36 dibasic acids containing some trimer and/or higher oligomers and also small amounts of monomer acids that are reacted with polyamines. Other polyacids include trimer acids, synthetic acids produced from fatty acids, maleic anhydride and acrylic acid and the like. Such acid compounds are commercially available from companies such as Witco Corporation, Union Camp, Chemtall, and Emery Industries. The reaction products are available from, for example, Champion Technologies, Inc. and Witco Corporation. Additional compounds which may be used as tackifying compounds include liquids and solutions of, for example, polyesters, polycarbonates and polycarbamates, natural resins such as shellac and the like. Suitable tackifying compounds are described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,853,048 issued to Weaver, et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 5,833,000 issued to Weaver, et al., the disclosures of which are herein incorporated by reference.
  • The agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may comprise any material and/or device that, when placed in a subterranean formation or well bore, can hinder or prevent loose particulates in the subterranean formation (e.g., proppant particulates, formation sands, etc.) from migrating into the well bore penetrating that formation. The agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may comprise proppant particulates, proppant particulates coated with resin (e.g., a curable resin), fibrous materials, deformable particulates, a screen (e.g., sized to control the flowback of the proppant that has been placed in a subterranean formation), or a mixture or combination thereof. In certain embodiments, the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may comprise a mixture of fibrous materials and proppant particulates. The fibrous materials may comprise multiple fibers with segment lengths of about less than about 0.5 inches and diameters of about 10 to about 50 microns. Among other purposes, the fibers may form a network that provides resistance to movement of particulates. Examples of fibrous materials that may be suitable for use in the present invention are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,172,011, 5,501,275, 5,439,055, and 5,330,005, the relevant disclosures of which are herein incorporated by reference. In certain embodiments, the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may comprise deformable particulates. Deformable particulates may, inter alia, allow surrounding proppant particulates to become embedded onto their bodies as stress closure is applied, which may allow the proppant pack to stabilize and minimizing the movement of proppant. Examples of deformable particulates that may be suitable for use in the present invention are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,330,916 and 6,059,034, the relevant disclosures of which are herein incorporated by reference.
  • In certain embodiments, the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may be placed in the near-well bore area of the fracture after the proppant coated with tackifying agent is placed in the far-well bore area of the fracture. For example, where the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback comprises a resin-coated proppant, the resin may cure and harden into a consolidated mass that is capable of allowing fluid production and yet will provide a barrier to flowback of the tackified proppant, the resin-coated proppant, and the formation sands.
  • In certain embodiments, the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may be used to displace a portion of the proppant coated with tackifying agent from one area of the fracture into the far-well bore area of the fracture. For example, a slurry that comprises the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback (e.g., a proppant coated with a curable resin) may be pumped into the well bore at or above a pressure sufficient to displace the proppant coated with tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture. In some instances, the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback may comprise a screen that, when placed in the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture, displaces at least a portion of the proppant coated with tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture.
  • Resins suitable for use in the resin slurries in the present invention include, but are not limited to, two-component epoxy-based resins, furan-based resins, phenolic-based resins, high-temperature (HT) epoxy-based resins, and phenol/phenol formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol resins.
  • Selection of a suitable resin-type coating material may be affected by the temperature of the subterranean formation to which the fluid will be introduced. By way of example, for subterranean formations having a bottom hole static temperature (“BHST”) ranging from about 60° F. to about 250° F., two-component epoxy-based resins comprising a hardenable resin component and a hardening agent component containing specific hardening agents may be preferred. For subterranean formations having a BHST ranging from about 300° F. to about 600° F., a furan-based resin may be preferred. For subterranean formations having a BHST ranging from about 200° F. to about 400° F., either a phenolic-based resin or a one-component HT epoxy-based resin may be suitable. For subterranean formations having a BHST of at least about 175° F., a phenol/phenol formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol resin also may be suitable.
  • One resin suitable for use in the methods of certain embodiments of the present invention is a two-component epoxy based resin comprising a hardenable resin component and a hardening agent component. The hardenable resin component is comprised of a hardenable resin and an optional solvent. The solvent may be added to the resin to reduce its viscosity for ease of handling, mixing and transferring. It is within the ability of one skilled in the art, with the benefit of this disclosure, to determine whether and how much solvent may be needed to achieve a viscosity suitable to the subterranean conditions. Factors that may affect this decision include geographic location of the well and the surrounding environmental conditions. An alternate way to reduce the viscosity of the liquid hardenable resin is to heat it. This method avoids the use of a solvent altogether, which may be desirable in some circumstances. The second component of the two-component epoxy based resin is the liquid hardening agent component, and it is comprised of a hardening agent, a silane coupling agent, a surfactant, an optional hydrolyzable ester for, inter alia, breaking gelled fracturing fluid films on the proppant particles, and an optional liquid carrier fluid for, inter alia, reducing the viscosity of the liquid hardening agent component. It is within the ability of one skilled in the art, with the benefit of this disclosure, to determine whether and how much liquid carrier fluid is needed to achieve a viscosity suitable to the subterranean conditions.
  • Examples of hardenable resins that can be used in the liquid hardenable resin component include, but are not limited to, organic resins such as bisphenol A-epichlorohydrin resin, polyepoxide resin, novolak resin, polyester resin, phenol-aldehyde resin, urea-aldehyde resin, furan resin, urethane resin, glycidyl ethers, and mixtures thereof. Of these, bisphenol A-epichlorohydrin resin is preferred. The resin used is included in the liquid hardenable resin component in an amount sufficient to consolidate the coated particulates. In some embodiments of the present invention, the resin used is included in the liquid hardenable resin component in the range of from about 70% to about 100% by weight of the liquid hardenable resin component.
  • Any solvent that is compatible with the hardenable resin and achieves the desired viscosity effect is suitable for use in the present invention. Preferred solvents are those having high flash points (most preferably about 125° F.) due to in part to safety concerns. As described above, use of a solvent in the hardenable resin composition is optional but may be desirable to reduce the viscosity of the hardenable resin component for a variety of reasons including ease of handling, mixing, and transferring. It is within the ability of one skilled in the art, with the benefit of this disclosure, to determine whether and how much solvent is needed to achieve a suitable viscosity. Solvents suitable for use in the present invention include, but are not limited to, butylglycidyl ether, dipropylene glycol methyl ether, dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether, dimethyl formamide, diethyleneglycol methyl ether, ethyleneglycol butyl ether, diethyleneglycol butyl ether, propylene carbonate, methanol, butyl alcohol, d-limonene, and fatty acid methyl esters.
  • Examples of the hardening agents that can be used in the liquid hardening agent component of the two-component epoxy based resin of the present invention include, but are not limited to, amines, aromatic amines, polyamines, aliphatic amines, cyclo-aliphatic amines, amides, polyamides, 2-ethyl-4-methyl imidazole, and 1,1,3-trichlorotrifluoroacetone. Selection of a preferred hardening agent depends, in part, on the temperature of the formation in which the hardening agent will be used. By way of example and not of limitation, in subterranean formations having a temperature from about 60° F. to about 250° F., amines and cyclo-aliphatic amines such as piperidine, triethylamine, N,N-dimethylaminopyridine, benzyldimethylamine, tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol, and 2-(N2N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenol are preferred with N,N-dimethylaminopyridine most preferred. In subterranean formations having higher temperatures, 4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone may be a suitable hardening agent. The hardening agent used is included in the liquid hardening agent component in an amount sufficient to consolidate the coated particulates. In some embodiments of the present invention, the hardening agent used is included in the liquid hardenable resin component in the range of from about 40% to about 60% by weight of the liquid hardening agent component.
  • The silane coupling agent may be used, inter alia, to act as a mediator to help bond the resin to the sand surface. Examples of silane coupling agents that can be used in the liquid hardening agent component of the two-component consolidation fluids of the present invention include, but are not limited to, n-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, and n-beta-(aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane. The silane coupling agent used is included in the liquid hardening agent component in an amount capable of sufficiently bonding the resin to the particulate. In some embodiments of the present invention, the silane coupling agent used is included in the liquid hardenable resin component in the range of from about 0.1% to about 3% by weight of the liquid hardening agent component.
  • Any surfactant compatible with the liquid hardening agent may be used in the present invention. Such surfactants include, but are not limited to, an ethoxylated nonyl phenol phosphate ester, mixtures of one or more cationic surfactants and one or more non-ionic surfactants, and an alkyl phosphonate surfactant. The mixtures of one or more cationic and nonionic surfactants are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,311,733, the relevant disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference. A C12-C22 alkyl phosphonate surfactant is preferred. The surfactant or surfactants used are included in the liquid hardening agent component in an amount in the range of from about 2% to about 15% by weight of the liquid hardening agent component.
  • Use of a diluent or liquid carrier fluid in the hardenable resin composition is optional and may be used to reduce the viscosity of the hardenable resin component for ease of handling, mixing and transferring. It is within the ability of one skilled in the art, with the benefit of this disclosure, to determine whether and how much liquid carrier fluid is needed to achieve a viscosity suitable to the subterranean conditions. Any suitable carrier fluid that is compatible with the hardenable resin and achieves the desired viscosity effects is suitable for use in the present invention. The liquid carrier fluids that can be used in the liquid hardening agent component of the two-component epoxy based coating material of the present invention preferably include those having high flash points (most preferably above about 125° F.). Examples of liquid carrier fluids suitable for use in the present invention include, but are not limited to, dipropylene glycol methyl ether, dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether, dimethyl formamide, diethyleneglycol methyl ether, ethyleneglycol butyl ether, diethyleneglycol butyl ether, propylene carbonate, d-limonene, and fatty acid methyl esters.
  • Another resin suitable for use in the methods of the present invention is a furan-based resin. Suitable furan-based resins include, but are not limited to, furfuryl alcohol, a mixture furfuryl alcohol with an aldehyde, and a mixture of furan resin and phenolic resin. The furan-based resin may be combined with a solvent to control viscosity if desired. Suitable solvents for use in the furan-based consolidation fluids of the present invention include, but are not limited to 2-butoxy ethanol, butyl acetate, and furfuryl acetate.
  • Still another resin suitable for use in the methods of the present invention is a phenolic-based resin. Suitable phenolic-based resins include, but are not limited to, terpolymers of phenol, phenolic formaldehyde resins, and a mixture of phenolic and furan resins. The phenolic-based resin may be combined with a solvent to control viscosity if desired. Suitable solvents for use in the phenolic-based consolidation fluids of the present invention include, but are not limited to butyl acetate, butyl lactate, furfuryl acetate, and 2-butoxy ethanol.
  • Another resin suitable for use in the methods of the present invention is a HT epoxy-based resin. Suitable HT epoxy-based components included, but are not limited to, bisphenol A-epichlorohydrin resin, polyepoxide resin, novolac resin, polyester resin, glycidyl ethers, and mixtures thereof. The HT epoxy-based resin may be combined with a solvent to control viscosity if desired. Suitable solvents for use with the HT epoxy-based resins of the present invention are those solvents capable of substantially dissolving the HT epoxy-resin chosen for use in the consolidation fluid. Such solvents include, but are not limited to, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl formamide. A co-solvent such as dipropylene glycol methyl ether, dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether, dimethyl formamide, diethylene glycol methyl ether, ethylene glycol butyl ether, diethylene glycol butyl ether, propylene carbonate, d-limonene, and fatty acid methyl esters, also may be used in combination with the solvent.
  • Yet another resin suitable for use in the methods of the present invention is a phenol/phenol formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol resin comprising from about 5% to about 30% phenol, from about 40% to about 70% phenol formaldehyde, from about 10 to about 40% furfuryl alcohol, from about 0.1% to about 3% of a silane coupling agent, and from about 1% to about 15% of a surfactant. In the phenol/phenol formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol resins suitable for use in the methods of the present invention, suitable silane coupling agents include, but are not limited to, n-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, and n-beta-(aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane. Suitable surfactants include, but are not limited to, an ethoxylated nonyl phenol phosphate ester, mixtures of one or more cationic surfactants and one or more non-ionic surfactants, and an alkyl phosphonate surfactant.
  • Some embodiments of the methods of the present invention further comprise the step of puncturing the subterranean formation surrounding a horizontal well bore located in a substantially consolidated subterranean formation before the step of hydraulically fracturing the formation. The stimulation and completion methods of the present invention comprising the step of puncturing the formation are particularly well suited for use in highly deviated and horizontal well bores that penetrate substantially consolidated formations. Substantially consolidated formations help in maintaining the integrity of the well bore, and thus helping to prevent well bore collapse and excessive formation sand migration into the well bore. In puncturing the formation, unconsolidated or weakly consolidated regions located above or below the substantially consolidated well bore region may be put into fluid communication with the well bore, thus enhancing production without destabilizing the well bore. The methods of the present invention are useful in open hole well bores, well bores having a non-cemented liner, and cased and cemented well bores.
  • In most subterranean formation structures, consolidated and unconsolidated strata form on top of one another. Thus, the punctures are preferably performed at either the top side of the horizontal well bore (i.e., 12-o'clock or 0°), the bottom side of the horizontal well bore (i.e., 6-o'clock or 180°), or both (substantially 180° phasing). FIG. 3 illustrates these three orientations of punctures in a horizontal well bore. By way of example, where the substantially consolidated portion of the formation containing the well bore is bordered on the top by an unconsolidated region, at least the top of the horizontal well bore is preferably punctured.
  • Any known puncturing technique may be used in the methods of the present invention, including but not limited to, perforating and hydrajetting. Hydrajetting generally involves the use of a hydrajetting tool such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,765,642, 5,494,103, and 5,361,856, the relevant portions of which are herein incorporated by reference. In a common hydrajetting operation, a hydrajetting tool having at least one fluid jet forming nozzle is positioned adjacent to a formation to be fractured, and fluid is then jetted through the nozzle against the formation at a pressure sufficient to form a cavity, or slot therein to fracture the formation by stagnation pressure in the cavity. Because the jetted fluids would have to flow out of the slot in a direction generally opposite to the direction of the incoming jetted fluid, they are trapped in the slot and create a relatively high stagnation pressure at the tip of a cavity. This high stagnation pressure may cause a micro-fracture to be formed that extends a short distance into the formation. That micro-fracture may be further extended by pumping a fluid into the well bore to raise the ambient fluid pressure exerted on the formation while the formation is being hydrajetted. Such a fluid in the well bore will flow into the slot and fracture produced by the fluid jet and, if introduced into the well bore at a sufficient rate and pressure, may be used to extend the fracture an additional distance from the well bore into the formation.
  • Therefore, the present invention is well adapted to attain the ends and advantages mentioned as well as those that are inherent therein. The particular embodiments disclosed above are illustrative only, as the present invention may be modified and practiced in different but equivalent manners apparent to those skilled in the art having the benefit of the teachings herein. While numerous changes may be made by those skilled in the art, such changes are encompassed within the spirit of this invention as defined by the appended claims. Furthermore, no limitations are intended to the details of construction or design herein shown, other than as described in the claims below. It is therefore evident that the particular illustrative embodiments disclosed above may be altered or modified and all such variations are considered within the scope and spirit of the present invention. In particular, every range of values (e.g., “from about a to about b,” or, equivalently, “from approximately a to b,” or, equivalently, “from approximately a-b”) disclosed herein is to be understood as referring to the power set (the set of all subsets) of the respective range of values. The terms in the claims have their plain, ordinary meaning unless otherwise explicitly and clearly defined by the patentee.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A method comprising:
    providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture;
    placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into an area of the fracture;
    placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or the near-well bore area of the fracture; and
    allowing the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback to displace at least a portion of the proppant coated with tackifying agent from one area of the fracture into the far-well bore area of the fracture.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein the tackifying agent is selected from the group consisting of polyamides, polyesters, polycarbonates, polycarbamates, natural resins, and combinations thereof.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1 wherein the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback comprises a screen.
  4. 4. The method of claim 3 wherein the screen is sized to control the flowback of the proppant coated with a tackifying agent.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 wherein the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback comprises proppant coated with curable resin.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5 wherein the curable resin comprises a hardenable resin component comprising a hardenable resin and a hardening agent component comprising a liquid hardening agent, a silane coupling agent, and a surfactant.
  7. 7. The method of claim 5 wherein the resin composition comprises a furan-based resin selected from the group consisting of furfuryl alcohol, mixtures of furfuryl alcohol with an aldehyde, mixtures of furan resin and phenolic resin, and mixtures thereof.
  8. 8. The method of claim 7 further comprising a solvent selected from the group consisting of 2-butoxy ethanol, butyl acetate, furfuryl acetate, and mixtures thereof.
  9. 9. The method of claim 5 wherein the resin composition comprises a phenolic-based resin selected from the group consisting of terpolymers of phenol, phenolic formaldehyde resins, mixtures of phenolic and furan resin, and mixtures thereof.
  10. 10. The method of claim 9 wherein the resin composition further comprises a solvent selected from the group consisting of butyl acetate, butyl lactate, furfuryl acetate, 2-butoxy ethanol, and mixtures thereof.
  11. 11. The method of claim 5 wherein the resin composition comprises a HT epoxy-based resin selected from the group consisting of bisphenol A-epichlorohydrin resins, polyepoxide resins, novolac resins, polyester resins, glycidyl ethers, and mixtures thereof.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 wherein the resin composition further comprises a solvent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethyl formamide, dipropylene glycol methyl ether, dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether, dimethyl formamide, diethylene glycol methyl ether, ethylene glycol butyl ether, diethylene glycol butyl ether, propylene carbonate, d-limonene, fatty acid methyl esters, and mixtures thereof.
  13. 13. The method of claim 5 wherein the resin composition comprises a phenol/phenol formaldehyde/furfuryl alcohol resin comprising from about 5% to about 30% phenol, from about 40% to about 70% phenol formaldehyde, from about 10 to about 40% furfuryl alcohol, from about 0.1% to about 3% of a silane coupling agent, and from about 1% to about 15% of a surfactant.
  14. 14. The method of claim 1 wherein providing a subterranean formation that comprises a fracture comprises hydraulically fracturing the subterranean formation surrounding the well bore to create or enhance the fracture.
  15. 15. The method of claim 1 wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis.
  16. 16. A method comprising:
    providing a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore wherein the subterranean formation comprises at least one fracture;
    placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis; and
    placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback comprises proppant coated with curable resin.
  18. 18. A method of fracturing a formation surrounding a well bore comprising:
    hydraulically fracturing a formation to create or enhance at least one fracture;
    placing proppant coated with a tackifying agent into the far-well bore area of the fracture, wherein the far-well bore area of the fracture is an area within the fracture at least about 2 feet from the well bore in a direction substantially orthogonal to the well bore axis; and
    placing an agent capable of controlling particulate flowback into the well bore or near-well bore area of the fracture.
  19. 19. The method of claim 18 wherein the agent capable of controlling particulate flowback comprises proppant coated with curable resin.
  20. 20. The method of claim 18 wherein the curable resin comprises a hardenable resin component comprising a hardenable resin and a hardening agent component comprising a liquid hardening agent, a silane coupling agent, and a surfactant.
US11522287 2004-01-05 2006-09-15 Methods of well stimulation and completion Abandoned US20070007009A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10751593 US20050145385A1 (en) 2004-01-05 2004-01-05 Methods of well stimulation and completion
US11522287 US20070007009A1 (en) 2004-01-05 2006-09-15 Methods of well stimulation and completion

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11522287 US20070007009A1 (en) 2004-01-05 2006-09-15 Methods of well stimulation and completion
PCT/GB2007/002273 WO2008032009A1 (en) 2006-09-15 2007-06-18 Methods of well stimulation and completion
AR061524A1 AR061524A1 (en) 2006-09-15 2007-06-19 Stimulation methods and completions

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10751593 Continuation-In-Part US20050145385A1 (en) 2004-01-05 2004-01-05 Methods of well stimulation and completion

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070007009A1 true true US20070007009A1 (en) 2007-01-11

Family

ID=38358053

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11522287 Abandoned US20070007009A1 (en) 2004-01-05 2006-09-15 Methods of well stimulation and completion

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20070007009A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2008032009A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100132943A1 (en) * 2004-02-10 2010-06-03 Nguyen Philip D Resin Compositions and Methods of Using Resin Compositions to Control Proppant Flow-Back
US20110030362A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Schmidt Howard K Hydraulic Geofracture Energy Storage System
US8720566B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2014-05-13 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Slot perforating tool
CN104695931A (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-10 中国石油天然气股份有限公司 Fracturing method for preventing fracturing propping agent of low-permeability horizontal well from reflowing
US9481519B2 (en) 2009-08-10 2016-11-01 Quidnet Energy Inc. Hydraulic geofracture energy storage system with desalinization

Citations (98)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2869642A (en) * 1954-09-14 1959-01-20 Texas Co Method of treating subsurface formations
US3297086A (en) * 1962-03-30 1967-01-10 Exxon Production Research Co Sand consolidation method
US3302719A (en) * 1965-01-25 1967-02-07 Union Oil Co Method for treating subterranean formations
US3364995A (en) * 1966-02-14 1968-01-23 Dow Chemical Co Hydraulic fracturing fluid-bearing earth formations
US3366178A (en) * 1965-09-10 1968-01-30 Halliburton Co Method of fracturing and propping a subterranean formation
US3489222A (en) * 1968-12-26 1970-01-13 Chevron Res Method of consolidating earth formations without removing tubing from well
US3492147A (en) * 1964-10-22 1970-01-27 Halliburton Co Method of coating particulate solids with an infusible resin
US3565176A (en) * 1969-09-08 1971-02-23 Clifford V Wittenwyler Consolidation of earth formation using epoxy-modified resins
US3708013A (en) * 1971-05-03 1973-01-02 Mobil Oil Corp Method and apparatus for obtaining an improved gravel pack
US3709298A (en) * 1971-05-20 1973-01-09 Shell Oil Co Sand pack-aided formation sand consolidation
US3709641A (en) * 1970-08-03 1973-01-09 Union Oil Co Apparatus for preparing and extruding a gelatinous material
US3784585A (en) * 1971-10-21 1974-01-08 American Cyanamid Co Water-degradable resins containing recurring,contiguous,polymerized glycolide units and process for preparing same
US3861467A (en) * 1973-12-28 1975-01-21 Texaco Inc Permeable cementing method
US3863709A (en) * 1973-12-20 1975-02-04 Mobil Oil Corp Method of recovering geothermal energy
US3933205A (en) * 1973-10-09 1976-01-20 Othar Meade Kiel Hydraulic fracturing process using reverse flow
US4000781A (en) * 1975-04-24 1977-01-04 Shell Oil Company Well treating process for consolidating particles with aqueous emulsions of epoxy resin components
US4008763A (en) * 1976-05-20 1977-02-22 Atlantic Richfield Company Well treatment method
US4068718A (en) * 1975-09-26 1978-01-17 Exxon Production Research Company Hydraulic fracturing method using sintered bauxite propping agent
US4070865A (en) * 1976-03-10 1978-01-31 Halliburton Company Method of consolidating porous formations using vinyl polymer sealer with divinylbenzene crosslinker
US4074760A (en) * 1976-11-01 1978-02-21 The Dow Chemical Company Method for forming a consolidated gravel pack
US4245702A (en) * 1978-05-22 1981-01-20 Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V. Method for forming channels of high fluid conductivity in hard acid-soluble formations
US4247430A (en) * 1979-04-11 1981-01-27 The Dow Chemical Company Aqueous based slurry and method of forming a consolidated gravel pack
US4428427A (en) * 1981-12-03 1984-01-31 Getty Oil Company Consolidatable gravel pack method
US4493875A (en) * 1983-12-09 1985-01-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Proppant for well fractures and method of making same
US4494605A (en) * 1981-12-11 1985-01-22 Texaco Inc. Sand control employing halogenated, oil soluble hydrocarbons
US4498995A (en) * 1981-08-10 1985-02-12 Judith Gockel Lost circulation drilling fluid
US4501328A (en) * 1983-03-14 1985-02-26 Mobil Oil Corporation Method of consolidation of oil bearing sands
US4564459A (en) * 1981-12-03 1986-01-14 Baker Oil Tools, Inc. Proppant charge and method
US4572803A (en) * 1979-08-31 1986-02-25 Asahi Dow Limited Organic rare-earth salt phosphor
US4716964A (en) * 1981-08-10 1988-01-05 Exxon Production Research Company Use of degradable ball sealers to seal casing perforations in well treatment fluid diversion
US4796701A (en) * 1987-07-30 1989-01-10 Dowell Schlumberger Incorporated Pyrolytic carbon coating of media improves gravel packing and fracturing capabilities
US4797262A (en) * 1986-06-16 1989-01-10 Shell Oil Company Downflow fluidized catalytic cracking system
US4800960A (en) * 1987-12-18 1989-01-31 Texaco Inc. Consolidatable gravel pack method
US4892147A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-01-09 Mobil Oil Corporation Hydraulic fracturing utilizing a refractory proppant
US4895207A (en) * 1988-12-19 1990-01-23 Texaco, Inc. Method and fluid for placing resin coated gravel or sand in a producing oil well
US4898750A (en) * 1988-12-05 1990-02-06 Texaco Inc. Processes for forming and using particles coated with a resin which is resistant to high temperature and high pH aqueous environments
US4903770A (en) * 1988-09-01 1990-02-27 Texaco Inc. Sand consolidation methods
US4984635A (en) * 1989-11-16 1991-01-15 Mobil Oil Corporation Thermal barriers for enhanced oil recovery
US4986353A (en) * 1988-09-14 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Placement process for oil field chemicals
US4986355A (en) * 1989-05-18 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Process for the preparation of fluid loss additive and gel breaker
US4986354A (en) * 1988-09-14 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Composition and placement process for oil field chemicals
US5082056A (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-01-21 Marathon Oil Company In situ reversible crosslinked polymer gel used in hydrocarbon recovery applications
US5178218A (en) * 1991-06-19 1993-01-12 Oryx Energy Company Method of sand consolidation with resin
US5182051A (en) * 1990-01-17 1993-01-26 Protechnics International, Inc. Raioactive tracing with particles
US5278203A (en) * 1991-03-21 1994-01-11 Halliburton Company Method of preparing and improved liquid gelling agent concentrate and suspendable gelling agent
US5285849A (en) * 1991-06-21 1994-02-15 Texaco Inc. Formation treating methods
US5377756A (en) * 1993-10-28 1995-01-03 Mobil Oil Corporation Method for producing low permeability reservoirs using a single well
US5377759A (en) * 1993-05-20 1995-01-03 Texaco Inc. Formation treating methods
US5381864A (en) * 1993-11-12 1995-01-17 Halliburton Company Well treating methods using particulate blends
US5386874A (en) * 1993-11-08 1995-02-07 Halliburton Company Perphosphate viscosity breakers in well fracture fluids
US5388648A (en) * 1993-10-08 1995-02-14 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for sealing the juncture between a vertical well and one or more horizontal wells using deformable sealing means
US5390741A (en) * 1993-12-21 1995-02-21 Halliburton Company Remedial treatment methods for coal bed methane wells
US5393810A (en) * 1993-12-30 1995-02-28 Halliburton Company Method and composition for breaking crosslinked gels
US5484881A (en) * 1992-10-02 1996-01-16 Cargill, Inc. Melt-stable amorphous lactide polymer film and process for manufacturing thereof
US5492177A (en) * 1994-12-01 1996-02-20 Mobil Oil Corporation Method for consolidating a subterranean formation
US5494178A (en) * 1994-07-25 1996-02-27 Alu Inc. Display and decorative fixture apparatus
US5494103A (en) * 1992-09-29 1996-02-27 Halliburton Company Well jetting apparatus
US5591700A (en) * 1994-12-22 1997-01-07 Halliburton Company Fracturing fluid with encapsulated breaker
US5594095A (en) * 1993-07-30 1997-01-14 Cargill, Incorporated Viscosity-modified lactide polymer composition and process for manufacture thereof
US5595245A (en) * 1995-08-04 1997-01-21 Scott, Iii; George L. Systems of injecting phenolic resin activator during subsurface fracture stimulation for enhanced oil recovery
US5597784A (en) * 1993-06-01 1997-01-28 Santrol, Inc. Composite and reinforced coatings on proppants and particles
US5604186A (en) * 1995-02-15 1997-02-18 Halliburton Company Encapsulated enzyme breaker and method for use in treating subterranean formations
US5604184A (en) * 1995-04-10 1997-02-18 Texaco, Inc. Chemically inert resin coated proppant system for control of proppant flowback in hydraulically fractured wells
US5712314A (en) * 1996-08-09 1998-01-27 Texaco Inc. Formulation for creating a pliable resin plug
US5864003A (en) * 1996-07-23 1999-01-26 Georgia-Pacific Resins, Inc. Thermosetting phenolic resin composition
US5865936A (en) * 1997-03-28 1999-02-02 National Starch And Chemical Investment Holding Corporation Rapid curing structural acrylic adhesive
US5871049A (en) * 1995-03-29 1999-02-16 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Control of fine particulate flowback in subterranean wells
US5873413A (en) * 1997-08-18 1999-02-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of modifying subterranean strata properties
US6012524A (en) * 1998-04-14 2000-01-11 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Remedial well bore sealing methods and compositions
US6016870A (en) * 1998-06-11 2000-01-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Compositions and methods for consolidating unconsolidated subterranean zones
US6024170A (en) * 1998-06-03 2000-02-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of treating subterranean formation using borate cross-linking compositions
US6028113A (en) * 1995-09-27 2000-02-22 Sunburst Chemicals, Inc. Solid sanitizers and cleaner disinfectants
US6169058B1 (en) * 1997-06-05 2001-01-02 Bj Services Company Compositions and methods for hydraulic fracturing
US6172011B1 (en) * 1993-04-05 2001-01-09 Schlumberger Technolgy Corporation Control of particulate flowback in subterranean wells
US6172077B1 (en) * 1997-04-25 2001-01-09 Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd. Spiro-azacyclic derivatives and their use as therapeutic agents
US6176315B1 (en) * 1998-12-04 2001-01-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Preventing flow through subterranean zones
US6177484B1 (en) * 1997-11-03 2001-01-23 Texaco Inc. Combination catalyst/coupling agent for furan resin
US6342467B1 (en) * 1997-05-28 2002-01-29 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Method and composition for controlling fluid loss in high permeability hydrocarbon bearing formations
US6503870B2 (en) * 1999-02-04 2003-01-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Sealing subterranean zones
US20030006036A1 (en) * 2001-05-23 2003-01-09 Core Laboratories Global N.V. Method for determining the extent of recovery of materials injected into oil wells during oil and gas exploration and production
US20030013871A1 (en) * 2001-02-02 2003-01-16 Mallon Charles B. Method of preparing modified cellulose ether
US6508305B1 (en) * 1999-09-16 2003-01-21 Bj Services Company Compositions and methods for cementing using elastic particles
US6510896B2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2003-01-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and methods for utilizing expandable sand screen in wellbores
US20040000402A1 (en) * 2002-06-26 2004-01-01 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of consolidating proppant and controlling fines in wells
US6677426B2 (en) * 2001-08-23 2004-01-13 Resolution Performance Products Llc Modified epoxy resin composition, production process for the same and solvent-free coating comprising the same
US20040014607A1 (en) * 2002-07-16 2004-01-22 Sinclair A. Richard Downhole chemical delivery system for oil and gas wells
US20040014608A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-01-22 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of preventing the flow-back of particulates deposited in subterranean formations
US6681856B1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2004-01-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of cementing in subterranean zones penetrated by well bores using biodegradable dispersants
US6837309B2 (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-01-04 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Methods and fluid compositions designed to cause tip screenouts
US20050000731A1 (en) * 2003-07-03 2005-01-06 Nguyen Philip D. Method and apparatus for treating a productive zone while drilling
US20050000694A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-01-06 Dalrymple Eldon D. Methods of reducing water permeability for acidizing a subterranean formation
US20050006096A1 (en) * 2003-07-09 2005-01-13 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of consolidating subterranean zones and compositions therefor
US20050006095A1 (en) * 2003-07-08 2005-01-13 Donald Justus Reduced-density proppants and methods of using reduced-density proppants to enhance their transport in well bores and fractures
US20050006093A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2005-01-13 Nguyen Philip D. Methods and compositions for enhancing consolidation strength of proppant in subterranean fractures
US7156194B2 (en) * 2003-08-26 2007-01-02 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of drilling and consolidating subterranean formation particulate
US20070007010A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods and compositions for controlling formation fines and reducing proppant flow-back
US20070012445A1 (en) * 2005-07-15 2007-01-18 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods for controlling water and sand production in subterranean wells
US20080006406A1 (en) * 2006-07-06 2008-01-10 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of enhancing uniform placement of a resin in a subterranean formation

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6209643B1 (en) * 1995-03-29 2001-04-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method of controlling particulate flowback in subterranean wells and introducing treatment chemicals
US20050145385A1 (en) * 2004-01-05 2005-07-07 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of well stimulation and completion
US7131491B2 (en) * 2004-06-09 2006-11-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Aqueous-based tackifier fluids and methods of use

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2869642A (en) * 1954-09-14 1959-01-20 Texas Co Method of treating subsurface formations
US3297086A (en) * 1962-03-30 1967-01-10 Exxon Production Research Co Sand consolidation method
US3492147A (en) * 1964-10-22 1970-01-27 Halliburton Co Method of coating particulate solids with an infusible resin
US3302719A (en) * 1965-01-25 1967-02-07 Union Oil Co Method for treating subterranean formations
US3366178A (en) * 1965-09-10 1968-01-30 Halliburton Co Method of fracturing and propping a subterranean formation
US3364995A (en) * 1966-02-14 1968-01-23 Dow Chemical Co Hydraulic fracturing fluid-bearing earth formations
US3489222A (en) * 1968-12-26 1970-01-13 Chevron Res Method of consolidating earth formations without removing tubing from well
US3565176A (en) * 1969-09-08 1971-02-23 Clifford V Wittenwyler Consolidation of earth formation using epoxy-modified resins
US3709641A (en) * 1970-08-03 1973-01-09 Union Oil Co Apparatus for preparing and extruding a gelatinous material
US3708013A (en) * 1971-05-03 1973-01-02 Mobil Oil Corp Method and apparatus for obtaining an improved gravel pack
US3709298A (en) * 1971-05-20 1973-01-09 Shell Oil Co Sand pack-aided formation sand consolidation
US3784585A (en) * 1971-10-21 1974-01-08 American Cyanamid Co Water-degradable resins containing recurring,contiguous,polymerized glycolide units and process for preparing same
US3933205A (en) * 1973-10-09 1976-01-20 Othar Meade Kiel Hydraulic fracturing process using reverse flow
US3863709A (en) * 1973-12-20 1975-02-04 Mobil Oil Corp Method of recovering geothermal energy
US3861467A (en) * 1973-12-28 1975-01-21 Texaco Inc Permeable cementing method
US4000781A (en) * 1975-04-24 1977-01-04 Shell Oil Company Well treating process for consolidating particles with aqueous emulsions of epoxy resin components
US4068718A (en) * 1975-09-26 1978-01-17 Exxon Production Research Company Hydraulic fracturing method using sintered bauxite propping agent
US4070865A (en) * 1976-03-10 1978-01-31 Halliburton Company Method of consolidating porous formations using vinyl polymer sealer with divinylbenzene crosslinker
US4008763A (en) * 1976-05-20 1977-02-22 Atlantic Richfield Company Well treatment method
US4074760A (en) * 1976-11-01 1978-02-21 The Dow Chemical Company Method for forming a consolidated gravel pack
US4245702A (en) * 1978-05-22 1981-01-20 Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V. Method for forming channels of high fluid conductivity in hard acid-soluble formations
US4247430A (en) * 1979-04-11 1981-01-27 The Dow Chemical Company Aqueous based slurry and method of forming a consolidated gravel pack
US4572803A (en) * 1979-08-31 1986-02-25 Asahi Dow Limited Organic rare-earth salt phosphor
US4716964A (en) * 1981-08-10 1988-01-05 Exxon Production Research Company Use of degradable ball sealers to seal casing perforations in well treatment fluid diversion
US4498995A (en) * 1981-08-10 1985-02-12 Judith Gockel Lost circulation drilling fluid
US4564459A (en) * 1981-12-03 1986-01-14 Baker Oil Tools, Inc. Proppant charge and method
US4428427A (en) * 1981-12-03 1984-01-31 Getty Oil Company Consolidatable gravel pack method
US4494605A (en) * 1981-12-11 1985-01-22 Texaco Inc. Sand control employing halogenated, oil soluble hydrocarbons
US4501328A (en) * 1983-03-14 1985-02-26 Mobil Oil Corporation Method of consolidation of oil bearing sands
US4493875A (en) * 1983-12-09 1985-01-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Proppant for well fractures and method of making same
US4797262A (en) * 1986-06-16 1989-01-10 Shell Oil Company Downflow fluidized catalytic cracking system
US4796701A (en) * 1987-07-30 1989-01-10 Dowell Schlumberger Incorporated Pyrolytic carbon coating of media improves gravel packing and fracturing capabilities
US4800960A (en) * 1987-12-18 1989-01-31 Texaco Inc. Consolidatable gravel pack method
US4892147A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-01-09 Mobil Oil Corporation Hydraulic fracturing utilizing a refractory proppant
US4903770A (en) * 1988-09-01 1990-02-27 Texaco Inc. Sand consolidation methods
US4986354A (en) * 1988-09-14 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Composition and placement process for oil field chemicals
US4986353A (en) * 1988-09-14 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Placement process for oil field chemicals
US4898750A (en) * 1988-12-05 1990-02-06 Texaco Inc. Processes for forming and using particles coated with a resin which is resistant to high temperature and high pH aqueous environments
US4895207A (en) * 1988-12-19 1990-01-23 Texaco, Inc. Method and fluid for placing resin coated gravel or sand in a producing oil well
US4986355A (en) * 1989-05-18 1991-01-22 Conoco Inc. Process for the preparation of fluid loss additive and gel breaker
US4984635A (en) * 1989-11-16 1991-01-15 Mobil Oil Corporation Thermal barriers for enhanced oil recovery
US5182051A (en) * 1990-01-17 1993-01-26 Protechnics International, Inc. Raioactive tracing with particles
US5082056A (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-01-21 Marathon Oil Company In situ reversible crosslinked polymer gel used in hydrocarbon recovery applications
US5278203A (en) * 1991-03-21 1994-01-11 Halliburton Company Method of preparing and improved liquid gelling agent concentrate and suspendable gelling agent
US5178218A (en) * 1991-06-19 1993-01-12 Oryx Energy Company Method of sand consolidation with resin
US5285849A (en) * 1991-06-21 1994-02-15 Texaco Inc. Formation treating methods
US5494103A (en) * 1992-09-29 1996-02-27 Halliburton Company Well jetting apparatus
US5484881A (en) * 1992-10-02 1996-01-16 Cargill, Inc. Melt-stable amorphous lactide polymer film and process for manufacturing thereof
US6172011B1 (en) * 1993-04-05 2001-01-09 Schlumberger Technolgy Corporation Control of particulate flowback in subterranean wells
US5377759A (en) * 1993-05-20 1995-01-03 Texaco Inc. Formation treating methods
US5597784A (en) * 1993-06-01 1997-01-28 Santrol, Inc. Composite and reinforced coatings on proppants and particles
US5594095A (en) * 1993-07-30 1997-01-14 Cargill, Incorporated Viscosity-modified lactide polymer composition and process for manufacture thereof
US5388648A (en) * 1993-10-08 1995-02-14 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for sealing the juncture between a vertical well and one or more horizontal wells using deformable sealing means
US5377756A (en) * 1993-10-28 1995-01-03 Mobil Oil Corporation Method for producing low permeability reservoirs using a single well
US5386874A (en) * 1993-11-08 1995-02-07 Halliburton Company Perphosphate viscosity breakers in well fracture fluids
US5381864A (en) * 1993-11-12 1995-01-17 Halliburton Company Well treating methods using particulate blends
US5492178A (en) * 1993-11-12 1996-02-20 Halliburton Company Well treating methods and devices using particulate blends
US5390741A (en) * 1993-12-21 1995-02-21 Halliburton Company Remedial treatment methods for coal bed methane wells
US5393810A (en) * 1993-12-30 1995-02-28 Halliburton Company Method and composition for breaking crosslinked gels
US5494178A (en) * 1994-07-25 1996-02-27 Alu Inc. Display and decorative fixture apparatus
US5492177A (en) * 1994-12-01 1996-02-20 Mobil Oil Corporation Method for consolidating a subterranean formation
US5591700A (en) * 1994-12-22 1997-01-07 Halliburton Company Fracturing fluid with encapsulated breaker
US5604186A (en) * 1995-02-15 1997-02-18 Halliburton Company Encapsulated enzyme breaker and method for use in treating subterranean formations
US5871049A (en) * 1995-03-29 1999-02-16 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Control of fine particulate flowback in subterranean wells
US5604184A (en) * 1995-04-10 1997-02-18 Texaco, Inc. Chemically inert resin coated proppant system for control of proppant flowback in hydraulically fractured wells
US5595245A (en) * 1995-08-04 1997-01-21 Scott, Iii; George L. Systems of injecting phenolic resin activator during subsurface fracture stimulation for enhanced oil recovery
US6028113A (en) * 1995-09-27 2000-02-22 Sunburst Chemicals, Inc. Solid sanitizers and cleaner disinfectants
US5864003A (en) * 1996-07-23 1999-01-26 Georgia-Pacific Resins, Inc. Thermosetting phenolic resin composition
US5712314A (en) * 1996-08-09 1998-01-27 Texaco Inc. Formulation for creating a pliable resin plug
US5865936A (en) * 1997-03-28 1999-02-02 National Starch And Chemical Investment Holding Corporation Rapid curing structural acrylic adhesive
US6172077B1 (en) * 1997-04-25 2001-01-09 Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd. Spiro-azacyclic derivatives and their use as therapeutic agents
US6342467B1 (en) * 1997-05-28 2002-01-29 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Method and composition for controlling fluid loss in high permeability hydrocarbon bearing formations
US6169058B1 (en) * 1997-06-05 2001-01-02 Bj Services Company Compositions and methods for hydraulic fracturing
US5873413A (en) * 1997-08-18 1999-02-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of modifying subterranean strata properties
US6177484B1 (en) * 1997-11-03 2001-01-23 Texaco Inc. Combination catalyst/coupling agent for furan resin
US6012524A (en) * 1998-04-14 2000-01-11 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Remedial well bore sealing methods and compositions
US6024170A (en) * 1998-06-03 2000-02-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of treating subterranean formation using borate cross-linking compositions
US6016870A (en) * 1998-06-11 2000-01-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Compositions and methods for consolidating unconsolidated subterranean zones
US6176315B1 (en) * 1998-12-04 2001-01-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Preventing flow through subterranean zones
US6503870B2 (en) * 1999-02-04 2003-01-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Sealing subterranean zones
US6508305B1 (en) * 1999-09-16 2003-01-21 Bj Services Company Compositions and methods for cementing using elastic particles
US20030013871A1 (en) * 2001-02-02 2003-01-16 Mallon Charles B. Method of preparing modified cellulose ether
US6510896B2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2003-01-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and methods for utilizing expandable sand screen in wellbores
US20030006036A1 (en) * 2001-05-23 2003-01-09 Core Laboratories Global N.V. Method for determining the extent of recovery of materials injected into oil wells during oil and gas exploration and production
US6677426B2 (en) * 2001-08-23 2004-01-13 Resolution Performance Products Llc Modified epoxy resin composition, production process for the same and solvent-free coating comprising the same
US6837309B2 (en) * 2001-09-11 2005-01-04 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Methods and fluid compositions designed to cause tip screenouts
US20040000402A1 (en) * 2002-06-26 2004-01-01 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of consolidating proppant and controlling fines in wells
US20040014607A1 (en) * 2002-07-16 2004-01-22 Sinclair A. Richard Downhole chemical delivery system for oil and gas wells
US20040014608A1 (en) * 2002-07-19 2004-01-22 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of preventing the flow-back of particulates deposited in subterranean formations
US6681856B1 (en) * 2003-05-16 2004-01-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of cementing in subterranean zones penetrated by well bores using biodegradable dispersants
US20050000694A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2005-01-06 Dalrymple Eldon D. Methods of reducing water permeability for acidizing a subterranean formation
US20050000731A1 (en) * 2003-07-03 2005-01-06 Nguyen Philip D. Method and apparatus for treating a productive zone while drilling
US20050006093A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2005-01-13 Nguyen Philip D. Methods and compositions for enhancing consolidation strength of proppant in subterranean fractures
US20050006095A1 (en) * 2003-07-08 2005-01-13 Donald Justus Reduced-density proppants and methods of using reduced-density proppants to enhance their transport in well bores and fractures
US20050006096A1 (en) * 2003-07-09 2005-01-13 Nguyen Philip D. Methods of consolidating subterranean zones and compositions therefor
US7156194B2 (en) * 2003-08-26 2007-01-02 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of drilling and consolidating subterranean formation particulate
US20070007010A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods and compositions for controlling formation fines and reducing proppant flow-back
US20070012445A1 (en) * 2005-07-15 2007-01-18 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods for controlling water and sand production in subterranean wells
US20080006406A1 (en) * 2006-07-06 2008-01-10 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Methods of enhancing uniform placement of a resin in a subterranean formation

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100132943A1 (en) * 2004-02-10 2010-06-03 Nguyen Philip D Resin Compositions and Methods of Using Resin Compositions to Control Proppant Flow-Back
US7963330B2 (en) 2004-02-10 2011-06-21 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Resin compositions and methods of using resin compositions to control proppant flow-back
US20110030362A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Schmidt Howard K Hydraulic Geofracture Energy Storage System
US8763387B2 (en) * 2009-08-10 2014-07-01 Howard K. Schmidt Hydraulic geofracture energy storage system
US9481519B2 (en) 2009-08-10 2016-11-01 Quidnet Energy Inc. Hydraulic geofracture energy storage system with desalinization
US8720566B2 (en) 2010-05-10 2014-05-13 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Slot perforating tool
CN104695931A (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-10 中国石油天然气股份有限公司 Fracturing method for preventing fracturing propping agent of low-permeability horizontal well from reflowing

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2008032009A1 (en) 2008-03-20 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3339633A (en) Polyepoxide consolidation of earthern materials
US5924488A (en) Methods of preventing well fracture proppant flow-back
US7225869B2 (en) Methods of isolating hydrajet stimulated zones
US7237612B2 (en) Methods of initiating a fracture tip screenout
US7325608B2 (en) Methods of hydraulic fracturing and of propping fractures in subterranean formations
US6079492A (en) Methods of rapidly consolidating particulate materials in wells
US7281581B2 (en) Methods of hydraulic fracturing and of propping fractures in subterranean formations
US5358047A (en) Fracturing with foamed cement
US7267171B2 (en) Methods and compositions for stabilizing the surface of a subterranean formation
US6725931B2 (en) Methods of consolidating proppant and controlling fines in wells
US7413010B2 (en) Remediation of subterranean formations using vibrational waves and consolidating agents
US7213651B2 (en) Methods and compositions for introducing conductive channels into a hydraulic fracturing treatment
US7063151B2 (en) Methods of preparing and using coated particulates
US5425421A (en) Method for sealing unwanted fractures in fluid-producing earth formations
US7571766B2 (en) Methods of fracturing a subterranean formation using a jetting tool and a viscoelastic surfactant fluid to minimize formation damage
US6978836B2 (en) Methods for controlling water and particulate production
US6192985B1 (en) Fluids and techniques for maximizing fracture fluid clean-up
US7819192B2 (en) Consolidating agent emulsions and associated methods
US2547778A (en) Method of treating earth formations
US7647966B2 (en) Method for drainage of heavy oil reservoir via horizontal wellbore
US6450260B1 (en) Sand consolidation with flexible gel system
US6729404B2 (en) Methods and compositions for consolidating proppant in subterranean fractures
US6866099B2 (en) Methods of completing wells in unconsolidated subterranean zones
US20050061509A1 (en) Methods for prodcing fluids from acidized and consolidated portions of subterranean formations
US7273099B2 (en) Methods of stimulating a subterranean formation comprising multiple production intervals

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NGUYEN, PHILIP D.;REEL/FRAME:018317/0381

Effective date: 20060914